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6A - Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) 2010 Major Update Return to Agenda MEMORANDUM TO: Mayor Osborne and Members of City Council Planning Board Members FROM: Jane S. Brautigam, City Manager Paul J. Fetherston, Deputy City Manager David Driskell, Executive Director, Community Planning and Sustainability Susan Richstone, Comprehensive Planning Manager Sam Assefa, Senior Urban Designer Chris Meschuk, Planner II Jean Gatza, Planner I Marie Zuzack, Planner I DATE: Sept. 23, 2010 SUBJECT: Oct. 12, 2010 Joint City Council and Planning Board Study Session - Check-in on Sustainable Boulder (2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan) I. PURPOSE In the first phase of the 2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) two broad areas of focus were identified: Community Design and Sustainability Policies. Since the last discussion with City Council and Planning Board on April 27, 2010, staff and stakeholder focus groups have helped identify key issues in these areas of focus and possible plan revisions. These are outlined in five draft policy briefing papers (Attachments B and C). In addition, at its May 25 meeting, City Council asked for additional information on the Area III- Planning Reserve (Attachment E). The purpose of this study session is to request Planning Board and City Council feedback on the following items: 1. Draft policy briefing papers (Attachments B and C): Community Design, Social Sustainability, Economic Sustainability, Local Food and Sustainable Agriculture, and Energy and Climate Action; 2. Options for next steps on the Area III-Planning Reserve (Attachment E). Specific questions are provided in the next section. Feedback received at the study session will be incorporated into the briefing papers before they are finalized for public review in the next phase of the update. Phase 3 public outreach will include several "Boulder Matters" events in October and November, as well as additional activities, further described in the Next Steps section of this memo. Immediately following the study session on October 12, City Council will reconvene to hold a special meeting and public hearing and provide direction on the Area III - 1 Agenda Item 6A Page 3 of 174 Previous View Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Planning Reserve. A separate memo will be provided for the special meeting, drawing on information outlined in section IV.C. of this memo and detailed in Attachment E. II. QUESTIONS Community design / urban form: 1. Is the Community Design briefing paper ready for public review and comment? 2. Do you agree with the proposed approach for the Sustainable Streets & Centers Project? Sustainability policies: 3. Are the sustainability policy briefing papers (Social Sustainability, Economic Sustainability, Local Food and Sustainable Agriculture, Energy and Climate Action) ready for public review and comment? Area III-Planning Reserve: Are there any questions and/or comments on: 4. The current Service Area Expansion process? 5. The options for the next step in the 2010 Update related to the Area III-Planning Reserve? 6. The potential changes to the Service Area expansion process? III. BACKGROUND This study session will conclude Phase 2 of the five-phase BVCP 2010 Major Update process (see chart in Attachment A). Phase 1 was the kick-off to the update. This phase featured three major public events in the first quarter of this year, as well as other outreach and input activities and opportunities. Baseline information and discussion questions centered around the theme of the update - "Sustainable Boulder: Creating Our Future." Phase 1 also provided the opportunity for the public to submit requests for land use and Area I, II, III map changes. Phase I concluded with council direction at the May 25 session that Community Design/Urban Form and Sustainability Policy Revisions should be the areas of focus for the update, in addition to determining which land use and Area 1, II, II map change requests should be considered further in the update. Council also asked for additional information on two requests in the Area III-Planning Reserve and the Planning Reserve/Service Area expansion process in general. Phase 2 has entailed staff research and analysis on the areas of focus, the selected land use requests, and the Planning Reserve process and options. This phase has included development of five policy briefing papers with help from various focus groups, which is further described later in this memo. Feedback from City Council and Planning Board at the Oct. 12 joint study session on the Phase 2 work will be incorporated into the materials and activities for next phase. 2 Agenda Item 6A Page 4 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Phase 3, from mid-October through December, will seek community input on the issues and potential policy changes outlined in the Community Design and Sustainability Policy briefing papers and on potential land use designation changes. Work on the Sustainable Streets and Centers Project will continue in parallel. The approach for inviting public dialogue and feedback in this phase is described in the Next Steps section of this memo. Phases 4 and 5, in the first half of 2011, will involve formal staff recommendations and final adoption of changes to the BVCP document. IV. ISSUES A. Areas of Focus for the Update Draft policy briefing papers have been prepared for the areas of focus for policy changes that were identified in Phase 1: 1. Community Design (Attachment B) 2. Sustainability Policies (Attachment C): • economic sustainability • social sustainability • local food and sustainable agriculture • energy and climate action Suggested environmental sustainability policy changes that reflect direction from recently accepted master plans are included in Attachment D. Numerous departments have been involved in developing the briefing papers: • Community Planning and Sustainability including the Comprehensive Planning, Economic Vitality, and Local Environmental Action divisions, the Regional Sustainability Coordinator and Downtown/ University Hill Management Division and Parking Services • Public Works - Transportation and Water Quality and Environmental Services • Housing and Human Services • Boulder County Land Use and Transportation Additionally, planning consultant Ruth McHeyser led development of the Community Design briefing paper. Each paper outlines key issues and challenges that should be addressed in the update, assesses current policies on the topic and makes recommendations on potential policy changes. Focus groups composed of key stakeholders were convened to provide input on the preliminary drafts of the papers. More specific information on the focus groups, the feedback provided, and how it was incorporated is provided in each paper. The briefing papers provide a framework for the community to discuss the key topics in the areas of focus and to develop and evaluate specific policy changes in the next phases of the update. Staff will revise the draft papers based on Planning Board and City Council feedback at the Oct. 12 study session and present them to the public for discussion and input in Phase 3. The issues, challenges, and recommendations included in the papers are summarized in the table on the next several pages. 3 Agenda Item 6A Page 5 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page 3 = n o 0 D o C v SUMMARY OF BRIEFING PAPERS m Issues and Challenges Recommendations Community Design 1. Need to define the components of sustainable urban 1. Define the components of sustainable urban form: form in order to evaluate the extent to which BVCP Compact: supports sustainable urban form. • Has a compact development pattern with density in appropriate locations to create and support viable, long term commercial opportunities and high frequency public transit. Connected: • Provides an integrated multimodal system with abundant opportunities to walk and bike and convenient access to frequent local and regional transit service; is an easy and pleasant place to get around without a car. • Connects people to nature and natural systems. Complete: • Provides all daily needs - grocery, cafe, restaurants, day care, bank, and the like - within easy access from school, work or home without driving a car. • Provides a quality of life that attracts, sustains and retains diverse businesses and creative entrepreneurs. • Creates comfortable, safe, and attractive places to live, work, learn and recreate. Green, Attractive and Distinct: • Preserves agriculturally significant lands, environmentally sensitive areas and historic resources. • Has a public realm-parks, plazas, complete streets, greenways-that is attractive, safe, well-used and enriched with art, trees and landscaping. • Ensures the location and design of buildings, streets, utilities and other infrastructure protect natural systems, minimize pollution and urban heat island effects and support clean energy generation. • Demonstrates an attractive, distinct character-defined by physical setting, streets, buildings, open space, history, arts and culture-that is memorable and unique to the specific place. Inchisive: • Provides a diversity of housing types and prices, employment, and uses to meet the needs of a diverse community (ages, incomes, abilities and lifestyles). • Provide welcoming, accessible public gathering spaces for interaction among people from all walks of life. 4 Agenda Item 6A Page 6 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o Need to address gaps in policies that wer hl, dentified 2. Revise policies to: in Phase 1, including: better integrating la`Ad use and a. Clarify how density affects the viability of providing many of the amenities transportation policies; extending the street grid to needed to have a more sustainable urban form, such as viable commercial make Crossroads and East Boulder subcommunities centers and high frequency public transit within walking distance of more walkable; and ensuring a good distribution of employment and residential neighborhoods; centers within walking distance of existing residential b. Identify the disparity that exists between the western and eastern parts of the and employment neighborhoods. city in terms of walkability, bikeability and transit access and the need to expand the multimodal network; c. Promote an urban form that makes it easy to get around without a car and acknowledge the importance of providing all daily needs within easy access of home, work, and school. d. Acknowledge the role that providing a high quality of life plays in attracting investment and enhancing the city's economic vitality; e. Consider additional Core Policies (General Policies section) on: comfortable, safe, attractive places to live, work, learn and recreate; and preservation of agriculturally significant lands and environmentally sensitive areas; f. Identify streets as public places that are part of the public realm that can beautify the city and play an important role in creating public gathering places; also strengthen policies on street trees. g. Address the goal of ensuring that the location and design of buildings, streets, utilities and other infrastructure protect natural systems, minimize pollution and urban heat island effects, and support clean energy generation. h. Speak to the goal of providing a diversity of jobs and uses to meet the needs of a diverse community, (i.e., diversity of incomes, ages and lifestyles). 3. Need to provide a clearer picture of the future of 3. Add diagram illustrating existing and projected future dwelling units and jobs in different areas of the city under the Comprehensive Areas I and 11. Plan 4. Better describe and illustrate city structure and the desired vision for the future by: 4. City structure map and description only focus on the . existing Replacing the city structure map with a series of new illustrations of the city structure; they do not illustrate or that define the city's structure, describe the desired future vision of the city structure elements ~ Adding Public Realm as an element in the city's structure, and urban form, or address where future change is . Revising current descriptions. expected and desired. 5. Need to consider establishing performance measures 5. Identify performance measures in this update and develop specific targets for the to assess progress toward implementing community measures in a subsequent process. Examples of potential measures include: design policies and achieving a more sustainable vehicle miles of travel per capita, mixture of uses, public space, scale of street urban form. grid, completeness of sidewalk system, street tree canopy. 5 Agenda Item 6A Page 7 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o fn < CD a y Issues and Challenges(D Recommendations Economic Sustainability 1. The BVCP should define and acknowledge the key factors in 1. Make changes to the Core Values, Economic Sustainability Policy and how Boulder's economy contributes to maintaining a Economic Vitality Section to succinctly describe key aspects that drive sustainable community and how a commitment to the success of Boulder's economy and make it sustainable in the long environmental and social sustainability helps maintain a vital term. economy. 2. The BVCP should define the city's role in supporting business 2. Clearly describe the city's role and economic vitality goals to include: competitiveness and redevelopment of commercial and • Working to retain and grow key employers / business clusters, industrial area and in addressing key issues, such as: including tourism and culture/arts • Difficulty in finding appropriate types of spaces • Developing specific redevelopment strategies • Right-sized businesses for Boulder • Defining role to promote sustainable business practices, including • Fostering partnerships in key redevelopment areas waste reduction and energy efficiency • Home occupations / flexibility in work spaces • Ensuring city processes are efficient and balance goals/needs • Sustainable business practices and energy efficiency • Supporting home-based businesses • Benefits and needs of tourism and culture/arts • Acknowledging the key role that higher education institutions, including the University of Colorado, the federal labs and workforce training efforts play in Boulder's economic health. 6 Agenda Item 6A Page 8 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o fn < CD a y Issues and ChallengA Recommendations Social Sustainability 1. Community well-being issues: 1. Create one place in plan for goals related to social sustainability. • Increasing number of households and individuals struggling Elements that are currently missing and could be strengthened include: to meet basic and other human service needs (including • addressing the needs of a growing senior population; growing senior population) • the importance of a well designed physical environment to social well • Achievement gap and school readiness being; • Inclusiveness and engagement of diverse populations • protecting civil rights; • fostering the inclusion of immigrants into the community; • articulating goals about reducing poverty; • clarifying connections between policy and meeting basic needs; • considering ways to reduce the transportation cost burden for low- income populations; • describing new and innovative outreach efforts; and • supporting child and youth education and creating physical environments that support healthy youth development. 2. Incorporate reconiunendations from the Affordable Housing Task 2. Affordable housing and housing diversity issues Force as they are available. Revisions to existing housing policies that could be considered include: • address housing needs of a growing senior population; • consider the needs and impacts of growing CU and Naropa University students populations; • address relationships between transportation options and costs, energy efficiency goals and costs and the needs of lower income households; • address indirect impacts of redevelopment policies, land prices and Inclusionary Housing policies on the distribution of affordable housing throughout the community; • encourage greater diversity in housing types to meet needs of the workforce and special populations; • identifying trends and goals related to middle-income housing and housing attractive to low, moderate and middle-income households with children; and • considering ways to prioritize creation of affordable housing. 7 Agenda Item 6A Page 9 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o fn < CD M a y Issues and Challenges(D Recommendations Energy & Climate Action The general policies should be reviewed to ensure consistency with the strategy areas identified in the Climate Action Plan (CAP) 1. Greenhouse gas emissions goal 1. 2012 is the only identified milestone for emissions reductions. A new reduction target, date and longer term goals will need to be considered and reflected in the Comprehensive Plan and CAP. 2. Decarbonizing Boulder's energy supply and renewable energy 2. Consider referencing direction to develop a long-term plan for clean energy options. Review and revise policy language on energy supply and transitioning to a sustainable energy economy. 3. Energy efficiency in new construction and existing buildings 3. Consider revising or strengthening existing policies on energy efficiency to describe goals for energy performance for existing buildings. 4. Reducing vehicle miles traveled (VMT) 4. Strengthen connection between reducing VMT and achieving CAP goal. 5. Climate adaptation 5. Consider adding policy language to support goals for climate adaptation analysis. Issues and Challenges Recommendations Local Food & Sustainable Agriculture 1. Regional nature of food production 1. Define food production as a regional issue with regional (if not global) solutions. Policies should support work with regional processes to define sustainable practices for Boulder Valley as well as the region. 2. Food production on city-owned lands within the Boulder Valley 2. Add policy defining sustainable food production practices on city- owned land. 3. Water availability and distribution 3. Consider whether policy on water should be added. 4. Food production in urban areas 4. Develop policy supporting community and home-based urban agriculture to allow more community gardens and innovative ideas for growing or raising food. 5. Access to locally produced food 5. Develop policy supporting local farmers markets, local food production, processing, storage and distribution infrastructure, working to improve consumer access and removing barriers to local food processing and sales. 8 Agenda Item 6A Page 10 of 174 Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page B. Sustainable Streets and Centers Project The Sustainable Streets and Centers Project (SS&C) is a key component as well as an extension of the community design/urban form policy section of the 2010 BVCP Major Update. But while with the initial stages of the work are being conducted concurrently with the major update process, the work for the BVCP update will be completed in spring of 2011, the SS&C project will continue beyond that time. Concepts identified through the SS&C project will inform community design policy changes, including revisions to the city structure/urban form maps and potential performance measures. Conversely, policy revisions identified in the community design section of the BVCP will inform next steps of the SS&C project, after completion of the Major Update. The process was originally envisioned to use the Arapahoe Avenue corridor as the basis for developing initial design prototypes. However, after the initial analysis work for Arapahoe, the south of downtown area (SoDA) study and work on a street prototype pilot for Pearl Parkway at Junction Place required a redirection of work efforts from the Arapahoe corridor. Background As discussed during the April 27 Joint Study Session, the goal for the SS&C project is to address Boulder's sustainable urban form objectives for streets and centers (listed below) through the creation of prototypes, design guidelines and performance metrics that help to integrate land use, transportation and urban design in context-specific settings. Over time, this will result in a Boulder Pattern Book of Sustainable Streets and Centers to help guide development, design, demand management and decision-making on streets and centers throughout the city where area plans are not in place. Streets Objectives • Recognize streets as significant public spaces and focal point of the city's most significant public investment. • Reinforce the connection between adj acent land uses, urban design and street character in supporting great public spaces. • Continue to emphasize multimodal travel over auto travel with a well-connected, fine grid of multimodal travel options which include walking, bicycling, local and regional transit and rideshare. • Develop guidelines that result in beautiful, walkable streets with differing character depending on the street's function, traffic volume and adjacent land uses. Develop appropriate travel demand management (TDM) guidelines, parking management policies, and performance expectations such as per capita VMT. • Develop guidelines to ensure that the design and function of new developments respond appropriately to the existing and/or planned network of streets, including their transportation function. • Further the city's sustainability goals by creating design guidelines to insure streets are complete, connected, well-designed and inclusive. g Agenda Item 6A Page 11 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Centers Objectives • Recognize the variety of regional and neighborhood activity centers. • Define and illustrate the role and urban design character of the different center types. • Develop appropriate TDM and parking management guidelines and performance expectations. • Further the city's sustainability goals by creating guidelines to insure centers are connected, complete, well-designed, and inclusive. Work to Date While it was anticipated that the SS&C project would focus only on the Arapahoe Avenue Corridor during its pilot phase, the specific project needs in SoDA and in Boulder Junction provided the opportunity to focus on the role of the public realm in urban design and city structure, and to develop an initial streets prototype applicable to these specific project conditions. 1. Public Realm in SoD.A A significant part of the study area and its context are comprised of the public realm, primarily rights-of-way, parks and city owned land. As a result of the analysis of the area, staff proposed focusing on the public realm as the most critical component in defining the future vision and character for SoDA. The focus on public realm issues is also relevant to the citywide analysis of community design/urban in the BVCP update. An initial analysis of Boulder's "public-realm" at the city scale is shown in the Community Design briefing paper (Attachment B). 2. Pearl Parkway Pilot: Urban Center Boulevard Prototype A proposed 319-unit residential development at 3100 Pearl Parkway provided an opportunity to test a street prototype that responds to a site condition where a former industrial area is being converted into a high-density residential mixed-use neighborhood along a high-traffic major arterial. This provided an opportunity to test a design prototype for streets that would maintain and enhance the "through" and multi-modal function of Pearl Parkway at this location, while at the same time create an inviting destination that is safe for pedestrians and bikes alike. The proposed Urban Center Boulevard Prototype introduces separate zones for through traffic and slow-pace vehicular, pedestrian and bike movements, all separated by tree-lined medians. For the local access lanes, the prototype introduces a "woonerf" street design concept as a shared public space primarily for pedestrians and bikes, but also provides access and on-street parking for cars. A woonerf is a Dutch street design which removes the traditional segregation of cars, pedestrians and other users, and blurs the boundaries between roadway, sidewalk and public space. It is a street that is both a destination and a conduit in which walking, cycling, shopping and driving become integrated activities. Below are examples of a woonerf street design from the Netherlands and Washington D.C. 10 Agenda Item 6A Page 12 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page "Woonerf" or Shared Street Examples LIII AIP' Hu Y'. ~ - hE F 111 Ili ; A_'A' Vii The Netherlands TI'ashington D.C. 3. Arapahoe Corridor Analysis The initial analysis for the Arapahoe Demonstration corridor indicates that while the street function as high-traffic major arterial, distinctively varying land uses and urban design characteristics exist along the corridors and on either sides of the street. These characteristics are listed below, and also illustrated on the following page. • Folsom to 30th: Primarily retail commercial strip • 30th to Foothills: Commercial and high density residential on the north, CU East Campus to the south • Foothills to Commercial St: Light industry and business commercial to the north, residential to the south • Commercial to 55th: Light industry and business commercial to the north, retail commercial center and residential to the south. 11 Agenda Item 6A Page 13 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page 3 = n o 0 D o N M M >v m iQ m SUSTAINABLE STREETS AND CENTERS, EXISTING ARAPAHOE AVENUE DEMONSTRATION CORRIDOR STUDY _q all VOW YOU Jim A. B. C. Q. L -L C ~ ~i I t ..,1 1 _ ~ ; ~ r~ I f ~ G. :C~ -Y-s Tr !"1 !#--.-i~41+~.Y Y~ ..f k / iq~ t~l !L~7 "'Ir, y~y}-i ~ ~ _ ,'f rJ.a -a_5•~l ~ t ~rtR~ /F ~ tl~grri ~ 1r ,i' r,,, lrS~ 9; ,{''l'.ef ~ 1~~ {ti ; t 1'` i, '~'•Y^4'~ i!! li''~ ~ yaLT~;~~,.;, ~ "i~ ~ ~ ~a %7y+J► k* fin' { r~,j~4 Y°L': s' i ~Y x , r~i •jt; r; .r 4' . tJ1 Y {!&;„ems .+.Yr~rMau Ali( :s, L -l'.t iti'r '~~+1S j.• '~i' t ti r~ ✓ ' ~ ~ r 3.ac'~k"' ~ 4.,, ~k{.r ~ ~ Lii4 .'1 c ~'1. ~ Fry ` ,-~s ~ ? ~~j ~~,~I.~ i- r ~ . ~j•.~ '"1',` . r ' ° P ~1 ~ ~r rrT"' r ~x , ~ R; E 9,1+1: '+~i.~1~ ~.w.aJ' '~"4: .~.~'~`~~~d ~".d \1'~'~''"' ~-'d t r •i' • ~ ,'rT ti ~.,r ~i~. 4r I,~ :C •7 r~y~j: •.n: F~,{` ~ ~r., .±~y I t ~ ',M, ~4S.hr,~~ !31 14~,,,,,►;tt". 'rY ,"~^hyL r'r. !/'Y I1. 1fi'•1 -,1~9 +~,"~.~.le' - ` j?i 1r,.~!' s.Yt➢31Z:,s.~`f;."?t:'.'4rrj~?'"X.4~i~'j-~~~.!~S' at *.SAM ~ 1 i~ Ili ~ ~ ~ 1 1■~~ ~i~■- ,•r -t A4 ; 1 , 9 a ~i_i, i a ■1Y N*r ' - ; 1■it 1s: two I ~41+.1i + 1 l . r•■ a.. -#",I r ♦1 r . r>j .r~i/ 1■ I C~`y1 F:9U1e0' 1fw~/k~rtia` 1• 1 ' iw° Jf+r+ f.~rw ii'LPAM1' Fi~:•LfR+r• ~ G 0 IM Primarily strip commercial. CU campus, high density residential and Industrial to the north and Commercial/Industrial to the retail commercial. residential to the south. north. Retail center and residential to the south. 12 Agenda Item 6A Page 14 of 174 Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page The different prototypes to be developed (see illustrative examples below) for street and centers will guide and facilitate a clear design and functional integration between transportation needs, land use and place-making objectives in potential redevelopment for specific existing and/or desired future site conditions. For example, in compact, mixed-use and relatively higher density areas, the design objective would be to treat the street and sidewalks less as a thoroughfare and more as a place of interest and destination. In this case, slower traffic speeds (both vehicular and bicycle), safe and attractive pedestrian environments, and opportunities for gathering and interaction with the adjoining land uses would be the primary emphasis. In areas where the land use pattern and the function of the streets are primarily auto-oriented, the primary objective and emphasis would be to enhance the design quality of the street and enhance the "thoroughfare" function for all modes (auto, bus, bike and foot). These prototypes will also strive to achieve other community objectives, such as mitigating air pollution from autos and minimizing environmental impacts of asphalt and concrete surfaces needed to accommodate vehicles and bikes. 13 Agenda Item 6A Page 15 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page 3 = n o 0 D o N t(D a m rQ M BOULEVARD PROTOTYPES /51411 main Street - Ancled - 2 Lanes _r ~ . 11 t a main Street Two La ncs With Parallel Parking J r 1 40 Nut It It t R.%M 'I- - , lilt; 1V -9 r l wrs ,r - rrf ~I r - I a~i r Main Sireel - Medran - a Laces Boulevard- 6 Lanes - i : ' •a " ' - i{~ -Ap Muhiway Boulevard - d Lanes 14 Agenda Item 6A Page 16 of 174 Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Next Steps The next steps for the SS&C project is to continue to develop and gather feedback on the city structure illustrations in the Community Design section of the BVCP, and the prototypes, guidelines and performance metrics. The prototypes will be organized by: 1. Multi-Modal Street Type a. Highway b. Regional Boulevard c. Main Street d. Local Street 2. Center Type a. Urban Center b. Regional Commercial Center c. Neighborhood Center 3. Character Area a. Regional Commercial Neighborhood b. Mixed Use Neighborhood c. Residential Neighborhood Prototype development will draw on successful examples already existing in Boulder, pilot prototypes from recent development review (e.g., 3100 Pearl) as well as examples from other communities. Once prototypes are developed, implementation and integration elements will need further input from Council, board and the community. Some of these include: • aligning existing policy direction with community design/urban form goals • funding issues, including public and private investment in construction and maintenance in the context of broader trade-offs and priorities • understanding opportunities within existing rights of way as well as expansions • how the prototypes will be phased in, over time, in operable segments on corridors • how the prototypes and design guidelines are integrated into the existing framework of master plans, area plans, codes and standards • identification of goals, performance measures and metrics C. Area III-Planning Reserve and the Service Area Expansion Process At the May 25, 2010 meeting, City Council requested additional information regarding the two property owner requests in the Area III-Planning Reserve (917 - Boulder Multisport Training Center and #18 - Agriburbia) and the Service Area expansion process. Attachment E provides detailed information and analysis, which is summarized below. Council will hold a public hearing and provide direction on the Area III-Planning Reserve immediately following the study session on Oct. 12. Background The Service Area concept and the creation of Areas I, II, and III is one of the keystones of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP), and in combination with joint city/county decision-making, distinguishes the plan from many others in the state and country. The Area III- Planning Reserve was created in 1993, at the conclusion of the Area III Planning Project. 15 Agenda Item 6A Page 17 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page City and county decision-makers concluded at the end of the Area III Planning Project that only a small amount of Area III should be contemplated for future urban expansion, and then only if detailed planning for the area indicates community benefits exceed potential negative impacts. The final report states: "Service Area expansion is not desirable simply to provide additional land supply for future development; it must provide a broad range of community benefits... conceptual planning should provide an analysis of cumulative impacts and whether the carrying capacity of the Boulder Valley can absorb this additional growth ...and should also provide an evaluation of trade-offs in meeting conflicting community goals." The process to develop land in the Area III-Planning Reserve has specific defined steps in the BVCP, and joint decision-making points. The criteria and process to expand the Service Area intentionally set a high threshold, to ensure that if land in Area III is to be brought into the Service Area, the benefits to the community outweigh any impacts. To begin the Service Area expansion process, all four bodies must determine that "sufficient merit exists to authorize a Service Area expansion plan." To determine whether "sufficient merit exists," there must be demonstration that a desired community need cannot be met within the existing Service Area. If all four bodies authorize the development of a Service Area expansion plan, it is a significant joint city-county planning effort. The BVCP outlines what the expansion plan must include. Additional information regarding the two property owner requests Additional information submitted from the property owners of the two requests in the Area III- Planning Reserve are included in Attachment E. The original materials submitted as part of the public request process can be found at www. boulderco lorado .gov/files/Clerk/Agendas/2010/May_2 5/2A.pdf. At the May 25, 2010 Meeting, council members questioned the implications of splitting the Area III-Planning Reserve if the Boulder Multisport Training Center were to be constructed. The intent of the Area III-Planning Reserve is that changes should be large enough areas to cohesively plan and annex by neighborhoods (which should have a diversity of land uses) and to build logical increments for infrastructure. If a central portion of the Area III- Planning Reserve is moved into the service area and developed, the flexibility in the remaining Area III-Planning Reserve lands could become more limited. This results in the possibility of eliminating some community needs from being met by utilizing the Area III- Planning Reserve. Other factors such as infrastructure planning like roads and utilities could become limited. All of these issues and factors are items that must be addressed in the service area expansion plan. Council members also expressed interest in understanding potential impacts of the two proposals, such as transportation or traffic generation. While it is premature to undertake traffic or transportation studies, the required components of a service area expansion plan 16 Agenda Item 6A Page 18 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page include developing requirements for development impact mitigation and offsets (both on-site and off-site), of which transportation and traffic impacts would be included. Council requested additional information from the property owners on the two specific requests within the Area III-Planning Reserve. Included in Attachment E is the additional information received from the property owners, and is summarized below. Request #17 is located near the intersection of Highway 36 and Yarmouth Avenue, and includes 61.4 acres of land proposed for development of a Multisport Training Center. The development would include indoor and outdoor recreational facilities (such as swimming pools, bicycle and running tracks), residential housing for athletes and their families, retail, and sports medicine facilities. The additional information submitted by the property owner includes a letter, a copy of a newspaper article supporting the project, and a letter of support from the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau. A brief list of three alternate sites was included, including Diagonal Plaza, McKenzie Junction, and the North Boulder Armory site. Staff considers that the McKenzie Junction property (which includes three parcels, which total approximately 20 acres) may be worth additional analysis for this project. While the parcel is uniquely shaped, it is currently vacant, located within the existing service area meaning that there urban services (such as water and sewer) available, is directly adjacent to the regional trail systems, and is zoned Business Transitional - 1, which allows for the uses proposed. With the time sensitivity expressed by the property owner, the McKenzie Junction parcel may provide a readily-developable parcel. Request #18 - 2815 Jay Road includes 23 acres of and, and is proposed for an "agriburbia" development, which is a mixed density housing development with agricultural production. The property owner and consultants submitted a summary with additional information on the proposal, and some questions and responses regarding the agriburbia development concept. The project is proposed to include approximately 270 housing units, 50% or more of which are proposed to be included within the city's affordable housing program. The proposal includes 230 single family homes and 40 units in a townhouse/rowhouse configuration. The portion of the site to be dedicated to agriculture is estimated at 30%. Options Based on the action that council took on May 25 and the current process articulated in the BVCP, three options have been outlined for next steps. Council will take action on these options in a public hearing directly following the October 12 Study Session. Option 1: Move forward to consider Service Area expansion as part of the 2010 Major Update Under this option, council would direct staff to conduct a study of community needs, and return to all four bodies (Planning Board, City Council, Planning Commission and County Commissioners) for consideration of authorizing a Service Area expansion plan. Under this option, the current process would not be amended. 17 Agenda Item 6A Page 19 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Option 2: Conduct Planning Reserve Study diti°it g 2012 BVCP ivfid-Tei°m Update Under this option, council would not consider a Service Area expansion further during the 2010 Update, but would request that a study of the Area III-Planning Reserve be conducted as part of the 2012 Mid-Term Update, which could include a study of community needs. Potential revisions to the Service Area expansion process could, however, be made as part of the 2010 Major Update as described below. Option 3: Do not move for ward to consider Service Area expansion at this time Under this option, council would not consider a Service Area expansion further during the 2010 Update. Under the current process, the next opportunity for considering a Service Area expansion would be the 2015 Major Update. However, potential revisions to the Service Area expansion process could still be made as part of the 2010 Major Update as described below. Initial information on potential revisions to the Service Area expansion process Both Planning Board and City Council have expressed interest in revising the Service Area expansion process. If option 2 or 3 above is selected, revisions to the process would be proposed as part of the 2010 update. Some suggestions for revisions areas follows: • Provide more flexibility to allow initiation of a Service Area expansion outside of the five-year major update. • Ensure a proactive process that does not automatically solicit proposals from property owners but rather is initiated by the city in response to an identified community need. • Consolidate and clarify the intent of the Area III-Planning Reserve, which is now described in parts through Policies 1.22, 2.04 and 2.10. • Consolidate the intent and purpose of the Planning Reserve with the procedures and criteria for expansion, so a user can completely understand the Area III-Planning Reserve and expansion process without reading the entire plan. • Organize the Service Area expansion procedures in order, rather than having to flip back and forth to follow the steps in order. Staff Recommendation Staff recommends that an Area III Study be conducted at the 2012 mid-term update, and to not move forward to consider a potential Service Area Expansion as part of the 2010 major update. A service area expansion would be a significant work effort for multiple city departments and the county that would have major impacts and require tradeoffs with the current work program. Potential expansion of the Service Area will be an issue of wide community interest and needs considerable thought as well as engagement with interested stakeholders. A brief memorandum with analysis of the options and a formal staff recommendation for the Oct. 12 public hearing will be delivered to Council members on Oct. 7. V. NEXT STEPS Briefing papers Following the study session, the briefing papers will be revised and prepared for public review and comment through the end of November. The papers will be posted on the web site, 18 Agenda Item 6A Page 20 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page disseminated to the BVCP list serve and various community groups and organizations, and a topic of discussion at Boulder Matters events. Planning Reserve On the evening of Oct. 12, following the joint study session, City Council will reconvene to hold a special meeting and public hearing on the Planning Reserve. The purpose of the meeting is for council to provide direction on the preferred option. The memorandum for this meeting will be delivered on Oct. 7. Phase 3 public process Input received from the Planning Board and City Council during the Oct. 12 study session will be incorporated and the events and materials will be finalized for Phase 3 public outreach in October and November. The approach for designing the Phase 3 public process is to ensure that community members have a variety of ways and times to get information and provide feedback on the analysis and preliminary recommendations on the areas of focus and the land use change requests. A primary goal is to reach people who have not participated in a comprehensive planning process in the past and to offer new ways to get involved. A major outreach effort titled "Boulder Matters: Harvesting Ideas" is being planned to consolidate public outreach on a number of Planning Department projects, including the BVCP update. Several events are scheduled at different times and locations from mid-October through mid-November to provide people a variety of opportunities to get information, engage in discussions and give feedback. This includes events geared to Spanish speaking residents and youth. Staff from multiple departments will be involved. Each event will have some unique aspects to it, with the culminating event in mid-November having a keynote speaker that will help attract a wide range of community members. All of the Boulder Matters events will provide information and opportunities to comment on the update. Additional outreach specifically for the BVCP update will include: • Website - information and input for all areas; may include videos or surveys. • Presentation and discussions with various civic groups and organizations, for example, ULI (Urban Land Institute), neighborhood climate action groups, PLAN-Boulder, the Boulder Chamber's 2140 group and various city boards. • Youth and/or CU involvement in `telling the story' and helping to generate interest and participation. Two CU Planning studios will both provide input on the major update and assist with the community outreach. • Neighborhood meetings in areas of proposed land use changes Beyond Phase 3 Following Phase 3 public outreach, in the first quarter of 2011 recommendations will be prepared for BVCP policy, map, graphic and text changes, performance measures and land use change requests, based on public feedback. The formal adoption process will occur in April and May. Staff also will be working to consolidate the BVCP document to make it more concise and easier to navigate and digest. The intent is to move toward a more interactive, Web-based product. 19 Agenda Item 6A Page 21 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page The vision is a graphically exciting, user-friendly series of Web pages that will be specifically designed and linked so as to highlight the interrelationships among policies and themes. For example, the themes of regional perspective and innovation, which were frequently mentioned in Phase 1 community discussions, affect many policy areas. Making interconnections clear will also demonstrate and support the sustainability theme of the update. Paper copies would no longer be printed for mass distribution; however, users will be able to request a paper copy or print out part, or all, of the plan from the Web. The four adopting bodies will start to see ideas for how this new, more consolidated "Web BVCP" might look and function in the first quarter of next year, with the final product going live as soon as possible after final adoption of the update changes. ATTACHMENTS: A: BVCP 2010 Major Update Process Chart B: Community Design Policy Briefing Paper C: Draft briefing papers on Sustainability Policies: o Social Sustainability o Economic Sustainability o Local Food and Sustainable Agriculture o Energy and Climate Action D: Proposed policy changes to reflect recently accepted master plans E: Information on Area III-Planning Reserve and Service Area expansion process 20 Agenda Item 6A Page 22 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page :t C 7 D 0 n m 0 ATTACHMENT A M ,s a) m .1aNU~,f Y -MAY aUN -`~>~~TCt~~~K OGToBtIFt- -PCPGaKft aa,NUA►9'r-MAFt- cH A~RrU - MgY ~uWp- I? ~ SO t--4 A~s- i Er- O= L7 floLp, 17~~T~I~FIN #'~+~~RS ~U6l,I~ I,PUT ~V't~lo~ ~coMMrir~G~rioN!~ p11 t G f'OI.JG~~`~~ 13 ~ol.IG1~5 ~'r ►r~l rr~ iN~L FO row e'l ~~vI I21 0 I4- u crap Its r.•n" ~,...arr oIL MMfin✓" ' 70 All M ~T~ I ~IGa'(o{~5;. ry _ G N1~ 64 P5 G"(I ot~ o~S ~~~©r{~Mlc ~ hol.IG`~ GIN l~t~ ~ 4n -'rz~ Requests ler Lend gse Changes I~ ~ Go►~M NvATi0r4'5 aN; ~H^H ~ UAt`l~ L;6r l1RP•b A-H o~2M oM Il ITS 7~St N OI.IGl~S'fI~G'(E,~RC f''fi NA9~Y H'I'S' >'zio,-vl~~ (pM~1UNl'fY I~ ev~vl M1~- 4vA110~442 ON; G I R (I~2 ~ GpMM. ot;Si M~. i~/et 911zl. I M pu or • ~~RG~'fi~ ~ t / ~.n , a i~ LIE] 0 11 n 110 11 D 11 El Ll U~ aINAA I, tGlEX-f t:'i t A 1-~5 M,Olw?h M& ~uT I~1rGaf'~MI I4vATio 4, O4: s( ! I T11/e:T' 4- ~.PIyL hF~,l o~ OIR~.rlvrl ~t~a( SC~i~ o f~ iRt;UfIoN AFY~ A`;' ~ hP'K-IH W/ fAIL Te'a c~Rouf k5: INt r.ACtrv~ , rou ~ o u'r ~L IG ' k DID fiH Il'l R- I'A t t~ wµRS, CV,~aG~ 1Y T , t~D 6, + DiFI~ nn n %a,I~~HO►-D~~ PU~1.~G 1+-~uOL~ Li -r rt W D Agenda Item 6A Page 23 of 174 o n c 0 M Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page ATTACHMENT B 2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan ■■N ■■w ■ 'a Community Design DRAFT Policy Briefing Paper September 2010 Prepared by City of Boulder Planning staff This paper is intended to serve as a starting point for community discussion of changes to the policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP). The ideas contained in the paper do not represent city policy or staff recommendations. This paper is one of four briefing papers. The Planning Board and City Council identified the following two broad focus areas for the major update following public input: urban form/ community design and sustainability policy changes. The briefing papers have been prepared to provide a framework for discussion of these focus areas. B1 Agenda Item 6A Page 24 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Acknowledgment An informal focus group consisting of representatives of various civic and neighborhood groups provided feedback to city staff on a preliminary draft of the Community Design Briefing Paper. The group met two times in July and August. Although they were not a decision-making group and were not expected to reach consensus, they provided extremely valuable input that helped refine these materials. Below is a list of focus group participants: • Architects and Planners of Boulder (APOB): Fenno Hoffman • Boulder Chamber: Ed Byrne • Downtown Design Advisory Board (DDAB): David Biek • Landmarks Board: Lisa Podmajersky • League of Women Voters: Lynne Wegley • Neighborhood groups: Holiday: Aaron Brockett Uni Hill: Scott Gibbons Mapleton Hill: Catherine Schweiger Goss-Grove: Jerrie and John Hurd Martin Acres: Kerry White Whittier: Steven Wallace • Sierra Club: Bill Roettker • Transportation Advisory Board (TAB): Michael Deragisch • PLAN Boulder County: Ruth Blackmore • ULI Boulder Chapter: Dan Cohen Contents 1. Introduction II. How is community design currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan? III. What community design issues and challenges should be addressed in the Plan? IV. What changes to the Community Design chapter would address these issues? V. Exhibits A. Sustainable Urban Form Research Summary B. Evaluation of the Comprehensive Plan in relation to the Urban Form Definition C. Community Design Focus Group Meeting Notes B2 Agenda Item 6A Page 25 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Community Design I. Introduction The community design chapter of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) is important to preserve and enhance Boulder's sense of place and to reinforce the community's strong design ethic and commitment to social, environmental and economic sustainability. This briefing paper discusses how community design issues are currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan and what issues and challenges should be addressed as part of the 2010 major update to the plan. II. How is community design currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan? The Comprehensive Plan has played a key role in shaping the physical form of the city. Through the policies and land use map, the plan "promotes an urban development pattern that is compact and efficient and that permits the most effective and cost-efficient provision of city facilities and services. Such a development pattern enhances the livability of the community for its residents by increasing accessibility to employment, recreation, shopping and other amenities and by reducing auto travel and air pollution. From an urban design perspective, it provides a strong image of Boulder as a separate community." (BVCP p. 13) The Community Design chapter of the plan includes a description and illustration of city structure and forty-five community design policies that guide land planning and design decisions in the city. The city structure description identifies four primary elements that define the city's urban form: 1) Boulder's natural setting and open space define the city's shape and size; 2) Activity centers define areas of high activity and intensity; 3) Individual character defines the quality of the city's centers and residential neighborhoods; and 4) The city's mobility grid defines important intersections and corridors. The community design policies strive to balance the community goals of being a compact community, preserving or enhancing neighborhood character, and providing vital activity centers. "Through policies on activity centers, mixed use development, and trail corridors and linkages, this section integrates the desire for economic vitality, alternative transportation links between uses and enhanced quality of life." (BVCPp. IS) The policies are organized as follows: • Community identity/land use pattern - seven policies promote a compact urban form, unique identity, strong urban edge and separation from surrounding communities. • Rural lands preservation- six policies speak to the city and county's commitment to preserving rural lands outside the city • Neighborhoods - nine policies support preservation of and compatibility with neighborhood character, but also support "a mixture of land use types, housing sizes and lot sizes" in neighborhoods when sensitively designed. In newly developing areas, a variety of residential densities and support services are encouraged. • Mixed Use - two policies support mixed use development "including some commercial centers, corridors and industrial areas" as well as creating incentives and removing regulatory barriers to encouraging mixed use development. B3 Agenda Item 6A Page 26 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Subcommunity and area planning - four policies endorse the concept of subcommunity and area planning as a means of identifying appropriate community facilities and infill (including considering "mixed use and higher density housing along certain multi-modal corridors") in different areas of the city and creating standards for design quality. • Activity centers - three policies describe and support a hierarchy of regional, subcommunity, and neighborhood-scale activity centers distributed throughout the community "in focused nodes of concentrated activities" to be located within walking distance of neighborhoods and business areas. • Urban design linkages - four policies promote a walkable city and an urban open land system "to provide active and passive recreation, environmental protection, flood management, city-pedestrian connections and enhancement of community character," and acknowledge the city's greenways as important urban design features. • Community preservation - six policies support the preservation of the city's historic and cultural resources, including encouraging city and county leadership in preserving publicly owned resources, and city and county development of a Boulder Valley-wide Historic and Cultural Preservation Plan. • Quality in the design of development and redevelopment projects - four policies promote sensitive infill and redevelopment, quality architecture and urban design in private sector development, and design excellence for public projects. Other sections of the BVCP that also address community design related goals include: Section 1, General Policies: • Growth requirements: says development and redevelopment must add significant value to the community, improving quality of life and must "maintain or improve environmental quality as a precondition for further housing and community growth." (1.20) • Planning Area I, II, III: establishes urban growth (service area) boundaries to create orderly, logical city service provision and avoid sprawl and leapfrog development. (1.22) • Jobs: housing balance: supports the city's role as a regional job center & encourages mixed use near where people work, preservation of service commercial uses, and conversion of industrial land to residential in appropriate locations. (1.21) Section 3, Facilities and Services: • Channeling development: says new development and redevelopment will be channeled to areas with adequate public services and facilities-existing or planned in the CIP. (3.04) Section 4, Energy: • Energy efficient land use: encourages more intense land use patterns and the provision of recreation, employment and essential services in proximity to housing.(4.40) • Water & an, quality: supports land use patterns that reduce water and air pollution. (4.37) • Flood: says undeveloped high hazard flood areas will be retained in their natural state whenever possible. (4.23) Section 5, Economy: • Regional job center: supports the city's role as a job center. (policy 5.02) • Industrial zoning: supports protection of areas for industrial and office uses." (5.06) • Retail base: encourages mixed uses in retail centers where appropriate. (5.09) Section 6, Transportation: • Design of Transportation facilities: says transportation facilities will be attractive and contribute to the desired community character. (6.14) • Connectivity: says new streets will be designed in a well connected and fine-grained pattern of streets and alleys. (6.13) B4 Agenda Item 6A Page 27 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Section 7, Housing: • Housing Mix: encourages a mix of housing types with varied prices and densities. (7.06) • Housing supply: reinforces the need to expand housing supply that matches the demand created by projected industrial/ commercial development (7.09) III. What community design issues and challenges should be addressed in the Plan? Phase 1 Public Involvement and City Council Direction The first phase of the 2010 BVCP Major Update included events and activities to engage the public in learning about the Comprehensive Plan and getting input on areas of focus and issues to be addressed in the planning process. Two community design issues garnered considerable discussion in public workshops. The first one, expressed as the "Tale of Two Cities," is that Boulder has evolved into a somewhat divided city, with a fine-grained, walkable, bikeable and transit-friendly development pattern on the west and a car-oriented, super-block pattern on the east. The second issue is that most of the projected housing and employment growth is expected to occur in the eastern part of the city (east of Folsom in the Crossroads and East Boulder subcommunities), which was a surprise to many participants. Maps showing the location and density of existing and projected future housing and jobs in the community based on the current Comprehensive Plan stimulated a lot of interest and discussion. When asked to list their "favorite places in Boulder," the vast majority of participants in the Phase 1 community workshops listed places on the west side of town. There was significant agreement about the qualities that characterize these favorite places: walkability, accessibility to nature and proximity to mature trees, views, and unique character. When asked what area of the city should be the focus for future planning, most people chose the east side of the city where most growth is projected and where change provides an opportunity to improve the existing character, walkability and mix of uses. Following the Phase 1 public outreach, Planning Board and City Council provided direction on areas of focus related to community design during the update. This included: 1. Define the Components of a Sustainable Urban Form The overarching theme for the update is "Sustainable Boulder: Creating Our Future." In order to ensure that the Community Design section supports the overall BVCP sustainability goals and addresses all three areas of sustainability, a key issue for this update is to define the elements of a sustainable urban form for Boulder. This includes defining the overall urban form goals related to economic, environmental and social sustainability as well as identifying the specific components that make up a sustainable urban form. This will help identify revisions to the policies and city structure map to make us a more sustainable community. 2. Revise the Policies Although many of the community design policies further the city's overall sustainability goals, a definition of the components of a sustainable urban form in the Boulder context is needed before we can identify any gaps in moving the city toward a more sustainable urban form. Some gaps that were identified in the workshops and/or by Planning Board and Council so far are: better integrating land use and transportation policies; weaving B5 Agenda Item 6A Page 28 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page the east and west parts of the city together, extending the street grid to make Crossroads and East Boulder subcommunities more walkable, bikeable and transit-friendly; and ensuring a good distribution of centers within walking distance of existing residential and employment neighborhoods. 3. Define Areas of Relative Stability vs. Areas of Change Planning Board and City Council were interested in exploring the use of an Areas of Relative Stability/ Areas of Change map to address public feedback in Phase 1 that there is not a clear picture of the future under the Comprehensive Plan nor is it very clear how BVCP policies affect different areas of the city. 4. Refine the City Structure Definition and Illustration The city structure map and description focus on the existing city structure; they do not illustrate or describe the desired future vision of the city structure and urban form, or address where future change is expected and desired. A revised city structure map at the "big picture" level of the Comprehensive Plan could illustrate the desired future, including addressing the components of the sustainable urban form definition that are deemed missing or weak. Community Design Focus Group Input A Community Design Focus Group consisting of representatives of civic and neighborhood groupsi provided input on a preliminary draft Community Design briefing paper that addressed the four issues listed above. The current version of the briefing paper reflects much of the input from the focus group. However, some of their more detailed input on the sustainable urban form definition will be included later when BVCP policy revisions are developed following public input on the general changes suggested in the next section. Revised community design policies will more fully describe how the sustainable urban form components in the definition will be implemented and will thus reflect some of the focus group's more detailed suggestions. One of the most significant areas of the focus group's discussion was the concept of whether/ how to identify areas of relative stability and areas of change. A majority of focus group members agreed with the need to provide a picture of future growth under the current Comprehensive Plan, but felt that doing so by defining areas of stability and areas of change was confusing and could be potentially misleading. On the one hand, some participants felt that areas of stability/ change maps would not allow for change in some areas they felt currently need to if the city is to become truly sustainable. They had examples of places they thought should change but would likely be labeled "areas of stability" because they are not projected to experience much development/ redevelopment. Conversely, other participants felt that some established business areas have the zoning capacity to change and would likely be labeled "areas of change," yet existing business owners in the area may not wish to see changes in the near future. They were concerned that an "area of change" label for these areas (e.g., neighborhood shopping centers) would send the wrong signal to local businesses that are thriving there. ' See Acknowledgments for background on the group and a list of participants. B6 Agenda Item 6A Page 29 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Nevertheless, every focus group participant agreed that the maps used during Phase 1 public input to show projected future housing and employment were a good tool to illustrate where current regulations allow and anticipate change through redevelopment at some point in the future, and should be included in the BVCP update. This briefing paper reflects the focus group's suggested approach of illustrating projected growth instead defining areas of stability/ change to provide a picture of the future under the current Comprehensive Plan. Focus group meeting notes are provided in Exhibit C. IV. What changes to the Community Design chapter would address these issues? Defining a Sustainable Urban Form The purpose of defining a sustainable urban form is to help evaluate the extent to which the current Comprehensive Plan creates and supports a sustainable urban form. Therefore, this section of the briefing paper starts with a definition of sustainable urban form and follows with an evaluation of the community design policies and overall city structure in relation to that definition. The section concludes with a diagram illustrating the projected amount, location and type of future development. The term "urban form" refers to the physical layout and design of the city. It includes everything from the layout and design of streets, bike paths and open spaces, to the mix of uses and activities that are allowed in each area of the city and the design and intensity of development. Defining the role that community design and urban form play in moving communities toward a more sustainable future has been the focus of the planning and design professions in recent years. The research summary in Exhibit A contains a compilation of many of these efforts and was used in developing the components of a sustainable urban form below. In general, a sustainable urban form is one that advances the community's environmental health, social equity and economic vitality. The components of a sustainable urban form include the following: Compact: • Has a compact development pattern with density in appropriate locations to create and support viable, long term commercial opportunities and high frequency public transit. Connected: • Provides an integrated multimodal system with abundant opportunities to walk and bike and convenient access to frequent local and regional transit service; is an easy and pleasant place to get around without a car. • Connects people to nature and natural systems. Complete: • Provides all daily needs - grocery, cafe, restaurants, day care, bank, and the like - within easy access from school, work or home without driving a car. • Provides a quality of life that attracts, sustains and retains diverse businesses and creative entrepreneurs. • Creates comfortable, safe, and attractive places to live, work, learn and recreate. B7 Agenda Item 6A Page 30 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Green, Attractive and Distinct: • Preserves agriculturally significant lands, environmentally sensitive areas and historic resources. • Has a public realm-parks, plazas, complete streets, greenways-that is attractive, safe, well-used and enriched with art, trees and landscaping. • Ensures the location and design of buildings, streets, utilities and other infrastructure protect natural systems, minimize pollution and urban heat island effects and support clean energy generation. • Demonstrates an attractive, distinct character-defined by physical setting, streets, buildings, open space, history, arts and culture-that is memorable and unique to the specific place. Inclusive: • Provides a diversity of housing types and prices, employment, and uses to meet the needs of a diverse community (ages, incomes, abilities and lifestyles). • Provides welcoming, accessible public gathering spaces for interaction among people from all walks of life. Policy Revisions An evaluation of the extent to which the BVCP addresses the components of a sustainable urban form as described above is provided in the chart in Exhibit B. Based on the gaps identified in the chart, the following policy revisions are recommended: 1. Clarify how higher density along multi-modal corridors and in mixed use developments can improve the viability of providing the amenities needed to achieve a more sustainable urban form, such as vibrant commercial centers and high frequency public transit within walking distance of employment and residential neighborhoods. 2. Identify the disparity that exists between the western and eastern parts of the city in terms of walkability, bikeability and transit access and the need to integrate and build on those areas with a robust multimodal network. 3. Specifically promote an urban form that makes it easy and pleasant to get around without a car and acknowledge the importance of providing all daily needs within easy access of home, work, and school. Also acknowledge the work that particularly needs to be done in East Boulder to meet these goals. 4. Acknowledge the role that providing a high quality of life plays in attracting investment and enhancing the city's economic vitality. 5. Consider additional Core Policies (in General Policies section) on: creating comfortable, safe and attractive places to live, work, learn and recreate; and preservation of agriculturally significant lands and environmentally sensitive areas. 6. Identify streets as public places that are part of the public realm that can beautify the city and plays an important role in creating public gathering places, in addition to their vital role of providing multimodal connectivity. Also strengthen policies on street trees. 7. More explicitly address the goal of ensuring that the location and design of buildings, streets, utilities and other infrastructure protect natural systems, minimize pollution and urban heat island effects and support clean energy generation. 8. Speak to the goal of providing a diversity of jobs and uses to meet the needs of a diverse community (i.e., diversity of incomes, ages, lifestyles, and family status). B8 Agenda Item 6A Page 31 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page In addition, a need has been identified for performance measures that would be used to assess progress toward implementing our community design policies and achieving a more sustainable urban form. Continued measurement of progress toward a set of key indicators would provide real improvement in the sustainability of the community. Examples of performance measures that could be adopted include vehicle miles of travel per capita, mixture of uses, and completeness of sidewalk systems. The specific targets for some or all of the measures would be different for different areas of the city. The 2010 Update would identify recommended performance measures, and specific targets would be developed later, as a longer timeframe will be needed for research, analysis and input. Potential Future Under the Current Comprehensive Plan The pattern of projected future housing and employment in the city is illustrated on the next page. The diagram illustrates where housing and employment could be added in the future through development of vacant parcels or redevelopment of properties that have additional square footage allowed under the current policies and regulations. The timeframe for actual development/redevelopment will depend primarily upon the overall economy and individual property owners' preferences and financial circumstances. The diagram helps demonstrate the following: • There is little vacant land left in the city; the majority of future change will happen through redevelopment of existing developed properties. • The majority of projected change is located in existing commercial and industrial areas of the city, primarily in the eastern part of the city and in the Gunbarrel subcommunity. • Under the current BVCP, there is potential for significantly more nonresidential growth (e.g., commercial and industrial uses) than there is for housing. • Because of the projected increase in jobs and the existing and projected increased shortage of housing for employees and post-secondary students, the plan encourages adding housing through mixed use in commercial and industrial areas where appropriate. Projected Future Housing and Employment Frojeeted Employment Projected D~+Ogig Units Agenda Item 6A Page 32 of 174 Previous View em over ag Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Refined City Structure Description and Illustration The purpose of the BVCP city structure description and illustration is to describe the key elements of the city's desired future urban form at a "big picture" level, incorporating the sustainable urban form definition. The yellow highlights on the next page show text recommended to be added to the description currently in the plan. The diagrams would replace the current city structure map. B10 Agenda Item 6A Page 33 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Elements That Define Boulder's City Structure Boulder's distinctive 'sense of place' and compact size did not happen by accident. Rather, it has taken many creative public policies and pragmatic planning decisions over many years to produce and preserve Boulder's unique character and physical beauty while allowing it to mature into a quality city. Elements that define Boulder's city structure and support its continuing evolution to a more sustainable urban form are described below. 1. Natural Setting Boulder's Natural Setting and Open Space V) Defines Boulder's Size and Shape. Perhaps the two most important factors that shape the city of Boulder are its mountain backdrop and surrounding open space. These natural features form a clearly-defined edge that separates the built city from the open countryside. 4 v 0. 1 2. Individual Character e Individual Character Defines the Quality of Boulder's Centers and Residential Neighborhoods. A second element of Boulder's city structure is the individual character and distinct qualities of its centers, residential neighborhoods 'y and employment areas. Historic character defines some n areas, others are defined by their development pattern or ~U ti~ln land use, such as industrial or commercial. The diagram w z ,i F shown here outlines different character areas within the city. L Nom'"` Some areas have a well defined and walkable character and F'7fA~- y sense of place where other areas need improvements to the existing development pattern, transportation network, and/ or mixture of uses. A broader delineation of the city's character areas is shown H f° on the subcommunity map in the Subcommunity and Area Plans section of the plan. The nine subcommunities represent distinct areas defined by natural or physical separation and existing character and are useful for planning and statistical reporting purposes. B11 Agenda Item 6A Page 34 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 3. Activity Centers Activity Centers Define Areas of High Activity and Intensity. The third element that sets Boulder apart is the form and distribution of its commercial, entertainment, educational and civic areas. Rather than being spread out along major streets in strip centers or shopping malls, the desired pattern is concentrated nodes of activities at a variety of scales distributed throughout the community. At the highest level of intensity are the city's three ow t vu regional centers: the Historic Downtown, the Boulder Valley Regional Center, and the University of Colorado (CU) with the University Hill business district. Each of these centers has a distinct function and character, provides a wide range of activities and draws from the entire city as well as the region. The next tier of intensity are subconuuunity and neighborhood centers, which provide goods and services for the day-to-day needs of residents and employees in nearby neighborhoods and employment areas, and also serve as neighborhood gathering areas. They are easily accessible by foot, bike or transit from surrounding neighborhoods. Improvements are needed in or around some existing center to make them more walkable, more easily accessible by transit and bike, and./ or more beautiful and functional. Further, it may be desirable to add new neighborhood centers in selected locations to provide services within closer proximity to existing residential or employment areas. 4. Mobility Grid Boulder's 'Mobility Grid' Defines Important Intersections and Corridors. Boulder's 'mobility grid,' the system of streets, alleys, transit corridors, bikeways, and paths, ties the city together and creates a network of movement within which regional centers, neighborhood centers, and residential and employment areas are located. Major transit corridors ' connect the city to the region; primary streets, high frequency transit corridors, and major bikeways connect the city within itself; and trails and paths connect the city to its natural surroundings. These public rights-of-way also represent some of the city's most significant public investments and are key parts of the public realm. As shown on this diagram, the fine-grained, walkable and bikeable street grid that exists in the western portion of the city should be extended east of Folsom, where a more car- oriented, super-block pattern predominates, to improve walkability, bikeability and character. B12 Agenda Item 6A Page 35 of 174 Previous V L Item 6A over Page Return to Agenda r a g. Public Realm Boulder's Public Realm-the system of streets, greenways, parks, plazas, and other outdoor public spaces within the city - provides one of the greatest opportunity to improve the character of Boulder and its neighborhoods. The design and function of theses spaces are critical components that define Boulder's city structure and support its evolution to a more sustainable urban form. Over 30 percent of Boulder's land is in the public realm. If we improve the design quality of the public realm, we will have beautified about a third of Boulder's area and positively impact the rest of the city. These areas provide passive and active recreational opportunities within the city, provide important gathering places and mobility links, help connect people to nature and can be designed to improve air and water quality and mitigate urban heat island effects. A '111d it, [11~ B13 Agenda Item 6A Page 36 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Exhibit A Sustainable Community Design Principles and Measures A Sample of Efforts from around the Country City of Boulder Department of Community Planning and Sustainability Updated June, 2010 This document summarizes a sampling of efforts around the country to define and measure what it means to have a sustainable urban form-- one that addresses the economic, environmental, and social health and well-being in the design and layout of the community. In his book on sustainable urbanismZ, Douglas Farr provides a history of the pioneering reforms that have influenced many of these efforts and makes the case that three reform movements smart growth, new urbanism, and green building movements-provide "the philosophical and practical bones of sustainable urbanism." This document begins by listing the principles that have been adopted by these three groups: • The Smart Growth principles: Ten principles of sustainable land use and transportation planning developed by Smart Growth Network (SGN), a consortium that includes the EPA, non-profit and governmental organizations; • The Congress for New Urbanism's Charter, Twenty-seven urban design and planning principles (nine each at the regional, neighborhood, and block scale) developed by the Congress for New Urbanism (CNU). • The LEED Neighborhood Development Project Scorecard: A rating system of over 50 sustainability factors for neighborhoods or areas. One of the six Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) certification programs, LEED ND was developed as a collaboration among the US Green Building Council, Congress for the New Urbanism, and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Following these entries are the five tenets of sustainable urbanism as defined in Farr's book, and various Sustainability checklists, definitions, goals, and criteria from around the country. Contents Smart Growth Principles Congress for New Urbanism (CNU) Charter LEED-ND Scorecard Sustainable Neighborhood Analysis Protocol (SNAP) Colorado Smart Growth Card Various Local Governments' Smart Growth Criteria Mobile, AL Austin, TX Maryland Davis, CA 2 Sustainable Urbanism, Urban Design with Nature, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2008 B14 Agenda Item 6A Page 37 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Principles of Smart Growth developed by Smart Growth Network (SGN), a consortium that includes the EPA, non-profit and governmental organizations (1996) 1. Create Range of Housing Opportunities and Choices Providing quality housing for people of all income levels is an integral component in any smart growth strategy. 2. Create Walkable Neighborhoods Walkable communities are desirable places to live, work, learn, worship and play, and therefore a key component of smart growth. 3. Encourage Community and Stakeholder Collaboration Growth can create great places to live, work and play if it responds to a community's own sense of how and where it wants to grow. 4. Foster Distinctive, Attractive Communities with a Strong Sense of Place Smart growth encourages communities to craft a vision and set standards for development and construction which respond to community values of architectural beauty and distinctiveness, as well as expanded choices in housing and transportation. 5. Make Development Decisions Predictable, Fair and Cost Effective For a community to be successful in implementing smart growth, it must be embraced by the private sector. 6. Mix Land Uses Smart growth supports the integration of mixed land uses into communities as a critical component of achieving better places to live. 7. Preserve Open Space, Farmland, Natural Beauty and Critical Environmental Areas Open space preservation supports smart growth goals by bolstering local economies, preserving critical environmental areas, improving our communities quality of life, and guiding new growth into existing communities. 8. Provide a Variety of Transportation Choices Providing people with more choices in housing, shopping, communities, and transportation is a key aim of smart growth. 9. Strengthen and Direct Development Towards Existing Communities Smart growth directs development towards existing communities already served by infrastructure, seeking to utilize the resources that existing neighborhoods offer, and conserve open space and irreplaceable natural resources on the urban fringe. 10. Take Advantage of Compact Building Design Smart growth provides a means for communities to incorporate more compact building design as an alternative to conventional, land consumptive development. B15 Agenda Item 6A Page 38 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page The Congress for New Urbanism (CNU) Charter developed by the Congress for New Urbanism (ratified in 1996) The region: Metropolis, city, and town 1. Metropolitan regions are finite places with geographic boundaries derived from topography, watersheds, coastlines, farmlands, regional parks, and river basins. The metropolis is made of multiple centers that are cities, towns, and villages, each with its own identifiable center and edges. 2. The metropolitan region is a fundamental economic unit of the contemporary world. Governmental cooperation, public policy, physical planning, and economic strategies must reflect this new reality. 3. The metropolis has a necessary and fragile relationship to its agrarian hinterland and natural landscapes. The relationship is environmental, economic, and cultural. Farmland and nature are as important to the metropolis as the garden is to the house. 4. Development patterns should not blur or eradicate the edges of the metropolis. Infill development within existing urban areas conserves environmental resources, economic investment, and social fabric, while reclaiming marginal and abandoned areas. Metropolitan regions should develop strategies to encourage such infill development over peripheral expansion. 5. Where appropriate, new development contiguous to urban boundaries should be organized as neighborhoods and districts, and be integrated with the existing urban pattern. Noncontiguous development should be organized as towns and villages with their own urban edges, and planned for a jobs/housing balance, not as bedroom suburbs. 6. The development and redevelopment of towns and cities should respect historical patterns, precedents, and boundaries. 7. Cities and towns should bring into proximity a broad spectrum of public and private uses to support a regional economy that benefits people of all incomes. Affordable housing should be distributed throughout the region to match job opportunities and to avoid concentrations of poverty. 8. The physical organization of the region should be supported by a framework of transportation alternatives. Transit, pedestrian, and bicycle systems should maximize access and mobility throughout the region while reducing dependence upon the automobile. 9. Revenues and resources can be shared more cooperatively among the municipalities and centers within regions to avoid destructive competition for tax base and to promote rational coordination of transportation, recreation, public services, housing, and community institutions. The neighborhood, the district, and the corridor 1. The neighborhood, the district, and the corridor are the essential elements of development and redevelopment in the metropolis. They form identifiable areas that encourage citizens to take responsibility for their maintenance and evolution. 2. Neighborhoods should be compact, pedestrian-friendly, and mixed-use. Districts generally emphasize a special single use, and should follow the principles of neighborhood design when possible. Corridors are regional connectors of neighborhoods and districts; they range from boulevards and rail lines to rivers and parkways. 3. Many activities of daily living should occur within walking distance, allowing independence to those who do not drive, especially the elderly and the young. B16 Agenda Item 6A Page 39 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Interconnected networks of streets should be designed to encourage walking, reduce the number and length of automobile trips, and conserve energy. 4. Within neighborhoods, a broad range of housing types and price levels can bring people of diverse ages, races, and incomes into daily interaction, strengthening the personal and civic bonds essential to an authentic community. 5. Transit corridors, when properly planned and coordinated, can help organize metropolitan structure and revitalize urban centers. In contrast, highway corridors should not displace investment from existing centers. 6. Appropriate building densities and land uses should be within walking distance of transit stops, permitting public transit to become a viable alternative to the automobile. 7. Concentrations of civic, institutional, and commercial activity should be embedded in neighborhoods and districts, not isolated in remote, single-use complexes. Schools should be sized and located to enable children to walk or bicycle to them. 8. The economic health and harmonious evolution of neighborhoods, districts, and corridors can be improved through graphic urban design codes that serve as predictable guides for change. 9. A range of parks, from tot-lots and village greens to ballfields and community gardens, should be distributed within neighborhoods. Conservation areas and open lands should be used to define and connect different neighborhoods and districts. The block, the street, and the building 1. A primary task of all urban architecture and landscape design is the physical definition of streets and public spaces as places of shared use. 2. Individual architectural projects should be seamlessly linked to their surroundings. This issue transcends style. 3. The revitalization of urban places depends on safety and security. The design of streets and buildings should reinforce safe environments, but not at the expense of accessibility and openness. 4. In the contemporary metropolis, development must adequately accommodate automobiles. It should do so in ways that respect the pedestrian and the form of public space. 5. Streets and squares should be safe, comfortable, and interesting to the pedestrian. Properly configured, they encourage walking and enable neighbors to know each other and protect their communities. 6. Architecture and landscape design should grow from local climate, topography, history, and building practice. 7. Civic buildings and public gathering places require important sites to reinforce community identity and the culture of democracy. They deserve distinctive form, because their role is different from that of other buildings and places that constitute the fabric of the city. 8. All buildings should provide their inhabitants with a clear sense of location, weather and time. Natural methods of heating and cooling can be more resource-efficient than mechanical systems. 9. Preservation and renewal of historic buildings, districts, and landscapes affirm the continuity and evolution of urban society. B17 Agenda Item 6A Page 40 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page LEED-ND Scorecard one of the six Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) certification programs, LEED ND was developed as a collaboration among the US Green Building Council, Congress for the New Urbanism, and the Natural Resources Defense Council. (2009) Smart Location and Linkage Prereq 1 Smart Location Prereq 2 Imperiled Species and Ecological Communities Prereq 3 Wetland and Water Body Conservation Prereq 4 Agricultural Land Conservation Prereq 5 Floodplain Avoidance Credit 1 Preferred Locations Credit 2 Brownfield Redevelopment Credit 3 Locations with Reduced Automobile Dependence Credit 4 Bicycle Network and Storage Credit 5 Housing and Jobs Proximity Credit 6 Steep Slope Protection Credit 7 Site Design for Habitat or Wetland and Water Body Conservation Credit 8 Restoration of Habitat or Wetlands and Water Bodies Credit 9 Long-Term Conservation Management of Habitat or Wetlands and Water Bodies Neighborhood Pattern and Design Prereq 1 Walkable Streets Prereq 2 Compact Development Prereq 3 Connected and Open Community Credit 1 Walkable Streets Credit 2 Compact Development Credit 3 Mixed-Use Neighborhood Centers Credit 4 Mixed-Income Diverse Communities Credit 5 Reduced Parking Footprint Credit 6 Street Network Credit 7 Transit Facilities Credit 8 Transportation Demand Management Credit 9 Access to Civic and Public Spaces Credit 10 Access to Recreation Facilities Credit 11 Visitability and Universal Design Credit 12 Community Outreach and Involvement Credit 13 Local Food Production Credit 14 Tree-Lined and Shaded Streets Credit 15 Neighborhood Schools Green Infrastructure and Buildings Prereq 1 Certified Green Building Prereq 2 Minimum Building Energy Efficiency Prereq 3 Minimum Building Water Efficiency Prereq 4 Construction Activity Pollution Prevention ✓ On-site renewable energy sources ✓ Infrastructure Energy Efficiency B18 Agenda Item 6A Page 41 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page ✓ Wastewater Management ✓ Water Efficient Landscaping Recycled Content in Infrastructure ✓ Stormwater Management Solid Waste Management Infrastructure ✓ Heat Island Reduction Light Pollution Reduction ✓ Solar Orientation Existing Building Reuse ✓ District Heating and Cooling ✓ Historic Resource Preservation and Adaptive Use ✓ Minimize Site Disturbance in Design and Construction Sustainable Neighborhood Analysis Protocol (SNAP) Five Tenets of Sustainable Urbanism (from Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design with Nature, by Douglas Farr): ✓ Definition 4 a walkable neighborhood with defined center and edges, a diverse place in terms of building types, people and uses ✓ Compactness 4 A neighborhood with the density to create and support viable, long term neighborhood commercial opportunities and public transit ✓ Completeness 4 A neighborhood where all daily needs can be met by foot and allows activities and relationships to be foot-powered ✓ Connectedness 4 A neighborhood that provided abundant opportunities to walk and bike, and provides convenient access to good transit service ✓ Biophilia A neighborhood that encourages interdependence between humans and all other living systems by providing natural environments and systems (access to healthy food, farmers markets, community gardens) Colorado Smart Growth Scorecard Smart growth criteria/ measures based on the smart growth principles, the scorecard was developed by the Colorado Center for Healthy Communities in partnership with The Orton Family Foundation, the Gates Family Foundation and local governments. It is adapted from the Vermont Smart Growth Scorecard with the permission of the Vermont Forum on Sprawl Section 1 -Compact Communities ✓ New residential development is located within or adjacent to the community ✓ Most existing and planned public buildings are in community core areas (including schools and post offices). ✓ New development connects directly to the existing community through the streets system and there are a number of pedestrian and bicycle connections. ✓ Zoning allows for mixed land uses in a number of locations throughout the community. ✓ Development along state highways and county roads is focused into nodes. ✓ Limit the size of the new commercial and industrial buildings, to fit with the community's character and the local market. ✓ Urban service or urban growth boundary to focus development adjacent to existing infrastructure and we have an intergovernmental agreement with the county to enforce it and expand it when appropriate. Section 2 -Foster a Range of Housing Choices ✓ Conduct housing studies every few years to assess what is affordable housing in out are, determine the mix of our housing inventory and understand the ration between jobs and housing in our community. B19 Agenda Item 6A Page 42 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page ✓ Mix of housing types, including affordable housing to buy, multi-family rental housing, and senior housing that reflects the composition of our community. ✓ Community plan projects the amounts and types of housing that will be needed over the next 10 year or has established housing goals. ✓ New developments are required to include housing targeted at more than one segment of the market -(i.e. apartments along with single-family homes) ✓ Range of incentives to encourage more affordable housing production ✓ Work actively with one or more local or regional housing groups. Section 3 -Transportation Options ✓ Streets are interconnected, in a clear pattern for getting around the community ✓ Regulations that allow flexible street design standards to tailor streets to the scale of the neighborhood and types of traffic they serve, and include bicycle lanes, streetside parking, or raised pedestrian crossings when necessary. ✓ Conduct (or participate at a regional level) travel pattern studies every few years to complement traffic counts. ✓ Public transit system supported by dedicated revenues. ✓ Transportation plan with a transit element that connects the community population centers, which also connects to a good network of sidewalks and bike paths within the community. ✓ Regulations allow for increased density and different parking requirements depending on the character of the area and connection to transit to promote Transit Oriented Development. Section 4 - Walkable Communities ✓ Sidewalk and trail design standards for residential and commercial development. ✓ Good network of sidewalks and pedestrian/bike paths connecting much of the community including safe and convenient crossings of major roads. ✓ Established safe routes to school from all parts of our community that include accessible and readily-visible means of crossing or getting around major barriers such busy roads. ✓ Parks and playgrounds are available in all neighborhoods, and can easily be reached by walking from other parts of town. ✓ Most of the neighborhoods have access to goods (such as housing, offices, and retail) and services (such as transport, schools and libraries) within walking distance (1/4 mile) Section 5 -Enhance Natural Capital ✓ Highlight our natural assets in our Comp Plan and take steps to restore/protect them ✓ New developments must contribute to the community open-space plan by creating additional open space and connections to adjacent open spaces. ✓ Low density farm and ranch lands, with provisions for small lots to protect farmland or forestland. ✓ Water conservancy or river group that works to ensure watershed health, river protections, water quality and quantity issues. Section 6 - Business Diversity ✓ Regular reports on local and regional economic information that includes data on sources of income, job creation, wages and housing affordability prepared by our Chamber of Commerce, local government, or a nonprofit organization. ✓ Meet everyday shopping needs at a diversity of local businesses. B20 Agenda Item 6A Page 43 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page ✓ Focus on attracting new business to the downtown business district by providing public- financed improvements to the downtown business district -street and sidewalk repairs, parking areas, benches, street trees, etc. ✓ Local regulations provide for a number of businesses in the downtown including those that meet people's daily needs; and they offer regulatory incentives, such as reduced parking and flexible setbacks and housing options. ✓ High-speed internet access from a number of providers. ✓ Have at least two of the following: farmers markets, community supported agriculture, or growers association. ✓ A local business group promotes local shopping, supports existing businesses, and recruits compatible new enterprises. Section 7 Impact Analysis ✓ Community requires a fiscal analysis for new development proposals over a certain size. ✓ Conducted a buildout analysis as part of comprehensive planning effort to illustrate what the community could look like if current land development trends and regulations continue. ✓ Comprehensive impact fee structure for community infrastructure (roads, parks, water and sewer, police and fire, etc) that is regularly updated. ✓ Conducts periodic cost of community services studies to better understand who is paying for and who is receiving public services? ✓ Capital improvement plan helps justify our various impact fees. Section 8 -Support Regional Cooperation Section 9 -Sense of Place ✓ Public places that foster community interaction and it is well used both formally and informally as a place of community interaction ✓ Set of design guidelines that connect our street, buildings and public spaces that work together to create a sense of place. ✓ Community arts organization and a formal program to place art throughout the community. ✓ Fairs, concerts, events celebrating our community heritage, natural assets, or character. ✓ Active conservation commission and a historic preservation group. ✓ Defined historic district, along with guidelines for development within it. Section 10 -Enhance Public Involvement Smart Growth Criteria -City of Mobile, AL Elements: ✓ Desired Development Zone o located in Urban Core ✓ Focused Public Improvement Area ✓ Existing Community o In-fill development, brownfield/greyfield redevelopment ✓ Mixed Use o Provides mixture of commercial and residential uses that are compatible with scale and design ✓ Residential Use B21 Agenda Item 6A Page 44 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page o Provides mixed residential uses ✓ Commercial Use o Incorporates traditional neighborhood retail/service o compatible scale o proximate to neighborhood supported retail ✓ Street o Grid Pattern, connectivity o alleyway network, sidewalk network o reduced street widths o on-street parking, traffic calming o street trees, ped oriented amenities o crossing signals ✓ Site o reduced lot sizes, increased density o rear access, minimize curb cuts with shared driveways/access o alternative parking, alternative surface for drives and walkways o sidewalks provided ✓ Building o reduced building setbacks / build to lines o building oriented to ped network, architectural compatibility ✓ Transit o transit stop, encourages use of alternative transportation ✓ Pedestrian / Bicycle o provides / maintains network of walking and biking paths ✓ Open Space o connects to existing green space o improvements to existing neighboring park o minimum of 15% of site area preserved as open space for commercial land and 25% for residential (sliding scale) ✓ Environmental o total impervious coverage no greater than 75% of total land area o individual storm water treatment, flood plain considered o shared driveways o Site clearing restricted only to areas where absolutely necessary for construction access, buildings, roads and utilities. Smart Growth Criteria -City of Austin, TX Goal 1: Determine How and Where Development Occurs ✓ Location o Smart Growth Zones, Location Risk ✓ Process o Neighborhood Planning, Design Commission, Historic Landmark ✓ Critical Mass o Threshold Density (population/employment) ✓ Land Use o Land Use Contribution, Compatibility, Mixed Use per building Goal 2: Improve Our Quality of Life ✓ Urban Design B22 Agenda Item 6A Page 45 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page o Facade treatment, Compatibility with surrounding area, accessible ✓ Multi-modal Transportation o Transit Coordination, building location on site, streetscape treatment for maximum ped comfort, ped and bike access, bike friendly ✓ Parking o structured parking, driveway ✓ Housing o reasonably priced housing ✓ Local economy o neighborhood stabilization, promote local business ✓ Sustainable Building Practices o building construction and environmental impact Goal 3: Enhance Our Tax Base Smart Growth Scorecard -New Jersey ✓ Near existing development and infrastructure o Near roads, water and sewer o Located in Planning Area 1 or 2 o Project requires new/additional services and/or facilities (fire, police, school) ✓ Range of Housing options o Offers mix of housing types and sizes o Has units with wide-range of pricing options, sold and leased, with 15% affordable housing o Contributes to community's fair share of affordable housing ✓ Protects open space, farmland and critical environmental areas o Avoids critical environmental areas o Located on land that is physically suitable for development (no steep slope, floodplains, etc) o Cleans up a brownfield site o Is energy efficient o Uses at least 30% recycled or "low impact" building materials ✓ Mix of uses o Any combination of housing, retail, office, commercial, public etc o Provides new type of development to existing neighborhood (employment, housing, retail, civic, educational, cultural, recreation etc o Adds to diversity of uses within an existing community ✓ Choices for Getting Around o Accessible by multiple modes of transportation o In walking distance to public transit o Has interconnected road system without cul-d-sacs ✓ Walkable, designed for personal interaction o Parking is located where it does not visually dominate the development from the street and allows easy and safe pedestrian access to buildings o Density is equal to or greater than that of surrounding areas o For commercial: high floor-area ration o For residential: high number of dwellings units/acre ✓ Respectful of community character and design o Reuses or rehabilitates existing and/or historic structures o Building design follows existing or desired architectural style B23 Agenda Item 6A Page 46 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page o Contributes to public streetscape with ped-friendly amenities o Creates or enhances community spaces such as public plazas, squares, parks etc. Smart Growth Scorecard -Maryland Attributes: ✓ Location o Project is located adjacent to existing development o Project reuses brownfield site ✓ Service Provision and Government Expenditures o Existing or planned sewer and water service within '/2 mile o Adequate school capacity o Existing or planned road capacity ✓ Density and compactness o If project site is within 1/2 mile of planned or existing transit infrastructure, the project is developed at a density supporting the transit investment o Site area devoted to roads is minimized o Site area devoted to parking is minimized ✓ Mixed Use o Mix of land uses, or adds to diversity of uses within 1/4 mile ✓ Housing Diversity o Different housing types are proposed o Housing priced to different income levels ✓ Transportation o Frequently visited uses are within 1/2 mile o Frequently visited uses are safely accessible without a car o Served by public transit o Road system connects to and logically extends external street systems at multiple locations o Internal road system that is interconnected, without cul-de-sac o Pedestrian and/or transit friendly features available at the site o Improved sidewalks along street frontages o Parking is located to support a pedestrian friendly environment ✓ Community Character and Design o Building orientation maintains or establishes an edge from the street o Project provides community centers, rec facilities, parks, plazas, open space or other public spaces o Reuses or rehabilitates existing structures o Protects and/or reuses historic structures ✓ Environmental Protection o Avoids development on wetlands, streams, shorelines o Minimizes impervious surfaces to improve stormwater quality / quantity o Uses "green building" design techniques o Protects on-site habitat for threatened or endangered species o Relieves development pressure on natural resources on or off site ✓ Stakeholder Participation o Concerns are documented and addressed formally o Participation is conducted early in process ✓ Economic Development o Promotes jobs/housing balance B24 Agenda Item 6A Page 47 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page o Positively impacts employment in community o Uses respond to identified community needs o Increases community opportunities for training and education, entertainment or recreation City of Davis Neighborhood Shopping Center Smart Growth Analysis Scorecard elements: (yes/no/how) ✓ The project location reinforces and logically extends existing and planned development. ✓ The project redevelops a brownfield site or a site/location receiving State or local assistance to support redevelopment. ✓ The project does not adversely impact water and sewer capacity. ✓ Does not adversely impact school capacity or road capacity ✓ Does not adversely impact the fiscal health of local or other government entities ✓ Appropriately planned densities ✓ Minimize parking ✓ Compact project design ✓ Mix of land uses or for single use projects, adds to the diversity of uses within 1/4 mile ✓ Provide different housing types and/or increases the diversity of housing options in the immediate (1/4 mile) neighborhood ✓ Variety of affordable housing ✓ Housing types and/or price levels are physically mixed-in the project or within the immediate adjacent neighborhood. At least 10% of the residential units provided are affordable (less than 120% of AMI x 30%) or are at a price level or type that meets an explicitly stated housing goal of the local government. ✓ Frequently visited uses are within 1/4 mile of the proposed project. ✓ There are no barriers to frequently visited uses inside or outside the project. ✓ Infrastructure for multiple transportation options ✓ Road system connects to and logically extends external street and transportation systems at multiple locations. ✓ The project is located on an existing interconnected street system, or provides an internal street system that is interconnected. ✓ The proposed or existing streetscape design is safe and pedestrian friendly. ✓ Project parking is designed and located for safe, pedestrian friendly environments ✓ The proposed building(s) orientation maintains a consistent edge from the street. ✓ Building exterior design are visually interesting, pedestrian friendly and establish or add to area design character. ✓ Project maintains or rehabilitates existing structures for continuing use. ✓ The project design and location is likely to benefit regional air quality. ✓ The project effectively handles storm-water quality and quantity ✓ "green building" design techniques ✓ Avoids development on wetlands, streams. shorelines, and slopes steeper than 15% or on highly unstable soils, floodplains etc. ✓ Uses design techniques such as clustering and vertical development to avoid sensitive environmental features ✓ Relieves development pressure on natural resources on or off site through use of transfer of development rights, long-term protection strategies or other means ✓ Inclusive citizen and stakeholder participation and their concerns are addressed ✓ Meets community needs B25 Agenda Item 6A Page 48 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page ✓ Positively impacts employment opportunities in the community ✓ Promotes jobs/housing balance. B26 Agenda Item 6A Page 49 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page 3 = n o 0 D o N M m ~ Evaluation of the Comprehensive in relation to the Urban Form Definition Exhibit B Many of the components of sustainable urban form are included in the Comprehensive Plan today and reflect long-standing community values; however, some areas are not adequately addressed. The chart below evaluates the extent to which the BVCP core concepts and policies further the goals of creating a sustainable urban form and lists what areas might be missing or could be strengthened. An additional issue that has been identified is the need for performance measures to assess and aid progress toward implementing BVCP policies and achieving sustainable urban form. How Does the BVCP Further the Goals of Creating a Sustainable Urban Form? Sustainability BVCP Core Concepts BVCP Specific Policies Missing/ Comp onent T Could be Strengthened Compact • Commitment to open space 1.22 Definition of Planning Areas/, 11, ll! . Not an explicit link Has a compact preservation and the use of open 1.23 Preclusion of New incorporated Areas between density and development pattern with space buffers to define the community 2.02 Physical Separation of Communities creating and supporting density in appropriate . Use of urban growth boundaries to 2.03 Community/ Regional Design commercial services and locations to create and maintain a compact city. 2.04 Compact Land Use Pattern public transit. support viable, long term • Encouragement of compact, 2.06 Design of Community Edges 2.20 Design in Newly Developing commercial opportunities contiguous development and a Areas ("encourage a ...concept ...that includes a variety of and high frequency public preference for infill land densities,... ) transit. redevelopment as opposed to sprawl. 2.22 Incentives for Mixed Use ("including some commercial centers, • Recognition of the importance of... a corridors and industrial areas") variety of subcommunity and 2.26 Mixed Use and Higher Density Housing ("along certain multi- neighborhood activity centers modal corridors") distributed throughout the community. 2.27 Variety of Activity Centers ("in focused nodes of concentrated • Commitment to a balanced multi- activities") modal transportation system. 4.40 Energy-Efficient Land Use ("the provision of recreation, employment and essential services in proximity to housing; the development of mass transit corridors; and efficient transportation..") 6.10 Multimodal development Connected • Commitment to a balanced multi- 2.31 Commitment to a Walkable City No acknowledgement of Provides an integrated modal transportation system. 6.03 System completion the disparity between the multimodal system with • Provision of quality urban spaces, and 6.04 Multimodal strategies western and eastern abundant opportunities walkways that connect the community. 6.07 Multimodal investment parts of the city in terms to walk and bike and 6.11 Managing parking supply of walkability, bikeability convenient access to 6.13 Neighborhood Streets Connectivity & transit. frequent transit service; is an easy and pleasant place to get around without a car. B27 Agenda Item 6A Page 50 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o m _ -p v Sustainability BVCP Core Concepts BVCP Specific Policies Missing/ Component Could be Strengthened • Provision of quality urban spaces, parks 2.29 Urban Open Lands • Connecting people to Connects people to and recreation that serve all sectors of 2.30 Boulder Creek and its Tributaries as Important Urban Design nature is addressed well nature and natural the community and trails and walkways Features in the core concepts and systems. that connect the community 2.32 Trail Corridors/ Linkages policies, but is not • Commitment to open space included in the city preservation... structure description or map. Complete • Recognition of the importance of... a 2.12 Neighborhoods as Building Blocks ("...provide services needed • No explicit goal to Provides all daily needs - variety of subcommunity and on a day-to-day basis...") provide all daily needs grocery, cafe, neighborhood activity centers 2.24 Support Services for Subcommunities ("...foster self sufficiency without use of a car. restaurants, dry cleaner, distributed throughout the community. in day-to-day support services...") • No acknowledgement of day care, bank, and the 2.27 Variety of Activity Centers ("centers should be located within locations lacking easy like - within easy access walking distance of neighborhood and business areas [and have] access (e.g., East from school, work or good multi-modal connections to and from centers..") Boulder). home without driving a car. • Recognition of the importance of the 5.01 Economic Vitality ("city and county will support a diversified • No acknowledgment of Provides a quality of life Federal Labs (NOAA, NIST, NCAR), employment base... recognizing amenities for emphasizing scientific, the role that providing that attracts, sustains CU & the private scientific & technological and related industries...") quality of life plays in and retains diverse technological communities' 5.02 Regional Job Center attracting investment and businesses and creative contributions to Boulder's economic 5.03 Support for Local Business creating diverse entrepreneurs. vitality. 5.04 Industry Clusters ("to retain, expand and attract business") businesses and creative 5.07 Upgrade Existing Commercial and Industrial Areas ("The city entrepreneurs. will ...foster revitalization of commercial and industrial areas,..enhance...services desired by employees, add housing and create transit-friendly developments...") B28 Agenda Item 6A Page 51 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o m _ -p v Sustainability BVCP Core Concepts BVCP Specific Policies Missing/ Component Could be Strengthened No core concept that addresses all 2.12 Neighborhoods as Building Blocks ("all neighborhoods, • Core concepts don't Creates comfortable, aspects, but one includes providing [including residential, business and mixed use], should offer include creating safe, and attractive places to recreate: unique... elements_.-amenities ...and facilities") comfortable, safe and places to live, work, learn Provision of quality urban spaces, 2.13 Support for Residential Neighborhoods attractive places. and recreate. parks and recreation that serve all 2.17 Protection of Residential Neighborhoods Adjacent to Non- • Policies don't specifically sectors of the community and trails residential Zones ("to ensure that the character and livability of use the adjectives and walkways that connect the established residential neighborhoods will not be undermined...") "comfortable, safe, and community 2.19 Compatibility of Adjacent Land Uses ("to minimize noise and attractive," but seem to visual conflicts get at it through 2.29 Urban Open Lands ("...to serve the following functions: active "character and livability." and passive recreation,... enhancement of community character...") Pretty weak policy re: 2.30 Boulder Creek and its Tributaries as Important Urban Design providing desirable Features ("...for recreation or trails; to provide a contrast to urban places to recreate development...") (particularly given the 2.39 Sensitive Infill and Redevelopment ("protect and enhance abundance of neighborhood character and livability") recreational opportunities 2.42 Enhanced Design for the Built Environment ("encourage or that exist in the require development that...provides a livable environment") community). 3.12 Parks and Recreation ("provide an adequate range of recreational opportunities for ...residents) B29 Agenda Item 6A Page 52 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o N M m ~ m Green, Attractive and Distinct • Not listed in the core values 2.05 Open Space Preservation • Given the number and Preserves agriculturally 2.08 Preservation of Rural Areas and Amenities ("...environmentally extent of policies that significant lands and sensitive areas,. _agriculturally significant lands...") address this component, environmentally sensitive 2.09 Agricultural Land seems like it deserves areas. 2.10 Delineation of Rural Lands ("include ...sensitive environmental mention in the BVCP core areas... significant agricultural lands...") values 2.29 Urban Open Lands ("...protection of the environmental quality of the urban environment...") 2.30 Boulder Creek and its Tributaries as Important Urban Design Features ("...natural ecosystems, wildlife habitat...") 4.01 Incorporating Ecological Systems into Planning 4.06 Natural Ecosystems 4.07 Ecosystem Connections and Buffers 4.08 Maintain and Restore Ecological Processes 4.09 Wetland Protection 4.13 Urban Environmental Quality 4.14 Urban Forests 4.15 Unique Geological Features 4.17 Hazardous Areas 4.18 Hillside Protection 4.19 Wildfire Protection and Management 4.20 Preservation of Floodplains 4.21 Flood Management 4.22 Non-structural Approach 4.23 Protection of High Hazard Areas 5.13 Role of Agriculture B30 Agenda Item 6A Page 53 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o m m • Provision of quality urban spaces, parks 2.29 Urban Open Lands Does not recognize what Has a public realm- and recreation that serve all sectors of 2.41 Design Excellence for Public Projects a large percentage of city parks, plazas, complete the community and trails and walkways 2.42 Enhanced Design for the Built Environment (encourage that public realm streets, greenways-that that connect the community. ..quality.. design in private sector development that addresses-the constitutes and that is attractive, safe, well- public realm) streets are part of "urban used and enriched with 3.12 Parks and Recreation open lands" too art, trees and 4.14 Urban Forests Limited recognition of landscaping. 6.14 integrated Design (...transportation facilities to contribute to a importance of public positive and attractive visual image and the desired community realm in beautifying the character) city, building community life and providing gathering spaces • Lacks clear commitment to street trees, their benefits and their maintenance- Not listed in the core values 4.01 Incorporating Ecological Systems into Planning • No reference to the role Ensures the location and 4.02 Adaptive Management Approach of creating green design of buildings, 4.03 City Leadership in Resource conservation infrastructure in reducing streets, utilities and other 4.04 Environmental Education and Technical Assistance air and water pollution. infrastructure protect 4.05 Monitoring and Tracking Lacks specific description natural systems, 4.13 Urban Environmental Quality of environmental minimize pollution and 4.14 Urban Forests concerns in urban areas urban heat island effects 4.26 Protection of Water Quality or of natural systems to and support clean 4.30 Storm Water protect or how to do so. energy generation. 4.33 Pollution Control . Need to update to include 4.35 Protection of Air Quality consideration of clean 4.37 integration of Water and Air Quality with Transportation energy in urban design. Planning 4.41 Energy-Efficient Building Design and Construction Waste Minimization B31 Agenda Item 6A Page 54 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o m m • Commitment to preservation of 2.01 Unique Community Identity • This component is Demonstrates an natural, cultural and historic features 2.05 Open Space Preservation thoroughly addressed in attractive, distinct that contribute to defining Boulder's 2.07Design of Major Entryways to emphasize and preserve the the core values, policies, character - defined by unique sense of place. natural setting and appearance of the community...') and city structure physical setting, streets, 2.29 Urban Open Lands ("...enhancement of community character..") description. buildings, open space, 2.30 Boulder Creek and its Tributaries as...Urban Design Features history, culture - that is 2.33 Preservation of Historical and Cultural Resources memorable and unique 2.34 Leadership in Preservation: City and County-Owned Resources to the specific place. 2.35 Historic and Cultural Preservation Plan 2.36 Eligible Historic Districts and Landmarks 2.37Hisotric Preservation/ Conservation Tools 2.38 Preservation of Archaeological Sites and Cultural Landscapes 2.39 Sensitive Infill and Redevelopment 2.41 Design Excellence for Public Projects ("capital projects [will be designed to be] positive additions to the community's architectural and urban design heritage") 2.42 Enhanced Design for the Built Environment Inclusive Commitment to a diversity of housing 2.14 Preservation of Community Character ("...as reflected • The core values don't Provides a diversity of types and price ranges to meet the needs in...Boulder's varied neighborhoods.") really speak to providing a housing types and of the Boulder Valley population. 2.15 Accessory Units diversity of jobs and uses. prices, employment, and 2.16 Preservation of Existing Residential Uses uses to meet the needs 2.18 Mixture of Complementary Land Uses ("In existing • The policies don't of a diverse community neighborhoods, a mixture of ..housing sizes and lot sizes..") explicitly talk about (ages, incomes, abilities 2.20 Design of Newly Developing Areas ("including a variety of providing uses to meet and lifestyles). residential densities, opportunities for shopping, nearby support the needs of people of all services and ..public facilities, ...parks, libraries and schools.") incomes; the focus is 2.24 Support Services for Subcommunities ("shopping and ...facilities primarily on providing and... programs... tailored to the particular needs of the diverse housing. subcommunity...") 5.01 Economic Vitality ("support a diversified employment base...") 7.03 Mixture of Housing Types 7.08 Preservation and Development of Manufactured Housing 7.09 Balancing Housing Supply With Employment Base 7.10 Keeping Low- and Moderate-income Workers in Boulder 7.12 Maintain Overall Housing Affordability B32 Agenda Item 6A Page 55 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o m m Commitment to programs that%upport 2.12 Neighborhoods as Building Blocks ("...foster community • This component is Provides welcoming, respect for human dignity, human rights & interaction...") addressed in the core accessible public the inclusion of all residents in community 2.40 Physical Design for People ("take steps to ensure that [public values and policies. gathering spaces for & civic life. and private sector] development and redevelopment be designed in a interaction among people manner that is sensitive to social, physical and emotional needs... from all walks of life. include factors such as accessibility...") B33 Agenda Item 6A Page 56 of 174 Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Exhibit C BVCP Community Design Focus Group Meeting Notes Session 1 July 19, 2010 General Questions and Comments • Clarify #2 on page 3 - take the next steps with this update. Need more detail on a design level. We don't have a definition of sustainable urban form currently and this work will synthesize what is already in the plan and add what is missing. • I don't understand how to do that without design guidelines. We will develop a description with words at the 10,000 ft. level that will lead to measures and more detail. We hope at the end of this process we will have a place-making guide to more sustainable urban form. We will also add key diagrams; mapping all open space and streets for control over public space. • How are the areas of change and stability identified? • We have a gap in implementing policy 6.14 Transportation. We lack implementation and need good design and maintenance funding with responsibility to maintain. • How do the area plans address the density issue? • How does density relate to sustainability? Or show up in this definition? In places with transit infrastructure and other ways to make it livable. • Areas of stability and change will need good definition to give security to established neighborhoods. Comments on the Sustainable Urban Form Definition • How is "compact" different than "high density"? It is used in terms of what is relative to that place. It will be different for new places vs. established areas. The level of intensity will be determined by each place keeping with character and appropriate change. We may need a good definition of "compact." • The sustainability language needs a component of lasting for generations and could add something about generating our own resources e.g. solar energy, food. • Policy 2.27 Variety of Activity Centers - turn it around and state that each neighborhood should have access to activity centers - not that centers should serve neighborhoods. • The completeness definition is missing anything about schools. Schools are the centers of neighborhoods; closing schools has been major losses to neighborhoods. For example, Mapleton had a scale that reflected the neighborhood. Schools function as one part that brings diversity to urban form. • The definition needs a cultural component. Bring to the form discussion - cultural uses or facilities near each neighborhood. Can be gathering places, everyday meeting places. • Look to historic neighborhoods for examples of walkability. • There should be a requirement for public art in every new development - encourage this in private design. E.g. art alley with Uni-Hill; it is a need for neighborhoods and people. B34 Agenda Item 6A Page 57 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Boulder falls short in #6 - "creating an attractive, safe, welcoming and inclusive environment" - needs more emphasis. • Need to consider age diversity. • Need places attractive to businesses. • Inclusive: diversity of prototypes - need to keep diversity of scale; language should invite diversity over prototype models. Recognize the importance of neighborhood diversity. • Address components of established neighborhoods in complete new redevelopments. Have large development projects split up to have more diversity, e.g. Holiday. • There is a concern in some neighborhoods that historic designation is very limiting to people when they want to upgrade or remodel their homes but they want to have some way to keep good neighborhood character -find a middle ground for change to occur appropriately. Define key aspects of neighborhood character and provide a level of flexibility. Use of "other tools" for preservation, such as conservation districts. Need to be able to change and protect. • For neighborhoods in transition - identify key livability / walkability issues and add the possibility of small-grain zoning to allow small retail or services, e.g. Delilah's on the Hill. • Define what distinct character means for character areas - Policy 2.01 Unique Community Identity. • Parks and open spaces are really important and shouldn't get short-changed in redevelopment. Evaluate parks standards as we are adding more people. Parks standard should be per capita, not just distance. Parks need to take into account surrounding density and how spaces are used. Need specific metric for open space/parks/gardens, e.g. x acres/ x population w/in walking distance. Include in parks more community garden space - especially for multi-family housing. • Consider quality of life and maintaining value of property in policy changes. We have existing issues with enforcing existing codes and ordinances, e.g. rentals, parking, maintenance, occupancy. Is there a need for a philosophical shift and policy direction for enforcement? Find ways to implement and emphasize what we have said we want and enforce rules about neighborhood livability. • Consider solar gardens to avoid major changes to homes / rooflines to add solar. • Zoning often doesn't consider neighborhoods - it tells what uses are allowed, but does not identify what is a need for adjacent residents. • Consider the effects of "protecting neighborhoods," e.g. not allowing wider-serving retail in Uptown. Residents don't care about this there. • Use the comp plan to define more elements or benefits than just more housing, e.g. cultural spaces. • Walkability and "connected" - needs something about looking where people actually walk and mapping the gaps. • Explore the use of detention areas for open space. B35 Agenda Item 6A Page 58 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Directing services, schools, etc. back to neighborhoods - comp plan should give this priority at the policy level. • Under Complete - retains businesses - it might be ok that some companies out-grow Boulder and have to move. This makes room for other new small businesses. In keeping vibrancy it is important to not depend on a few but have a large variety of smaller, growing businesses. B36 Agenda Item 6A Page 59 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page BVCP Community Design Focus Group Meeting Notes Session 1 July 21, 2010 Community Design/Urban Form -Have a set of policies in plan that could be used to evaluate existing neighborhoods to see where they measure up/fall short. -City structure definition seems two dimensional. Could expand to include more, like time element. Sustainable Urban Form Definition -Add per capita to minimize resource use. -Public realm needs to be explicit - cultural uses or gathering places are part of public realm. -Not just per capita, but overall resource use - leads to discussion of capping or limiting growth. -Need regional approach to many components, especially carbon, which don't comply with political boundaries. -Time for all in county to check in about projections. Add into goals - look regionally at jobs, housing, shopping. -Comprehensive -commuter-shed. -Regional approach - explicit in goals. -All communities - lower density codes/patterns - contribute to regional issues. -Resiliency - need to consider longer-term fiiture; energy limitations - with urgency. 44 Economy - expand: mix of incomes, lifestyles and ages. Expands on other aspect of healthy/diverse community - mix of economic profiles. -Do we want to have something in six goals about growth paying on-going costs to support long- term needs. -Want new development to make things better, not worse. Energy, other needs to be considered, cultural gathering. -Walkability - sidewalks and bikepaths - have the infrastructure - but that people can walk to most everything they need. -We conceive of ourselves as compact - most in RM Region, but we still don't have jobs within walkable distance. B37 Agenda Item 6A Page 60 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page -Expand "complete" - what would it take to get services walkable. -Compromised downtown walkability with closing of schools. -Need to consider care/accessibility for seniors- need to evaluate use. -Getting people to use facilities/ need good schedules/ process- look at size, frequency, types. -Find the right language - different implications/interpretation of goals - e.g. healthy lifestyle- trails or sidewalks. -Compact - relative - define what the goal is. Define appropriate. -Provide models of what compact means here - supplement with good examples. -What is performance piece? Quantify and check, measure. -Majority of daily activities- within 5-15 minutes distance from homes. -Economy of scale has pushed out smaller stores, schools. -How to change mind set? Double $ of gas. Trees. Streets have to be right. -Much of the discussion is very idealistic - # of grocery stores, ability to walk. -Acknowledge changing demographics in all discussions of sustainability - livable to all generations/lifestyles. -Under "Connected" - real measures - do people walk and use transit? Find successes. - To change, for people to walk, bike, and use transit - need incentives and disincentives and policy about parking/land uses. -Is walk/bike transit as efficient (time) as car use? -We have competing policies - e.g. neighborhood parking plans. -"Distinct" and "defined" - not preserve all existing neighborhood character- come up with positive examples. -Under "Complete," include affordable housing, schools and workplaces -All services/ range of facilities/uses in each neighborhood. -"Complete" - break out live-play close to where you sleep. Take out "comfortable"; "well- used"/"pleasant"; add "and neighborhood"- small scale and city wide. -If words are too broad, too much wiggle room. Take out vague terms. B38 Agenda Item 6A Page 61 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page -More specific about what we want. -Adjectives- not necessary vs. could be important - "attractive" works well. -"Compact" - loaded. Need to define what it means on a city scale/neighborhood scale - not all places are the same. -"In appropriate locations"- density in relation to public facilities. -"Compact" - with appropriate, effective locations, density; not whole community. Where does it fit? Appropriate means to make transit work, address big box model, support neighborhood schools, to make wonderful places; development patterns that support transit and mix of uses. -Comprehensive Plan - so much in existing plan about preservation, open space - need more on community design throughout plan - add language about innovation and change - elevate urban form - steer new growth and development. -Need to look at overall growth numbers. -Words like "appropriate" can polarize. -Can use change and uses to fix existing problems - not necessarily more growth- move intensity. -Look at adding smaller centers in neighborhoods. -With redevelopment, where do small businesses go? -Forgetting futuristic transportation options that can bring people together. -Like to see density defined where every neighborhood would welcome it, not fear. -Time dimension - look 50 years out - energy, food; create well-done urban spaces- lure people with delight. -Local decisions have to work regionally/accountability. B39 Agenda Item 6A Page 62 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page BVCP Community Design Focus Group Meeting Notes Session 2 August 2, 2010 Comments on City Structure Revised Elements: -Like web/ click idea -Need more attention, revisions to character diagram -Job/housing dot map shows it all- such as activity centers- use it as base -Take care in defining areas of stability/change -Use "character areas" term consistently, e.g. Post-WWII character areas. Broaden term and define what scale, i.e., single neighborhood or groups of neighborhoods? Use term districts instead? (though that sounds like an official designation) -Public realm vs. green space- blended here. Urban/civic vs. natural areas (or define that public realm is both). Separate them? They serve different functions. Separating them may help implementation. -Green lines on Public Realm map look like parkways, not street trees- clarify. Don't use quotes in "green"- define better. -Public realm connects urban to wildlife habitats. -Vision is concentrated and distributed nodes, not strip, or clustered activity nodes (our commercial service areas are not focused now) -Locate nodes to be convenient from (not to) neighborhoods- focus on neighborhoods and consider adding walking distance - 1/4 mile? -Some activity centers could function as both a city-wide resource and a neighborhood resource (e.g., Diagonal Plaza) -Lots of centers are outside'/4 mile walking distance. Is 1/z mile adequate? Most people will drive instead of walk if more than 1/4 mile, especially if unpleasant. Many areas of stability don't have 1/4 mile walk between activity center and homes. -Just because something is "accessible" does not guarantee that many people are actually using a path or sidewalk -Path or sidewalk must be made walkable with physical qualities -Street grid diagram- too literal. Convey that places people like are within denser part of the city. Could incorporate 5 into 4 - tie together transportation and place-quality aspects of streets. B40 Agenda Item 6A Page 63 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page -In urban areas public realm is space defined by buildings, facades really influence street character Comments on Areas of Relative Stability/ Change Definition and Map: -Map areas of stability to put people at ease vs. acknowledge need for change, sometimes significant (if needed to become walkable) and specify what's valued and shouldn't change in these areas. -Drawing a line can create fear... or are they already afraid? -In update, let's map what we want vs. what comp plan gives us -Focus on areas of change- where we want growth to go. -Like definition of Change Area B -Make areas of change more like areas of stability- well-liked, traditional, or urban vs. suburban -Stability criteria- historic, e.g. Mapleton -Stability- Pearl/downtown (or Change Area A) Areas of Change and Criteria for Change: -Hill- dirty, not well-maintained, not usable to surrounding neighborhoods due to uses, not character -Table Mesa/Martin Acres- improve livability without cars, use infill- specify where -Broadway north of downtown to Iris -North Boulder mobile home park and North Broadway- densify to get more affordable units -All large vacant parcels in established neighborhoods- these are unique opportunities to advance sustainability goals, like corner stores (e.g., Jr. Academy, Washington School) -Perimeter areas and other infill spots, transit corridors, areas that need commercial; nearby older housing stock will upgrade as a result - West side of city is where housing market is strongest, so ripest for change -East Arapahoe and East Pearl to Valmont with transit "necklace" with nodes along the way on Broadway and 28'h; also Transit village and future train service. -Make Transit Village focus for change in East Boulder -Transit Village should have cultural uses, too- this would support sustainability B41 Agenda Item 6A Page 64 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page -East Boulder- more grid and density - centers at 28th and Iris, 19th and Iris Does this concept of areas of stability/change have value? -Yes, but must be carefully defined -No, scares people, could be divisive -Preserve valued characteristics instead and specify what to improve -No, not refined enough to be useful, pushes buttons -Has value, but needs work- map areas of "sustainable change." Carefully characterize and articulate goals for this -Show where city investment to support change -Qualities of change, not areas of change are what's important to articulate. Livability, not geographic areas, e.g. walkability B42 Agenda Item 6A Page 65 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page BVCP Community Design Focus Group Meeting Notes Session 2 August 4, 2010 -Adaptive preservation- keep strong in BVCP -Define transit corridor- should connect nodes of density, not have density all along corridor -Support small businesses and start-ups to stay in Boulder -Maintain diversity of commercial spaces Comments of City Structure Revised Elements: -2. Like added paragraph -Walkability depends on physical environment (character, safety), not just presence of sidewalks and paths -3. Add public art (and to 5.) -Be clear that streets accommodate all modes -Label/define Boulder Valley Regional Center 4. Define walkability -Protect riparian zones- important green space -Separate green space/ natural space and public realm- or else better define -Include alleys- good potential as public realm Comments on Areas of Stability/Change Definition and Map: Add to Stability: "These areas have potential to achieve full sustainability" Three categories are too black and white. Need more gradation- convey possibility of change in established neighborhoods based on measured sustainability performance -Labeling a neighborhood "stable" breeds complacency and builds defense of substandard status quo -Need city-wide measures of success for walkability and sustainability- not just areas of change - Every house should have a center within X distance and have good access (few barriers) -Create additional category for large vacant parcel in established neighborhood, e.g. Jr. Academy B43 Agenda Item 6A Page 66 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page -Need to preserve areas for businesses to expand -Concern about neighborhoods that don't have convenient access to daily needs -Disagreement about whether '/4 or ~/z mile walkability is a key measure -Could just allow corner stores in Areas of Stability (instead of big, high density developments) -Key to sustainability for Boulder is too much in-commuting- need more worker housing -Clarify purpose of map and that areas of stability will experience change -Show key corridors on map -Improve transit routes and frequency to improve access to centers; don't necessarily need to centers, just better transit -Add layer to define potential improvements to improve sustainability, access -Add arrows to indicate major in-commuting routes Does this concept of areas of stability/change have value? -Better to just show where zoning allows redevelopment (don't call it "areas of change"); consider also showing grocery stores, elementary schools -Talk more about what we want to save/ preserve, including neighborhood diversity and character; don't just talk about change -Better to show areas that work and those that don't work and should change (vs. showing where zoning allows redevelopment) B44 Agenda Item 6A Page 67 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Attachment C . SustainableB ou lder Creating our Fuld; DRAFT Sustainability Policy Briefing Papers: Of) ' W ' Social Sustainability Economic Sustainability Local Food & Sustainable Agriculture Energy & Climate Action September 2010 Agenda Item 6A Page 68 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Social Sustainability DRAFT Policy Briefing Paper September 2010 Prepared by City of Boulder Housing and Human Services staff This paper is intended to serve as a starting point for community discussion of changes to the policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. This paper is one of five briefing papers. The Planning Board and City Council identified the following two broad focus areas for the major update following public input: urban form/ community design and sustainability policy changes- The briefing papers have been prepared to provide a framework for discussion of these focus areas. C-Social-1 Agenda Item 6A Page 69 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Social Sustainability 1. Introduction Social sustainability's mission, as described in the City of Boulder Social Sustainability Strategic Plan, is to enhance livability by providing outreach and developing policies that address the needs of the community, including under-served, under-represented, and under-participating residents, so all who live in Boulder can feel a part of, and thrive in, our community. A socially sustainable Boulder supports more equitable distribution of resources, supports diversity within the community, meets the basic needs of residents, and invests in social and human capital, thereby sustaining the quality of life and community livability for all residents into the future. A well designed physical environment plays a critical role in social well being by providing conveniently located businesses and services, equal access to transit, public parks and community gathering places, and other facilities and services including libraries and schools. Boulder, like all communities, is much more than its physical form. It is composed of people as well as the places where they live and work; it is as much a social environment as it is a physical environment. Among the unique qualities of Boulder are its residents' commitment to supporting a broad range of human services, preserving and creating affordable housing and the value placed on social, cultural and institutions that give a deeper meaning to life in Boulder. Boulder is recognized as a state-wide leader of such efforts with a holistic approach to service delivery. A signature mark of human services in Boulder is the extent and success of its partnerships, collaborations, blended funding and programs among agencies. The vision for Boulder includes creating a comprehensive safety net for residents, accessible and coordinated regional services and programs, and integrated partnerships. Boulder is a fluid community, growing and changing over time and its policies will be responsive to these changes. II. How Social Sustainability is currently addressed in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan The Comprehensive Plan policies include a Housing chapter (Chapter 7) and a chapter on Human Services (Chapter 8), which address broad needs, goals, and city and county roles for housing and human services. The full text of related policies is included in Exhibit A. Key policies include: Principles of Social Sustainability: • Recognize, respect and value cultural and social diversity; • Recognize that social and cultural inequities create environmental and economic instability; • Ensure the basic health and safety needs of all residents are met; C-Social-2 Agenda Item 6A Page 70 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Preserve and maintain a high quality of life for all of its residents; and • Provide certain facilities and services, including human service programs, to promote cultural, social and economic equity. Policy 1.04 Principles of Social Sustainability. The city and county recognize the rights of and encourage all members to play a role in governmental decisions... efforts will be made to remove barriers to participation and involve community members not usually engaged in civic life. Policy 1.05 Community Engagement. All new development and redevelopment should be designed in a manner that is sensitive to social, physical and mental health needs including factors such as accessibility to those with limited mobility. Policy 2.40 Physical Design for People. The city and county will develop a balanced all-mode transportation system that provides transportation choices, services and facilities for people with mobility impairments, as well as youth, older adults and low-income persons. Police 6.05 Accessibility. Human Services Chapter In order to preserve and maintain a high quality of life for all City of Boulder and Boulder County residents, certain facilities and services, among which are human service programs, must be provided. Human services are broadly defined as those programs that care for people's physical and mental health, economic well-being and social needs. Social equity is achieved when the needs of all members of the community are considered and included in the planning and decision-making process. Key human services policies include: • providing for a broad spectrum of human needs (from basic needs for food, health and shelter through prevention and early intervention services); • outreach to diverse residents, organizations and business communities, and those not typically engaged; • access to services; • regional cooperation; and • support of children, youth, seniors and families. Housing Chapter Housing has always been an area of concern and attention in the comprehensive plan and providing affordable housing and a diversity of housing options has been a key goal of the plan since 1970. Key housing policies include: • securing ten percent of the city's housing stock as permanently affordable for low- and moderate-income households and those with special needs; • encouraging preservation and rehabilitation of existing housing stock through land use policies, regulation and incentives; • preserving and rehabilitating existing low and moderate income units; • encouraging the preservation of existing mobile home parks and the development of new manufactured home parks, and C-Social-3 Agenda Item 6A Page 71 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • balancing the housing supply with the employment base by facilitating the creation of mixed-use and multi-family development. The Social Sustainability Strategic Plan adopted in 2007 includes the following goal areas: • Promote community and city organization engagement, • Expand and value diversity, • Improve neighborhood and community livability, • Address the needs of children, youth and seniors, • Partner with schools, and • Create a shared vision of community sustainability. III. What issues and challenges should be addressed in the Plan? Key issues raised in the update's first phase regarding social sustainability are: • Recent trends and future demographics in the community should be considered regarding service provision and community needs from the perspective of diverse people in the community, including: those living in poverty, seniors, immigrants, children and youth. • The importance of robust and innovative community engagement and support of neighborhood and community organizations. • The key role education for all ages plays in our community including: early childhood, University of Colorado and other higher education institutions, workforce training and life-long learning. • Affordable Housing and diverse housing types as key elements in creating a diverse economic and social community. Long-term socio- demographic trends, the current economic and funding environment, the local market, community and political priorities, and evolving housing and land use trends drive issues related to social sustainability. 1. Increasing number of households and individuals struggling to meet basic and other human service needs The poor economy over the last five years has increased the numbers of households struggling to make ends meet, as evidenced by increased numbers of households and individuals living in poverty (19% increase in number of individuals in Boulder County with incomes below the poverty line from 2004 to 20071 ) and a more rapidly increasing poverty rate for children in Colorado compared to any other state and the nation - Colorado's rate increased 50% from 2000 to 2008, whereas the national rate increased about 6% during the same period. The City ' U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2006-2008 American Community Survey, accessed 7-27-2010. http://factfinder.census.gov 2 As cited in, Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2010 Kids Count in Colorado, 2000 U. S. Census Bureau and American FactFinder, 2008 American Community Survey. C-Social-4 Agenda Item 6A Page 72 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page of Boulder's poverty rate is 21% and the rate for Boulder County is 12%3. People are struggling to meet their basic needs for housing, food, health and dental care, and transportation. Local human service providers have reported significant increases in residents applying for basic living and emergency assistance. The Emergency Family Assistance Association experienced a 21% increase in the number of families seeking financial assistance from January 2008 to January 2009. Community Food Share reported a 20% increase in the need for food assistance from both their member agencies and their direct service programs over the past year. In addition, there are few affordable options to shop for basic needs (e.g., discount grocery and department stores) in Boulder. Public entities also report increases in applications for a variety of public assistance over the past two years including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Colorado Child Care Assistance and unemployment benefits with wait lists for some benefits. Human service agencies are experiencing increased demand for basic safety net support and also for mental health services, and drug and alcohol treatment services, at a time when federal, state, and local revenues as well as charitable giving are being reduced4. Estimated shortfalls in the Colorado state budgets are expected to increase from 15% to 19% from 2009 to 2010. The amount donated to charity by residents of the City of Boulder declined from 3.8% of incomes in 2005 to 2.9% in 2006. It is anticipated that the data will reflect a trend of continued reduced charitable giving over the past several years as a reflection of the poor economy. A larger number of households are also struggling to care for their children and elderly and disabled members. Full time, center based child care in Boulder cost $12,000 to $15,000 per year per child in 2009, an amount that is considered a major cost in family budgets along with food, rent, and other basic expenses of daily living. Low and middle income parents have less access to affordable, quality care and may move their children from licensed programs to informal, less expensive child care settings with unknown quality.' This results in children being less prepared to start school and at greater risk of health and safety concerns. As subsidized child- care waitlists have become indefinite, affordable, quality childcare, close to home or work, remains a critical need required to sustain parents' employment and families' self-sufficiency. Middle-income families may not qualify for childcare subsidies but nonetheless find the cost and availability of childcare to be an issue. Demographic trend data indicate the senior population will double between 2005 and 2030 which will dramatically increase the demand for support services needed by a significantly aging and increasingly disabled population and their caregivers. The population aged 85 and over, which is more frail and in need of support, is increasing most rapidly. It is likely that, 3 U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2006-2008 American Community Survey, accessed 8-27-2010. http://factfinder.census.gov 4 The Community Foundation Serving Boulder County. Boulder County Trends: The Community Foundation's Report on Key Indicators, 2009. s National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care, 2010 Update, August 2010. C-Social-5 Agenda Item 6A Page 73 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page especially in the last several years, the percentage of recent veterans (of various ages) may be increasing as well. In order to reduce costs and 'make ends meet', there has been an increase in people combining households (adult children moving in with aging parents, relatives moving in together, and more non-traditional housing sharing e.g., single adult roommates). The number of American households dropped by an estimated 1.2 million between 2005 and 2008 as more young and middle aged people were living with their parents, and more families and individuals were combining households; all for economic reasons.6 Employment and housing opportunities are the significant drivers of self sufficiency. Local employers, also having to adjust to the poor economy, are hiring fewer employees (full-time, part-time, and temporary). Workforce Boulder County's employment registry contained half as many jobs in 2010 as in 2008.7 The poor economy is therefore resulting in increased unemployment rates. Despite some fluctuation, unemployment rates increased from 4% of the Boulder County labor force in January of 2008 to 6.6% in June of 20108. 'Secondary employment pools' (e.g., seniors, youth, homeless), which often rely on temporary, casual and lower wage work to provide for their own or their families' needs, are finding it more difficult to compete with the 'primary workforce' to secure fewer available positions. Young people and seniors are having the hardest time securing employment.' Competition for employment is intensified among those who face additional employment barriers including non-English speakers, people with disabilities and people who have limited education. Employed workers also need ongoing, lifelong training and education opportunities to maintain their competitive edge and to secure work with employers who must continually strive to maintain their competitive place in the market. 2. Affordable Housing and Housing Diversity Ability to secure self sufficiency wages is exacerbated by the high cost of housing. A diverse choice of housing at different incomes and serving different household types is necessary if Boulder is to be a diverse community. Stable, safe and affordable housing allows people to address other needs in their lives and to more fully participate in their community. Low and moderate income renters have difficulty finding affordable rental housing. Sixty- three percent of city of Boulder renters are housing-burdened, spending over 30% of their income on rent, with the vast majority of these households spending over 35% of income on rent.10 CU and Naropa University plan to add over 8,000 students by 2030, creating more pressure on rental housing markets. Low income non-student residents compete with students 6 Gary Painter, April 2010, "What Happens to Household Formation in a Recession?" Research Institute for Housing America and Mortgage Bankers Association. 'Workforce Boulder County, August, 2010. 8 Workforce Boulder County, August, 2010. 9 Workforce Boulder County, August, 2010. 10 U.S. Census Bureau. American FactFinder, 2006-2008 American Community Survey, accessed 7-26-2010. http://factfinder.census.gov C-Social-6 Agenda Item 6A Page 74 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page for available rental units. When the demand for rental units exceeds the availability, vacancy rates are reduced and rents increase. For very low income individuals, subsidized rental units are often the only option, but these units consistently have a waitlist. In 2009, when Boulder County Housing Authority's wait list last opened for its Housing Choice Voucher Program, the estimated waiting period for a subsidized unit was two to six years. High housing costs and low vacancies pose problems for low- and moderate-income students and scholars, who are largely not eligible for affordable housing programs but may use community and college provided human services. The median sales price of a single family home has outpaced income growth in Boulder, rising from $399,000 in 2001 to a peak of $525,000 in 2007, an increase of 31.5%. In the same time period, median family income rose 1.4%. In 2009 the median price of a modest single family home (under 2,000 square feet) was $425,000; in comparison a family earning the median household income of $89,100 could afford a $275,000 homed. The median price of an attached unit was $250,000 in 2009, up from $187,000 in 2000. Based on these prices, it is difficult for Boulder to meet needs for housing across a range of incomes, family status, lifestyle and life stages, and for populations with special needs. Issues include the need for supportive and transitional housing; a growing senior population; and some households which may not be able to afford needed home maintenance or rising HOA assessments. The city has little vacant land remaining and new development will primarily occur through redevelopment of existing land. This presents challenges as redevelopment is more complex and expensive than greenfield development and land assemblage, demolition and possibly environmental remediation may be necessary to varying degrees. This also means that there is limited land available for certain housing types, particularly single-family housing as well as townhomes and other medium-density housing that may be attractive to households with children. There is demand for a diversity of housing types, including affordable single-room occupancy (SRO) residences for low-income singles (many SRO's have been lost to conversion); accessible, visitable or universal design units for a growing senior population and those with disabilities; and accessory units that provide affordable rental options while providing income to homeowners who may themselves be cost-burdened. Other issues include a continuing jobs-housing imbalance where Boulder serves as an employment center for neighboring communities, creating demand for housing and transportation. Finally, Boulder has seen an aging housing stock with 68% of housing units having been built before 1980.12 Older units not only require maintenance to meet codes and standards, but may be of a construction or unit configuration that is not attractive to today's ' 1 Assumes that households spend no more than 28% of income on housing costs. 12 U.S. Census Bureau. American FactFinder, 2006-2008 American Community Survey, accessed 7-26-2010. http://factfinder. census. gov C-Social-7 Agenda Item 6A Page 75 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page buyers. Many condominiums built in earlier eras are no longer attractive to buyers and have become rental units. Further, availability of a range of housing, including affordable housing, has environmental and economic benefits, by reducing commuting and by supporting a diverse workforce. There is increasing awareness that the costs of "housing plus transportation" are becoming a burden to many low, moderate and middle-income households. Especially for low- and moderate- income workers, those who choose to live outside of Boulder may see transportation costs consume much of their savings in housing costs.13 As public transit prices increase, the poorest users who are transit-dependent are disproportionately impacted. There is concern about the limited housing opportunities in the city for middle- and moderate- income households with children. Approximately 20% of households in Boulder have children under 18, compared to 30.6% in Boulder County.14 Boulder has historically had a smaller percentage of households with children.15 For low, moderate and middle-income households, the type of housing which is affordable consists largely of condominiums or, for middle-income earners, smaller, older homes often in need of repair or upgrades. Market and housing preference data show that despite growing demand for attached housing, households with children overwhelmingly prefer single-family detached housing, a housing type difficult to provide affordably in Boulder. However, factors such as price, neighborhood characteristics, access to parks and open space, and access to transportation and amenities also are important to their housing choice..16 In Boulder, even moderately-priced single-family homes tend to attract fewer households with children than either higher-priced single-family homes, mobile homes, or Boulder Housing Partners affordable rentals.17,18 3. Achievement Gap and School Readiness Another trend in Boulder County is the achievement gap and lack of school readiness, particularly among Latino and lower income children. Trends for lower test scores, academic performance and graduation rates translate into significantly lower lifetime earnings, employment rates, and health outcomes among adults, and increased risk behaviors compared to national averages, among youth (alcohol use among older high school students, prescription drug abuse, sexual activity, thoughts of suicide). Lifetime earnings of those " Center for Neighborhood Technology, Housing and Transportation Affordability Index, accessed 7-26-2010. http://htaindex.cnt.org/ 14 U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2006-2008 American Community Survey, accessed 7-26-2010. http://facttinder.census.gov " In 1990, 21.7% of Boulder households and 32.7% of Boulder County households had children. 16 Littman, Todd. 2010. Where We Want to Be: Home Location Preferences and Their Implications for Smart Growth. Victoria Transport Policy Institute. http://www.vtpi.org/sscp.pdf, accessed August 3, 2010. 17 According the Boulder Valley School District data from 2005-2009, only 25% of single-family homes valued at under $500,000 contained children attending BVSD, while 42% of homes valued at over $500,000 contained BVSD children- This pattern is not seen elsewhere in the Boulder Valley School District. ]s From 2005-2009, 38% of mobile homes contained children attending a BVSD school; in 2009, 60% of Boulder Housing Partners affordable rental units contained children. C-Social-8 Agenda Item 6A Page 76 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page without high school diplomas are estimated to be 47% of college graduates' earnings.19 Some youth in our community are also challenged by increased pressure to help support their family, serve as translators for relatives, care for young children while parents work, etc. As these trends are becoming more entrenched, there is increased stratification of children in schools (less economic, racial and cultural diversity, which can be exacerbated by open enrollment). Ongoing employment related education and training opportunities for non-college bound youth and positive social, recreational and cultural opportunities for youth are needed. 4. Increasing Regional Interdependencies Many of Boulder's emerging social trends are increasingly regional in scope and have more far reaching economic and environmental implications. For example, as households with children choose to live outside of Boulder, effective plans for housing, transportation, and provision of the full range of educational, human, cultural, and recreational services are increasingly regional in scope. With increasing recognition that transportation and housing often consume over half of household incomes, regional planning must consider provision of housing accessible to transportation options for low, moderate and middle-income families. The regional HOME consortium, the Boulder County Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness and the Boulder County Human Services Strategic Plan are examples of recent coordinated, regional planning initiatives. Regional planning efforts will benefit from shared service planning and allocation of resources based on needs and demands. Distribution of resources to county residents will need to be assessed for disproportionate burdens on communities across the county and particularly on key service centers. 5. Inclusiveness and Engagement of Diverse Populations As noted in the City of Boulder Social Sustainability Strategic Plan, critical to a socially sustainable community is an engaged, respectful and inclusive population in which all are welcomed and can live with dignity. In order for a community to thrive, all of its residents must have the opportunity participate in decisions that impact them. Efforts will continue to be made to remove barriers to participation and involve community members not usually engaged in civic life. Outcomes of a more diverse community include increased diversity (of thought, experiences, beliefs, age, physical and mental capabilities, language abilities, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and socio-economic status), retention of community members and household types through different life stages, a diverse work population that can better serve the needs of the community and provide increased opportunities for civic participation and volunteerism, provision of inclusive community services, and accessible government and public programs. IV. What are some suggested changes to Comprehensive Plan to address these issues? Currently the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan includes only limited policies describing the community's goals related to social sustainability and key areas of community well-being. The 19 Boulder Community Foundation, Boulder County Trends 2009: Report on Key Indicators. C-Social-9 Agenda Item 6A Page 77 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page language could be strengthened and policies added to describe the type of community and social environment Boulder residents want. Proposed revisions to the comprehensive plan policies include creating one place where the goals related to community well-being are clearly outlined. Elements that are currently missing or could be considered include: • addressing the needs of a growing senior population; • clearly articulating the relationship between the physical environment and social well-being; • protecting civil rights; (even though this has been a long-standing core value) • fostering the inclusion of immigrants into the community; • addressing issues related to poverty; • considering the impacts of city policies and planning efforts on low and moderate income populations (e.g., affordability of combined housing plus transportation costs); • considering ways to reduce the transportation cost burden for low-income populations; • implementing new and innovative civic participation opportunities (enabling underrepresented to become engaged) and actively seeking diverse representation in leadership roles; and • supporting child and youth education needs (e.g., availability of accessible, affordable, quality child care; school readiness). Recommendations from the Affordable Housing Task Force will be incorporated in policy changes for the 2010 update as they are available. However revisions to the following existing housing policies may be considered: • addressing housing needs of a growing senior population (e.g. accessible housing, universal design, occupancy limits, accessory units, maintenance and costs); • considering the housing needs and impact on the market of an increasing number of post- secondary students, and encouraging post-secondary educational institutions to house a larger number of their student body; • considering relationships between energy efficiency goals and the needs of lower income households; • addressing indirect impacts of redevelopment policies on ensuring that affordable housing is distributed throughout the community; • adding goals to encourage and/or remove barriers to creation of more diversity in housing types to meet needs of the workforce and special populations (e.g.: rental housing; accessory units; efficiency units; shared and cooperative housing, and boarding houses or single-room occupancy units, reconsideration of occupancy limits); • identifying trends and community goals regarding middle-income housing, and particularly housing attractive to low, moderate and middle-income families with children; and • adding stronger policy direction to adopt a "community benefit" standard that would enable the city and its staff to more proactively encourage the provision of affordable housing and address priority social needs. This might be implemented by providing incentives or amending review processes for developments providing a significant number of affordable units or addressing priority social needs. C-Social-10 Agenda Item 6A Page 78 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Links to Adopted Plans to Provide a Complete Picture Many community well-being goals have been defined in the Social Sustainability Strategic Plan and other Human Service Plans and planning efforts. The new web-based structure of the plan will have links to these other plans to provide a complete policy picture of how the vision and goals in the comprehensive plan is implemented at the operations and program level. The city has adopted human services and social sustainability policy goals in the following key plans: • Housing and Human Services Master Plan; • Comprehensive Housing Strategy; • City of Boulder Social Sustainability Strategic Plan; • Boulder County Human Services Strategic Plan; • Boulder Broomfield Regional Consortium 2010-2014 Consolidated Plan; • Early Childhood Council of Boulder County Comprehensive System Plan; • Boulder County 10-Year Plan to Address Homelessness. Public Requests for BVCP Policy Changes In the public request process at the start of the comprehensive plan update several requests for policy revisions were made regarding issues related to social sustainability. Boulder Housing Partners made two requests: • adding stronger policy direction to adopt a "community benefit" standard that would enable the city and its staff to more proactively encourage the provision of affordable housing and address priority social needs. This is described above in suggested changes and will be further explored as part of the update process, and • revisions to the land use designation description for manufactured housing to clarify the intent and more specifically address mobile homes. This will be considered further as specific text changes and policy language is drafted. The Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center requested consideration of a range of issues regarding social and economic sustainability that were considered and discussed in developing the briefing papers. Issues about occupancy limits and rental housing are included in suggested changes above. Many of the issues raised are specific programmatic or implementation actions that are more appropriately considered at the program or master plan level, however adding a policy section and language about community well-being will provide broad policy direction supporting the intent of many of the requests to sustain all people in the community, especially the most vulnerable. Focus Group Review Two informal focus group consisting of representatives of various civic and service organizations provided feedback to city staff on a preliminary draft of the Social Sustainability Briefing Paper. Although they were not a decision-making group and were not expected to C-Social-11 Agenda Item 6A Page 79 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page reach consensus, they provided extremely valuable input that helped refine these materials. Below is a list of focus group participants: Intercambio- Maria Velasco Clinica Family Health Services - Tom Littleton ECCB (Early Childhood Council) - Bobbie Watson Veterans Helping Veterans Now - Judy Nogg Homeless Shelter - Greg Harms Community Foundation - Morgan Rogers Foothills United Way - Barbara Pingrey Center for People with Disabilities - Elaine Senko Boulder County Aging Services - Eden Bailey YWCA - Janet Beardsley Human Relations Commission - Leisha Connors Bauer Boulder Housing Partners - Tim Beal Senior Community Advisory Council - Jeanne Nolan & Win Nolan Growing Up Boulder - Debbie Flanders Cushing City Manager's Advisory Committee of Students - Stuart Hayden Rocky Mountain Peace & Justice Center - Carolyn Bninski Youth Advisory Board (YOAB) - Peter Osmes Colorado Statewide Parent Coalition - Richard Garcia Key themes to add or change in the paper • Need to emphasize more information about increasing senior population - including the increasing need for care-givers; increasing number of people with disabilities; need to explore zoning or other regulations or barriers so people can stay in their homes longer; changes to neighborhoods as older adults may be moving out or having other needs; universal design and the need for more accessible units. • View increasing number of students as an opportunity for the community, not an impediment - need to mention increased need for some services as student populations grow. • Need to strengthen housing goals around looking at housing types and urban design - accessible/universal design; SRO's/boarding houses; ADU's; occupancy limits; preservation of mobile homes. • Recognize number of veterans in the community and increasing need for services also opportunities. • Affordability of transportation - might be something to add to policies. Transportation + housing + energy costs needs to be further explored/addressed. Related impacts - i.e. households living farther need more childcare/childcare near employment. • Importance of having different outreach approaches and ways people can provide input; actively recruit diverse people for boards, leadership. Address issues of digital divide. C-Social-12 Agenda Item 6A Page 80 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • City should clearly define what we can do given limited resources and increasing needs; and to focus on specific goals (numeric or programmatic). Consider how this applies at the Comp. Plan level (e.g. 10% affordable housing goal). • Seek flexibility in regulations; find innovative ways to address problems - address multiple goals. • Achievement gap continues to be an issue - what is City's role? • Lack of employment opportunities • Explore links between energy efficiency and housing costs. Older multi-family HOA's are a gap because homeowners can't use many rebates (i.e. HOA is responsible for building). C-Social-13 Agenda Item 6A Page 81 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Focus Group 91 Aug 23, 2010, 4:00 - 5:30 PM Housing • How is affordable housing balanced with historic preservation goals - Washington School • How do we keep people living, shopping in Boulder when you can buy a house for $200,000 in Lafayette? Is it a goal to try to attract people back to Boulder? • Density - San Juan del Centro and trailer parks are too dense • Housing for people already here - people who grow up in Boulder • We have lost most of our SRO's - these are an important part of our housing stock • Address stigma of mobile homes - strengthen goal • Families who can't afford to live in Boulder spend more time commuting, need more child care. Senior Issues (Housing or Human Services) • Be careful how we define dependent: not all seniors are "dependents" and there are very specific definitions of dependency; need more emphasis on seniors • The language focuses heavily on households with children, even though they represent only 20% of households in Boulder; • More people need caregiving assistance; long-distance caregivers • Visitibility, mobility issues • Aging in place - seniors need help with landscape, snow removal, etc. Families or seniors may want accessory units but it is often a zoning violation. People live longer if in their own community. • Senior population in Boulder County will increase by 80% by 2035; greatest increase of age 85+; more frail elderly/more need for services • Partner with County on senior issues ("Creating Our Future" process) Human Services • We should set quantifiable goals - like the 10% affordable housing goal - e.g. community can provide services to x number of people/households. Based on what community can afford. E.g. 160 shelter beds are always full; we could add more but it would still be full. • Focus on prevention strategies • Have we measured how effective our programs are? • Need to resolve Mapleton School issue • Need strategies to address goal - e.g. no family should pay more than 10% of income for child care. Achievement Gap • Achievement gap & dropping out - how does city play a role? • Summer/after school programs C-Social-14 Agenda Item 6A Page 82 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Summer jobs • YOAB role Outreach & Engagement • How are we addressing diversity issues? • Urban form should create welcoming places • Need to resolve Mapleton School issue • Language in paper regards students as a negative impact on community - doesn't recognize students have needs (not all are wealthy) and can contribute to community; how do we partner with students; involve students in community input? Students have unique needs - childcare. • Engage different populations in a way and location that makes them feel comfortable • Jobs for seniors/youth Focus Group 92 Aug 25, 2010, 7:30 - 9:00 AM Housing • 3 unrelated rule - should be discussed - affects seniors • rent control/rent stabilization - there are barriers and cons, but it could be discussed • Protection of mobile home parks still an issue • Regionalism is important (housing) • Senior housing needs - last senior development was in 1979 • Want to remain independent • Need to plan for extended families • How do we become more flexible in regulations; give flexibility to our higher priorities • Lafayette City Council has been supporting visitability (Jay Rigeri) • Need to fund/rebate/accelerate weatherization - more efficient than high-tech solutions; Multi-family HOA's can't take advantage of rebates • Burden of energy costs (older housing stock) • "Green leases" - share benefit of energy efficiency with tenant • Maximize use of limited land to accommodate seniors, poor, students: ADU's, occupancy, shared spaces • Language about "negative impacts" of housing - what about positive impacts? Human Services • Provide more resource specialists for seniors • Nationally 11% are veterans; 8% in Boulder County. So probably 16% of households include a veteran • Veterans needs - housing, health care (only 100% disabled get VA health care) • 25% of homeless are veterans • No camping allowed on public property in summer; yet shelter is closed C-Social-15 Agenda Item 6A Page 83 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • We need low-cost alternatives - designate a place to camp or sleep. City is spending $ now to prosecute. • Many issues are polarized - no middle ground • Homeless services are disjointed • Need transit that serves youth, where they want to go (i.e. affordable classes at YMCA) • Transit is not affordable - if you don't have an ecopass • Some families may not qualify for food stamps b/c if they live together, must combine income for qualifying • Need to mention need for jobs • Think ahead - training for people to be caregivers Achievement gap • Training for adults Community Outreach & Engagement • Veterans know how to accomplish goals - they can be effective volunteers • Need to actively j•eci•itit diversity on Boards & Commissions • Those who make decisions (i.e. City Council) are not full-time workers - are often privileged • Challenges to including people in decision making - long, formal meetings make it difficult for many to participate • Go to where people are to do outreach - i.e. Sacred Heart on Sunday • Digital divide is very important - b/c more things are online (jobs applications, public participation, etc.). Library hours, etc. Can't assume people have internet access. • Use cell phone polling • Connect with all populations • Hear from those not currently engaged • Police department is one of biggest service providers - we need to involve them • We need to identify community leaders who can involve more people • Public is asked what to cut, but not asked about how to increase revenues C-Social-16 Agenda Item 6A Page 84 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Exhibit A Key Policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan related to Social Sustainability 1. Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Policies 1. General Policies The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan is a joint plan between the city of Boulder and Boulder County that provides shared responsibility for planning and development in the Boulder Valley. The general policies section of the plan provides the overall planning framework for sustainability, intergovernmental cooperation, growth management and annexation. Boulder has a long tradition of community planning. Most of the key policies that have guided the development pattern in the Boulder Valley have not changed since the 1977 Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan was first adopted, and many of them stem from long-standing community values. Boulder's planning has focused on respecting our unique community identity and sense of place, city-county cooperation, and keeping Boulder a distinct, separate and compact community. They represent a clear, articulate vision of our desired development pattern including: • Recognition of sustainability as a unifying goal to secure Boulder's future economic, ecological and social health. • Commitment to open space preservation and the use of open space buffers to define the community. • Use of urban growth boundaries to maintain a compact city (the boundaries of the service area have remained virtually unchanged since first developed in 1977). • Encouragement of compact, contiguous development and a preference for infill land redevelopment as opposed to sprawl. • Provision of quality urban spaces, parks and recreation that serve all sectors of the community and trails and walkways that connect the community. • Commitment to preservation of natural, cultural and historic features that contribute to defining the unique sense of place in Boulder. • Commitment to programs that support respect for human dignity, human rights and the inclusion of all residents in community and civic life. • Recognition of the importance of a central area (Downtown, University of Colorado, the Boulder Valley Regional Center) as a regional service center of the Boulder Valley and a variety of subcommunity and neighborhood activity centers distributed throughout the community. • Recognition of the importance of the Federal Scientific Laboratories (NOAA, NIST, NCAR), the University of Colorado, and the private scientific and technology community that contributes to the economic vitality of Boulder. • Commitment to a diversity of housing types and price ranges to meet the needs of the Boulder Valley population. • Commitment to a balanced multi-modal transportation system. C-Social-17 Agenda Item 6A Page 85 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Sustainability 1.01 Community Sustainability. The city and county adopt the sustainability principles in policies 1.01-1.05 to interpret and guide implementation of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The city and county recognize: a) the critical interrelationships among economic, social and environmental health; b) the way we produce, trade and consume impacts our ability to sustain natural resources; c) social and cultural equity and diversity creates valuable human capital that contributes to the economy and environmental sustainability; d) planned physical development has an impact on social conditions and should be considered in community planning; and e) the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon the full engagement and involvement of the community. The city and county seek to maintain and enhance the livability, health and vitality of the Boulder Valley and the natural systems of which it is a part, now and in the long- term future. The city and county seek to preserve choices for future generations and to anticipate and adapt to changing community needs and external influences. 1.02 Principles of Environmental Sustainability. There are limits to the capacity of the biosphere to support the life of human beings at current levels of consumption and pollution. There are limits to the land and soil available for food production, to available water, to resources such as trees, fish and wildlife, to industrial resources like oil and metals, and to the ability of nature to absorb our waste. With this in mind, the city and county acknowledge the importance of natural capital, which can be kept at healthy levels for the long term only when we are able to do the following: a) Renewable resources should not be used faster than they are recharged or replenished by the environment. b) Non-renewable resources should be used with the greatest care and efficiency, and some of those should be used to develop renewable replacements. c) Waste should not be dumped into nature any faster than nature can absorb it. 1.03 Principles of Economic Sustainability. a) The city and county will encourage a viable and balanced economic structure and employment base within the parameters of established land use, environmental and growth policies. b) The city and county recognize that a healthy, adaptable local economy is vital to the community's ability to provide a highly desirable quality of life, high levels of services and amenities. C-Social-18 Agenda Item 6A Page 86 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page c) The city and county will promote a diverse and sustainable economy that supports the needs of all community members. d) The city and county will seek to ensure that current needs are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs, for the economy is a subsystem of the environment and depends upon the environment both as a source of raw material inputs and as a sink for waste outputs. 1.04 Principles of Social Sustainability. The city and county will promote a healthy, sustainable community by: a) Recognizing, respecting and valuing cultural and social diversity. b) Recognizing that social and cultural inequities create environmental and economic instability. c) Ensuring the basic health and safety needs of all residents are met. d) Providing infrastructure that will encourage culturally and socially diverse communities to both prosper within and connect to the larger community. 1.05 Community Engagement. The city and county recognize that the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon full involvement of the community. The city and county will recognize the rights of and encourage all community members to play a role in governmental decisions, especially those that affect their lives or property, through continual efforts to maintain and improve public communication and the open conduct of business. In addition, the city and county will continue to support programs and provide opportunities for public participation and neighborhood involvement. Efforts will be made to remove barriers to participation and involve community members not usually engaged in civic life. Increased emphasis will be placed on notification and engagement of the public in decisions involving large development proposals or major land use decisions that may have significant impact on, or benefits to the community. 2.40 Physical Design for People. The city and county will take all reasonable steps to ensure that new development and redevelopment, public as well as private, be designed in a manner that is sensitive to social, physical and emotional needs. Broadly defined, this will include factors such as accessibility to those with limited mobility; provision of coordinated facilities for pedestrians, bicyclists and bus-riders; provision of functional landscaping and open space; and the appropriate scale and massing of buildings related to neighborhood context. 7. Housing Healthy communities foster strong families, a sustainable economy and a sense of belonging among its members. The availability of affordable housing is at the heart of what it takes to sustain a healthy community. There is no single solution, and a variety of measures are needed to address the community's housing needs. Addressing those needs is essential to preserving the richness of our community's perspectives, experiences and voices. The range of available housing opportunities helps to define a community. The comprehensive plan, which identifies the C-Social-19 Agenda Item 6A Page 87 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page desired locations, densities and types of housing planned for Boulder, is an integral link in the community's housing strategy. The high cost of local housing results in many households paying a disproportionate amount of their income for housing or moving farther from their work in order to find housing that they can afford. Housing cost burdened households have less money available for other necessities and generally find that they are unable to actively participate in the community. This leads to additional demands on supportive human services and to an exclusion of key members of our society from the civic infrastructure. Research has shown that stable, affordable housing is pivotal for enabling families to address other needs and be self sufficient, productive members of the community. Boulder cannot house everyone who would like to live here. However, the social, economic and environmental well-being of the community is enhanced when families are retained, workers are housed and existing residents with changing or special housing needs are served. Through a variety of policies, programs and regulations a definitive difference can be made in the type, number, and affordability of new and existing housing units and in the programs and assistance available to those who have limited resources or special needs. The city's Comprehensive Housing Strategy, completed in 1999, examined possibilities for increasing choices and ensuring that the income diversity that has historically characterized Boulder can be maintained. The strategy recommended a variety of actions that address both existing and new housing, subsidized and market-rate housing, rental and owner-occupied, and single-family and multi-family housing. The city's Housing and Human Services Master Plan, developed in 2005, provides a variety of polices and strategies for serving the diverse needs of Boulder residents. In particular it outlines strategies for achieving the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan goal to have 10 percent of the total housing stock as permanently affordable within 15 years or less. Local Support for Community Housing Needs 7.01 Local Solutions to Affordable Housing. The city and county will emphasize locally developed solutions to meet the housing needs of their low and moderate income households, including those who work but may not live in Boulder County. The city and county further recognize that such needs may not be met solely through private development. To facilitate availability of housing for this segment of the population, appropriate federal, state and local programs and resources will be used both locally and in collaboration with other jurisdictions. The city's pursuit of additional affordable housing programs will include an analysis of the unmet need for such programs as well as an analysis of the financial, social, demographic and community resources and constraints. 7.02 Supply of Affordable Housing. There is a growing concern about the availability of affordable housing for low and moderate income families in the Boulder Valley. The city will continually monitor and evaluate its policies, programs and regulations that affect land cost, development fees, C-Social-20 Agenda Item 6A Page 88 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page and other associated development costs to ensure that these costs are compatible with the overall goal of affordable housing. Where appropriate, incentives and regulations will be employed to encourage construction of affordable housing or to mitigate the costs of constructing and acquiring permanently affordable housing. (See Policy 2.22 Incentives for Mixed Use.) 7.03 Permanently Affordable Housing. The city will increase the proportion of permanently affordable housing units to an overall goal of at least ten percent of the total existing housing stock through regulations, financial subsidies and other incentives. City resources will also be directed toward maintaining existing permanently affordable housing units and securing replacements for lost low and very low income units. The city will continually evaluate existing and potential affordable housing efforts in order to ensure that the continuum of housing needs in the community as well as its affordable housing goals can be met. 7.04 Populations with Special Needs. The city and county will encourage development of housing for very low and low income populations with special needs including facilities for the older adults, people with disabilities and other populations requiring group homes or other specialized facilities where appropriate. The location of such housing should be in proximity to shopping, medical services, entertainment and public transportation. Every effort will be made to avoid concentration of these homes in one area. (See Policy 2.40 Physical Design for People and Policy 6.05 Accessibility.) 7.05 Strengthening Community Housing Partnerships. The city will create and preserve partnerships dedicated to the community's housing needs by providing technical assistance, periodically reviewing and revising its regulations and, where appropriate, approving public funding. The city will facilitate partnerships with community employers in order to encourage the creation of employee housing, support private and nonprofit agencies that create and maintain permanently affordable housing in the community, foster nonprofit and private sector partnerships and support the university in its efforts to increase the amount of on-campus student housing. Preserve Housing Choices 7.06 Mixture of Housing Types. The city and county, through their land use regulations and incentive programs, will encourage the private sector to provide and maintain a mixture of housing types with varied price ranges and densities, which attempt to meet the affordability needs of a broad range of the Boulder Valley population. This includes families, essential workers, older adults, persons with disabilities, at-risk children and adults and vulnerable, very low income residents. (See Policy 2.18 Mixture of Complementary Land Uses and Policy 2.42 Enhanced Design for the Built Environment.) C-Social-21 Agenda Item 6A Page 89 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 7.07 Preserve Existing Housing Stock. The city and county, recognizing the value of their existing housing stock, will encourage its preservation and rehabilitation through its land use policies, regulations and incentives. Special efforts will be made to preserve and rehabilitate existing low and moderate income units in order to meet the needs of all residents in the community. (See Policy 2.14 Preservation of Community Character.) 7.08 Preservation and Development of Manufactured Housing. Recognizing the importance of manufactured housing as an option for many households, the city and county will encourage the preservation of existing mobile home parks and the development of new manufactured home parks, including increasing opportunities for resident-owned parks. Whenever an existing mobile home park is found in a hazardous area, every reasonable effort will be made to reduce or eliminate the hazard, when feasible, or to help mitigate for the loss of housing through relocation of affected households, development of additional manufactured housing capacity in the county or other appropriate means. Advance and Sustain Economic Diversity 7.09 Balancing Housing Supply with Employment Base. Consistent with the city's growth management system, expansion of the Boulder Valley housing supply should reflect to the extent possible current employer locations, projected industrial/commercial development sites, and the demand such developments bring for housing employees. Key considerations include housing type, mix, and affordability required to house the employee base of current and anticipated employers. (See Policy 1.21 Jobs:Housing Balance.) 7.10 Keeping Low- and Moderate-Income Workers in Boulder. The city will explore policies and programs to increase housing for low and moderate income Boulder workers, particularly essential workers, by fostering housing opportunities through mixed-use and multi-family development, developing permanently affordable housing on vacant and redevelopable sites, by considering the conversion of commercial and industrial zoned or designated land to residential use, and providing preferences within city-subsidized projects for housing Boulder's workforce. (See Policy 2.21 Mixed Use.) Integrate Growth and Community Housing Goals 7.11 Incorporate Mix of Housing in Future Service Area. In considering future expansion of the service area, the city will identify possible sites for low and moderate income households. Designation of land uses in new growth areas will provide for a mixture of housing types and densities in order to meet the diversity of housing needs. C-Social-22 Agenda Item 6A Page 90 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 7.12 Maintain Overall Housing Affordability. It is a goal of the city to maintain and promote the affordability of Boulder's housing stock to meet the needs of residents along the full range of income levels. The city recognizes that decisions regarding development and redevelopment, including the size and density of houses, can impact the overall affordability of housing in a neighborhood. 7.13 Conversion of Residential Uses in the Community. The city will evaluate and revise its land use regulations to reduce the opportunities for the conversion of residential uses to non-residential uses or to require mitigation for residential units lost through the redevelopment of existing housing or the conversion of a residential use to non-residential uses. (See Policy 2.16 Preservation of Existing Residential Uses.) 7.14 Integration of Permanently Affordable Housing. Permanently affordable housing, whether publicly, privately or jointly financed, will be designed as to be compatible, dispersed, and integrated with housing throughout the community. 7.15 Minimizing Displacement. The city will evaluate its policies and regulations in order to minimize the negative effects of displacement on low income persons when housing sites are redeveloped by the private sector. A variety of mitigation requirements may be considered. Available relocation assistance options in the community will continue to be offered to displaced low-income persons. 8. Human Services For a community to preserve and maintain a high quality of life for all of its residents, it roust provide certain facilities and services, among which are human service programs and a focus on promoting cultural, social and economic equity. Human services are broadly defined as those programs that care for people's physical and mental health, economic well-being and social needs. Social equity is broadly defined as insuring the needs of all members of the community, including those who are low income and marginalized, are considered and included in the planning and decision-making process. The role of human services in the comprehensive plan revolves around two primary issues: 1) The policies and investments that guide the provision of human services, and 2) The social implications of proposed physical development. Completion of the Community Sustainability Goal Committee Strategic Workplan will broaden the social and human services policy scope. Many residents struggle with incomes that are insufficient to meet basic needs. High local housing costs and escalating health care costs, combined with low wages, leave many people C-Social-23 Agenda Item 6A Page 91 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page without sufficient resources to cover essential needs, such as food, housing, health care, child care and transportation. These factors place a heavy demand on local human service systems. While poverty is clearly a risk factor for many problems, it is by no means the sole determinant contributing to the need for human services. Alcohol and drug use, suicide, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, social isolation and other issues impact all members of the community, regardless of economic status. Because of finite resources, public human services often give priority to low-income residents and those with chronic disabilities. An increasingly diverse community, the aging of the population, income disparity among residents, the high percentage of parents in the labor force, and issues of concern for youth will bring challenges to the human services network. The provision of human services in the community is related to social conditions that are impacted by other factors, such as the local economy, availability of transportation, significant events, and local regulations. These trends and factors create a greater need for community involvement to address social issues. Involvement is key to addressing equity issues. Outreach to all residents of the community and inclusion in problem solving widens the view of community priorities, minimizes inequities, and creates more informed solutions to local problems. The fundamental goal of human services is to improve life conditions by responding to economic, social and health needs, especially in time of crisis. To attain this goal, human services are designed to assist individuals and families in meeting primary needs, with the ultimate goal of helping people achieve self-sufficiency and become, or continue to be, contributing members of the community. These basic needs include: • Survival (e.g., housing/shelter, food, safety, clothing) • Physical and mental health care • Sustaining gainful employment (e.g., available child care) • Social support and assistance, especially in times of personal or family crisis (e.g., information and referral and emergency assistance) • Management of chronic or situational disabilities (e.g., care and treatment) • Access to available, appropriate services (e.g., transportation and information) A signature mark of human services in the Boulder community is the extent and success of partnerships among public and nonprofit agencies. Another noteworthy feature is the extent to which problems are addressed using local resources. Both of these factors are particularly important during times of diminished state and federal funding. Human services contribute to the character and quality of life of the entire community, not just those receiving services. For example, child care assistance helps employees of local business retain jobs, and the availability of health care through nonprofits supports employees of business that do not provide health care. A family with access to primary medical care will avoid more costly future treatment and directly impacts a child's ability to learn in school or a parent's ability to work. 8.01 Provide for Broad Spectrum of Human Needs. The city and county will develop and maintain human service programs that provide for the broad spectrum of human needs, where governmental involvement is appropriate, C-Social-24 Agenda Item 6A Page 92 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page from the most basic needs for food, health and shelter through prevention and early intervention services that forestall worsening social conditions and treatment. 8.02 City Human Service Program Funding. The city's funding of human service programs will be guided by the following themes, identified in the Housing and Human Services Master Plan: promotion of healthy, nurturing families - prenatal through adolescence; provision of home, school and community-based services; provision of comprehensive, intensive and flexible services; and a balance among prevention, intervention and treatment strategies. Appropriate adjustments will be made to reflect changing demographics and community needs. 8.03 Community Engagement. Outreach to diverse residents, organizations and business communities, and those not typically engaged, will be included in the development of human service programs to meet community needs. 8.04 Access to Services. The city and county will ensure that all residents have access to information on available human service programs. 8.05 Regular Assessment of Community Needs. The city and county will regularly assess the needs for human services and changes in the provision of services to address the current and relevant social concerns of the community. 8.06 Periodic Evaluation of Program Effectiveness. The city and county will develop and maintain a periodic evaluation of outcomes and effectiveness of human service programs. 8.07 Regional Cooperation. The city and county will encourage cooperation between public, private, and nonprofit organizations through the development of commonly acknowledged goals and coordination of services where appropriate, for the public good, to leverage resources and strengthen systems of services. 8.08 Support of Children, Youth and Families. The city and county will support and encourage prevention and early intervention programs that support children, youth and families to achieve their full potential and become self-reliant, contributing members of the community. C-Social-25 Agenda Item 6A Page 93 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Economic Sustainability DRAFT Policy Briefing Paper September 2010 Prepared by City of Boulder staff This paper is intended to serve as a starting point for community discussion of changes to the policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The ideas contained in the paper do not represent city policy or staff recommendations. This paper is one of five briefing papers. The Planning Board and City Council identified the following two broad focus areas for the major update following public input: urban form/ community design and sustainability policy changes. The briefing papers have been prepared to provide a framework for discussion of these focus areas. C-Economic-1 Agenda Item 6A Page 94 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Economic Sustainability 1. Introduction A strong, sustainable economy for Boulder is critical to community members' well being now and into the future. The city government's economic health and ability to provide quality services is tightly linked to the health of the local and regional economy. This briefing paper will discuss how economic sustainability is currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan and what issues and challenges are new or missing and should be addressed in the 2010 update to the comprehensive plan. II. How is Economic Sustainability currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan? The Comprehensive Plan includes an Economy Chapter (Chapter 7) which addresses the current economic climate, broad needs, goals, and city partnership roles for economic vitality. The existing policies may be summarized as follows: • Economic Sustainability principles: o City & County will encourage a viable and balanced economic structure and employment base; o A healthy and adaptable local economy is vital to the community's ability to provide a highly desirable quality of life, o High levels of services and amenities; promote diverse and sustainable economy to meet the needs of all community members, o City and County will seek to ensure that current needs are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. • The city will pursue economic vitality through a partnership among the public, private and non-profit sectors of the community, provide efficient processes and procedures and will adopt programs and strategies that foster innovation, enhance competitiveness and expand markets. • The city supports a diverse employment base emphasizing entrepreneurial, scientific, technological and related industries as well as Boulder's role as regional job center. • The city will support retention and expansion of existing local businesses, support entrepreneurial activities and industry clusters and maintain a positive environment for retail and business. • The city will work with employers to provide job opportunities and support affirmative action. • Zoning will provide locations for industries of various types and uses. • The city will work with the private sector to enhance commercial locations and consider mixed uses. C-Economic-2 Agenda Item 6A Page 95 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • The city recognizes the need to preserve a vital retail base and will: • Update land use regulations to encourage and facilitate private reinvestment and redevelopment of retail centers; • Coordinate capital infrastructure improvements to encourage private investments to occur; • Support coordinated public/private initiatives at activity centers and community retail centers; and • Develop and implement a retail strategy that will address community opportunities and needs. • The city will encourage a strong sustainable economy to fund quality services. • The city will support on-going efforts to implement a tourism program with various partners, study the role of tourism in the community, and track the impact. • Explore policies and programs to increase housing for low and moderate income Boulder workers by fostering housing opportunities through various means. Policy 7.10 Keeping low- and moderate-income workers in Boulder • The city will encourage a strong sustainable economy to fund quality city services for the public that are consistent with community goals and character. The city recognizes the need for the city to actively support its retail base. (Policy 5.10 Funding City Services, Policy 5.09 Vital and Prodnctive Retail Base) III. What economic sustainability issues and challenges should be addressed in the update? Current Context Boulder is a regional job center with an estimated 96,800 jobs with about half of the people who work in Boulder commuting in from other communities. Boulder is a great place to do business, building on a highly educated workforce, superb quality of life, and synergies with the University of Colorado and 16 federal labs. Boulder attracts and grows talented entrepreneurs who have created a unique business community focused on cutting edge innovation and vision. Residents benefit from a diverse economic base which supports strong employment opportunities and business growth. In addition to the technological and scientific sectors, this includes strong clusters in natural and organic products, active living / outdoor recreation and clean technology as well as many longtime employers. Boulder has a diverse manufacturing base grounded in high tech companies with expertise in aerospace (over 40 in the Boulder area), bioscience (over 100), photonics (over 100), data storage and software (over 900), nanotechnology, and renewable and alternative energies. Boulder's manufacturing sector draws upon the area's highly educated workforce and benefits from the concentration of related businesses. C-Economic-3 Agenda Item 6A Page 96 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Because of Boulder's vibrant entrepreneurial and creative spirit, high education level and university presence, it enjoys a wide range of small business types, industries and growth potentials. While Boulder houses all of the traditional "small business" types (including retail, restaurant, professional and other service firms,) it is also home to small business ventures (such as energy, technology and biotech, product-based and early manufacturing ventures.) Over 98% of firms in Boulder have fewer than 100 employees equating to 6,553 ventures with under 100 employees. Though not immune from recent business and job losses in sectors like professional/technical services and retail, Boulder has fared better than many cities in the recent economic downturn due to a diverse industry base and the presence of the federal labs and university in the community. Boulder's unemployment rate has been consistently lower that Colorado's rate and much lower than the national unemployment level. Also, access to venture capital funds (2008: $204 million was invested in Boulder companies, 25% of VC investment in the state) has been significant for entrepreneurs choosing Boulder to start their new ventures. Both of these trends help fuel start-ups and Boulder business growth. Based on the Boulder in 2035: Trends & Consequences Forecast from the University of Colorado: projections for the future include strong employment growth in few employment industries. There will be competition and pressure for businesses to relocate within the region. Boulder will need to continue to preserve community livability while fostering redevelopment, an entrepreneurial environment, preserving and creating great neighborhoods and creative enclaves and continuing to increase transportation options. Issues and challenges include: 1. The Comprehensive Plan should define and acknowledge the key factors in how Boulder's economy contributes to maintaining a sustainable community and how a commitment to environmental and social sustainability helps maintain a vital economy. There are specific aspects about Boulder that contribute to making this community's economy successful and contributing to Boulder being a very desirable place to live and do business. Boulder is fortunate to have a very talented workforce and a high level of desirability that allows companies to attract talented employees. Decisions we make about land uses, urban form, transportation options, energy efficiency, housing and protection of the environment directly affect what businesses locate in Boulder, how they can do business, and how many people are employed. These connections should be recognized in the Comprehensive Plan core values and policies. 2. The Comprehensive Plan should define the city's role in supporting business competitiveness and redevelopment of commercial and industrial areas. C-Economic-4 Agenda Item 6A Page 97 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page As our community matures, we have very few vacant commercial and industrial parcels for future development. Boulder's existing context as a compact, urban city means that the redevelopment focus and opportunities for change are through infill and redevelopment within targeted areas. Keeping employers in Boulder and allowing them to expand are essential parts of a sustainable economy The city may need to develop strategies to be more proactive in redevelopment and/or improvements for efficiency in commercial and industrial areas including prime office space. We need to more fully explore and understand the synergies between how future planning and urban design decisions relate to the evolution and support of the entrepreneurial businesses and cycles typical of Boulder companies. • Difficulty in Finding Appropriate Types of Spaces Some Boulder-based businesses looking to grow and expand cannot find appropriate space within the city to meet their needs. This can mean limited prime office space or difficulty in finding the right space e.g. "flex space" or places where there can be a combination of manufacturing and office space in order to have the company headquarters in the same place as where they are making products. • Right-Sized Businesses for Boulder and the Regional Context Boulder is the home to many small and mid-sized businesses and attracts a clear "niche" for environmentally-sensitive, technological, entrepreneurial, scientific and outdoor- oriented businesses. Accommodating the growth of Boulder businesses is an important focus. However, it is important to be realistic about which businesses may be able to thrive and expand in Boulder. When companies need to expand and can't find the right space within the city it still benefits the city and related businesses when they can relocate within the county or region. Given the number of people who commute into Boulder for work, future efforts need to include improving regional transit options as well as considering diversity in housing types in a regional context. • Opportunities for Partnerships in Key Redevelopment Areas Many of the city's commercial and industrial areas have aging, inefficient buildings and lack good multi-modal infrastructure and access to services. The city is working to establish a new paradigm for the design, development and management of community shopping centers and aging commercial and industrial areas in Boulder in manner that advances our community's goals related to economic, social and environmental sustainability. • Service Uses and Affordable Retail In order to serve lower-income, minority populations, and non-profit organizations, there should be a range of retail and service use options. This includes a range of affordability in lease rates as well as a wide range of available goods and services to meet the needs of our community. Affordable and diverse shopping options within C-Economic-5 Agenda Item 6A Page 98 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Boulder support the Boulder economy and all community members who live and work here. 3. Need for Flexibility / Support for Home Occupations How, where and when people work is rapidly changing. Businesses share space, people have multiple jobs or businesses in some spaces and the existing definitions of uses may not fit the innovative ways people are finding to stay in business and to meet their needs. To support not only the entrepreneurial spirit but to allow people to work in new ways the city needs to be responsive to shifting ways people do business and be clear about supporting those goals. For example, Boulder has a significant number of people who operate businesses out of their homes. This leads to many innovative startup companies and can lead to a decrease in commuting transportation impacts. The Comprehensive Plan is currently silent about support for home-based jobs. Zoning regulations specify that a home occupation is an allowed accessory use with stipulations for neighborhood impacts such as equipment storage and parking. Since this is an important aspect of how people work in Boulder, regulations could be clarified to reflect the goal of allowing more flexibility to have home based businesses balanced with addressing potential impacts. 4. City Programs to Promote Sustainable Business Practices and Energy Efficiency Energy efficiency, greenhouse gas reduction and waste reduction are key goals for the city and the community. The city has many established programs to assist businesses in reducing energy costs. The Comprehensive Plan currently has limited language about the city's role and efforts to help businesses employ sustainable practices and building renovations to reduce transportation impacts and greenhouse gas emissions. 5. Support for Tourism and Cultural Arts Boulder's natural beauty, major sporting events, outdoor activities, academic and scientific focus, and unique shopping and entertainment experiences are valued by citizens and draw visitors from around the world to our community. Tourism results in significant support for Boulder's retail businesses, restaurants, hotels and motels which in turn increases city revenues. The importance of tourism to the economic sustainability of Boulder could be better understood and strengthened in the comprehensive plan. IV. What are some suggested changes to the plan to address these issues? Although the current economic policies generally address many of the issues raised by the community and staff regarding promoting a thriving economy, the importance of economic sustainability is missing in the core values of the plan and the economy section could provide more specific direction about the city's role in supporting and actively promoting key aspects of the Boulder economy and economic environment. C-Economic-6 Agenda Item 6A Page 99 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 1. Make changes to the Core Values, Economic Sustainability Policy and Economic Vitality Section to succinctly describe key aspects that drive the success of Boulder's economy and make it sustainable in the long term. • The core values needs to include language about a strong, sustainable economy for Boulder is critical to community members' well being. • The Economic Policies should be revised and potentially consolidated to ensure that they clearly describe the key components of a sustainable economy for Boulder. These could include the following key areas: Boulder's Distinct Economic Edge "Center of Creativity and Innovation" • Attracting and retaining key businesses and employers with a good "fit" for Boulder • Thriving industry clusters, startups and entrepreneurs • Thriving tourism sector, arts & cultural programs Diverse Economy / Existing Businesses • Diverse economy / Good mix of business types • Thriving Local Businesses • Vital and Productive Retail Sector • Competitiveness - appropriate and variety of spaces and good mix and range of land uses Sustainable Business Practices • Businesses have strong commitment to environmentally sound practices • Growing number of businesses in "sustainable industries" • Thriving home occupations / flexibility in work space Good jobs & Wages / Education & Training Opportunities • Quality jobs / range of wages / sufficient employment opportunities for local residents • Residents have access to training and services that assist them in being gainfully employed • Residents are making ends meet/ decreasing number in poverty • Diverse range of incomes • Emphasis of role of CU, entrepreneurial centers Quality Places and Strong Infrastructure • Access to cutting edge and dependable telecommunication and broadband system • A robust, multi-modal transportation system within the city and with connections between communities in the region • Physically beautiful community • Great sense of place and livability C-Economic-7 Agenda Item 6A Page 100 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Reliable and affordable infrastructure including power and water 2. Clearly describe the city's role and economic vitality goals to include: • Working to retain and grow primary employers, building on strengths of the economy and further developing the thriving business clusters. • Developing specific strategies the city will use to proactively address redevelopment of key commercial and industrial areas by incentivizing property and project upgrades. Areas for redevelopment that have been identified are Diagonal Plaza, University Hill Commercial district and the East Boulder Industrial area. Planning initiatives are underway to understand the specific constraints and opportunities for each area. • Redevelopment and area-planning efforts should acknowledge that displacement of service and affordable retail uses is an important concern in redevelop efforts and strive to ensure a mix of uses throughout the city. • Defining the city's role in helping to promote sustainable business practices and energy efficiency. • Ensuring city processes don't undermine competitiveness but work with business and development community to balance goals and needs. • Supporting new business paradigms and home based businesses and exploring existing policies or procedures that may create barriers for people who have or would like to have home-based businesses / providing quality infrastructure to support telecommunications for home based businesses. • Considering the needs of federal labs and local businesses to ensure consistent and affordable provision of power as the city undertakes clean energy future planning efforts. 3. Describe more proactive support of higher education institutions, the University of Colorado, the Federal Labs and workforce training efforts. The existing policies describe important partnerships in the community but the importance of key institutions is weak. The plan should reflect the importance of education and training and having strong institutions for higher education, continuing education and workforce training thriving in the community. Also, the seminal role of the University of Colorado and the Federal Labs in technology transfers, tech start ups and business creation needs to be fully understood, evaluated and enhanced. Public Requests for BVCP Policy Changes In the public request process at the start of the Comprehensive Plan update several requests for policy revisions were made by members of the community regarding issues related to economic sustainability. These issues have been considered in the analysis process and included in the issues and challenges as well as suggested changes described above. They include: • Adding policy language to recognize and encourage home occupations, and • Including policy language to recognize the importance of job creation and regional competitiveness. C-Economic-8 Agenda Item 6A Page 101 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Related Issues in other Briefing Papers Many of the issues of concern in the 2010 major update overlap and influence other areas of concern. The Social Sustainability Briefing Paper includes issues related to a successful and sustainable economy including: the growing education gap where a decreasing number of students are completing high school and completing secondary education, limited "workforce housing" in Boulder and limited access to sufficient or quality child care. The new work to define sustainable urban form in the Community Design Briefing Paper directly relates to many of the issues raised in the Economic Sustainability Focus Group related to ensuring that redevelopment is focused on provision of quality urban spaces, residential units along transit corridors and infrastructure improvements and new connections that lead to improved mobility and transportation options within the city and within the region. Focus Group Review An informal focus group consisting of representatives of various civic and business groups provided feedback to city staff on a preliminary draft of the Economic Sustainability Briefing Paper. Although they were not a decision-making group and were not expected to reach consensus, they provided extremely valuable input that helped refine these materials. Below is a list of focus group participants: Boulder Chamber - Dan Powers Boulder Economic Council - Frances Draper Downtown Boulder - Sean Maher Downtown Management Division - Matt McMullen Boulder Visitors Convention Bureau Board - MaryAnn Mahoney Naturally Boulder - Arron Mansika Responsible Hospitality Group - Chris Emma Boulder Hotel/Motel Association - Jim Turner & Dan King UHGID - Bill Shrum Boulder Independent Business Association - Richard Fleming, Robert Wilson Small Business Development Center - Sharon King Boulder Innovation Center - Tim Bour Federal Labs (NOAA, NIST & CO-LABS) - DeAnne Butterfield 20-40 Group Boulder Chamber - Kristin MacDonald Workforce Boulder County - Tom Miller Boulder Realtors Association - Ken Hotard Economic Focus Groups Boulder Comp Plan Update August 31 and September 1 Key Themes that resulted in changes to the briefing paper • People affirmed the information in the paper on: defining important aspects about the Boulder economy (innovation, creative class); need to encourage or enable C-Economic-9 Agenda Item 6A Page 102 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page redevelopment; importance of tourism; support for CU (add Fed Labs); home-based businesses. • Provision of infrastructure by city is essential to supporting businesses - especially reliability and cost of electricity. • Redevelopment is important to keeping Boulder businesses thriving - both residential and non-residential as new, interesting housing types are needed to keep attracting talented people and young people. • Emphasize Regional Issues - we need to use connections with other cities to leverage state and federal resources (especially regarding work force training); the importance of jobs/businesses in the area staying in the area (if not the city); and the importance of having good transportation connections for commuters. • Mentioning the importance of CU is good but need to add the Federal Labs. • Need to re-word the 'right size' concept to be positive about what we can provide and maybe add positive aspects of larger companies locating or relocating in the county or nearby areas. • Flexibility - as things change and we want to innovate to meet goals, as in what is said about allowing flexibility with home based businesses, apply to other aspects of keeping up with the new paradigms. We need to be responsive to shifting ways people do business and we need to be clear about supporting those goals in new ways. It might mean changes, trade-offs or less certainty in other areas but let people try to find new solutions. • Focus on a proactive city role - using language like enable, promote rather than encourage and finding ways for the city to "seed" endeavors or find levers within niches that can make a difference. There are great examples of this such as how the city worked with Naturally Boulder. • People identified that there are conflicting policies in the plan and we should find a way to identify them, discuss trade offs and try to resolve them. August 31, 2010 and September 2, 2010 Meeting Notes • Keep emphasis on Arts in policies - The production side of art is lacking in Boulder - is a tool in social change. • If we are going to support primary employers and retail we need to address # of jobs and # of commuters through: o Infrastructure that supports: high density redevelopment - need places for employees to live o Along transit corridors, coordinate with adjacent communities; assist commuter employees; family housing / not just affordable housing. • Remove language about jobs:population policy - people fail to recognize that boulder is a regional job center and we want to continue to be. In-commuting is a reality. C-Economic-10 Agenda Item 6A Page 103 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Need commitment and consistency - implement policies we have. • Strengthen language on Partnerships = CU AND the national Labs - the labs create a lot of spin-off businesses. • No mention of real estate markets and protecting their health. City policy directly affects property values / protection of property values is an ok city goal. Very small changes in policies can affect economics of redevelopment - either way. • Simplify the plan for the public and show benefits of small local businesses to many environmental and social goals - more on benefit of buying locally. • Acknowledge benefits from large corporations locating in the area but maybe not in Boulder - e.g. Conoco Phillips - Focus on the positive. • Boulder is unique in entrepreneurial success - large source of research, labs and CU; large generation of patents; asset of volunteer advisors for start ups; how to invest in these strengths; how to educate people coming into Boulder through this sector - how to plug in - need networking; and second need - young companies need capital; also specific suggestion - have government provide some expertise about getting grants and funding for businesses example Fort Collins and Colorado Springs. • Good to emphasize effects of tourism and visitors to city and support infrastructure needed. Missing - competition is there, i.e. hotels on 36; need to communicate that we care to hotels. • Need infrastructure to support primary employees. • Emphasize how city can encourage redevelopment and better products - "cutting edge stuff"- hotels, office space - expand "tired" buildings section. Boulder is not a cool place to live for under 40s - it's Denver. Denver has areas of change and stability. • Overarching - need flexible policies to innovate to meet goals; bonus for support of social and environmental - how to allow flexibility. • Add something about the strength of creative cluster - design, film, digital media. • Redevelopment needs to include what we don't have - not copy success of other areas in town. Elephant in the room - how to handle the downtown - what have we learned • Related to home occupations: - short-term private home rentals - need to figure out how to have the conversation with the community about this. C-Economic-11 Agenda Item 6A Page 104 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Issue - reliability and dependability of electrical power and cost; This is a big impact to some key businesses and labs. We need to provide infrastructure that supports the economy. • Need integration of infrastructure and funding of infrastructure - what is revenue impact of new projects on city. • We cannot freeze time in Boulder - Boulder is a living organism and needs to change and adapt. • Re right sizing - take out what we do not want - focus on positive - niches that work. • Use "enable" rather than "encourage" in policy language. • Policy for planning to look at the long-term impact $ of project (park vs. redevelopment). • More info (graphics?) about "what is business in Boulder". • On right track for what is right sized; one size does not fit all - focus on what we have and what makes sense for us. • Likes "promote" not "regulate" sustainable business practices; carrot not the stick • What is distinction between primary and secondary employers? Do we need to make a distinction in the comp plan? Is there a priority? • Do we need to articulate sectors? • Can consider how to integrate primary and secondary employers; and how home based businesses impact other sectors. • It is most important to focus on where issues (economic, social and environmental) intersect - provides challenges and opportunities. • What is role of the county?; a lot of resources come from the feds and the state i.e. grants; lose acknowledgement of a larger regional approach; need a larger vision than just Boulder; need forum for larger vision. Acknowledge relationship and strengthen partnerships. • As businesses grow if they cannot stay in Boulder important to stay in the area or the state rather than leaving - keeps economic core within the area. Also most people don't change residences with a job change - they are our residents. C-Economic-12 Agenda Item 6A Page 105 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Add federal labs to recommendation #3 pg. 7; how can federal labs grow to maintain Boulder as the climate change center; be proactive to outreach to the federal labs; other states want them; make sure no policies get in the way of keeping them; they are integral to innovation and impacts all levels of employees. Don't take their geographic proximity for granted - with technology and communications expansions can happen elsewhere. • Focus on innovation - it hits all levels: small businesses, primary, secondary, spin-offs and support services. • Don't ignore Naropa; support its growth also proactively consider Front Range. Naropa grads are local entrepreneurs and school is looking at major redevelopment. • Use comp plan as a tool for business owners to communicate intention of economic policies • Creative class, Richard Florida, concepts need to be transferred to the comp plan since they are so "Boulder" - keeping Boulder as an exciting place to young talented people by having great places - encourage innovation. • Hospitality industry makes significant contributions to the tax base; it is a type of recreation - not everyone hikes mountains • Optimize relationships - see how changes in one area can help others - providing transportation for visitors without cars help transportation goals. • Consider agriculture as a role in local economy • Important to consider the impact of energy reliability and price on the impact of doing businesses • Consider indirect results of social and environmental policies on economy; seek input form businesses on the consequences of other policies • There is uncertainty from home-based businesses about city policies • Need to identify conflicting and competing goals and directives for trade off discussion for city council; where are the challenges i.e. priority based budgeting and demographic trends • How do silos in comp plan translate into departments? • What are the new paradigms in the economic sector like home based businesses? - outsourcing and co-location were two trends mentioned; sharing commercial kitchens; need for flexibility. C-Economic-13 Agenda Item 6A Page 106 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • How can the government "seed" businesses like the example of Naturally Boulder? • What are the key levers for each niche or sector that would make a difference and what is the role of the city government - can the city work with partners to identify key drivers or needs of clusters? E.g. manufacturing and shared specific equipment. • Include economic gardening concept and how it supports small businesses • Partnering very important - a trend throughout all areas • Might be too detailed but mentioning the key role of the Boulder public library for small businesses and workers. • Does the form of the city government contribute to uncertainty with businesses? - CM form of government as a practice in Boulder - is leadership too diffuse? C-Economic-14 Agenda Item 6A Page 107 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Exhibit A Key Policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan related to Economic Sustainability 1. Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Policies 1. General Policies The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan is a joint plan between the city of Boulder and Boulder County that provides shared responsibility for planning and development in the Boulder Valley. The general policies section of the plan provides the overall planning fi-amework for sustainability, intergovernmental cooperation, growth management and annexation. Boulder has a long tradition of community planning. Most of the key policies that have guided the development pattern in the Boulder Valley have not changed since the 1977 Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan was first adopted, and many of them stem from long-standing community values. Boulder's planning has focused on respecting our unique community identity and sense of place, city-county cooperation, and keeping Boulder a distinct, separate and compact community. They represent a clear, articulate vision of our desired development pattern including: • Recognition of sustainability as a unifying goal to secure Boulder's future economic, ecological and social health. • Commitment to open space preservation and the use of open space buffers to define the community. • Use of urban growth boundaries to maintain a compact city (the boundaries of the service area have remained virtually unchanged since first developed in 1977). • Encouragement of compact, contiguous development and a preference for infill land redevelopment as opposed to sprawl. • Provision of quality urban spaces, parks and recreation that serve all sectors of the community and trails and walkways that connect the community. • Commitment to preservation of natural, cultural and historic features that contribute to defining the unique sense of place in Boulder. • Commitment to programs that support respect for human dignity, human rights and the inclusion of all residents in community and civic life. • Recognition of the importance of a central area (Downtown, University of Colorado, the Boulder Valley Regional Center) as a regional service center of the Boulder Valley and a variety of subcommunity and neighborhood activity centers distributed throughout the community. • Recognition of the importance of the Federal Scientific Laboratories (NOAA, NIST, NCAR), the University of Colorado, and the private scientific and technology community that contributes to the economic vitality of Boulder. • Commitment to a diversity of housing types and price ranges to meet the needs of the Boulder Valley population. • Commitment to a balanced multi-modal transportation system. C-Economic-15 Agenda Item 6A Page 108 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Sustainability 1.01 Community Sustainability. The city and county adopt the sustainability principles in policies 1.01-1.05 to interpret and guide implementation of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The city and county recognize: a) the critical interrelationships among economic, social and environmental health; b) the way we produce, trade and consume impacts our ability to sustain natural resources; c) social and cultural equity and diversity creates valuable human capital that contributes to the economy and environmental sustainability; d) planned physical development has an impact on social conditions and should be considered in community planning; and e) the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon the full engagement and involvement of the community. The city and county seek to maintain and enhance the livability, health and vitality of the Boulder Valley and the natural systems of which it is a part, now and in the long- term future. The city and county seek to preserve choices for future generations and to anticipate and adapt to changing community needs and external influences. 1.02 Principles of Environmental Sustainability. There are limits to the capacity of the biosphere to support the life of human beings at current levels of consumption and pollution. There are limits to the land and soil available for food production, to available water, to resources such as trees, fish and wildlife, to industrial resources like oil and metals, and to the ability of nature to absorb our waste. With this in mind, the city and county acknowledge the importance of natural capital, which can be kept at healthy levels for the long term only when we are able to do the following: a) Renewable resources should not be used faster than they are recharged or replenished by the environment. b) Non-renewable resources should be used with the greatest care and efficiency, and some of those should be used to develop renewable replacements. c) Waste should not be dumped into nature any faster than nature can absorb it. 1.03 Principles of Economic Sustainability. a) The city and county will encourage a viable and balanced economic structure and employment base within the parameters of established land use, environmental and growth policies. b) The city and county recognize that a healthy, adaptable local economy is vital to the community's ability to provide a highly desirable quality of life, high levels of services and amenities. C-Economic-16 Agenda Item 6A Page 109 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page c) The city and county will promote a diverse and sustainable economy that supports the needs of all community members. d) The city and county will seek to ensure that current needs are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs, for the economy is a subsystem of the environment and depends upon the environment both as a source of raw material inputs and as a sink for waste outputs. 1.04 Principles of Social Sustainability. The city and county will promote a healthy, sustainable community by: a) Recognizing, respecting and valuing cultural and social diversity. b) Recognizing that social and cultural inequities create environmental and economic instability. c) Ensuring the basic health and safety needs of all residents are met. d) Providing infrastructure that will encourage culturally and socially diverse communities to both prosper within and connect to the larger community. 1.05 Community Engagement. The city and county recognize that the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon full involvement of the community. The city and county will recognize the rights of and encourage all community members to play a role in governmental decisions, especially those that affect their lives or property, through continual efforts to maintain and improve public communication and the open conduct of business. In addition, the city and county will continue to support programs and provide opportunities for public participation and neighborhood involvement. Efforts will be made to remove barriers to participation and involve community members not usually engaged in civic life. Increased emphasis will be placed on notification and engagement of the public in decisions involving large development proposals or major land use decisions that may have significant impact on, or benefits to the community. Intergovernmental Cooperation 1.11 Regional and Statewide Cooperation. Many of the most significant problems and opportunities faced by Boulder and other jurisdictions, particularly providing affordable housing, addressing the jobs-housing imbalance, creating a healthy economy, improving regional transportation, protecting the environment, managing open space, delivering human services and managing growth can only be dealt with effectively through regional or statewide cooperation and solutions. Therefore, the city and county will actively pursue cooperative planning opportunities, broader information exchange and communication, collaborative initiatives and closer cooperation with each other and with other entities in the region and state, including other cities, counties, unincorporated communities, the University of Colorado, the school districts, regional organizations and other policy-making bodies. These entities will be encouraged to identify and address issues of shared concern for which a multi-jurisdictional perspective can best achieve mutually beneficial solutions. C-Economic-17 Agenda Item 6A Page 110 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 5. Economy The city and county will encourage a viable and balanced economic structure and employment base within the parameters of established land use, environmental and growth policies. The city and county recognize that a healthy, adaptable local economy is vital to the community's ability to provide a highly desirable gatality of life, high levels of services and amenities. The city and county recognize the critical interrelationship between the long-term health of the natural environment, the economy, and the social health of the community. The city and county will seek to ensure that current needs are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Boulder's economy is based on innovation, entrepreneurship, quality and service. The private- sector employment base is mostly focused in services, primarily research, technology and scientific occupations. Boulder has a large number of businesses in the following industry groups: natural foods, renewable energy and green building, biosciences, photonics, software and the internet, outdoor and sports, and creative services. Retail, manufacturing and the public sector (the University of Colorado, federal labs, school district and local government) play strong roles in the Boulder economy, as does tourism. Boulder is fortunate to serve as the home of the University of Colorado and Naropa University. The city promotes sustainable tourism, which is tourism that enhances the economic, environmental and social elements of a community. Sustainable tourism adds to our quality of life and supports vital aspects of our community such as our vibrant arts and cultural community and our active recreation sector. Boulder's role in the region has changed dramatically over the last decade. Approximately 30 years of growth management policies focused principally on limiting residential sprawl and acquiring large buffers of permanent open space have had many beneficial effects. These have, however, also contributed to a jobs/housing imbalance where the number of the jobs in the community is about equal to the total population and considerably greater than the resident work force. Surrounding communities have experienced substantial increases in housing as well as commercial and job opportunities. In addition, many retail developments in other communities have been developed with the assistance of public financing. Consequently, Boulder's share of the regional market has decreased, reflecting a long term shift that has resulted in the city no longer enjoying the role of regional retail and business center. The Twenty Ninth Street project (redevelopment of the Crossroads Mall), anticipated to open in 2006, is expected to recapture some of the sales tax leakage. In 2003, the city adopted an Economic Vitality policy to reinforce the importance of economic health to the overall quality of life and articulate the city's support of business and economic development. Since 2003, economic indicators have shown mild improvement in the local economy including improved retail sales activity, positive job growth, and increased personal and household incomes. The Economic Vitality Work Plan, approved in 2005, includes strategies C-Economic-18 Agenda Item 6A Page 111 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page and actions to further the city's Economic Vitality policy and is based on partnering with other organizations that provide economic development services to the Boulder community. Boulder's economic policies and programs are aimed at supporting and enhancing our community's unique, innovative and entrepreneurial assets and opportunities while balancing the community's essential goals and distinctive lifestyle. 5.01 Economic Vitality. Economic vitality in Boulder will be pursued through a partnership among the public, private and nonprofit sectors. The city's primary contribution is through the provision of efficient processes and procedures required for site development, the investment in municipal infrastructure, and consideration of other initiatives on a case-by-case basis. The city will adopt economic vitality programs and strategies that foster innovation, enhance competitiveness and expand markets. The city and county will support a diversified employment base within the Boulder Valley, reflecting labor force capabilities and recognizing amenities for emphasizing scientific, technological and related industries. Inclusion of elements in the economic vitality program should enhance the community's role in the global and domestic marketplace. 5.02 Regional Job Center. The city is one of several job centers in the region, and significant additional employment growth is projected in the future. The city will adopt policies and strategies that support the city's role as a job center in the future consistent with Policies 1.02-1.04 and 1.21. 5.03 Support for Local Business. The city and county recognize the significant contribution of existing businesses in the local economy. The city will support the retention, expansion and entrepreneurial activities of existing local businesses and maintain a positive climate for retail and business. 5.04 Industry Clusters. The city will adopt an industry cluster approach to business development and consider financial and technical assistance programs and other tools to retain, expand and attract businesses in those clusters. Cluster efforts focus on supporting multiple businesses in an industry. 5.05 Employment Opportunities. The city and county will encourage local employers, to the maximum extent feasible, to provide employment opportunities for all persons including the local unemployed and underemployed work force, and to implement affirmative action programs in cooperation with various agencies providing employment assistance programs. C-Economic-19 Agenda Item 6A Page 112 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 5.06 Industrial Zoning. Industrial zoning under the comprehensive plan will provide the opportunity for the location of industries of various types and uses, including those uses considered essential to the Boulder Valley population from a service standpoint. The zoning ordinance will be updated periodically to assure it is adequately accommodating the existing and future needs of a rapidly changing and technologically-oriented global industrial and services employment base. The city will identify areas that should be protected for industrial and office uses. Where appropriate, mixed use development will be encouraged incorporating residential uses and support services for the employment base. 5.07 Upgrade Existing Commercial and Industrial Areas. The city will cooperate with the private sector to foster the revitalization of commercial and industrial areas in order to create greater vitality. Where appropriate, the city will enhance retail and services desired by employees, add housing and create transit- friendly developments. The city will work with property owners to improve the quality of Boulder's office and industrial buildings through rehabilitation or redevelopment. A variety of tools should be considered to create public/private partnerships that lead to successful redevelopment. These tools may include, but are not limited to, area planning, infrastructure improvements, changes to zoning or development standards and financial incentives. 5.08 Partnerships. The efforts of the city and the private sector to enhance the economic prosperity of the community are directly and indirectly supported by several organizations and entities. This includes the University of Colorado, Downtown Boulder Inc., Boulder Chamber of Commerce and the Boulder Economic Council, Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau, Boulder Innovation Center, the Boulder Valley School District, and other groups. Though each has an independent focus, their work contributes to the overall quality of life enjoyed within the community. The city and county understand the central role that the Federal Labs and the University of Colorado play in our economy. The city will take an active role in efforts to preserve the State and Federal funding for these entities to ensure they remain in Boulder and will pursue mutually beneficial partnerships. The city and county will encourage and support dedicated efforts of the public school system as well as the variety of post-secondary educational institutions to offer quality continuing education and vocational training. 5.09 Vital and Productive Retail Base. With Boulder's retail role in the region changing, the city and county recognize the need for the city to actively support its retail base. a) The city will update its land use regulations to encourage and facilitate private reinvestment and redevelopment of its retail centers. Particular emphasis will be focused on creating opportunities for mixed use centers incorporating retail, entertainment, office and residential uses served by transit. C-Economic-20 Agenda Item 6A Page 113 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page b) The city will coordinate its Capital Improvements Program in a manner where public infrastructure investments may be completed in conjunction with approved city adopted plans as incentives to encourage private investments to occur. c) The city will support coordinated public/private initiatives at the regional activity centers, including downtown Boulder, University Hill and the Boulder Valley Regional Center. It will also consider, depending upon specific circumstances and opportunities/needs, initiatives designed to facilitate mixed use development at community retail centers where appropriate. d) The city will develop and implement a retail strategy that will address the market opportunities and shopping needs of the community and identify strategies to improve the retail base and the city's sales tax revenues. 5.10 Funding City Services. The city will encourage a strong sustainable economy to fund quality city services for the public that are consistent with community goals and character. 5.11 Role of Tourism in the Economy. Recognizing the unique character of Boulder, the city will support on-going efforts to implement a tourism program with various partners including the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau, study the existing and future role of tourism in the community and track the impact of tourism on the economy. 5.12 Role of Arts and Cultural Programs. The city and county will support and encourage further development of arts and cultural programs that can serve as attractors for new business investment as well as enhance quality of life. (See Policy 3.19 The Arts.) 5.13 Role of Agriculture. The city and county will foster and assist continued agricultural production in the Boulder Valley. A viable agricultural economy is an important tool for preserving the rural character of Area III and providing an opportunity to grow and/or market locally produced food, fiber and horticultural products. (See Policy 2.09 Agricultural Land.) C-Economic-21 Agenda Item 6A Page 114 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page 3 = n o 0 D o m Exhibit B CL v Sustainable Economy Addressed in the BVCP Missing/ Could be Strengthened Boulder's Distinct Economic Edge/ Strength as "Center of Creativity and Innovation" BVCP Core Concepts Specific Policies • Recognition of the importance of the Economic Section Introduction: "Boulder's economy is Core Values does not include Define Key Aspects of the Federal Scientific Laboratories based on innovation, entrepreneurship, quality and acknowledgment of the role that Boulder Economy (NOAA, NIST, NCAR), the University service.." providing quality of life plays in of Colorado, and the private scientific attracting good businesses or and technological community that 5.01 Economic Vitality "..city will support a diversified maintaining a sustainable economy. Commitment to fostering a quality of life that contributes to the economic vitality of employment base recognizing amenities for attracts, sustains and Boulder. emphasizing scientific, technological and related • Commitment to preservation of industries. EV programs should enhance the community's • Policy on partnerships is quite retains diverse businesses and creative natural, cultural and historic features role in the global and domestic marketplace-" wordy and long so the importance that contribute to defining Boulder's of partnerships and organizations entrepreneurs. unique sense of place. 5.08 Partnerships "..the efforts of the city and the private and the city's role in supporting • Provision of quality urban spaces, sector to enhance the economic prosperity of the them gets lost. parks and recreation that serve all community are directly and indirectly supported by several sectors of the community and trails organizations and entities. This includes .[list].....though and walkways that connect the each has an independent focus, their work contributes to community the overall quality of life enjoyed within the community. The city and county understand the central role that the Federal Labs and the University of Colorado play in our economy. The city will take an active role in efforts to preserve funding and ensure they remain in Boulder..." Attracting and retaining 5.01 Economic Vitality "The city's primary contribution is Regional Job Center policy businesses and ...efficient processes ...for site development, ...municipal acknowledges projected growth but employers (primary infrastructure, and ...other initiatives" could address sustainability in a employers, clean 5.02 Regional Job Center "..significant additional better way than referencing other industry, high-paying) employment growth is projected. city will adopt policies policies. and strategies that support the city's role.." . Core Concepts don't really address 5.03 Support for Local Business either goal of attracting businesses 5.04 Industry Clusters(".. consider tools to retain, expand or providing desirable places to live and attract business.." and work. 5.07 Upgrade Existing Commercial and Industrial Areas . Somewhere there should be "The city will ...foster revitalization of commercial and language regarding the role industrial areas,..enhance...services desired by transportation infrastructure or employees, add housing and create transit-friendly improvements mean to attracting developments..." and retaining businesses. C-Economic-22 Agenda Item 6A Page 115 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o Thriving Inc istry Clusters 5.04 Industry Clusters - "..city will adopt a cluster Doesn't list important clusters, "cluster approach to business development and consider assisting approach to business development" programs and other tools to retain.." could be clarified to be meaningful. Thriving Start-ups / 5.03 Support for Local Business - "city will support the Could clarify city role in retention and Entrepreneurs retention, expansion and entrepreneurial activities of expansion efforts existing local businesses.." Key Role of Tourism . 5.11 Role of Tourism in the Economy "city will support ongoing efforts to implement a tourism program with various partners.. and track the impact on the economy" Thriving Arts & Cultural . 5.12 Role of Arts and Cultural Programs - "..support and Programs encourage development of programs that can serve as attractors for new business investment..." Strong Agricultural 5.13 Role of Agriculture - foster and assist continued This policy will be assessed, revised Production agricultural production in the BV." and located with food-related policies. Diverse Economy Supporting Existing Businesses BVCP Core Concepts Specific Policies • Economic Sustainability policy is Maintain Diverse 1.03 Economic Sustainability pretty general, interestingly worded Economy / Good Mix of 5.01 Economic Vitality support a diversified and doesn't emphasize the positive. Business Types employment base recognizing amenities for • EV policy says "support" of many emphasizing scientific, technological and related functions but should reflect changes industries." in the program since the last update and provide more specifics 5.06 Industrial Zoning - " plan will provide opportunity for locations of various types of uses including services uses... zoning will be updated to assure that existing and future needs are considered and accommodated." Thriving Local Business 5.03 Support for Local Business city will support the Could strengthen - emphasize retention, expansion and entrepreneurial activities of retention of key employers existing local businesses.." Vital and Productive 5.09 Vital and Productive Retail Base Lists ways city will actively support its Retail Sector retail base. This could be expanded to reference other commercial uses and city support for redevelopment. C-Economic-23 Agenda Item 6A Page 116 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o CL Remove or revise reference in the policy about Boulder's retail role in the region changing. Competitiveness - 5.07 Upgrade Existing Commercial and Industrial Areas This is a key issue for this update - Appropriate Spaces and the city will cooperate with the private sector to foster the revisions could help clarify city's role Good Mix / Range of revitalization of commercial and industrial areas... variety and give it more strength. Land Uses of tools should be considered.." 6.09 Transportation Impact traffic impacts from proposed development that cause unacceptable community or environmental impacts.- will be mitigated. The city will provide tools and resources to help businesses manage employee access and mobility and support public-private partnerships such as.. TMOs to facilitate these efforts." Sustainable Business Practices BVCP Core Concepts Specific Policies Could more clearly state city's role in Businesses have strong 4.39 Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy city implementing changes commitment to will implement programs that enhance opportunities for environmentally sound individuals, businesses and public organizations to limit practices the use of non-renewable energy resources.." Growing businesses in No policy language "sustainable" industries to support climate action strategies Thriving home No policy language occupations / flexibility in work space Good Jobs and Wages / Education and Training Opportunities BVCP Core Concepts Specific Policies It is not clear what the Employment Good jobs / range of 1.03 Economic Sustainability city will promote a diverse Opportunities policy achieves. wages / sufficient and sustainable economy that supports the needs of all employment opportunities community members." Could consider adding policy language for local residents 5.05 Employment Opportunities " city will encourage local about living wages, benefits? employers... to provide employment opportunities.-. and to implement affirmative action programs.." C-Economic-24 Agenda Item 6A Page 117 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o Residents f ve access to 5.08 Partnerships - "...support efforts of the public school The training part is lost in a long policy training and services that system as well as in the variety of post-secondary assist them in being educational institutions to offer quality continuing gainfully employed education and vocational training.. " Residents making ends 1.04 Social Sustainability ensuring the basic health and No direct mention of a goal of meet / decreasing safety needs of all residents are met." decreasing the number of people in number of people in poverty. poverty Diverse range of incomes 7.09 Balance of Housing Supply with Employment Base 7.10 Keeping Low- and moderate-Income Workers in Boulder (aimed at housing) 7.12 Maintain Overall Housing Affordability Clear support and role of 5.08 Partnerships efforts of the city.. to enhance the Could be stronger on the importance of CU and entrepreneur economic prosperity of the community are directly and CU in the community and how city will centers indirectly supported by several organizations and entities.. support/ work with CU this includes the University of Colorado, Boulder Innovation Center.." C-Economic-25 Agenda Item 6A Page 118 of 174 Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Local Food and Sustainable Agriculture DRAFT Policy Briefing Paper September 2010 Prepared by City of Boulder and Boulder County staff This paper is intended to serve as a starting point for community discussion of changes to the policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The ideas contained in the paper do not represent city policy or staff recommendations. This paper is one of five briefing papers. The Planning Board and City Council identified the following two broad focus areas for the major update following public input: urban form/ community design and sustainability policy changes. The briefing papers have been prepared to provide a framework for discussion of these focus areas. C-Food-1 Agenda Item 6A Page 119 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Local Food & Sustainable Agriculture Introduction Many issues related to local food supply and sustainable agriculture were raised in the Comprehensive Plan update's first phase. Residents requested that Boulder take steps to actively encourage, promote, expand and sustain local food production for local consumption. Food choices and their method of production represent one of the most significant impacts that we humans have on the world around us. How the community feeds itself is directly related to meeting economic, social and environmental sustainability goals. Access to safe food, including locally grown food for all Boulder residents, should be a top priority for our community. A growing number of people in the region are "food-insecure". Roots in progressive food movements run deep in Boulder County and have contributed to the dynamic and thriving natural foods industry. Many local restaurants specialize in providing local ingredients in their food, garden to table processes have been initiated in local schools, and the demand for a year-round farmers market are all indications of people's growing interest in and demand for locally produced food. This paper will discuss how issues related to food and agriculture are currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan and what issues and challenges should be addressed as part of the 2010 major update to the comprehensive plan. How is local food and agriculture currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan? Agricultural Sustainability - City and County will promote a viable agricultural economy and continued agricultural production in the Boulder Valley. Policy 1.14 Agricultural Sustainability Preservation of Agricultural Land, Rural Areas & Amenities - City and County will preserve existing rural land use and character where agriculturally significant lands exist, and encourage the preservation and sustainable use of agricultural lands as a current and renewable source of both food and fuel and for their contribution to cultural, environmental and economic diversity using a variety of means. Policy 2.08 Preservation of Rural Areas and Amenities, Policy 2.09 Agricultural Land Agricultural Economy - City and County recognize that a viable agricultural economy is an important tool for preserving rural character and providing an opportunity to grow and/or market locally produced food, fiber and horticultural products. Policy 5.13 Role of Agriculture Delineation of Rural Lands - Significant agricultural lands are identified and delineated as Area III Rural Preservation Area. Police/ 2.10 Delineation of Rural Lands C-Food-2 Agenda Item 6A Page 120 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Multi-purpose Use of Public Lands - Multi-purpose use of public lands will be emphasized. However, in consideration of potential use of parks and open space lands, only activities consistent with the original intent of acquisition will be considered. Polio 3.08 Multi-Purpose Use of Public Lands What issues and challenges should be addressed in the Plan? Context While there is a significant amount of agriculturally viable land within the Boulder Valley, other areas within Boulder County and the region offer a wider range of food production capacity, having more suitable soils. Some of this land is owned by city and county open space. Agricultural land in Boulder County (public and private) beyond the Boulder Valley offers a wide range of potential food production. Much of the agricultural land owned by city open space in the Boulder Valley is best suited for forage production for livestock due to limitations of the soil (rocky, steep, prairie dog presence) and of the availability of water for irrigation (less than full season availability, no ability to store for later use, no ability to get smaller sized water flows). Forage production or raising livestock can be done in a range of ways: conventional, natural or organic. Recently there has been demand for organic agricultural production on city and county-owned open space within the Boulder Valley. Currently the most common type of agricultural production on city owned open space lands is natural beef production. Grain crops, animal feed, sugar beets, and organic vegetable production is occurring on Boulder County-owned lands outside the Boulder Valley. These two agencies work together to provide land and water resources for natural and organic food production in areas suitable for a range of food production. Further information needs to be gathered and evaluated to determine whether other open space lands are suitable for food crop production including evaluating soil types and conditions and water availability. The Boulder County Commissioners have created a new advisory committee, the Food and Agriculture Policy Council with the mission "to promote a locally-based food and agricultural system that advances Boulder County's economic, environmental and social well-being, through research, education and public policy recommendations." A high priority is to preserve and improve the viability of county agricultural lands and to increase the ability of the community to feed itself. The process is underway and some recommendations are expected to be developed later this year and into 2011. City and county staff are also participating in the Northern Colorado Regional Food Assessment Project which will identify opportunities and needs related to the existing local food system in Larimer, Boulder and Weld Counties. C-Food-3 Agenda Item 6A Page 121 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Because food production capacity is most effectively addressed on a regional level, city Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) staff is working jointly with county staff in this work as it relates to publicly and privately owned lands within the Boulder Valley and will work with the county to assess and implement policies or practices that are developed through this process. Recommendations from these processes will be incorporated in policy changes for the 2010 update as they are available; however if the process is not complete, additional information and direction will be incorporated into the plan at the next mid-term update. The Boulder Farmers' Markets are very successful, at capacity and are having to turn away farmers. City staff is initiating a process for the 13f Street, Central Park and Civic Center area that may include exploration for a year-round market. Issues to consider in the Comprehensive Plan update: • Food Production on City-Owned Lands within the Boulder Valley As residents have become more aware of the benefits of fresh produce, and the costs and impacts of importing food, there has been a significant demand for more locally produced food, particularly sustainably produced food. Residents have requested that the city explore ways to increase sustainably produced food on city-owned lands. As people are more concerned about local food production, the city will continue to manage agricultural uses within the context of multiple uses on city Open Space and consider expanding food production as appropriate. A commonly held belief is that conventional food production, processing and distribution have a higher contribution to climate change than organic or natural production due to high energy and water needs. While this may be the case in some circumstances, there are other considerations to take into account in assessing the full sustainability of any approach or process including labor needs, local market saturation, capital needs, suitability of soil, water supply and others. The current practice for agricultural production on city-owned lands is to promote sustainable practices appropriate for the specific lands. The city's recently adopted Grassland Management Plan spells out specific strategies needed to maintain city owned native grasslands and their associated species. "Sustainable practices" can include a range of production types that take into account land suitability, water availability, invasive species, etc. Current city policies limit the application of pesticides to those specifically approved by the city IPM program. Currently no similar constraints on chemical fertilizer use exist. Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) policy currently does not allow genetically modified crops to be grown on OSMP lands. As the work with the regional processes progress, there will be more information available about sustainable food production and recommended practices for the Boulder region that will inform on-going sustainable food production. C-Food-4 Agenda Item 6A Page 122 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Water Availability and Distribution While open space land may be available, water rights are sometimes separated from the land for other uses.-Maintaining the availability of water rights for use on suitable agricultural land is imperative to making food production viable. There are sometimes deficiencies in the infrastructure needed to deliver water to the areas with suitable soils. Education of gardeners on water saving irrigation methods would be a useful tool to encourage local food production and make it financially viable. The city and county, as owners of many shares in various ditch companies, may need to explore budgeting funds to assist ditch companies in better maintaining and enhancing the ditch and irrigation infrastructure. The City of Boulder actively pursues acquisition or contractual control of water rights and ditch rights historically used on land within the city boundaries to minimize the need to secure agricultural water from outside the city boundaries if additional municipal water supplies are required in the future. This also assures a stable amount of water is available for community use by preventing local water rights from being purchased and transferred out of the Boulder Creek basin. The city allows larger-lot single-family or agricultural properties that are annexing to the city or connecting to the municipal water system to keep water rights for irrigation use with a condition to sell to the city later when the property redevelops. The city often will lease- back use of irrigation water to the selling party for a time. The city leases most of its surplus annual municipal raw water supplies to agricultural users. As demand for locally produced food continues or land suitability is re-evaluated, the city and county may cooperatively develop a strategy to focus available water under their control on the area's most suitable land for food production. • Food Production in Urban Areas The interest in home and community gardening, raising chickens and constructing greenhouses or other structures to grow food is increasing. While the Comprehensive Plan is currently silent on the issue of supporting individual or community efforts to grow food, this is an issue that has been repeatedly raised through the Comprehensive Plan process. Existing regulations allow gardens, accessory structures and some urban livestock with some limitations. Currently watering home vegetable gardens is treated as part of the resident's water budget and is not differentiated from water for other landscaping. Watering home and community gardens can be cost prohibitive for food production to be a viable use depending on the size and type of production. In a drought, water for vegetable gardens would be limited in a one in one hundred year drought (Stage III) and would be eliminated along with most outdoor irrigation in a 1 in 1000 year drought (Stage IV). Zoning regulations for community urban gardens are being developed to support these uses and address any potential impacts to neighborhoods. The city may need to review regulations and processes to remove barriers and encourage more innovative approaches to urban gardening including use of rooftops for multi-family and commercial buildings. More opportunities for small growers to sell their excess produce should be evaluated including those that might grow within publicly or privately owned community gardens. C-Food-5 Agenda Item 6A Page 123 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page There has been growing demand for community garden space, particularly for people in multi- family housing where personal or private open space is limited. There are also new organizations committed to growing food and/or providing fresh produce for populations that are food-insecure. • Access to Locally Produced Food One of Boulder County's Food and Agricultural Policy goals is to improve access to locally produced food. Also, this is an important way for local farmers to remain economically viable while offering local residents access to fresh produce and locally produced products. The existing farmers markets are well supported and seek additional times and locations to operate. The city is working to support the farmers market, facilitating its expansion into a year-round market including finding additional locations. Appropriate locations and uses for food production and distribution may need to be evaluated as demand for locally or regionally produced food continues to grow. Currently the Comprehensive Plan policies recognize the importance of an agricultural economy but lack more specific direction about uses, priorities or removing barriers. What are suggested measures or changes to address these issues? Sustainable Practices on City-Owned Land: Add a policy defining sustainable practices on city- owned land. Sustainable practices might include food production methods that are healthy, do not harm the environment, respect workers, are humane to animals, provide fair wages to farmers, and support farming communities. Support Regional Processes: Define the issue of food production as a regional issue with regional (if not global) solutions. Policies should support work with regional processes to define sustainable practices for the Boulder Valley as well as the region including continued work with Boulder County Food and Agriculture Policy Council (FAPC) to implement the Strategic Plan and consider implementation of recommendations from the Northern Colorado Regional Food Assessment Project. If recommendations from this process are available by early 2011 they will be incorporated in the BVCP policy revisions. Promote Access to Local Food: Develop a policy supporting local farmers markets, local food production, processing, storage and distribution infrastructure, working to improve consumer access and removing barriers to local food processing and sales. C-Food-6 Agenda Item 6A Page 124 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Promote Urban Gardenm : Develop a policy supporting community and home-based urban agriculture to allow more community gardens and innovative ideas for growing or raising food, including use of the rooftops on multi-family residential and commercial buildings, see examples below. 57 Ake a _ yam, k„ . A A& Organization: Currently the policies related to food and agriculture are scattered throughout the plan. This is an issue that bridges all areas of sustainability and the policies should be clear and easy to find. Public Requests for BVCP Policy Changes In the public request process at the start of the Comprehensive Plan update Everybody Eats!, a project of the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center, requested policy revisions to actively encourage, promote, expand and sustain local food production for local consumption. The information in the request strongly influenced the issues and challenges as well as the recommendations in this briefing paper, especially acknowledging that this is an important component of sustainability for Boulder. Many of the requested changes regarding agricultural policy will be specifically addressed in other regional processes focusing on sustainable agriculture practices and will be incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan or other planning documents as appropriate and as they are available. C-Food-7 Agenda Item 6A Page 125 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Focus Group Review An informal focus group consisting of representatives of various local food organizations and county staff provided feedback to city staff on a preliminary draft of the Local Food and Sustainable Agriculture Briefing Paper. Although they were not a decision-making group and did not represent all viewpoints found in our farming community, they provided valuable input that helped refine these materials. Below is a list of focus group participants: Growing Gardens & Boulder County Food and Agriculture Policy Council: Ramona Clark Everybody Eats!: Rich Andrews (also associated with Transition Boulder) Boulder Parks and Open Space/CSU Extension Agriculture Resources staff: Adrian Card Key themes from the Focus Group • Revise the description of land suitability in the Boulder Valley - there are places very suitable to vegetable production or "human food" production. • The paper is missing information about raw water and agricultural uses / ditch policies / infrastructure needs. • Add information describing the need for small gardeners or growers to have access to market. • Include information on why local food is important -growing number of people in the areas who are food in-secure. • Support agricultural education efforts. • One member encourages being bold - recommends no GMOs on public lands in Boulder Valley. Focus Group Meeting Notes • Change description in context to more accurately reflect suitability of land within Boulder Valley for vegetable production - not all beef production. Request mapping information- it has been done. • Major omission in the paper is the lack of discussion about water for ag use. If the city is looking to promote ag uses we need to change conditions to make that happen. Water rights acquisition for prime ag lands would be important. Ditch rights and use for ag is important. Getting water to where it needs to go - dispensation to smaller growers and households that have access to raw water. • Discussion of cost for urban water for ag use - there are differing ideas about cost of water. Community gardens don't pay for water currently but it would be a big expense and is in other areas. • Infrastructure for the transportation of water is a key area that will need attention and resources if more agriculture is to happen in the future. This infrastructure has been neglected over the past many decades. This includes maintenance to ditches to improve delivery capacity. Protecting trees and wildlife habitat is often in conflict with water C-Food-8 Agenda Item 6A Page 126 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page delivery. As more water is being consumed in the urban areas there is not as much available for downstream ag uses. Seasonality of water is also an issue and how much can be stored. • Urban food access - need to find ways to support small garden retail - ability to accommodate smaller or individual growers to sell surplus food somewhere / how as farmers market is at capacity. • The community gardens managed through the parks & recreation dept. don't allow sales because it is defined as a 'recreational' program. This may not be the case for other gardens where people want or need to sell a small amount of surplus. Could consider "neighborhood food hubs" for distribution. Neighborhood or roadside stands regulations or temporary permits should be considered. • Support for "farmer cultivation center" - education concept with the intent to have a place to train new farmers and potentially connect with city or county open space for places for them to farm. • Non-food ag - feed for nonfood animals -might consider priority for human food production. • Need to add to paper - critical issue that a large portion of county residents are food- insecure. Look at civic forum stats - especially for unemployed or under-employed. • Be bold in the paper and develop policy - no GMOs on public lands. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) important as well - in tune with true sustainability - involves weed management and invasive species - also relates to prairie dog management. • City could encourage planting of fruit or nut trees to encourage urban gleaning programs; also edible landscaping or at least consider not precluding these. • Consider issues of allowed uses on rural or ag properties - need to allow some processing of foods (jams, jellies, other products) so that growers can have more viable products. C-Food-9 Agenda Item 6A Page 127 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Exhibit A Key Policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan related to Food & Agriculture 1. Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Policies 1. General Policies The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan is a joint plan between the city of Boulder and Boulder County that provides shared responsibility for planning and development in the Boulder Valley. The general policies section of the plan provides the overall planning framework for sustainability, intergovernmental cooperation, growth management and annexation. Boulder has a long tradition of community planning. Most of the key policies that have guided the development pattern in the Boulder Valley have not changed since the 1977 Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan was first adopted, and many of them stem from long-standing community values. Boulder's planning has focused on respecting our unique community identity and sense of place, city-county cooperation, and keeping Boulder a distinct, separate and compact community. They represent a clear, articulate vision of our desired development pattern including: • Recognition of sustainability as a unifying goal to secure Boulder's future economic, ecological and social health. • Commitment to open space preservation and the use of open space buffers to define the community. • Use of urban growth boundaries to maintain a compact city (the boundaries of the service area have remained virtually unchanged since first developed in 1977). • Encouragement of compact, contiguous development and a preference for infill land redevelopment as opposed to sprawl. • Provision of quality urban spaces, parks and recreation that serve all sectors of the community and trails and walkways that connect the community. • Commitment to preservation of natural, cultural and historic features that contribute to defining the unique sense of place in Boulder. • Commitment to programs that support respect for human dignity, human rights and the inclusion of all residents in community and civic life. • Recognition of the importance of a central area (Downtown, University of Colorado, the Boulder Valley Regional Center) as a regional service center of the Boulder Valley and a variety of subcommunity and neighborhood activity centers distributed throughout the community. • Recognition of the importance of the Federal Scientific Laboratories (NOAA, NIST, NCAR), the University of Colorado, and the private scientific and technology community that contributes to the economic vitality of Boulder. • Commitment to a diversity of housing types and price ranges to meet the needs of the Boulder Valley population. • Commitment to a balanced multi-modal transportation system. C-Food-10 Agenda Item 6A Page 128 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Sustainability 1.01 Community Sustainability. The city and county adopt the sustainability principles in policies 1.01-1.05 to interpret and guide implementation of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The city and county recognize: a) the critical interrelationships among economic, social and environmental health; b) the way we produce, trade and consume impacts our ability to sustain natural resources; c) social and cultural equity and diversity creates valuable human capital that contributes to the economy and environmental sustainability; d) planned physical development has an impact on social conditions and should be considered in community planning; and e) the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon the full engagement and involvement of the community. The city and county seek to maintain and enhance the livability, health and vitality of the Boulder Valley and the natural systems of which it is a part, now and in the long- term future. The city and county seek to preserve choices for future generations and to anticipate and adapt to changing community needs and external influences. 1.02 Principles of Environmental Sustainability. There are limits to the capacity of the biosphere to support the life of human beings at current levels of consumption and pollution. There are limits to the land and soil available for food production, to available water, to resources such as trees, fish and wildlife, to industrial resources like oil and metals, and to the ability of nature to absorb our waste. With this in mind, the city and county acknowledge the importance of natural capital, which can be kept at healthy levels for the long term only when we are able to do the following: a) Renewable resources should not be used faster than they are recharged or replenished by the environment. b) Non-renewable resources should be used with the greatest care and efficiency, and some of those should be used to develop renewable replacements. c) Waste should not be dumped into nature any faster than nature can absorb it. 1.03 Principles of Economic Sustainability. a) The city and county will encourage a viable and balanced economic structure and employment base within the parameters of established land use, environmental and growth policies. b) The city and county recognize that a healthy, adaptable local economy is vital to the community's ability to provide a highly desirable quality of life, high levels of services and amenities. C-Food-11 Agenda Item 6A Page 129 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page c) The city and county will promote a diverse and sustainable economy that supports the needs of all community members. d) The city and county will seek to ensure that current needs are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs, for the economy is a subsystem of the environment and depends upon the environment both as a source of raw material inputs and as a sink for waste outputs. 1.04 Principles of Social Sustainability. The city and county will promote a healthy, sustainable community by: a) Recognizing, respecting and valuing cultural and social diversity. b) Recognizing that social and cultural inequities create environmental and economic instability. c) Ensuring the basic health and safety needs of all residents are met. d) Providing infrastructure that will encourage culturally and socially diverse communities to both prosper within and connect to the larger community. 1.05 Community Engagement. The city and county recognize that the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon full involvement of the community. The city and county will recognize the rights of and encourage all community members to play a role in governmental decisions, especially those that affect their lives or property, through continual efforts to maintain and improve public communication and the open conduct of business. In addition, the city and county will continue to support programs and provide opportunities for public participation and neighborhood involvement. Efforts will be made to remove barriers to participation and involve community members not usually engaged in civic life. Increased emphasis will be placed on notification and engagement of the public in decisions involving large development proposals or major land use decisions that may have significant impact on, or benefits to the community. Intergovernmental Cooperation 1.11 Regional and Statewide Cooperation. Many of the most significant problems and opportunities faced by Boulder and other jurisdictions, particularly providing affordable housing, addressing the jobs-housing imbalance, creating a healthy economy, improving regional transportation, protecting the environment, managing open space, delivering human services and managing growth can only be dealt with effectively through regional or statewide cooperation and solutions. Therefore, the city and county will actively pursue cooperative planning opportunities, broader information exchange and communication, collaborative initiatives and closer cooperation with each other and with other entities in the region and state, including other cities, counties, unincorporated communities, the University of Colorado, the school districts, regional organizations and other policy-making bodies. These entities will be encouraged to identify and address issues of shared concern for which a multi-jurisdictional perspective can best achieve mutually beneficial solutions. C-Food-12 Agenda Item 6A Page 130 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 1.14 Agricultural Sustainability. The city and county will promote a viable agricultural economy for the Boulder Valley and beyond by working together and with the agricultural community. Rural Lands Preservation 2.08 Preservation of Rural Areas and Amenities. The city and county will attempt to preserve existing rural land use and character in and adjacent to the Boulder Valley where environmentally sensitive areas, hazard areas, agriculturally significant lands, vistas, significant historic resources, and established rural residential areas exist. A clear boundary between urban and rural areas at the periphery of the city will be maintained, where possible. Existing tools and programs for rural preservation will be strengthened and new tools and programs will be put in place. 2.09 Agricultural Land. The city and county will encourage the preservation and sustainable use of agricultural lands as a current and renewable source of both food and fuel and for their contribution to cultural, environmental and economic diversity. The city and county will encourage the protection of significant agricultural areas and related water supplies and facilities, including the historic and existing ditch systems, through a variety of means, which may include public acquisition, land use planning, and sale or lease of water for agricultural use. (See Policy 5.13 Role of Agriculture.) 2.10 Delineation of Rural Lands. Area III consists of the rural lands in the Boulder Valley, outside the Boulder Service Area. The Boulder Service Area includes urban lands in the city and lands planned for future annexation and urban service provision. Within Area III, land is placed within one of two classifications: the Area III-Rural Preservation Area (RPA) or the Area III- Planning Reserve Area (PRA). The boundaries of these two areas are shown on the Area III-Rural Preservation Area and Area I, II, III Map. The more specific Area III land use designations on the comprehensive plan map indicate the type of non-urban land use that is desired as well as recognize those county developments that have or can still develop at other than rural densities and uses. The Area III-Rural Preservation Area is intended to show the desired long-term rural land use; the Area III-Planning Reserve Area is an interim classification until it is decided whether or not this land should be placed in the Area III-Rural Preservation Area or in the Service Area. a) Area III-Rural Preservation Area. The Area III-Rural Preservation Area is that portion of Area III where rural land uses and character will be preserved through existing and new rural land use preservation techniques and no new urban development will be allowed during the planning period. Rural land uses to be preserved to the greatest possible extent include: rural town sites (Eldorado Springs, Marshall and Valmont); existing county rural residential subdivisions (primarily along Eldorado Springs Drive, on Davidson Mesa west of Louisville, adjacent to Gunbarrel, and in proximity to Boulder C-Food-13 Agenda Item 6A Page 131 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Reservoir); city and county acquired open space and parkland; sensitive environmental areas and hazard areas that are unsuitable for urban development; significant agricultural lands; and lands that are unsuitable for urban development because of a high cost of extending urban services or scattered locations, which are not conducive to maintaining a compact community. b) Area III-Planning Reserve Area. The Area III-Planning Reserve Area (PRA) is that portion of Area III with rural land uses where the city intends to maintain the option of limited Service Area expansion. The Area III-Planning Reserve Area classification maintains both rural preservation and urban development options until the city and county decide the ultimate desired land use. The location and characteristics of this land make it potentially suitable for new urban development, based on the apparent lack of sensitive environmental areas, hazard areas, and significant agricultural lands, the feasibility of efficient urban service extension, and contiguity to the existing Service Area, which maintains a compact community. 5.13 Role of Agriculture. The city and county will foster and assist continued agricultural production in the Boulder Valley. A viable agricultural economy is an important tool for preserving the rural character of Area III and providing an opportunity to grow and/or market locally produced food, fiber and horticultural products. (See Policy 2.09 Agricultural Land.) C-Food-14 Agenda Item 6A Page 132 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 2010 Major Update to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Energy and Climate Action DRAFT Policy Briefing Paper September 2010 Prepared by City of Boulder staff This paper is intended to serve as a starting point for community discussion of changes to the policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The ideas contained in the paper do not represent city policy or staff recommendations. This paper is one of five briefing papers. The Planning Board and City Council identified the following two broad focus areas for the major update following public input: urban form/ community design and sustainability policy changes. The briefing papers have been prepared to provide a framework for discussion of these focus areas. C-Energy-1 Agenda Item 6A Page 133 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Energy & Climate Action Introduction Boulder's commitment to energy use reduction, renewable energy, greenhouse gas emission reduction, building efficiency and waste reduction is reflected by recent and emerging policy and program decisions. Most of these policies and programs are articulated in the Climate Action Plan (CAP). The CAP includes a set of strategies intended to guide community efforts for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Those strategies have focused on improving energy efficiency and conservation in our homes and businesses-the source of nearly three-fourths of local greenhouse gas emissions. The plan also promotes strategies to reduce emissions from transportation and solid waste which combined account for close to 25 percent of our local greenhouse gas sources. While existing Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan policies address many of the priority areas related to energy and climate related issues, the CAP and its supplemental "Community Guide" are the implementation plan for the policies. By achieving a higher level of integration between the Comprehensive Plan and the CAP, the community commitment to address climate change and sustainability issues should be more clearly reflected in the policies to help guide decision- making over the next few years. This briefing paper will discuss how greenhouse gas reduction and related energy, waste reduction and transportation issues are currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan and what policy issues and challenges should be considered as part of the 2010 major update to the plan in order to more closely integrate the CAP with the Comprehensive Plan. Key issues from the first phase of the Comprehensive Plan update process regarding climate and energy are: • Support for continued innovative and bold efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and achieve climate action goals. • Move more quickly to achieve community energy self-sufficiency by closing or re-powering the Valmont coal-fired electricity plant. • Find ways to improve transportation options to address the connection between transportation, energy use and greenhouse gas reduction. • Develop incentives regarding energy efficiency for innovation and creativity that supports city goals and local business innovation. • Support for moving the community to zero-waste. C-Energy-2 Agenda Item 6A Page 134 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page How are Energy and Climate issues currently addressed in the Comprehensive Plan? The Comprehensive Plan currently provides an overall framework for sustainability throughout, while Sections 4 Environment and 6 Transportation contain specific policies on energy, waste reduction and transportation that generally help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The following is a summary of specific policies: Section 4, Environment, Conserving Natural Resources • Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions - work toward reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to be in alignment with the Kyoto Protocol target. • Integrating Water and Air Quality with Transportation Planning- encourage land use patterns to reduce emissions; promote low emission vehicles, alternatives to traditional fuels and travel in single-occupant vehicles. • Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy - support opportunities for individuals, businesses and public organizations to conserve energy and convert to renewable resources. • Energy Efficient Land Use, Energy Efficient Building Design - encourage conservation of energy through land use policies; continue efforts to improve the energy and resource efficiency of new and existing buildings; and whenever possible, promote renovation over demolition where appropriate, as well as reuse of materials. • Waste Minimization and Recvcling - actively pursue and support programs and activities that reduce the amount of waste that must be landfilled. The city's goal is to achieve zero waste, which equate to 85 percent waste diversion. • Promoting the Use of Recycled Materials - develop recycling programs, policies and infrastructure that encourage and support the recycling and reuse of recyclable materials and continue to implement the City's Environmental Purchasing Policy. • Reduction of Use and Safe Disposal of Hazardous Materials - work to reduce use and ensure safe disposal of hazardous materials by providing information and use of a household hazardous waste collection facility for residents. Section 6, Transportation • Transportation Impact - environmental impacts from proposed development will be mitigated and all development will include strategies to reduce the vehicle miles traveled generated by the development. • Improving Air Quality - design the transportation system to minimized air pollution by promoting the use of non-automotive modes, encouraging the use of fuel efficient and alternatively fueled vehicles that demonstrate air pollution reductions, and other means. The complete summary of existing policies in the Comprehensive Plan is provided as Exhibit A. C-Energy-3 Agenda Item 6A Page 135 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page What issues and challenges should be addressed in the Plan? Since the last major update to the Comprehensive Plan, Boulder's sustainability efforts have been greatly enhanced. To provide context for the issues and challenges to be addressed in this update, this section provides a high-level summary of the strategies in place to implement current policies along with new priority areas that have surfaced since the last Comprehensive Plan update. An evaluation of the Comprehensive Plan policies related to energy and climate and how they relate to the Climate Action Plan Strategy areas is included as Exhibit B. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Goal Boulder's Climate Action Plan defines six key strategy areas to address greenhouse gas emissions. Together they provide the structure for the climate action programs. These strategy areas include: • Reduce Use; • Build Better; • Ramp Up Renewables; • Travel Wise; • Waste Not; and • Grow Green Boulder's Climate Action Plan is implemented through a set of programs designed to put each strategy area into action. The greenhouse gas emission reduction goal was adopted in 2002 when few local or state governments in the US had established emission reduction targets. Since the last plan update in 2005, the community has adopted the CAP and approved a tax on electricity use to fund emissions reduction programs. The city also developed an emissions tracking system, annually updates the inventory and reports progress to the community. Current policy assessment: The Comprehensive Plan includes a greenhouse gas policy that calls for reducing emissions in line with Kyoto Protocol or 7 percent below 1990 emissions levels by 2012. While community emissions are moving in the right direction, the current goal calls for the equivalent of a 26 percent reduction in emissions by 2012 from current levels. To achieve this goal, Boulder needs to accelerate its reductions in the next two years. 2012 is the only identified milestone for emissions reductions. Therefore, a new reduction target and date will need to be discussed which should ultimately be reflected in the Comprehensive Plan and the CAP. C-Energy-4 Agenda Item 6A Page 136 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Energy Efficiency, Conservation and Renewable Energy Most of the city's efforts to encourage energy conservation and increase use of renewable energy are conducted under the framework of the CAP adopted in 2006 although programs were first implemented in 2005. E iciency and Conservation Lowering energy use through improved energy efficiency and conservation is the easiest, most cost-effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency refers to ensuring that existing buildings are well-insulated and well-sealed to minimize energy waste and are heated, cooled, and lighted as efficiently as possible. It also means investing in energy-efficient appliances and fuel-efficient vehicles. The CAP programs have been focused to deliver rapid and effective efficiency upgrades to homeowners and businesses to lower Boulder's overall community energy use. In 2008 the City worked with Boulder County to create the ClimateSmart loan program to support further voluntary efforts. In 2009 and 2010, the program increased awareness that reducing household energy use was a community priority and facilitated unprecedented investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy systems. In 2009 the CAP tax was increased and federal stimulus funds were received in 2009 and 2010, including a $25 million grant shared with Boulder and Garfield County along with the City and County of Denver. These funds will greatly expand and expedite implementation of the programs and services available to residents and businesses to reduce energy use, increase renewable energy generation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Renewable EneiQgy The CAP attempts to increase Boulder's use of clean energy by de-carbonizing our energy supply and developing wind and solar systems, including large-scale regional facilities and small-scale installations on homes, businesses and institutional buildings. The current strategies are to: • Work at the local, regional and state level to gradually shift our fuel mix from a heavy reliance on carbon-intensive fuel sources, such as coal, to cleaner energy sources, such as natural gas, wind, solar and other renewable energy sources; • Remove the barriers to development of large-scale renewable energy systems and encourage the installation of residential and commercial solar projects; • Educate residents and businesses about renewable energy options; and • Encourage solar installations by providing solar sales tax rebates to homeowners and businesses and grants to nonprofits and affordable housing. Current policy assessment: An existing policy describes the city's commitment and approach to increasing energy conservation and renewable energy use in the community. However, the policy does not C-Energy-5 Agenda Item 6A Page 137 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page acknowledge the connection to greenhouse gas emissions, nor is it reflected that increased efficiency and conservation has a direct relationship with the economic and social areas of sustainability. The current policy states that the city and county will implement policies and programs that enhance opportunities for individuals, businesses and public organizations to limit the use of non-renewable energy resources by conserving energy and converting to renewable resources. It also calls for the city to set goals for the use of non-renewable energy that are consistent with an orderly transition to a sustainable energy economy in order to preserve fossil fuels for future generations. The city will support private decisions to use renewable energy, will publicly develop local renewable energy resources where economical, and will preserve future options for renewable energy so that they may be developed when they become cost effective. De-carbonizing Boulder's Energy Supply This topic became a stronger community and statewide priority over the last couple of years. Since the last plan update the City has been involved in many state legislative processes that affect energy supply including the following: • Electric Utility Renewable Energy Standards (Renewable Portfolio Standards) • Community Solar Gardens • Clean Energy Development Authority Financing Limits • Clean Air Clean Jobs Act of 2010 In order to understand the options at the Valmont Power Plant, the city and county commissioned a study to review the array of opportunities for reducing emissions by retiring and/or using renewable fuels and power sources. The study assessed both system wide and site-specific impacts. The results of the study helped inform the city's position on HB10-1365, the Clean Air Clean Jobs Act of 2010, which identifies plans to decommission the Valmont Power Plant by 2017. In addition, the new CAP strategy includes engaging six teams of community stakeholders and experts to help create and implement the strategy. One team is dedicated to helping assess options for decarbonizing Boulder's energy supply. The City is also working with regional partners to achieve the broader goal of decarbonizing our regional energy supply. As a key opportunity to increase renewable energy supply the City evaluated options for municipalizing electricity supply as an alternative to renewing the franchise agreement with Xcel Energy, as well as options for renewing the franchise with side agreements that would reduce the amount of fossil fuel used to generate power supplied to Boulder. In 2008 the City decided to discontinue pursuit of municipalizing and accepted Xcel Energy's offer to make Boulder the first SmartGridCity. This project promises improved electric system reliability, enhanced meters and devices enabling consumer control, improved management of distributed C-Energy-6 Agenda Item 6A Page 138 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page generation (primarily onsite solar systems) and the possibility of vehicle to grid (V2G) technology. In 2010, as the franchise renewal deadline approached and it became apparent that agreements with Xcel Energy were not supported by the community, the City Council decided not to renew the franchise and instead to actively investigate and pursue alternative options aimed at achieving our energy and emission related goals. Over the next two years, the city will be actively analyzing the various clean energy options for Boulder that may include legislative or regulatory changes and includes a renewed review of creating a municipal utility. Current policy assessment: Energy supply and transitioning to a sustainable energy economy are mentioned in two plan policies although there is no single policy devoted to this topic. Future options for municipalization, or city ownership of the distribution system are not included. Energy Efficiency in New Construction and Existing Buildings Although residents are undertaking voluntary actions outlined in the CAP, these efforts have been slow to show significant results. Energy use in buildings accounts for 74 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in Boulder. Although the City has not set a specific target like Net Zero Energy construction by a certain date, it has established progressively more stringent codes requiring greater energy performance in residential and commercial new construction, major remodels and additions. Boulder implemented improvements in building construction through its nationally-recognized Green Building and Green Points programs which were updated in 2008, with new requirements effective in March 2009. Developing codes for existing buildings is a current priority; new codes establishing energy performance standards for rental housing will go into effect in January 2011. A similar code addressing existing commercial buildings could be developed in 2011. Other plans include evaluating whether to replace or integrate the Residential Green Building and Green Points program with the National Green Building Standard. The City is also working with Boulder County and other jurisdictions on a commercial code that could be adopted countywide. Current policy assessment: An existing policy addresses energy efficiency and waste minimization in building design and construction. It does not address setting energy performance for existing buildings like the rental housing requirements in SmartRegs. Waste Reduction Because of its contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, waste reduction is identified as one of the six strategy areas in the CAP. In 2006 the City Council adopted the Master Plan for Waste Reduction (MPWR) and a Zero Waste Resolution with the goal of reducing and eventually eliminating waste going to the landfill - to become a Zero Waste community through curbside C-Energy-7 Agenda Item 6A Page 139 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page collection of recyclable and compostable materials and a range of other recycling and re-use programs. Solid waste accounted for 3 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. This percentage would be higher without the longstanding community commitment to recycling and reducing waste. Starting in the fall of 2010, the City will initiate the five-year update to the MPWR. Through the public process the City hopes to create a vision for the community's path to zero waste, including recommendations for waste reduction infrastructure at 6400 Arapahoe. The MPWR will build on the Boulder County Zero Waste Plan that will be adopted in 2010. City Council will consider the five-year update to the MPWR during the first quarter of 2011. Current policy assessment: Three existing policies focus on waste reduction. Climate Adaptation The city is working with Boulder County and local stakeholders to create a Climate Adaptation Plan that will summarize the best known science on climate change impacts in the state to assess vulnerability and outline possible solutions that can be implemented within the City and across the region to promote resiliency. This is the first step in an ongoing, evolving process to reduce Boulder and Colorado's vulnerability to long-term climate change impacts. Boulder's ability to manage its climate risks through adaptation depends on a number of critical factors including its baseline and projected economic resources, technologies, infrastructure, institutional support and effective governance, public awareness, access to the best available scientific information, sustainably managed natural resources, and equity in access to these resources. A RFP that outlines a consultant's scope of work has been developed, and it scheduled to be released in the fall of 2010. It is anticipated that the draft Adaptation Plan will be released to the public during the first quarter of 2011. Current policy assessment: The Comprehensive Plan does not include a policy addressing adapting to climate change impacts. What changes to the Comprehensive Plan would address these issues? The following recommendations apply to general sections or policies of the Comprehensive Plan. • The general policies in the Comprehensive Plan should be updated to clarify the community's commitment to environmental and sustainability leadership. C-Energy-8 Agenda Item 6A Page 140 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • The general policies should be reviewed to ensure consistency with the strategy areas identified in the CAP. • The environmental sustainability policies in Section 1 should be revisited to ensure that they reflect current energy and climate priorities. • The climate-related policies are hard to locate within the plan and should be moved to a separate section. The remainder of the section is focused on changes to environmental policies specific to Section 4. While there may be an interest to add policies related to some of the high profile projects and decisions because they are at the forefront today, the purpose of the plan and the update process are to identify big picture and in some sense general policies that best reflect community priorities. The existing energy and climate-related policies provide the general framework and direction for current community priorities with a few minor adjustments. Two new policies are recommended to address community priorities. 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions The current policy sets a specific date that is expiring. The language should be changed to remove the reference to the 2012 Kyoto goal. It should also be updated to acknowledge the need for longer term goals, likely with milestones as well as how goals will be evaluated. Setting a new goal should be discussed as part of the clean energy options analysis or during discussions about the possible renewal of the CAP tax. At a minimum the city should match the state goal (20 percent below 2005 levels by 2020) which is slightly more aggressive that the city's goal. 2. Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy The existing policy language generally reflects the community's priorities, as well as current and planned work in these areas. However, the reference to an energy supply plan for fossil fuel sources should be updated to reflect the community's desire to develop a long-term plan for clean energy options. Potential changes include referencing greenhouse gas emissions reductions and climate change as priorities that influence energy conservation and renewable energy policies. Priorities might include exploring future uses and sites in Areas II or III for renewable energy and a review of related regulations. This review should also include siting buildings for solar access, building in passive and active solar systems, ensuring shading over windows, and making use of latest technologies for building insulation, circulation and energy supply. 3. De-carbonizing Boulder's Energy Supply Two existing policies address energy supply and transitioning to a sustainable energy economy may adequately address the city's general intentions. Given the overarching nature of energy supply to the city's energy and climate-related goals, a new clean energy supply policy should be considered to reflect the community's interest and support. The C-Energy-9 Agenda Item 6A Page 141 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page existing policies that reference this topic could be revised to avoid duplication or left as is to maintain links among policies. 4. Energy Efficiency in New Construction and Existing Buildings Add language to building codes-related policies to reflect the city's role in establishing energy efficiency requirements in existing buildings and redevelopment in addition to new construction. These changes relate to the SmartRegs rental housing requirements going into effect in 2011 and similar codes for existing commercial buildings that could be developed in 2011. 5. Waste Reduction The policies should be updated to reflect goals and targets that result from Waste Reduction Planning efforts occurring in late 2010 and early 2011. 6. Climate Adaptation Add a new policy describing the goals for developing and implementing a climate adaptation and resiliency plan in coordination with Boulder County. The policy should acknowledge the roles of government to protect and prepare the community. 7. Development Impact The policies should be updated to describe how environmental impacts from proposed development should be mitigated. 8. Transportation Several existing policies address transportation, particularly focused on designing the transportation system to minimized air pollution by promoting the use of non-automotive modes, encouraging the use of fuel efficient and alternatively fueled vehicles that demonstrate air pollution reductions, and other means. The policies do not adequately reflect the nexus between climate impact and transportation emissions, which represent 21% of Boulder's greenhouse gasses. Given the role of transportation in the city's climate-related goals, the existing transportation policies should be revised to include the importance of alternative modes of transportation, reducing vehicle miles traveled and cleaner fuel sources to support the emission reduction goals in the CAP. Related Issues in other Briefing Papers update for energy and climate Many of the issues of concern in the 2010 major update overlap and influence other areas of concern. Significant changes proposed in the Community Design Briefing Paper will enhance the policies and tools to guide quality urban design and help create a sustainable, integrated development and transportation pattern, as redevelopment occurs. This means developing a high quality, walkable urban environment that attracts investment, is a desirable place to live, work and recreate, reduces auto dependency, and reduces carbon emissions. C-Energy-10 Agenda Item 6A Page 142 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Recommendations in the Economic Sustainability paper include clarifying the city's role to promote sustainable business practices. The Comprehensive Plan currently has limited language about the city's role and efforts to help businesses employ sustainable practices and building renovations to reduce transportation impacts and greenhouse gas emissions. A key issue identified in that process highlights the importance of having an affordable and reliable electricity source for businesses and key federal labs. Issues around maintenance and renovation costs - particularly related to energy efficiency improvements for low and moderate income families are described in the Social Sustainability Briefing Paper and are directly related to housing costs. The Social Sustainability paper also addresses the costs of transportation for low- and moderate-income households, particularly commuters and describes considering approaches that address energy costs with housing and transportation costs. Focus Group Review An informal focus group consisting of representatives of various organizations provided feedback to city staff on a preliminary draft of the Energy and Climate Action Briefing Paper. Although they were not a decision-making group and were not expected to reach consensus, they provided extremely valuable input that helped refine these materials. Below is a list of focus group participants: Plan Boulder County - Leonard May CAP Technical Teams - Decarb - Ken Regelson CAP Technical Teams - Residential - Jim Logan CAP Technical Teams - Commercial - Dan Powers EcoCycle - Eric Lombardi Boulder Green Building Guild - Julie Herman Key Issues Raised in the Focus Group include: • The group agreed that greenhouse gas measurements need to be measured in the short term, and despite the differences in the city and county adopted targets, should be recognized in the plan. It was agreed that a specific number, goal, or measurement should not be in the BVCP, but that level of detail is appropriate for master plans. • Some questioned if energy conservation policies should address supply/peak oil concerns (related to Transportation as well)? • How do issues of pricing for energy play into the plan? • There was discussion about policies around exploring locations in the Boulder valley (all BVCP Planning Areas) for sustainable community infrastructure. C-Energy-11 Agenda Item 6A Page 143 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Exhibit A Key Policies in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan related to Energy and Climate Sustainability 1. Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Policies 1. General Policies The Boulder Vallev Comprehensive Plan is a joint plan between the city of Boulder and Boulder County that provides shared responsibility for planning and development in the Boulder Valley. The general policies section of the plan provides the overall planning framework for sustainability, intergovernmental cooperation, growth management and annexation. Boulder has a long tradition of community planning. Most of the key policies that have guided the development pattern in the Boulder Valley have not changed since the 1977 Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan was first adopted, and many of them stem from long-standing community values. Boulder's planning has focused on respecting our unique community identity and sense of place, city-county cooperation, and keeping Boulder a distinct, separate and compact community. They represent a clear, articulate vision of our desired development pattern including: • Recognition of sustainability as a unifying goal to secure Boulder's future economic, ecological and social health. • Commitment to open space preservation and the use of open space buffers to define the community. • Use of urban growth boundaries to maintain a compact city (the boundaries of the service area have remained virtually unchanged since first developed in 1977). • Encouragement of compact, contiguous development and a preference for infill land redevelopment as opposed to sprawl. • Provision of quality urban spaces, parks and recreation that serve all sectors of the community and trails and walkways that connect the community. • Commitment to preservation of natural, cultural and historic features that contribute to defining the unique sense of place in Boulder. • Commitment to programs that support respect for human dignity, human rights and the inclusion of all residents in community and civic life. • Recognition of the importance of a central area (Downtown, University of Colorado, the Boulder Valley Regional Center) as a regional service center of the Boulder Valley and a variety of subcommunity and neighborhood activity centers distributed throughout the community. • Recognition of the importance of the Federal Scientific Laboratories (NOAA, NIST, NCAR), the University of Colorado, and the private scientific and technology community that contributes to the economic vitality of Boulder. • Commitment to a diversity of housing types and price ranges to meet the needs of the Boulder Valley population. C-Energy-12 Agenda Item 6A Page 144 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Commitment to a balanced multi-modal transportation system. Sustainability 1.01 Community Sustainability. The city and county adopt the sustainability principles in policies 1.01-1.05 to interpret and guide implementation of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The city and county recognize: a) the critical interrelationships among economic, social and environmental health; b) the way we produce, trade and consume impacts our ability to sustain natural resources; c) social and cultural equity and diversity creates valuable human capital that contributes to the economy and environmental sustainability; d) planned physical development has an impact on social conditions and should be considered in community planning; and e) the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon the full engagement and involvement of the community. The city and county seek to maintain and enhance the livability, health and vitality of the Boulder Valley and the natural systems of which it is a part, now and in the long-term future. The city and county seek to preserve choices for future generations and to anticipate and adapt to changing community needs and external influences. 1.02 Principles of Environmental Sustainability. There are limits to the capacity of the biosphere to support the life of human beings at current levels of consumption and pollution. There are limits to the land and soil available for food production, to available water, to resources such as trees, fish and wildlife, to industrial resources like oil and metals, and to the ability of nature to absorb our waste. With this in mind, the city and county acknowledge the importance of natural capital, which can be kept at healthy levels for the long term only when we are able to do the following: a) Renewable resources should not be used faster than they are recharged or replenished by the environment. b) Non-renewable resources should be used with the greatest care and efficiency, and some of those should be used to develop renewable replacements. c) Waste should not be dumped into nature any faster than nature can absorb it. C-Energy-13 Agenda Item 6A Page 145 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 1.03 Principles of Economic Sustainability. a) The city and county will encourage a viable and balanced economic structure and employment base within the parameters of established land use, environmental and growth policies. b) The city and county recognize that a healthy, adaptable local economy is vital to the community's ability to provide a highly desirable quality of life, high levels of services and amenities. c) The city and county will promote a diverse and sustainable economy that supports the needs of all community members. d) The city and county will seek to ensure that current needs are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs, for the economy is a subsystem of the environment and depends upon the environment both as a source of raw material inputs and as a sink for waste outputs. 1.04 Principles of Social Sustainability. The city and county will promote a healthy, sustainable community by: a) Recognizing, respecting and valuing cultural and social diversity. b) Recognizing that social and cultural inequities create environmental and economic instability. c) Ensuring the basic health and safety needs of all residents are met. d) Providing infrastructure that will encourage culturally and socially diverse communities to both prosper within and connect to the larger community. 1.05 Community Engagement. The city and county recognize that the quality of environmental, economic and social health is built upon full involvement of the community. The city and county will recognize the rights of and encourage all community members to play a role in governmental decisions, especially those that affect their lives or property, through continual efforts to maintain and improve public communication and the open conduct of business. In addition, the city and county will continue to support programs and provide opportunities for public participation and neighborhood involvement. Efforts will be made to remove barriers to participation and involve community members not usually engaged in civic life. Increased emphasis will be placed on notification and engagement of the public in decisions involving large development proposals or major land use decisions that may have significant impact on, or benefits to the community. Conserving Natural Resources 4.36 Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The city and county will identify and implement cost-effective actions that will reduce the community's contribution to total global greenhouse gas emissions. The initial goal is to be in alignment with the Kyoto Protocol target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions seven percent below 1990 levels. Reducing emissions C-Energy-14 Agenda Item 6A Page 146 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page requires integration of land use, building code, transportation and energy supply policies. 4.37 Integration of Water and Air Quality with Transportation Planning. The city and county will integrate air and water quality planning into the land use and transportation planning, and traffic management processes. Land use patterns that reduce water pollution and air emissions will be encouraged. The city and county will consider strategies to reduce impacts to air and water quality through water quality protection measures, stabilization of soils, appropriate monitoring of construction and mining operations, and minimization of exposure to both mobile and stationary sources of air pollution. The city and county will promote transportation strategies encouraging low emission vehicles, alternatives to traditional fuels and travel in single-occupant vehicles. (See Policy 6.15 Improving Air Quality.) 4.39 Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy. The city and county will implement policies and programs that enhance opportunities for individuals, businesses and public organizations to limit the use of non-renewable energy resources by conserving energy and converting to renewable resources. The city will set goals for the use of non-renewable energy that are consistent with an orderly transition to a sustainable energy economy in order to preserve fossil fuels for future generations. The city will support private decisions to use renewable energy, will publicly develop local renewable energy resources where economical, and will preserve future options for renewable energy so that they may be developed when they become cost effective. 4.40 Energy-Efficient Land Use. The city and county will encourage the conservation of energy through land use policies and regulations governing placement, orientation and clustering of development and through housing policies and regulations. The conservation of energy is served by the development of more intense land use patterns; the provision of recreation, employment and essential services in proximity to housing; the development of mass transit corridors; and efficient transportation. 4.41 Energy-Efficient Building Design and Construction Waste Minimization. The city and county will continue their efforts to improve the energy and resource efficiency of new and existing buildings. The city and county will continue to improve codes, standards and regulations assuring energy and resource efficiency in new construction, remodels and renovation projects. Energy conservation programs will be sensitive to the unique situations that involve historic preservation and low-income home owners and renters and will assure that programs assisting these groups are continued. The city and county will encourage renovation of existing buildings over demolition and will develop C-Energy-15 Agenda Item 6A Page 147 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page policies and programs that promote the reuse of materials salvaged after deconstruction in development and construction practices. 4.42 Waste Minimization and Recycling. The city and county will actively pursue and support programs and activities that reduce the amount of waste that must be landfilled. Policies will emphasize source reduction, reuse, composting, recycling and the use of materials with recycled content. It is the goal of the city to reduce solid waste produced in the city by achieving a fifty percent waste diversion level. Higher goals may be set by City Council from time to time as it is deemed feasible and desirable. Only as a last resort should a waste be buried or burned. 4.43 Promoting the Use of Recycled Materials. The city will develop recycling programs, policies and infrastructure that encourage and support the recycling and reuse of recyclable materials. The city will create and maintain relevant Environmental Purchasing Policy that promotes markets for recycled commodities, promotes the preferential purchase of recycled products for government use, and encourages the use of products and services that are durable, repairable, reusable, recyclable and economically viable. 4.44 Reduction of Use and Safe Disposal of Hazardous Materials. The city and county will work together to reduce use and ensure safe disposal of hazardous materials in city and county operations, residences and businesses. Information will be provided for businesses and households about non-toxic alternatives, pollution prevention and responsible use and disposal of hazardous materials. Use of a household hazardous waste collection facility will be made available to all residents. Transportation 6.09 Transportation Impact. Traffic impacts from a proposed development that cause unacceptable community or environmental impacts or unacceptable reduction in level of service will be mitigated. All development will include strategies to reduce the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) generated by the development. New development will be designed and built to be multimodal and pedestrian- oriented. Strategies to reduce the VMT generated by new development will include all modes of travel as well as travel management programs such as the Eco Pass. The design of new development will especially focus on providing continuous modal systems through the development, on connecting these systems to those surrounding the development and on providing connections between the modes. (See Policy 3.05 Growth to Pay Fair Share of New Facility Costs.) C-Energy-16 Agenda Item 6A Page 148 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page The city will provide tools and resources to help businesses manage employee access and mobility and support public-private partnerships such as transportation management organizations to facilitate these efforts. 6.15 Improving Air Quality. The city will develop a highly connected and continuous transportation system for all modes, including a grid-based transportation pattern allowing for convenient and efficient travel by all modes. The city will look for opportunities to complete missing links of the current transportation grid through the use of area transportation plans and at the time of parcel redevelopment. The city and county will design the transportation system to minimize air pollution by promoting the use of non-automotive transportation modes, encouraging the use of fuel efficient and alternatively fueled vehicles that demonstrate air pollution reductions, reducing auto traffic, maintaining acceptable traffic flow, and siting facilities so they do not block air drainage corridors. The city and county will cooperate with other entities that make transportation decisions to achieve these ends. (See Policy 4.37 Integration of Water and Air Quality with Transportation Planning.) C-Energy-17 Agenda Item 6A Page 149 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page 3 = n o 0 D o N a N Exhibit B Evaluation of the BVCP Energy and Climate Policies and Climate Action Plan Strategy Areas Many of the current and long-standing community energy and climate priorities and are included in the comprehensive plan today; however, some areas are not at the level to address the importance the community has placed on energy and climate issues. The chart below evaluates the extent to which the Comprehensive Plan core concepts and policies further the community's energy and climate goals. This chart is organized by the six Climate Action Plan Strategy Areas and lists what areas might be missing or could be strengthened in the Comprehensive Plan. i Action Core BVCP Policy Missing/Could i a nrgy ate ff e P _n Strategy Concept Strengthened Area, All priorities All strategy areas Several policies 1.01 Community Sustainability The core concepts and BVCP recognize policies should be updated to sustainability as a 1.02 Principles of Environmental acknowledge the importance of unifying goal to Sustainability. energy and climate as community secure Boulder's priorities future economic, ecological and social health. Greenhouse Gas The CAP is the Not addressed 4.36 Greenhouse Gas Emissions The current policy sets a specific Emissions implementation plan "...city and county will identify and date that is expiring. The language for policies outlined in implement cost-effective actions that should be changed to remove the the BVCP. All CAP will reduce the community's reference to the 2012 Kyoto goal. It Strategy Areas are contribution to total global should also be updated to focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The initial acknowledge the need for longer greenhouse gas goal is to be in alignment with the term goals, likely with milestones as emissions. Kyoto Protocol target of reducing well as how goals will be evaluated. greenhouse gas emissions seven Setting a new goal should be percent below 1990 levels. Reducing discussed as part of the clean energy emissions requires integration of land plan process or during discussions use, building code, transportation and about the CAP tax. At a minimum energy supply policies." the city should match the state goal (20 percent below 2005 levels by 2020) which is slightly more aggressive that the city's goal. C-Energy-18 Agenda Item 6A Page 150 of 174 3 o~ D o 0 D Energy fficiency Strategy Area 1: liot addressed 4.39 Energy Conservation and The existing policy language and Conservation M Renewable Energy generally reflects the community's { "..city and county will implement priorities, as well as current and { policies and programs that enhance planned work in these areas. opportunities for individuals, Potential changes include businesses and public organizations to referencing greenhouse gas limit the use of non-renewable energy emissions reductions and climate resources by conserving energy and change as priorities that influence Reduce Use converting to renewable resources. energy conservation and renewable The city will set goals for the use of energy policies. non-renewable energy that are consistent with an orderly transition to a sustainable energy economy in order to preserve fossil fuels for future generations. The city will support private decisions to use renewable energy, will publicly develop local renewable energy resources where economical, and will preserve future options for renewable energy so that they may be developed when they become cost effective. De-carbonizing Strategy Area 3: Not addressed 4.36 Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Two existing policies address energy Boulder's Energy See above supply and transitioning to a Supply sustainable energy economy may 4.39 Energy Conservation and adequately address the city's general Renewable Energy See above intentions. Given the overarching nature of energy supply to the city's energy and climate-related goals, a new clean energy supply policy Ramp Up Renewables should be considered to reflect the community's interest and support. The existing policies that reference this topic could be revised to avoid duplication or left as is to maintain links among policies. C-Energy-19 Agenda Item 6A Page 151 of 174 3 o~ D o 0 D Energy fficiency Strategy Area 2: liot addressed 4.41 Energy-Efficient Building Add language to building codes- in Newo Design and Construction Waste related policies to reflect the city's Construction and Minimization role in establishing energy efficiency Existing Buildings The city and county will continue requirements in existing buildings ■ ■ ■ their efforts to improve the energy and redevelopment in addition to ■ ■ ■ and resource efficiency of new and new construction. These changes ■ existing buildings. The city and relate to the SmartRegs rental county will continue to improve housing requirements going into codes, standards and regulations effect in 2011 and similar codes for Build Better assuring energy and resource existing commercial buildings that efficiency in new construction, could be developed in 2011. remodels and renovation projects. Energy conservation programs will be sensitive to the unique situations that involve historic preservation and low- income home owners and renters and will assure that programs assisting these groups are continued. The city and county will encourage renovation of existing buildings over demolition and will develop policies and programs that promote the reuse of materials salvaged after deconstruction in development and construction practices. Waste Reduction Strategy Area 5: Not addressed 4.42 Waste Minimization and The policies should be updated to Recycling reflect goals and targets that result "city and county will actively pursue from Waste Reduction Planning and support programs and activities efforts occurring in late 2010 and that reduce the amount of waste that early 2011. must be landfilled.. It is the goal of the city to reduce solid waste produced by achieving a fifty percent Waste Not waste diversion level. 4.43 Promoting the Use of Recycled Materials " city will develop recycling C-Energy-20 Agenda Item 6A Page 152 of 174 3 = n o 0 D o programs, policies and infrastructure a 03 that encourage and support the recycling and reuse of recyclable materials... and create and maintain relevant Environmental Purchasing Policy.. 4.44 Reduction of Use and Safe Disposal of Hazardous Materials " city and county will work together to reduce use and ensure safe disposal of hazardous materials in city and county operations, residences and businesses.." Climate Adaptation Not addressed The comprehensive plan does not Add a new policy describing the include a policy addressing adapting goals for developing and to climate change impacts. implementing a climate adaptation and resiliency plan in coordination with Boulder County. The policy should acknowledge the roles of government to protect and prepare the community. C-Energy-21 Agenda Item 6A Page 153 of 174 3 = n o 0 ra ~ Attachment D Proposed BVCP Policy Changes to RIflect Recently Accepted Master Plans Many of the city's master plans outline specific ways we will address sustainable service provision and resource protection. Several master plans and supporting plans have been updated or are new since the last major update, and the goals and direction adopted in them needs to be reflected in BVCP policies. Also, Planning Board and City Council have given policy direction on stream and wetland protection; these policies should be updated as well. All Urban Service Criteria and Standards will be updated to reflect changes in plans. Plans accepted since the 2005 major update where policies need updating in the BVCP are the following: Water Utility Master Plan (in progress) Source Water Master Plan (2009) Drought Plan (2009) Water Conservation Plan (2010) Wastewater Utility Plan (2009) Stormwater Master Plan (2009) Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan (2008) Water Quality Strategic Plan (WQSP)(2009) Wetlands Ordinance revisions (2009) To illustrate integration of policies and concepts, significant revisions may be made to the plan to eliminate, consolidate or re- organize some policies that are now described in more detail in master plans or management plans. This will eliminate redundancies and make the true vision and goals at the Comprehensive Plan level more clear. New Issue or Policy Direction Missing or Needs to be Strengthened New regulations for An overarching policy approach identified in the WQSP is the Strengthen BVCP water resource planning Drinking Water, challenge of addressing new regulations and emerging policy to provide direction for the city to Wastewater and contaminants. This challenge is common to drinking water be proactive and prepare for new water Stormwater quality, wastewater and stormwater quality. Current BVCP quality standards and emerging policy provides direction to meet water quality standards but contaminants. does not provide overall direction to be proactive and prepare for new water quality standards. Drinking Water The WQSP provides direction to implement system wide Strengthen BVCP drinking water policy to System Wide drinking water quality protection strategies from the city source emphasize a system wide approach to Planning waters, to the water treatment plant and throughout the water protection of drinking water quality from D1 Agenda Item 6A Page 154 of 174 3 = n o 0 D O distribution systerrio Current BVCP policy provides adequate "source to tap." direction to meet d%inking water standards but is missing direction for system wide protection strategies. Water System The city's Treated Water Master Plan (2000, update in progress), Include drought planning and response in Reliability Water Conservation Plan (2010) and Drought Plan (2009) water resources planning policy and water emphasize the importance of water system reliability and conservation policy. drought response criteria to manage the city's water supply. Source Water The Source Water Master Plan provides direction to actively Revise BVCP policies that address multi- Protection pursue protection of the city's source water quality. Management purpose use and include protection of the of reservoirs and adjacent land is important to protect the quality quality of the city's source water. of source water. Current BVCP multi-purpose use policies do not include references to "public waters" and do not address the importance of source water quality in decisions about public lands. Sustainable The wastewater treatment plant was upgraded in 2008 to meet Strengthen wastewater policy to seek the Wastewater future capacity demands and new state discharge permit limits. most sustainable wastewater treatment Treatment New discharge limits are expected in late 2010, which will processes, which balance achievement of require additional treatment upgrades to be implemented. In water quality improvements with greater addition, the city continuously seeks to optimize operations to energy efficiency and minimal chemical achieve water quality improvements in balance with energy usage. demand and chemical usage (Wastewater Utility Master Plan). Maintain The city wastewater collection system now serves a mature city Change the current emphasis from central Wastewater that is close to its planned physical limits. Continuous collection system growth to cost effective, Collection System improvement of maintenance techniques and capacity is proactive maintenance of collection recommended to prevent blockages and deterioration of the system for future growth patterns and collection svstem. long term sustainability. Source Control of The Wastewater Utility Master Plan identifies the Industrial Add the need to continually improve the Wastewater Pretreatment Program as an essential element for the protection city's Industrial Pretreatment Program to of the integrity of the wastewater collection and treatment prevent discharge of harmful substances system. to the collection system and treatment facility and ensure compliance with current and future discharge limits. D2 Agenda Item 6A Page 155 of 174 3 ~ D o 0 D Entegrated Design The Stormwater A ter Plan cross supports the Comprehensive Update BVCP community design and CL IS Approach to Flood and Stormwater Utility Master Plan (2004), and the WASP. Area Plan policies to Stormwater, Collectively, these master plans provide direction to integrate • Reference stream corridors and basins Groundwater and management of stormwater and groundwater into area wide and as an important framework and Pollution Control site specific designs. context for urban design. • Include direction to create system of Area-wide planning: BVCP policies that address area-wide green spaces that minimize air and planning are missing references to include stormwater and water pollution and urban heat island groundwater management as important design elements. effects. • Incorporate language about Site-specific planning: BVCP policies could better support importance of stream corridors and integration of stormwater quality and groundwater protection associated buffers for protecting water into site design. quality and managing pollutants from urban areas. Combine and revise existing stormwater, groundwater and pollution control policies to support integration of stormwater and groundwater protection into site design: • Strengthen protection of surface water and groundwater interconnections during site design. • Make stormwater low impact development techniques the preferred design approach for buildings and associated impervious areas. • Support integrated management of stormwater quantity and quality through innovative design approaches. • Design public and private right-of- ways to address stormwater pollution from transportation D3 Agenda Item 6A Page 156 of 174 3 = n o 0 D 10 CL corridors and adjacent urban areas. • Support urban trees by facilitating stormwater infiltration and protecting natural groundwater hydrology. Flood Mitigation Revise flood policies to clarify approach to Policies The Comprehensive Flood and Stormwater Master Plan calls for critical facilities protection, the development of 500-year protection standards for critical facilities in line with federal guidance to ensure access to, use of and uninterrupted service for critical facilities. The development of a critical facilities ordinance was identified as a mitigation goal as part of the city's Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, which was adopted in 2008. This plan calls for the adoption of an ordinance that regulates new construction and improvement for critical facilities to the 500-year flood level to protect these facilities from flood losses and damages that could render them unusable during times of need. Work on the critical facilities ordinance is on-going and as decisions are made will inform the BVCP policy updates. Groundwater The recent update to the wetlands protection ordinance and Highlight the importance of maintaining several development projects in the city have highlighted the natural groundwater hydrology to issue of impacts to streams and riparian areas from lowering the wetland, stream and riparian area groundwater table for underground development or sustainability and flood management and infrastructure. The city has not yet established a clear policy or add a goal to better understand and direction to address this issue. prevent the potential impacts of dewatering for underground development and infrastructure on urban creeks, wetlands and riparian areas. D4 Agenda Item 6A Page 157 of 174 Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Attachment E Area III-Planning Reserve and the Service Area Expansion Process At the May 25, 2010 meeting, City Council requested additional information regarding the two property owner requests in the Area III-Planning Reserve (Boulder Multi-sport Training Center and Agriburbia) and the service area expansion process. This memo provides the following additional information and analysis: 1. Background on the Area III-Planning Reserve 2. The current service area expansion process 3. Additional information regarding the two property owner requests 4. Options for next steps on a service area expansion 5. Initial information on potential service area expansion options 1. Background on the Area III-Planning Reserve The Service Area concept and the creation of Areas I, II, and III is one of the keystones of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP). In combination with joint city/county decision-making, it distinguishes the plan from many others in the state and country. Area I (the city) and Area II (the area planned for annexation and service provision) form the city's service area. Area III was defined in 1977 as the area that would not accommodate urban development and where the rural character should be preserved and protected. The Planning Areas remained as originally defined until 1993, at the conclusion of the Area III Planning Project. The Area III Planning Project was a three-year joint effort of the city and county planning departments. The city and the county had been receiving incremental requests for Area III to II changes, particularly along the Jay Road corridor and East Arapahoe, and the plan did not provide guidance as to where such a change would be appropriate. The goal was to determine where and when urban growth might and might not be acceptable in the future, prior to considering Service Area expansions. The following studies were completed as part of the project: (1) Land Use Suitability Analysis; (2) Urban Services Feasibility Analysis; (3) Vacant, Redevelopable and Underdeveloped Land Inventories in the existing Service Area; (4) Potential Service Area ExpansionBVCP Policy Compatibility Analysis; and (5) Gunbarrel Policy Analysis. At the conclusion of the project, city and county decision-makers determined that only a small amount of Area III should be contemplated for future urban expansion, and then only if detailed planning for the area indicates community benefits exceed potential negative impacts. The final report states: "Service Area expansion is not desirable simply to provide additional land supply for future development; it must provide a broad range of community benefits.... conceptual planning should provide an analysis of cumulative impacts and whether the carrying E1 Agenda Item 6A Page 158 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page capacity of the Boulder Valley can absorb this additional growth....and should also provide an evaluation of trade-offs in meeting conflicting community goals." After a series of public hearings the four approval bodies agreed in the fall of 1993 to: • Designate 680 acres in the "West Portion-Northcentral Area" as Area III-Planning Reserve because it presented very limited environmental constraints, was proximate to urban services, and was of sufficient overall size to potentially accommodate the conclusions of the future vacant land needs analysis. • Designate the remainder of Area III as "Area III- Rural Preservation Area." The procedures for amending the plan were changed following the project to set in place a process for service area expansions that would be initiated by the city and county, and provide for comprehensive planning of the Planning Reserve as opposed to incremental changes. The policy direction for determining the procedures for amending the Area III/II change process was described in 1993 as the following: 1. Consider limited Service Area expansion to include land in the Planning Reserve Area if the benefits to the community outweigh costs and negative impacts. 2. Revise the Area III to II change process to change it from an incremental, reactive, applicant driven process to a process based on comprehensive planning of growth areas and city-initiated Area IIUII changes. The revised Area IUII change process and criteria must establish greater community control over the location, type, acreage, and timing of development. 3. Service Area expansion is not desirable simply to provide additional land for future development-it must provide a broad range of community benefits. 4. Area III to II changes should be large enough areas to cohesively plan and annex by neighborhoods (which should have a diversity of land uses) and to build logical increments for infrastructure. 5. In order to achieve community goals and policies, the city should be more directive in determining what actually gets built both for development in the existing Service Area and for any new growth areas (in Area III). 6. Require that new growth (in Areas II and III) provide needed land uses that compliment existing subcommunities and implement a broad range of community goals. Development of land in new growth areas should be phased over many years in order to enhance growth management, encourage appropriate infill and redevelop- ment in the existing Service Area, and preserve development options for the future. The procedures that were developed based on this policy direction are still found in the plan today, including: • Area III to II changes only apply to lands in the Area III-Planning Reserve, not the Area III-Rural Preservation Area, unless the change can qualify as a minor amendment to the boundary. • A process for expanding the Service Area boundary was established • A Service Area Expansion Plan process was created, with a list of what the plan must contain, and the criteria that the plan must meet. • The role of property owners in the Service Area expansion process is established. E2 Agenda Item 6A Page 159 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Since the original procedures were adopted into the plan, several minor revisions and re- organizations have occurred, however the key elements of the process remain intact. Of most significance was the change that occurred in 2005, when additional text was added to define "sufficient merit" to authorize the development of a service area expansion plan, and a new criterion for approval of a service area expansion plan was added requiring that the change provides for a "priority need that cannot be met within the existing service area." This was added to strengthen the intent of the service area expansion process as a comprehensive, city initiated process. The result of these two changes was the addition of an initial community process to identify a list of unmet needs prior to considering whether to authorize a service area expansion plan. This process is further explained in the following section. In researching other communities, many utilize an urban service area or growth boundaries, and some have vacant lands designated for specific land uses while others have no future use identified. Of the communities researched, none had a provision for future land reserved for the future needs of the community, such as described in the BVCP. The closest example of a system similar to that of the Area III-Planning Reserve in the BVCP is the Urban Reserves program recently established by the Oregon Metro Regional Government. Metro's program is on a regional scale, and has identified lands in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties that are appropriate for future urban development, and lands for rural preservation. The time horizon of the urban reserves is 50 years. The system was established to eliminate the incremental, site-specific decision making that was required as part of urban growth boundary changes as required by Oregon state law. The guidelines and policies for how an urban reserve can be moved inside the urban growth boundary includes a comprehensive planning process, much like the Service Area Expansion Plan process in the BVCP. Discussions of the Area III - Planning Reserve by the four approval bodies as part of the 2010 Major Update are summarized below: April 13, 2010 joint study session between the City Council and the Board of County Commissioners: • Process is misleading in that plan intent is to be proactive, but process is reactive: we provide opportunity for landowners in the Planning Reserve to submit requests, but we aren't really interested in expanding the service area. Need to relook at the process. • Need more flexibility to respond to special opportunities and not limit ability to look at the Area III - Planning Reserve to the major update (only every five years). April 15, 2010 Planning Board meeting: • The board voted not to consider a service area expansion. • Some board members recognized the interesting aspects of the multi-sport training complex concept, and the need expressed by the speakers. • Several board members recognized the innovation presented by both of the specific Planning Reserve requests. E3 Agenda Item 6A Page 160 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • The board agreed that the process issues should be worked out during this update as raised during the City Council and Board of County Commissioners dinner. • Several board members agreed that the concept was interesting, but that the Planning Reserve is a significant undertaking and now may not be the time to expand the service area. April 27, 2010 Joint study session between the Planning Board and City Council: • Council and Planning Board members indicated a desire to start the discussion about the Area III-Planning Reserve some time after this update is complete and that we should make small process changes in this update to provide flexibility and change the process for automatically soliciting requests from Area III - Planning Reserve property owners". May 25, 2010 City Council meeting: • Several council members were interested in studying both Request #17 -Multi-Sport Training Complex and Request #18 - Agriburbia further • Individual council member comments included: o Both requests meet an important need and have real community benefit. o Council needs to be clear regarding what it is asking for as further study, stating that a full analysis was no small feat. o The idea of a Sports Facility was interesting, but would split the Planning Reserve Area in half o Not interested in further study of Request #18. o How long should the city hold this land aside for new ideas? o It is time to have a larger conversation about this area and what the community wants. If the community decides to keep the area as Open Space or Agricultural, then the city should state that and not continue to invite applicants to submit proposals that would not be approved. o Suggestion that staff provide a scope of work to council before a full analysis or exploration of community need is completed. o The projects were interesting, the process outlined in the Comprehensive Plan made it difficult to have a conversation about whether these projects belong in the Planning Reserve. • Staff agreed to comeback with additional information regarding requests #17 and #18, and the planning reserve in general, and to lay out some options related to the planning reserve process and properties. Individual council members asked for the following information: o More information on transportation, alternative sites, combining some of the pieces and the business plans. o Information on the implications of Request 917 splitting the Planning Reserve. o Understand the business plan for Request #18, specifically how much affordable housing would there be above and beyond what the city would expect and what was the community benefit. June 16, 2010 and August 18, 2010 Planning Commission Meetings: • The commissioners took no formal action E4 Agenda Item 6A Page 161 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • The majority of commissioners felt that the city and county should engage in a study of visionary and appropriate uses of the Area III-Planning Reserve before reacting to individual proposals. August 24, 2010 Board of County Commissioners Meeting: • The board took no formal action • The board agreed that there seems to be a consistency issue when the plan states that the area should be looked at comprehensively, yet we invite property owners to submit proposals. • There should be a process for the community to weigh-in on what is of high-value. • Individual Commissioners stated: o It is a high bar to look at urban development in the Area III-Planning Reserve, and to question what are the broad community needs and impacts to the county as well, such as the jobs/housing balance, commuting and transportation. o Not having some guidance on what the community desires in that area is disappointing. Service Area Expansion Process 2. The current process to develop land Public Hearing to discuss Service Area Expansion: in the Planning Reserve Should the City study if sufficient merit (unmet need in service area) exists to develop expansion plan? The process to develop land in the Area III-Planning Reserve has very distinct steps, and joint YES NO decision-making points. The process is outlined in the flow chart to the right. As Identify range of community articulated in the background needs, and if they cannot be met Expansion Plan Cannot be section above, the intent of the considered until next Major Area III-Planning Reserve is not to serve as additional land 4-body Public Hearings: supply for development, but to NO potentially provide land for Sufficient Merit to Authorize community needs if they cannot Expansion Plan? (Any One Body) be met within the service area. The criteria and process to expand the YES service area intentionally set a high threshold, to ensure that if land is to be removed from Area III, F Prepare Expansion Plan the benefits to the community outweigh any impacts. Public Hearings: To begin the service area Approve Proposed Plan? expansion process, all four bodies must determine that "sufficient merit exists to YES NO: authorize a service area Property Moves from Area I I I to Area II (Eligible for Annexation) E5 Agenda Item 6A Page 162 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page expansion plan." To determine whether "sufficient merit exists", there must be demonstration that a desired community need cannot be met within the existing service area. If all four bodies authorize the development of a service area expansion plan, it is a significant joint city-county planning effort. The BVCP outlines what the expansion plan must include. After the plan is completed, all four bodies must review and consider whether to approve the plan, based on criteria listed in the BVCP. If approved, the area included in the plan is moved from Area III-Planning Reserve to Area II. Property owners may then begin the annexation and development process according to the phasing identified in the expansion plan and the extension of city infrastructure. 3. Additional information on the proposals from the property owners in the Planning Reserve and any alternative sites for the uses proposed Additional information submitted from the property owners of the two requests in the Area III- Planning Reserve are attached. The original materials submitted as part of the public request process can be found at www.bouldercolorado.gov/files/Clerk/Agendas/2010/May_25/2A.pdf. At the May 25, 2010 Meeting, council members questioned the implications of splitting the Area III-Planning Reserve if the Boulder Multisport Training Center were to be constructed. The intent of the Area III-Planning Reserve is that changes should be large enough areas to cohesively plan and annex by neighborhoods (which should have a diversity of land uses) and to build logical increments for infrastructure. If a central portion of the Area III- Planning Reserve is moved into the service area and developed, the flexibility in the remaining Area III-Planning Reserve lands could become more limited. This results in the possibility of eliminating some community needs from being met by utilizing the Area III- Planning Reserve. Other factors such as infrastructure planning like roads and utilities could become limited. All of these issues and factors are items that must be addressed in the service area expansion plan. Council members also expressed interest in understanding potential impacts of the two proposals, such as transportation or traffic generation. While it is premature to undertake traffic or transportation studies, the required components of a service area expansion plan include developing requirements for development impact mitigation and offsets (both on-site and off-site), of which transportation and traffic impacts would be included. Council requested additional information from the property owners on the two specific requests within the Area III-Planning Reserve. Included in Attachment E is the additional information received from the property owners, and is summarized below. Request #17 is located near the intersection of Highway 36 and Yarmouth Avenue, and includes 61.4 acres of land proposed for development of a Multisport Training Center. The development would include indoor and outdoor recreational facilities (such as swimming pools, bicycle and running tracks), residential housing for athletes and their families, retail, E6 Agenda Item 6A Page 163 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page and sports medicine facilities. The additional information submitted by the property owner includes a letter, a copy of a newspaper article supporting the project, and a letter of support from the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau. A brief list of three alternate sites was included, including Diagonal Plaza, McKenzie Junction, and the North Boulder Armory site. Staff considers that the McKenzie Junction property (which includes three parcels, which total approximately 20 acres) may be worth additional analysis for this project. While the parcel is uniquely shaped, it is currently vacant, located within the existing service area meaning that there urban services (such as water and sewer) available, is directly adjacent to the regional trail systems, and is zoned Business Transitional - 1, which allows for the uses proposed. With the time sensitivity expressed by the property owner, the McKenzie Junction parcel may provide a readily-developable parcel. Request #18 - 2815 Jay Road includes 23 acres of land, and is proposed for an "agriburbia" development, which is a mixed density housing development with agricultural production. The property owner and consultants submitted a summary with additional information on the proposal, and some questions and responses regarding the agriburbia development concept. The project is proposed to include approximately 270 housing units, 50% or more of which are proposed to be included within the city's affordable housing program. The proposal includes 230 single family homes and 40 units in a townhouse/rowhouse configuration. The portion of the site to be dedicated to agriculture is estimated at 30%. 4. Options for next steps related to the Area III-Planning Reserve for the 2010 Major update to the BVCP Option 1: Move forward to consider Service Area expansion In a public hearing, council would pass a motion directing 1. Public process to identify staff to conduct a study to identify a broad range of community needs not community needs and analysis on whether they can be met currently met in service area within the service area. This public process would occur in the first quarter of 2011. After the study is complete, all four approval bodies would 2. Public Hearings -Sufficient hold public hearings to determine if sufficient merit exists to Merit to Authorize Service authorize a service area expansion plan. All four bodies must Area Expansion Plan? authorize a service area expansion plan. A service area expansion plan is a significant work effort, 3. Service Area requiring staff resources from both the city and county and Expansion Plan YES would need to be a priority work program item. Developing developed the plan is anticipated to take more than a year to complete, and must include the following components: No further a) Types of development needed to meet long term analysis of NO community needs; service area expansion E7 Agenda Item 6A Page 164 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page b) Key requirements to ensure compliance with community goals and policies, and to ensure compatibility with the existing development context and surrounding areas; c) Conceptual land use and infrastructure plan components; d) Requirements for development impact mitigation and offsets (both on-site and off-site); and e) Development Phasing It is presumed that taking this first step in the service area expansion process means that the city is seriously considering a service area expansion. While the city and county are not required to authorize the development of a service area expansion plan at the conclusion of the study, the community and property owner's expectations of the process continuing will be raised. With this option, no revisions to the service area expansion process would be made as part of the 2010 BVCP Major Update. Option 2: Conduct Planning Reserve Study during 2012 Mid- 1. Revise service area Term Update expansion process as part of 2010 BVCP Update In a public hearing, council would pass a motion that the service area should not be considered for expansion during 2. Conduct study of Area III- the 2010 Update, and request that a study of the Area III- Planning Reserve as part of Planning Reserve occur as part of the 2012 Mid-Term 2012 Mid-term update update. As part of the 2010 update, revisions to the service area expansion process would be made, including the areas described in the following section. During the 2012 Mid-term update to the BVCP, a study of the Area III-Planning Reserve would occur. Based on council input, the scope of this study could include broader issues related to the Area III-Planning Reserve, as well as a study of community needs that are not currently met within the existing service area. Option 3: Do not move forward to consider service area expansion at this time: In a public hearing, council would pass a motion that the service area should not be considered for expansion during the 2010 Update to the BVCP. Staff will work on revising the service area expansion process as part of the 2010 Major Update, and consideration of the changes will be included as part of the policy and text changes adoption process with all four bodies in the spring of 2011. See the following section for additional information on revisions to the service area expansion process under this option. 5. Initial information on potential service area expansion options If there is support for options 2 or 3, changes to the service area expansion process would be made as part of the 2010 Major Update. Based on the input to date, ideas and suggestions for changes to the service area expansion process are as follows: E8 Agenda Item 6A Page 165 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page • Examine options to initiate a service area expansion outside of the five-year major update. • Examine options on when the appropriate time is to solicit proposals from property owners. • Consolidate and clarify the intent of the Area III-Planning Reserve, which is now described in parts through Policy 1.22, 2.04 and 2.10. • Consolidate the intent and purpose of the Planning Reserve with the procedures and criteria for expansion, so a user can completely understand the Area III-Planning Reserve and expansion process without reading the entire plan. • Organize the service area expansion procedures in order, rather than having to flip back and forth to follow the steps in order. Staff will work on revising the service area expansion process as part of the 2010 Major Update, and consideration of the changes will be included as part of the policy and text changes adoption process with all four bodies in the spring of 2011. E9 Agenda Item 6A Page 166 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Boulder Multisport Training Alan Villavicencio, MD & Sports Science Center 1155 Alpine Ave, Suite 320 Boulder, CO 80304 Office: 303-938-5700 BMT Cell: 303-808-9926 Fax: 303-998-0007 September 14, 2010 Members of Boulder City Council 1777 Broadway, Boulder Boulder, Colorado 80306 Re: Boulder Multi-Sport Training & Sports Science Center Dear City Council Members: It is my understanding that the Boulder City Council (Council) will hold a study session later this month and a joint session with the Planning Board next month regarding the Planning Reserve. These study sessions follow upon the decision by the Council directing Planning Department staff to study two projects proposed in the Planning Reserve, one of which is the Boulder Multi-Sport Training and Sports Science Center (BMT). This correspondence is an attempt to convey some important facts to the Council regarding the BMT and its place in Boulder, the lack of any other feasible sites in Boulder for the BMT, the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP), and the Planning Reserve. During various follow-up meetings and conversations, I have been informed that there is a hold-up in studying this project because it may be necessary to study the entire Planning Reserve prior to this project moving forward. The simple fact is that the study of the two projects as directed by the Council last May is quite appropriate and a full study of the entire Planning Reserve is not necessary prior to permitting development of any portion of the Planning Reserve - especially when the proposed project is directly adjacent to existing City boundaries and is located on a main thoroughfare. I have heard legitimate concerns about the burden to the existing workload from studying the Planning Reserve and that such a study could take as long as two years. Even if the Council decided to study the entire Planning Reserve, the scale of the analysis could be substantially smaller than even just studying the 388-acre developable portion of the Planning Reserve because not all land in the Planning Reserve is created equal in terms of the effort required to study it for infrastructure needs or its impact to the City. Again, since the BMT would be located on property that is adjacent to the City and with frontage on 28th Street/Highway 36, this would require much less analysis than a property on the Planning Reserve's interior with no proximity to utilities or roadways. I would like to point out that Paragraph 3.B.1.(b). on page 59 of the BVCP states that it is encouraged that the minimum size of the parcel or combined parcels for Service Area expansion be at least forty acres. Clearly, the BVCP contemplates that service expansion would (and should) occur on an incremental basis. E10 Agenda Item 6A Page 167 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Boulder Multisport Training Alan Villavicencio, MD & Sports Science Center 1155 Alpine Ave, Suite 320 Boulder, CO 80304 Office: 303-938-5700 BMT Cell: 303-808-9926 Fax: 303-998-0007 It would also seem to me that the service area expansion should be done concurrent and in coordination with the current Boulder Valley Comp Plan update process. Given that the Planning Reserve is identified in the Comp Plan as an interim classification with an urban development option, the question is not whether, but when and how to develop the Planning Reserve to best serve the community and citizens of Boulder and to match the ideals and ethics that Boulder has come to stand for. It should be importantly noted that the feasibility of implementing the BMT in Boulder is time sensitive. If Boulder does not allow the BMT to be built here in the reasonable future, a project geared towards the same target user base may be built elsewhere in Colorado. There is already a group trying to rapidly put something together in Denver. Neighboring communities such as Longmont, Erie, Superior and Louisville all have large, accommodating, commercially zoned properties that are available and these communities would love to have this very project or another such as this in their city. Since I have been approached by leaders in other Boulder County and surrounding communities hoping to lure the project to their community with the promise of attractive land, partnerships, and easy approval, I may have no option but to seriously consider such options if I don't see a predictable and timely path to potential approval in Boulder. The Council should be aware that there are no other sites within Boulder to accommodate the BMT. This project requires a site large enough to accommodate the various components of the training center and sports science center as well as proximity to the primary competitive and training routes, transit, and other amenities. This is the only potential location in Boulder where this project could possibly occur. Some alternative sites we reviewed will not work for the project for the reasons described below: - Diagonal Plaza. This site requires assemblage of 15 separate owners, has existing viable uses, is not large enough, and in all of its locational attributes is a prime and essential retail location for the City. - McKenzie Junction (47th Street/the Diagonal). The site is far too small (15+ acres) and has substantial access limitations for modes of transit other than cars. - The North Boulder Armory. The site is far too small (8.5 acres), is proposed for a different development, and was already denied by City Council for further study in the 2010 Comp Plan update process. Analyzing the first potential future development in the Planning Reserve should be seen as a unique opportunity for reinforcing a high standard for Boulder's sustainable future, reiterating that Boulder is a leader in sustainable land use and lifestyle. The BMT would hopefully set a new development standard established specifically for the Planning Reserve that embodies our community's goals for holistically sustainable planning. I would like the Council to understand that I am highly supportive of the fact that Boulder has a responsibility to articulate the necessary benefits, delineate an appropriate vision, assess E11 Agenda Item 6A Page 168 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Boulder Multisport Training Alan Villavicencio, MD & Sports Science Center 1155 Alpine Ave, Suite 320 Boulder, CO 80304 Office: 303-938-5700 BMT Cell: 303-808-9926 Fax: 303-998-0007 infrastructure requirements, ensure no major negative impacts, consider phasing, and identify the best uses. I am asking that you reaffirm that effort and provide clear guidance to the city staff so that, with respect to this project, it can occur on a reasonable and predictable timetable. I am deeply committed to this project and to achieving it in Boulder. I believe the demand for the project exists here and this project has the potential to be iconic of Boulder's core values of sustainability, healthy lifestyle, and a thoughtful approach to land use. I have heard from nearly every person I have spoken to locally about the BMT that "it is so Boulder!" I am passionate about ensuring that we continue to get the same reaction from inception through the planning and long-term operation of the BMT. That said, if it is unrealistic for this project to get off the ground in a reasonable amount of time then I will have no choice but to begin seriously considering alternative locations despite the fact that I believe this project truly belongs in Boulder. This is exactly the type of project that the Planning Reserve was set aside for. If the BMT is built, I believe it will substantially reinforce Boulder's position as both a mecca for multi-sport and athletics in the United States and as one of the nation's most sustainable cities. I have repeatedly stated that I would like to work in partnership with the City to make this project a reality. Such a partnership has the potential to set a new standard locally for how the private and public sectors work jointly to take advantage of emerging green development opportunities. Thank you for your time and consideration. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or comments. Yours truly, Alan Villavicencio, MD Owner 4756 28th Street (and adjacent properties) E12 Agenda Item 6A Page 169 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Sean Maher: Sports complex would boost Boulder's profile Sean Maher, For the Camera Boulder Daily Camera Posted: 06/27/2010 09:40:46 AM MDT Dr. Alan Villavicencio owns some land up in north Boulder and he has a big idea. Actually it is a huge idea that would ensure Boulder's status as the Mecca of endurance sports for decades to come. The plan is to build a world-class training complex that would give Boulder the best facilities on the planet for cycling, running, swimming and triathlon. And they would all be housed together in a single place The Boulder Multisport Training & Sports Science Center. The project may cost up to $100 million and would include an Olympic-size outdoor pool, a 25-meter indoor pool, a full-size velodrome and 400-meter track with a football/soccer field. There would also be a sports science center, a fitness center, tennis courts and a full-service hotel with retail and food service. Extended-stay housing and maybe a conference center will complete the project. Why do we need this? Many reasons, but since this column is about the local economy, I'll focus on that. Every year, thousands of athletes come from all over the world to train here. They include professionals, Olympians and national teams from New Zealand, Japan and many others. Some stay for weeks and some for months. However, they all spend money and go back home to rave about this amazing place called Boulder. This in turn encourages others to visit here and spend money in our hotels, shops and restaurants. The impact of Boulder's "athletic economy" has never been formally measured, but it is huge and it enriches our city both economically and culturally. It also contributes mightily to the Boulder brand that is now recognized around the world. However, we have new competition for this lucrative market. Boulder's training facilities are not the latest or greatest and this is starting to erode our reputation. Other cities see the economic benefit of attracting athletes and they are scrambling to position themselves as the "next" Boulder. Cities such as Ogden, Utah; Phoenix; and Oregon cities such as Portland and Eugene are building new pools, tracks and trails to actively market their locales to the athletic training and tourism market. This project will ensure that the "next" Boulder is not in Arizona or Oregon, but right here. It could do for our athletic community what the federal labs did for our science and research community. Yes it is that big. And it's not all about catering to elite athletes from other places. Villavicencio is committed to keeping the facility affordable and accessible for local families, teams and recreational athletes. This will not be a country club for uber jocks. It will also not be a huge generator of pollution and traffic. Parking will be limited and a "clean" shuttle will transport visitors from DIA and around town when they are not on their bikes. The latest green building technology and solar energy will be integral to every component of the project. Many questions remain to be answered. The most obvious is funding. But the first (and maybe hardest) step is to get a green light from the city and county. The City Council is intrigued by the idea and recently voted to study it further. Let's hope they recognize how important it is to make sure the next Boulder is Boulder. Sean Maher is the Executive Director of the Downtown Boulder Business Improvement District and Downtown Boulder, Inc. E13 Agenda Item 6A Page 170 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page 2440 Pearl Street Boulder, Co 80302 April 15, 2010 City of Boulder, Planning Board RE: Comp Plan, Planning Reserve: Multi Sport Training Complex As you review the recommendations for the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan service area expansion for Areas III, I urge you to support the request to expand the service area to include the Boulder Multisport Training Complex. The concept of a Multi Sport Training Center in Boulder is such a unique opportunity to provide a facility that supports Boulder's international reputation as destination for top performing athletes. The concept of this facility does not exist anywhere in Colorado, nor does expertise to support all of Boulder's world class athletes. The Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau would like Planning Board to recommend this concept to be included in the Boulder Valley Comp Plan. Most Sincerely, Mary Ann Mahoney Executive Director E14 Agenda Item 6A Page 171 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page Here is more information regarding Agriburbia: Link to their web-site: http://www.agriburbia.com/index.html Agriburbia FAQ's attached. Regarding the site specifically: Overview: The proposed project helps to meet two significant community needs, 1) permanently affordable work force family housing and 2) local agricultural production. Housing: Our proposed housing program is as follows: - 130 single family home lots ranging from 1700 to 2000 SF - 100 single family home lots ranging from 1300 to 1500 SF - 40 row homes/town homes in 2-plex and 4-plex configurations We have had multiple discussions with Thistle regarding the affordable portion of the development which we anticipate will be more than 50% of the living units. This project can increase the affordable housing stock in Boulder by about 4.8% (currently about 2,800 affordable housing units, 135/2,800 = 4.8%). Furthermore, the type of units proposed are primarily single family residences which are the most desired housing type in the affordable housing program. By providing affordable work force family housing we will reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled by commuters to and from Boulder. It is reasonable to assume that if 135 families lived in Boulder rather than drove into Boulder to work every day, vehicle miles driven would be reduced by about 1,350,000 miles per year (135 homes X 2 working people per home X 20 mile round trip commute per person in and out of Boulder X 250 working days per year = 1,350,000 vehicle miles driven per year). Farming: We anticipate the agricultural portion of the development will be approximately 30% of the site. Our objective is to create a sustainable community that will help reduce the need for the 5000 mile salad by growing more food locally which can be consumed by the residents in the immediate community, sold at the local farmers market, and/or sold to several of our local markets and restaurants. If needed, the appropriate soil can be imported to facilitate optimal growing conditions and by using computerized drip watering techniques the water requirement is less than 1/3 of that required for a typical grass lawn. Other: Lastly, there will be minimal impact on City services. The site is contiguous to City limits, surrounded on 3 sides by urban densities, and is compatible with the surrounding area. E15 Agenda Item 6A Page 172 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page T51 Grow April 15, 2010 Qty of Boulder ComTuhity Raining and %Aainability Attn: Chris Mescxk, AICP MEMORANDUM RE B1/CP Request for 2815 Jay Fbad - AGRIBUFBA FREQUENTLYA9<® QUE TIONS(FAQ's) What is Agri burbia? Agribu'bia isdesign movement that integrates aspects of Agrariarisr~ along with oorterrporary design methodsand other erMronrrertally sound principlesof real estate development. Agriburbia incorporatesprofesional food production asa key elerrent inthe commuity design of the development. It corrtoinesthe positive cultural, physical and financial characteristics from both the urban and rural ends of the landuse spectrum to create an entirely new land use designation. Agriburbia providesa medmnisnfor individualsto become more self afficient and create truly sAainable oommtitiesby growing more food closer to home. Can You Farm Year Faound? o Nearly, and Yes-several solutionsrrey be employed as`ssason extendersi such ashigh-tunnels and hoop houseswhich extend the growing seasons 1-2 months in both the spring and the fall. Not all cropswill grow year round however and assudh the food produce available with change throughout the season. o True Year round cultivation and growth can be achieved in Green Houseswhich may be a part of the development and site planning program What if Existing Soils are Not Optimal? o All soilsare an-ended with local organic/ natural conpost where required Can City Water be Used for Irrigation in a Cost lEffective Fashion? o Yes- dty water can actually be less expensive after equipment costs are incurred to filter and ready sxface water sources How Much Water do You Need? o Approximately 1 Acre Fbot of Water per Acre per Season (1 AcreFoot / Acre / Season). By corrparison, this isapproxin -ately the same water use for xeric landscapes. We achieve this through use of modern agricultural drip irrigation systemsthat deliverswater directly to the rootsof the plants o these systemsare constartly monitored and adjucted by oorrputer for humidity, teaperature and weather forecast. R se same systerrscanwater decorative landscape areas aswell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The TSR Group. Inc. 888.458.8554 theTSRgroup.com E16 Agenda Item 6A Page 173 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page Return to Agenda Item 6A Cover Page fe Agriburbia Frequently Asiced Questions (continued) What if Residents Don't Want to Actively Farm? o Agriburbia develop ments are profesaonally maintained and managed. R~sidentsand tenantsare not required to farm bi t may participate in a wage earring capacity if they desire. How Much Land is Required to be in Agricultural Production? o Thee actual an-ount and location of land in cultivation isdetermined during the site planing phase. Agriburbia approachesthe solution methodologically, similar to calculating Roor Area Ratio (FAF~ and Parking Space calculations for site development; our criteria isa VAR(Veggie Area Ratio). Loosely, we factor the nxrber of residentsand their caloric requirements soil site, solar and water supply constraints and what type of cropscan support local caloricand conimrcial demands (some crops Trey be grown for trade rather than cons-r ption). How Much More Production DoesAgriburbia Generate Compared to Traditional Farming? o Agriburbia utilizesa bio-intensive, highFdensity crop farming method similar to other urban and sustainable approaches(SPIN farming, Square-Foot Farming, Pernamiture, etc). It'sreasonable to expect that Agriburbia farming will produce 2x to 3x the an-out of HUMAN caloriesper square foot compared to traditional/ industrial agricultural practice. Do You use Heavy Machinery (Tractors etc.) And Pesticides (Crop Dusting etc.)? o The Agriburbia concept is`mininally mechanized' which means that srrell scale rrechinery may be used (skid-steer, srrall utility tractor, etc). We have designed the farming so that it can be done with Light lrrplen-ert machinery powered by diesel or waste grease derived fuels so that the operation are `cradle to cradle' sustainable. o Inorgaricand ran-biodegradable pesticidesare not permitted. Crop dining isnot permitted. o Farm plot layout is designed so that it could be metabolically farmed (by horse or oxen) aswell. o Developnert guidelinesnay also be implenented to govern machine operating tirresaswell as crop selection and allowed pest control n-easres Wewelcon-e any eommentsor questionto clarify any of these poirtsand any other aspectsof the Agriburbia approach. On behalf of Falmos Development, The TSR Group 810 Brickyard Qrde, Suite 4 Golden CO, 80403 303 458 8554 You are welcome to contact us directly: Matthew "Quint" Pednrnnd (CHD) x11 or by email: gredrrnnd@thetErgroup.com Paul Newton (Serior Project Manager) x27 or by email: pnewton@thets'group.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The TSR Group. Inc 888.458.8554 wrvv~~ theTSRgroup.com E17 Agenda Item 6A Page 174 of 174 Previous View Item 6A Cover Page