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2009 Recreation Plan Survey - DRAFT Report of Results City of Boulder 2009 Recreation Plan Survey DRAFT REPORT OF RESULTS L limp L., f t ti f'• i Recreation Plan Survey A F'r wool April 2009 Table of Contents Executive Summary .....................................................................................................................1 Survey Background .......................................................................................................................5 Community Priorities for Recreation .........................................................................................6 Residents' Perspectives on Funding Options for Recreation ..................................................18 Resident Sources for Recreation Information ..........................................................................22 Resident Perspectives on Registration .......................................................................................24 In Conclusion ...............................................................................................................................25 Appendix A: Responses to Survey Questions ............................................................................27 Appendix B: Responses to Open-ended Survey Question ........................................................41 Appendix C: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Geographic Area .........................45 Appendix D: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household ........................................................................................................59 Appendix E: Survey Methodology .............................................................................................68 Developing the Questionnaire 68 Selecting Survey Recipients 68 Survey Administration and Response 69 Survey Processing (Data Entry) 70 Survey Analysis 70 Appendix F: Survey Materials ...................................................................................................72 U C N C N U L U N C O 43 ca Z M O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Recreation Plan Survey n April 2009 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Survey Background The city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department is developing a Recreation Program and Facilities Plan as part of a recommendation from the 2006 Parks and Recreation Department's Master Plan and the City Manager's Work Group on Recreation Financing. This plan will include an assessment of recreation trends and issues; local demographics; and recommendations for recreation programs, services and facilities. The goal of this plan is to help guide future decisions and resource allocations for Boulder's recreation division. As a part of the public input process for the plan, a survey of a representative sample of Boulder Valley residents was commissioned. A randomly selected sample of 3,000 residential addresses within Boulder Valley (zipcodes 80301 through 80305) were mailed the 2009 Boulder Recreation Plan Survey. About 4% of these addresses were vacant. A total of 622 completed surveys were received, for a response rate of 22%. Survey results were weighted so that respondent age, gender and type of residence (rent or own, detached single-family housing unit or attached housing unit) were represented in the proportions reflective of the Boulder population. The 95% confidence interval ("margin of error") is plus or minus four percentage points. Community Priorities for Recreation Those completing the survey were asked to what extent they agreed or disagreed with a series of statements about the overarching goals of recreation programming in Boulder. The percent strongly agreeing that each statement should be part of the mission of Boulder Parks and Recreation was: ♦ To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community, 78% ♦ To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 and younger), 70% ♦ To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 and older), 58% ♦ To provide recreational opportunities for adults (20 to 59 years old), 57% ♦ To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities (e.g., people with disabilities or people with low incomes), 55% ♦ To provide opportunities to make social connections; to strengthen the "social fabric" of the community, 34% ♦ To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the community, 24% In addition to providing feedback about the broad purposes of recreation, those completing the survey were asked which population groups they thought should be given the highest priority. The percent rating each group as "essential" was: ♦ Children age 12 and younger, 50% U ♦ Teenagers 13 to 19 years old, 49% ♦ People with low incomes, 44% ♦ People with disabilities, 3 8% ♦ Senior adults (age 60 and older), 33% ♦ Adults (20 to 59 years old), 29% ♦ Families together as a group, 23% Z 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 1 Recreation Plan Survey rj;ZAFT AprN 2009 Those completing the survey were asked how they would allocate of recreation facility time across five types of opportunities. They were to assign a percent of time to each, such that the percents added to 100%. The average percent allocation for each category was: ♦ Opportunities for drop-in use (e.g., swim laps, shoot baskets, lift weights, etc.), 29% ♦ Opportunities to "learn-to" (skill-building; beginner and intermediate classes), 22% ♦ Opportunities for city-sponsored leagues to use the facilities (e.g., softball leagues, adult soccer leagues volleyball leagues, youth football leagues, etc.), 19% Opportunities for community groups to use the facilities (e.g., Little League, Master Swimming, youth soccer clubs, Boulder Rugby Club, etc.), 17% ♦ Opportunities for advanced or elite programs (advanced classes or competitive opportunities), 12% Respondents were asked how they would distribute recreation class offerings among three categories. On average, respondents felt that about half of the class offerings should be in the activity physical recreation category. The remaining allocation was split fairly evenly between leisure enrichment (25%) and community education classes (24%). Respondents also were asked how they would distribute tax dollars to best meet the needs of the Boulder community. They were invited to distribute $100 tax dollars across five categories of recreation programming. The highest allocation of tax dollars was given to recreational programs offered at the beginning and intermediate level, with an average of $35 allocated to this category. The next biggest allocation was given to reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups, with an average allocation of $24. The remaining allocations were roughly equal, with about $13 or $14 being given, on average, to recreational programs at advanced an elite levels, to reducing rental rates for adult community groups, and to providing one-day community events. Those participating in the survey were given a series of five pairs of statements from which they were to choose the one that best represented how they felt. ♦ The first pair of statements dealt with the overarching philosophy of the parks and recreation department, and whether it should be considered a human service (and therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax dollars) or whether it should be considered a business (and therefore offer more services funded primarily through fees). There was great support for the human services model, which was chosen by 84% of respondents compared to the business model chosen by 16% of respondents. ♦ Two-thirds of respondents felt that program offerings should be offered at many different levels from beginner to very advanced, while a third felt they should be concentrated at the beginning and intermediate levels. This seems somewhat contradictory to the finding that when allocating tax dollars, respondents on average devoted more tax dollars to introductory level programming ($35, the highest amount of the five categories) and less to advanced and elite levels ($14). It may be that when faced with the trade-off, many respondents chose to have a variety of levels served, including the introductory levels but also the advanced levels, but when allocating the tax U dollars, placed a higher priority on the introductory levels while still allocating some of their hypothetical dollars to the advanced levels. N ♦ About two-thirds considered it more important to make facilities more available for drop-in use, while about a third thought facilities should mostly be programmed with leagues and other pre- planned activities. • Respondents were evenly split between choosing whether the city should "provide the facilities o and programs identified as needed by residents even if they are provided by other agencies" or z 0 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) a Page 2 Recreation Plan Survey f•:~: April 2009 whether "the city should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and do not replicate them." The survey was also used to assess resident involvement in a variety of recreation activities. For each activity, respondents indicated whether, in the last year, they or anyone in their household had participated in the activity at a city of Boulder facility, at a nonprofit facility, at a private facility, or at another city's facility. After indicating their participation in the various activities, respondents evaluated the importance of offering each to the community through city Parks and Recreation. ♦ The six most popular activities, in which more than 30% of households had participated, were using an indoor swimming pool for drop-in or lap swim (53% of households), drop-in exercise (51 fitness and wellness classes (43%), using the reservoir (41 using an outdoor swimming pool for drop-in or lap swim (31%) and using and indoor leisure pool (31%). * In general, the participation levels for the various activities mirrored the importance ratings. The four activities given the highest importance ratings were also the four most popular activities. There were a few notable exceptions; while a relatively small percent of respondents had participated in EXPAND (3%), certification classes (12%), children's summer day camp (8%), children's day camp on school days off (4%) or the Youth Services Initiative (2%), these activities were all rated as "essential" by 30% to 38% of respondents. ♦ Some other offerings that had relatively lower participation rates but higher importance ratings included educational health and wellness classes; boating at the reservoir; outdoor swimming pools for lessons and classes; and summer swim team for children and teens. Residents' Perspectives on Funding Options for Recreation Those completing the survey were asked to what extent they would support or oppose various funding options for city parks and recreation offerings. The proportion that "strongly" or "somewhat" supporting each option presented was: ♦ Renew existing sales taxes for parks and recreation when they expire, 90% ♦ Partnering with other municipalities, school districts or nonprofits to develop joint use recreational facilities or programs, 85% ♦ Grants and donations, which require raising matching funds from the community on a portion of the monies received, 82% ♦ Partnering with private organizations to develop recreational facilities or programs, 77% ♦ A new sales tax, 38% Other types of funding strategies were also presented to respondents. The proportion that "strongly" or "somewhat" agreed that the city should support each was: • Profitable or popular programs (such as sports leagues and swimming lessons) can help pay for less profitable programs (such as therapeutic, senior and youth programs), 81 % ♦ Individuals living outside Boulder should pay higher fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities, 77% ♦ Individuals who live outside Boulder but work or own a business in Boulder should pay resident fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation 2 facilities, 70% ♦ The city of Boulder should seek corporate sponsors in order to supplement parks and recreation W funding (e.g., signage with advertisements on baseball fences, use of event banners with logos or advertising during events or games, naming of facilities, etc.), 69% C ♦ Recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees, 37% Z 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 3 Recreation Plan Survey a. F:-r April 2009 Four options for the use of additional funding, if any were found for Parks and Recreation, were presented to respondents. Nearly all supported the idea that these funds should be used to maintain and update the existing facilities and equipment. About three-quarters of respondents thought such funds could be used to lower fees for facilities and programs. About two-thirds supported building or renovating facilities, or offering additional recreation programming. Respondents were asked how much subsidy they thought should be given to a variety of types of programming. In general, the programs that had previously been seen to be more popular in terms of use or support were more likely to be deemed appropriate for higher levels of subsidy. In addition, programs for children and teens were more likely to be given a higher subsidy than programs for adults. Two programs, however, particularly stand out; about 40% of respondents thought that the Youth Services Initiative and EXPAND should receive a near total subsidy; 12% or fewer respondents thought any other program should receive such a subsidy. Resident Sources for Recreation Information The availability of information about the recreation offerings of the city was perceived fairly positively. Just over a quarter of respondents (26%) considered the availability of recreation information as "excellent" and another 51% rated it as "good." About 23% rated the availability of information as "fair" or "poor." The Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide was the most frequently used source of information about the city's parks and recreation programs, with nearly two-thirds of respondents reporting that they find out about programs from the Guide. About 4 in 10 respondents said they use the city of Boulder Web site, and about 3 in 10 learn about parks and recreation offerings through the Boulder Camera newspaper. About 2 in 10 pick up the informational flyers about program offerings. Very few (4%) learn about recreational programs from Channel 8. When asked which one source they most preferred, the Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide was the most popular choice with 4 in 10 indicating this as their preferred choice. This was followed by the city's Web site, chosen by 3 in 10 respondents, and the Boulder Camera newspaper, selected by 1 in 10 respondents. Resident Perspectives on Registration Those completing the survey were asked whether or not they or anyone in their household had registered for a city of Boulder Parks and Recreation program or class in the last year. About a third reported that they had. Those who had registered were asked what method or methods they had used to register. The most frequently used options were in-person (39%) and online (39%). About a quarter of those who had registered had done so by phone. When asked how they would rate the ease or difficulty of registration, just over half deemed registration "very easy" with another 45% rating it as "somewhat" easy. Only 3% felt registering for classes or programs was "somewhat difficult," and no respondent rated the registration process as "very difficult." In Conclusion ➢Boulder residents view Parks and Recreation as a resource for the entire community, and are willing for tax dollars to be used to subsidize fees. Y A special emphasis is placed recreational offerings for youth by Boulder residents. m Boulder residents believe Parks and Recreation should serve those who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities. Residents want Parks and Recreation to serve a wide range of purposes, but do place a higher priority on active physical recreation and introductory-level programming. 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 4 Recreation Plan Survey April 2009 SURVEY BACKGROUND The city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department is developing a Recreation Program and Facilities Plan as part of a recommendation from the 2006 Parks and Recreation Department's Master Plan and the City Manager's Work Group on Recreation Financing. This plan will include an assessment of recreation trends and issues; local demographics, and recommendations for recreation programs, services and facilities. The goal of this plan is to help guide future decisions and resource allocations for Boulder's recreation division. As a part of the public input process for the plan, a survey of a representative sample of Boulder Valley residents was commissioned. A random sample of households located in the Boulder Valley (zip codes 80301 through 80305) were selected to receive the survey. Each selected household was contacted three times, starting February 25, 2009. First, a prenotification announcement was sent, informing the household members that they had been selected to participate in the Boulder Recreation Survey. Approximately one week after mailing the prenotification, each household was mailed a survey containing a cover letter signed by the city manager and the department director enlisting participation. A reminder letter and survey, scheduled to arrive one week after the first survey was the final contact. The cover letter contained instructions in Spanish directing Spanish-speakers to a Web site where they could complete the survey online in Spanish, if they wished. No survey recipient chose to complete the Spanish version of the survey online. About 4% (121) of the 3,000 surveys mailed were returned because the housing unit was vacant or the postal service was unable to deliver the survey as addressed. Of the 2,879 households presumed to have received a survey, 622 completed the survey, providing a response rate of 22%. The 95% confidence interval (or "margin of error") quantifies the "sampling error" or precision of the estimates made from the survey results. A 95% confidence interval can be calculated for any sample size, and indicates that in 95 of 100 surveys conducted like this one, for a particular item, a result would be found that is within ±4 percentage points of the result that would be found if everyone in the population of interest was surveyed. The demographic characteristics of the survey sample were compared to those found in the 2000 Census estimates for adults in the city. Sample results were weighted using the population norms to reflect the appropriate percent of those residents in the city. The variables used for weighting were respondent gender, age and housing situation. Additional details on the survey administration and analysis can be found in Appendix E: Survey Methodology. On many of the questions in the survey, respondents could answer, "don't know." The proportion of respondents giving this reply is shown in the full set of responses included in Appendix A: Responses to Survey Questions. However, for the most part, these responses have been removed from the analyses presented in the body of the report. In other words, the tables and graphs display the responses from respondents who had an opinion about a specific item. U t For some questions, respondents were permitted to select multiple responses. When the total exceeds 100% in a table for a multiple response question, it is because some respondents are counted in multiple categories. When a table for a question that only permitted a single response does not total to o exactly 100°/x, it is due to the customary practice of percentages being rounded to the nearest whole z number. m O O Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 5 Recreation Plan Survey t~ A April 2009 COMMUNITY PRIORITIES FOR RECREATION A variety of purposes can be served by recreation facilities and programs. Those completing the survey were asked to what extent they agreed or disagreed with a series of statements about the overarching goals of recreation programming in Boulder. There was strong agreement with each statement presented (see Figure 1), but the statement with the most support was "to maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community," with nearly 8 in 10 respondents "strongly" agreeing and virtually all respondents (95%) at least "somewhat" agreeing with the statement. Providing positive activities for children and teens received high affirmation, with 7 in 10 respondents "strongly" agreeing this was an important purpose for recreation programming, and 94% at least "somewhat" agreeing. A majority strongly felt that recreation programming should provide recreational opportunities for senior adults age 60 and older (58%) and for adults age 20 to 59 (57%), with over 90% at least somewhat agreeing with each of these purposes. Over half of respondents (55%) strongly agreed that the city should be providing recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise have the chance, and nearly 9 in 10 at least somewhat agreed. Strengthening the social fabric and enhancing the economic vitality of the community were given somewhat less support, although over 70% at least somewhat agreed with these two purposes. Figure 1: Community Priorities for Recreation To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well- 1796. 95% being of the general population of the community To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 24% 94% and younger) To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 and older) 35% 93% To provide recreational opportunities for adults (20 to 59 35% 92% years old) To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities (e.g., 89"/o people with disabilities or people with low incomes) To provide opportunities to make social connections; to 53% 87% strengthen the "social fabric" of the community To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the 4896 72% community U 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% M Percent of Respondents Lq a) ■ Strongly Agree ■ Somewhat Agree o z m 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 6 Recreation Plan Survey m~ April 2009 After rating their agreement with the seven purpose statements, respondents were asked to indicate which one statement they felt was the most important purpose for recreation offerings. About two- thirds of respondents indicated that maintenance and improvement of the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community was the primary purpose of city recreation services. Figure 2 below displays the percent of respondents indicating which statement they felt was the most important along side the percent of respondents who had strongly agreed with each statement. In general, the rank order is fairly similar. There is a slight discrepancy among the lower rated items, but this is because some of the people that "strongly" agreed with these statements still chose the maintenance and improvement of the community's health and well-being as their first priority. Figure 2: Highest Priorities for Recreation To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well- 67% being of the general population of the community 78% To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 14% and younger) 700 To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities (e.g., people with disabilities or people with low incomes) 55% To provide recreational opportunities for adults (20 to 59 4% years old) 57% To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering 4% special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the community 24% To provide opportunities to make social connections; to 3% strengthen the "social fabric" of the community 34% To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 1% and older) 58% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 60% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents V C ■ Percent ranking as highest priority ■ Percent "strongly agree" U L U N Vl N l6 C O i+ Z O O 4 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 7 A FT Recreation Plan Survey y =.a April 2009 In addition to providing feedback about the overarching purposes of recreation, those completing the survey were asked which population groups they thought should be given the highest priority. Children and teenagers were most often deemed "essential" groups to serve; about half of respondents gave these two groups "essential" ratings. Over 80% rated these groups as "essential" or "very important" to serve. People with low incomes were rated as "essential" to serve by 44% of respondents, followed by people with disabilities (38%) and senior adults (33%). Each of these three groups was considered "very important" or "essential" to serve by 76% to 80% of respondents. The adult population was rated as "essential" to serve by 29% of respondents, with 76% considering this group at least "very important." Families as a group were considered "essential" to serve by 29% of respondents, and as at least "very important" by over half of respondents (58%), but this category was given the lowest priority among all the groups rated. Figure 3: Rating of Importance of Serving Various Population Groups Children age 12 and younger ' . 33% 83% Teenagers 13 to 19 years old 36% 850/,, People with low incomes 34% 78% People with disabilities 38% 76% Senior adults (age 60 and 489'0 81°10 older) Adults (20 to 59 years old) • ' 47°~ 76% Families together as a group 35% 58% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40`e 5010 60% 70°x`' 80% 90% 100°/n Percent of Respondents ■ Essential ■Very Important U C N C N V L 1U N N W l° C O Y O z O) 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 8 Recreation Plan Survey I'~~ { April 20T9 After rating the importance of serving various population groups through recreation offerings, respondents were asked to indicate to which two groups they would give highest priority. Figure 4 below displays the proportion of survey participants choosing each of the groups as one of their top two priorities, side-by-side with the percent of participants rating each as "essential." In general, the rank order of the two types of ratings are similar, with teenagers and children receiving the highest priority and families together as a group receiving the lowest priority. However, there was some variation in the rank order of ratings comparing "essential" ratings as priority ratings. This is because respondents could rate more than two items as "essential" but could only choose two groups to give their highest priority. Figure 4: Highest Priority for Serving Various Population Groups 39~J~ Teenagers 13 to 19 years old 49% 38% Children age 12 and younger 50% People with low Incomes 31QJ° f ~ 44°Jo Adults (20 to 59 years old) 25% 29% ■ Percent ranking as highest priority ■ Percent rating as essential Senior adults (age 60 and 19 older) 33% People with disabilities 38°/a ° Families together as a group 12 1u 239'0 0%11 10% 20% 30`Yo 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents Differences in subgroup ratings Generally, the "mission statement" endorsed by the highest percent of respondents was that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to its residents to maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population, followed by an emphasis on providing positive activities or recreational opportunities for youth, senior adults, adults and those with who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities. However, in Gunbarrel, providing positive activities for youth received the greatest endorsement by respondents. (See Appendix C: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Geographic Area.) A larger proportion of those whose households included children or teenagers "strongly" agreed that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs in order to provide positive activities for children and teens than did those whose households did not include children and teenagers. N However, even among respondents in households without children and teenagers, a strongly majority (67%) strongly agreed that providing positive activities for youth was an important mission for o Boulder Parks and Recreation. (See Appendix D: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Presence Z of Children or Teenagers in Household.) N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 9 Recreation Plan Survey FT April 2009 The city has to take into account a range of community needs and desires when planning the use of its recreation facilities. Those completing the survey were asked how they would balance the allocation of facilities across five types of opportunities: drop-in use, learn-to (skill-building) classes, advanced or elite programs, city-sponsored leagues and community groups. They were to assign a percent of time to each, such that the percents added to 100%. The average allocation by respondents is shown in Figure 5. Opportunities for drop-in use were given the highest allocation, 30% on average. The second highest allocation, 22%, was given to beginner and intermediate ("leam-to") opportunities. Leagues and community groups received 19% and 17% allocation on average, respectively. Advanced classes or elite competitive opportunities were given the lowest allocation, with 12% on average. Figure 5: Average Percent Allocation by Residents to Various Purposes at City Recreation Facilities Opportunities for drop-in use (e.g., swim laps, 29% shoot baskets, lift weights, etc.) Opportunities for community groups to use the facilities (e.g., Little League, Master Swimming, 17''A youth soccer clubs, Boulder Rugby Club, etc.) Opportunities for city-sponsored leagues to use the facilities (e.g., softball leagues, adult soccer 19% leagues volleyball leagues, youth football leagues, etc.) Opportunities for advanced or elite programs (advanced classes or competitive opportunities) 12 /o Opportunities to "learn-to" (skill-building; beginner 22% and intermediate classes) 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Average Allocation c~ t U M 4) N N C O .m Z O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 10 Recreation Plan Survey viol Aprf12009 Respondents were asked how they would distribute recreation class offerings among three categories: active physical recreation, leisure enrichment activities, and community education and certification. They reported what proportion of all the classes should fall into each of the three categories, with the total percents across all three categories summing to 100%. Figure 6 below shows that average distribution among the categories given by respondents. On average, respondents felt that about half of the class offerings should be in the activity physical recreation category. The remaining allocation was split fairly evenly between leisure enrichment (25%) and community education classes (24%). Figure 6: Average Distribution to Various Categories of Classes Active physical recreation (e.g., yoga, Pilates, sports, 52% dance, swimming, fitness, etc.) Leisure enrichment activities (e.g., pottery, painting, ° photography, cooking, etc.) 25 /o Community education (e.g., babysitting certification, 24% CPR, health and wellness lectures, etc.) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Average Allocation C N C O U r U l0 N N 10 C O .6 Z O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 11 Recreation Plan Survey April 2009 Respondents also were asked haw they would distribute tax dollars to best meet the needs of the Boulder community. They were invited to distribute $100 tax dollars across five categories of recreation programming. The highest allocation of tax dollars was given to recreational programs offered at the beginning and intermediate level, with an average of $35 allocated to this category. The next biggest allocation was given to reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups, with an average allocation of $24. The remaining allocations were roughly equal, with about $13 or $14 being given, on average, to recreational programs at advanced an elite levels, to reducing rental rates for adult community groups, and to providing one-day community events. Figure 7: Distribution of Tax Dollars to Various Purposes Recreational programs at the beginning and $35 intermediate level ('learn-to" programs) Reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups (e.g., Little League, synchronized $24 swim team, etc.) Reducing rental rates for adult community groups (e.g., Masters Swimming, Adult Ultimate Frisbee, $14 etc.) Recreational programs at the advanced and elite $14 levels ("competitive" programs) Providing one-day community events at city $13 recreation facilities $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 $35 $40 Average Allocation V C 61 V C N U L V N O d l6 C O Z rn O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 12 Recreation Plan Survey n^ ate" tiNr"i'i 2009 City staff and officials are often faced with competing interests when planning recreational offerings with limited resources. Those participating in the survey were given a series of five pairs of statements from which they were to choose the one that best represented how they felt. The first pair of statements dealt with the overarching philosophy of the parks and recreation department, and whether it should be considered a human service (and therefore offer limited services funded primarily through tax dollars) or whether it should be considered a business (and therefore offer more services funded primarily through fees). There was great support for the human services model, which was chosen 17 to 3 over the business model choice (see Figure Two-thirds of respondents felt that program offerings should be offered at many different levels from beginner to very advanced, while a third felt they should be concentrated at the beginning and intermediate levels. About two-thirds considered it more important to make facilities more available for drop-in use, while about a third thought facilities should mostly be programmed with leagues and other pre- planned activities. Respondents were evenly split between choosing whether the city should provide the facilities and programs identified as needed by residents even if they are provided by other agencies or whether the city should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and do not replicate them. There were some differences by subcommunity in responses to this last trade-off. those in North Boulder/Palo Park, South Boulder and Southeast Boulder were more likely to choose providing programs and facilities identified by residents regardless if they are provided by others, while those in Central/East/CU/Crossroads, Outside and in Gunbarrel were more likely to choose providing facilities and programs that complement and do not replicate others. Gunbarrel residents, in particular, were more likely to choose this option (69%). Figure 8: Trade-Off Preferences Consider parks and recreation a human service that contributes Consider parks and recreation a business which should attract to the physical, emotional and social welfare of the whole community, 84% 16% and serve as many people as possible who can afford to pay for the and therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax services provided, and therefore offers more services funded primarily dollars. through user fees. Parks and recreation program offerings should be at many a a Parks and recreation program offerings should focus primarily different skill levels, i.e. beginner through very advanced. 65 /0 35 /o on introductory classes at beginning and intermediate levels. Parks and recreation facilities should mostly be available for Parks and recreation facilities should be mostly programmed public drop-in use, with some active programming, likely 63% 37% with leagues and other pre-planned activities or events, with earning lesser revenues. some drop-in use, likely earning greater revenues. v Parks and recreation program offerings should offer some Parks and recreation program offerings should focus mostly on popular sports and fitness activities, but also include diverse 61% 39% popular sports and fitness (e.g., aerobics, yoga, softball, soccer, i opportunities like arts and crafts, and classes (e.g., cooking, tai chi, basketball, etc.) because those serve the most number of etc.). people. The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs identified by residents, regardless of whether 51% 49% and programs that complement others in the community and z they are provided by other agencies in or near Boulder. not replicate them. o N Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 13 Recreation Plan Survey April 2609 The survey was also used to assess resident involvement in a variety of recreation activities. For each activity, respondents indicated whether, in the last year, they or anyone in their household had participated in the activity at a city of Boulder facility, at a nonprofit facility, at a private facility or at another city's facility. Figure 9 (on the next two pages) displays the proportion of respondents whose households had participated in the activity in the previous year at an facility. Appendix A: Responses to Survey Questions includes a table that shows the percent participating at each type of facility. After indicating their participation in the various activities, respondents evaluated the importance of offering each to the community through the city's Parks and Recreation Department. The proportion rating each as "essential" is also displayed in Figure 9. The six most popular activities, in which more than 30% of households had participated, were using an indoor swimming pool for drop-in or lap swim (53% of households), drop-in exercise (51%), fitness and wellness classes (43%), using the reservoir (41%), using an outdoor swimming pool for drop-in or lap swim (31%) and using and indoor leisure pool (31%). In general, the participation levels for the various activities mirrored the importance ratings. The four activities given the highest importance ratings were also the four most popular activities. There were a few notable exceptions; while a relatively small percent of respondents had participated in EXPAND (3%), certification classes (12%), children's summer day camp (8%), children's day camp on school days off (4%) or the Youth Services Initiative (2%), these activities were all rated as "essential" by 30% to 38% of respondents. Some other offerings that had relatively lower participation rates but higher importance ratings included educational health and wellness classes; boating at the reservoir; outdoor swimming pools for lessons and classes; and summer swim team for children and teens. Differences In subgroup ratings In general, households with children or teenagers had higher participation rates for most recreational activities compared to households without children or teenagers. A couple notable exceptions included leisure enrichment classes (similar participation rates among both groups) and educational health and wellness classes (somewhat higher participation rates among households without children or teenagers). (See Appendix D: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household.) In addition, households without children or teenagers gave lower importance ratings to most recreation activities compared to households with children or teenagers. The activities given the highest importance ratings among households without children and teenagers differed somewhat from the activities given the highest importance ratings among households with children and teenagers. t U fA N N C O Z m O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 14 Recreation Plan Survey IF`b rA r April 2009 Figure 9: Resident Use and Importance Rating of Recreation Activities Drop-in exercise (weights, exercise machines, etc.) 53% 51% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, ;7743 % yoga, weight training, etc.) Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap 43°~ swim) 53% Drop-in to a reservoir 4 2/° 41 Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise 40% classes 2EXPAND 3% 38% Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) 12%. Children's summer day camp 35% !!1 36% S% Youth Services Initiative ° 34% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or 32% lap swim) 31% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring 30% break, holidays) 29% ■ Percent "essential" Drop-in yoga/Pilates 26% ■ Percent participating in last Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, 26% football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) 25% Educational health and wellness classes 12% 26% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play 25% features)' 31% Drop-in to a reservoir for boating !T9 / o 25% o Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgebal1, 23% basketball, etc.) 22% a~ Drop-in basketball or volleyball 23% 0 !!!T19% l° V-• 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Percent of respondents 0 z 0 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 15 ~s Recreation Plan Survey A &A Aprii 2009 Figure 9: Resident Use and Importance Rating of Recreation Activities (continued) Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise 22% classes 11% Children and teen summer swim team 5!° ° 22% Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, mini- 16% sports) 10% Gymnastics classes/instruction 16% 9°l0 Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, 15% music, drama, etc.) 13% Small watercraft rental 6% 13% Dance classes/instruction 12% 15% Community event % 12% 7 12 °1° Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp 5% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais 11% 8°!0 Golfing 10°!° 16% ■ Percent "essential" ■ Percent participating in last year Pottery instruction/classes 10% Drop-in to the Pottery Lab 10% Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, 7% private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) 9% Golf lessons/instruction 7% 0 Competitive team gymnastics ° o, C ° N Competitive dance team/company 4° M 4) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Ir Percent of respondents `o M z m 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 16 Recreation Plan Survey A FT moor April 2009 After indicating in what recreational activities their household participated, respondents were given the opportunity to provide suggestions for other recreational offerings the city of Boulder might provide that it does not already provide. About a quarter of respondents chose to write in a response. Their answers as written are provided in Appendix B: Responses to Open-ended Survey Question. Their was great variety in the responses. These responses were categorized into several broad categories. About a third suggestions related to specific classes or programs the respondent would like to see offered; some of the suggestions given more than once included bicycling programs or classes, hiking classes or programs, other types of outdoor classes or programs, and activities for children and youth. Several specific types of facilities were mentioned; those named more than once included various types of fields, tennis facilities (including indoor tennis and lighted courts), an ice rink, a large outdoor pool, disc golf and dog parks. Lowering fees was mentioned in a variety of contexts; several respondents felt that "resident" fees should apply to all of Boulder County, not just those living within the city limits. Table 1: Suggestions For Recreational Offerings What suggestions, if any, do you have for other recreational offerings the city of Percent of Respondents Boulder might provide that it does not already provide? Who Gave an Answer Bicycling 4% Activities for children/youth 2%0 Outdoor classes/programs 2% Hiking 1% Other classes/programs 24% Tennis (indoor tennis, lighted courts, more courts) 5% Fields 4% Ice rink 4% Outdoor pool 3% Disc golf 2% Dog park 2% Other facilities 7% Lower fees 8% Services/facilities for Gunbarrel -i 1% Compliments to Parks and Recreation 5% Bone 7% Other 19% Total - - 1 - 100% U C N C N U L U co 61 N N Z C O M Z rn O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 17 Recreation Plan Survey . F April 2009 RESIDENTS' PERSPECTIVES ON FUNDING OPTIONS FOR RECREATION Several question sets were included on the questionnaire to determine the community's support for or opposition to a variety of funding options for parks and recreation offerings by the city. Nearly two- thirds said they would "strongly" support renewing existing sales taxes when they expire, and 90% said they would at least "somewhat" support renewing these sales taxes. However, only about a third of respondents said they would even "somewhat" support a new sales tax. About half of respondents strongly supported partnering with other public or nonprofit agencies to develop joint use facilities or programs, and 85% at least "somewhat" supported this idea. About a third of respondents strongly supported the suggestion of partnering with private organizations, and about three quarters somewhat supported this suggestion. About S in 10 respondents somewhat or strongly supported pursuing grants and donations which often require raising matching funds from the community. Figure 10: Resident Support for Various Funding Options Renew existing sales taxes for parks and recreation wher, they expire 251X, 90% Partnering with other municipalities, school districts or nonprofits to develop joint use recreational facilities or 35% 85% programs Partnering with private organizations to develop recreational 3986 77% facilities or programs Grants and donations, which require raising matchingfunds 49% 82% from the community on a portion of the monies received A new sales tax 32% 38% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents ■ Strongly Support ■ Somewhat Support U t 2 cc 01 N C O M O Z O O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) 0 Page 18 r 6' Recreation Plan Survey mow-. A April 2009 Several funding strategies were presented to respondents through the survey. Many of them were at least somewhat supported by a two-thirds or more of respondents. However, only about 4 in 10 respondents agreed with the statement that "recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees." There was support for individuals living outside the city to pay higher fees than residents for city offerings. However, there was also support for those who live outside the city limits but who work or own a business inside city limits paying the resident rates. About two-thirds of respondents agreed that the city should seek corporate sponsors to supplement parks and recreation funding. Most respondents (S 1 also supported the idea that fees from profitable or popular programs could be used to subsidize less profitable programs. Figure 11: Agreement with Funding Strategies Individuals living outside Boulder should pay higher fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of, 29"/a 77`%, Boulder recreation facilities The city of Boulder should seek corporate sponsors in order to supplement parks and recreation funding (e.g., slgnage with 3796 69% advertisements on baseball fences, use of event banners with logos or advertising during events or games, naming of facilities, etc. Profitable or popular programs (such as sports leagues and swimming lessons) can help pay for less profitable programs (such as + 51% 81% therapeutic, senior and youth programs) Individuals who live outside Boulder but work or own a business in Boulder should pay resident fees for participating in city of Boulder 42% " 70% recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities Recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees 31% 37'% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents ■ Strongly Agree ■ Somewhat Agree U t U c0 N N G1 K O C O Z m O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 19 Recreation Plan Survey %AFT ` April 2009 Four options for the use of additional funding, if any were found for Parks and Recreation, were presented to respondents. Nearly all supported the idea that these funds should be used to maintain and update the existing facilities and equipment. About three-quarters of respondents thought such funds could be used to lower fees for facilities and programs. About two-thirds supported building or renovating facilities, or offering additional recreation programming. When asked to choose just one option, the most popular choice was to maintain and update existing facilities (see Figure 13). Figure 12: Support for Uses of Additional Funding. Maintain and update existing 29% 990/0 facilities and equipment Lower user fees 4396 75% Build new recreation facilities or renovate existing facilities 41% 68% Offer additional recreation programs S2' 700 N 10%a 2055 30% 40% 50°4 6090 70%e 80% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents ■Strongly Support ■Somewhat Support Figure 13: Highest Priority forAdditlonal Funding Maintain and update existing X16-/° facilities and equipment 70% 19% Lower user fees • 32% ■ Percent ranking as highest priority Build new recreation facilities 10% ■ Percent "strongly support" or renovate existing facilities 27% Offer additional recreation U` programs 18% 0'%G 101'15 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%a 80% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents Respondents were asked how much subsidy they thought should be given to a variety of types of programming. In general, the programs that had previously been seen to be more popular in terms of use or support were more likely to be deemed appropriate for higher levels of subsidy (see Figure 14 on the next page). Two programs, however, particularly stand out; about 40% of respondents thought that the Youth Services Initiative and EXPAND should receive a near total subsidy; 12% or fewer respondents thought any other program should receive such a subsidy. 16 Z 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 20 Pecreation Plan Survey April 2009 Figure 14: Residents' Preferences for Subsidies for Various Recreational Activities/Programs Golfing for adults and seniors 2796 7%6 5~ Advanced or elite level recreation classes for adults and seniors 30W, 89b arc Golfing for children and teens 28% 6%6 6% Pottery "drop-in" studio for adults and seniors 29% 1296 5°i Pottery classes for adults and seniors 30% pa-011111011 - 10% Community groups using pools 31% 279u 10, sa Community groups using fields or courts 26% 13 5°r% Community groups using gyms 29% 1294 Pottery "drop-in" studio for children and teens 28% 12% 6?' Pottery classes for children and teens 796' 12 a + Advanced or elite level recreation classes for children and teens 2896 12%0 + Sports classes or teams for adults and seniors 32% 13~ 5 Beginning or intermediate level recreation classes for adults and seniors 2896 1396 Swim lessons or water exercise classes for adults and 2896 1496 a seniors - "Drop-in" to the gym for adults and seniors 24% 1696 8°~ "Drop-in" exercise for adults and seniors 279b 0009 19% 9% "Open swim" (drop-in) for adults and seniors 24%16 -jj 20'Y" 8% Swim lessons for children and teens 24% 26% s°r% Beginning or intermediate level recreation classes for r. 20% 26% 17%] children and teens Sports classes or teams for children and teens 27% 21%6 51% "Drop-in" to the gym for children and teens 209fi 12% "Open swim" (drop-in) for children and teens 251A 10%r Youth Services Initiative 20% 46% EXPAND 27% 39% U t 2 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% N Percent of respondents cc ■ 100% through fees t8 70%-100% through fees ■ 35%-70% through fees Q 15%-35% through fees O 0%-15°/% through fees (no subsidy) (0%-30%/% subsidy) (30°/%-651/'~ subsidy) (65%-85°/% subsidy) (85°/%-100°/% subsidy) z 00 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 21 Recreation Plan Survey -A : FT April 2009 RESIDENT SOURCES FOR RECREATION INFORMATION The availability of information about the recreation offerings of the city was perceived fairly positively. Just over a quarter of respondents (26%) considered the availability of recreation information as "excellent" and another 51% rated it as "good." About 23% rated the availability of information as "fair" or "poor." Figure 15: Ratings of Availability of Recreation Information Excellent 26% Good 51% Poor 5% Fair 18% Differences in subgroup ratings Those living in Gunbazrel gave less positive ratings to the availability of information about the city of Boulder's recreation offerings than those living in other subcommunities. (See Appendix C: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Geographic Area.) Those in households with children or teenagers rated the availability of information about the city of Boulder's recreation offerings more positively than did those in households without children or teenagers. (See Appendix D: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household.) V C N C d U L U 4) N N O C O Y O Z O) 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 22 Recreation Plan Survey - April 2009 The Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide was the most frequently used source of information about the city's parks and recreation programs, with nearly two-thirds of respondents reporting that they find out about programs from the Guide. About 4 in 10 respondents said they use the city of Boulder Web site, and about 3 in 10 learn about parks and recreation offerings through the Boulder Camera newspaper. About 2 in 10 pick up the informational flyers about program offerings. Very few (4%) learn about recreational programs from Channel 8. In addition to indicating which sources they use to obtain information about Boulder parks and recreation programs, respondents were asked which one source they preferred. The Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide was the most popular choice with 4 in 10 indicating this as their preferred choice. This was followed by the city's Web site, chosen by 3 in 10 respondents, and the Boulder Camera newspaper, selected by 1 in 10 respondents. Figure 16: Information Sources for Information About Boulder Parks and Recreation Programs Boulder Parks and Recreation f 62% Guide (quarterly publication) 42% 42% The city of Boulder Web site 30% 28% Boulder Camera newspaper 11°10 21% Informational flyers 6°10 ® How do you find out about programs? 17% ■ What is your preferred way to find out about Other X019 7% E-mail groups/listserves 7% Channel 8 (the municipal 4°1° cable N channel) 1% 0% 100/. 20% 30`A 40% 50% 60% 70% 8M 90% 100% Percent of Respondents Differences in subgroup ratings Households with children or teenagers were more likely to prefer the Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide as their information source for city of Boulder Parks and Recreation programs (63%) than were those in households without children or teenagers (35%).(See Appendix D: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household.) Those living in Central/East/CU/Crossroads were as likely to prefer obtaining their information about the city's parks and recreation offerings from the city of Boulder Web site as the Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide. Those living in other subcommunities were most likely to prefer the Guide. (See Appendix C: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Geographic Area.) o 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 23 Recreation Plan Survey April 2009 RESIDENT PERSPECTIVES ON REGISTRATION Those completing the survey were asked whether or not they or anyone in their household had registered for a city of Boulder Parks and Recreation program or class in the last year. About a third (34%, data not shown) reported that they had. Those who had registered were asked what method or methods they had used to register. The most frequently used options were in-person (39%) and online (39%). About a quarter of those who had registered had done so by phone. When asked how they would rate the ease or difficulty of registration, just over half deemed registration "very easy" with another 45% rating it as "somewhat" easy. Only 3% felt registering for classes or programs was "somewhat difficult," and no respondent rated the registration process as "very difficult." Figure 17: Method Used for Registration In-person 39% Online 39% On the phone 25% Don't know 17% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Percent of Respondents* *Percents may add to more than 100% as respondents could give more than one answer. Figure 18: Ratings of Ease of Registration very easy 52% somewhat easy 45% a~ very difficult m °/u w somewhat difficult 3% z m 0 NN Report of Results (2000-04-24) 0 Page 24 Recreation Plan Survey i bs April 2009 IN CONCLUSION Boulder residents view Parks and Recreation as a resource for the entire community, and are willing for tax dollars to be used to subsidize fees. Nearly 80% "strongly" agreed that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to residents to maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community. A large majority (84%) of respondents thought the Parks and Recreation Department should operate using a human services model, in which parks and recreation contributes to the physical, emotional and social welfare of the whole community, and therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax dollars; as opposed to a business model which should attract and serve as many people as possible who can afford to pay for the services provided. About two-thirds opposed the idea that recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees. ➢ About two-thirds of respondents would "strongly support" renewing existing parks and recreation sales taxes when they expire. However, less than 40% would even "somewhat support" a new sales tax increase for parks and recreation. A special emphasis is placed recreational offerings for youth by Boulder residents. Y Seven in 10 respondents "strongly" agreed that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to residents to provide positive activities for children and teens, while 94% at least somewhat agreed. r About half of respondents felt it was "essential" that the city provide recreation programs for children and for teens. Of the seven population groups rated, these two groups were deemed the most important. This priority was reflected in other questions throughout the survey. When allocating hypothetical tax dollars, respondents, on average, gave more dollars to community groups serving youth ($24) than community groups serving adults ($14). When determining how much subsidy various activities should receive, activities for children and teens were given more subsidy, on average, than activities for adults. Boulder residents believe Parks and Recreation should serve those who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities. People with low incomes and people with disabilities were considered "very important" or "essential' to serve by about three-quarters of respondents. y When presented with a list of 27 recreational offerings, and asked how much subsidy each should receive, there were only two items which more than 10% of respondents thought should receive 85% to 100% subsidy: the Youth Services Initiative (a community based after school and summer program for youth living in public housing and EXPAND (programs and/or inclusions for people L with disabilities). In fact, nearly 40% supported a nearly full subsidy for EXPAND and 46% supported a nearly full subsidy for the Youth Services Initiative. 0 Z M 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) ° Page 25 Recreation Plan Survey A F:T April 2009 Residents want Parks and Recreation to serve a wide range of purposes, but do place a higher priority on active physical recreation and introductory-level programming. ➢ A greater proportion of respondents felt the city should offer diverse recreational opportunities (61 rather than placing more focus on popular sports and fitness that attract more users (39%). ➢ When asked what proportion of time should be allocated to three types of classes, respondents on average allocated about half of the class time to active physical recreation, a quarter to community education and a quarter to leisure enrichment activities. ➢ When asked to trade-off between the city offering programming primarily at the introductory (beginning and intermediate) levels and offering programming at all levels (beginning through very advanced), about two-thirds of residents felt the city should offer programming at all levels while a third believed the focus should be at the introductory levels. However, when allocating tax dollars, respondents on average devoted more tax dollars to introductory level programming ($35, the highest amount of the five categories) and less to advanced and elite levels ($14). It may be that when faced with the trade-off, many respondents chose to have a variety of levels served, including the introductory levels but also the advanced levels, but when allocating the tax dollars, placed a higher priority on the introductory levels while still allocating some of their hypothetical dollars to the advanced levels. N U t U (0 N N O Cr 'ffi C O N 2 rn O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 26 Recreation Plan Survey A April 2009 APPENDIX A: RESPONSES TO SURVEY QUESTIONS The following pages contain a complete set of responses to each question on the survey. Question #1 Cities offer recreation facilities and programs to their residents for a variety of reasons and purposes. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to its residents for each of the following I F purposes. Then rate which you think is the Most MOST IMPORTANT reason the city of Important Boulder should offer recreation facilities Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Don't (check one and programs. Agree Agree Disagree Disagree know Total only) To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community 78% 17% 1% 5% 0% 100% 67% To provide opportunities to make social connections; to strengthen the "social fabric" of the community 34% 53% 9% 4% 0% ' 100% 3% To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the i community 24% 48x,4, ' 24% 5% 0% ~ 100% 4% To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities (e.g., people with disabilities or people with low incomes) 55% 34% 6% 5% 1 0% 1 100% 8% To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 and younger) 70% 24% 3% 4% 0% 100% 14% To provide recreational opportunities for adults (20 to 59 years old) 57% 35% 4% 4% 0% 100% 4% To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 and older) 58% 35% 3% 4% 0% 100% 1% fJ C N C N U .c v w N 01 f6 C O Z O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 27 Recreation Plan Survey A F:T @mow April 2009 Question #2a The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles forfuture parks and recreation programming. Recognizingthat all the statements may reflect values that are Important to you, from each pair of statements below, please indicate which ONE Percent of of the two statements you believe is more Important for Boulder. Respondents Consider parks and recreation a human service that contributes to the physical, emotional and social welfare of the whole community, and therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax dollars. 84% Consider parks and recreation a business which should attract and serve as many j people as possible who can afford to pay for the services provided, and therefore offers more services funded primarily through user fees. 16% Tota 1 { 100% Question #2b The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the statements may reflect values that are Important to you, from each pair of statements below, please Indicate which ONE Percent of of the two statements you believe Is more Important for Boulder. Respondents Parks and recreation program offerings should be at many different skill levels, i.e. beginner through very advanced. 65% Parks and recreation program offerings should focus primarily on introductory classes at beginning and intermediate levels. 35% Total 100% Question #2c The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the statements may reflect values that are Important to you, from each pair of statements below, please Indicate which ONE Percent of of the two statements you believe is more important for Boulder. Respondents Parks and recreation facilities should be mostly programmed with leagues and other pre-planned activities or events, with some drop-in use, likely earning greater revenues. 37% Parks and recreation facilities should mostly be available for public drop-in use, with some active programming, likely earning lesser revenues. 63% Tota 1 100% U C GI C N V L U f0 N N f0 G O Z Q~ O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 28 Recreation Plan Survey A FT spoor April 2009 Question #2d The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the statements may reflect values that are Important to you, from each pair of statements below, please Indicate which ONE Percent of of the two statements you believe Is more Important for Boulder. Respondents Parks and recreation program offerings should focus mostly on popular sports and fitness (e.g., aerobics, yoga, softball, soccer, basketball, etc.) because those serve the most number of people. 39% Parks and recreation program offerings should offer some popular sports and fitness activities, but also include-diverse opportunities like arts and crafts, and classes (e.g., cooking, tai chi, etc.). 61% Total - - I 100% Question #2e The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the statements may reflect values that are important to you, from each pair of statements below, please Indicate which ONE Percent of of the two statements you believe is more Important for Boulder. Respondents The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and not replicate them. 49% The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs j identified by residents, regardless of whether they are provided by other agencies in or near Boulder. 51% Tota 1 100% U C N a-. G 01 U r U lU C7 N 77 d' l0 C O i% t0 z rn 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 29 Recreation Plan Survey nszAFT savor April 2009 Question #3 Please rate how important you think it is for the city of Highest Boulder to provide recreation Priority programs for each of the Very Somewhat Not At All (check two population groups below. Essential Important Important Important Total only) Children age 12 and younger 50% 33% 14% 3% 100% 38% Teenagers 13 to 19 years old 49% I 36% 13% 2% 100% 39% Adults (20 to 59 years old) 29% 47% r10/. 3% 100% 25% Senior adults (age 60 and older) 33% 48% 2% 100% 19% Families together as a group 23% 35% { 35% 7% 100% 12% People with disabilities 38% 38% 21% 3%° 100%° 12% People with low incomes ; 44% 34% 18% 4% 100% 31% Question #4 When planning for the use of its various recreation facilities (recreation centers class space, gym space, pools, fields, etc.), the city of Boulder has to consider a variety of priorities and community needs. What do you think is the appropriate allocation of time for each of the following purposes at the city's recreation facilities? Average Percent Opportunities to "learn-to" (skill-building; beginner and intermediate classes) 22% Opportunities for advanced or elite programs (advanced classes or competitive opportunities) 12% Opportunities for city-sponsored leagues to use the facilities (e.g., softball leagues, adult soccer leagues volleyball leagues, youth football leagues, etc.) 19% Opportunities for community groups to use the facilities (e.g., Little League, Master Swimming, youth soccer clubs, Boulder Rugby Club, etc.) 17% Opportunities for drop-in use (e.g., swim laps, shoot baskets, lift weights, etc.) 29% Question #5 The city of Boulder has to consider a wide variety of needs in our community when planning the recreation classes to offer. About what percent of classes do you think the city of Boulder should offer to the community in each of the following three categories? Average Percent "Active" physical recreation (e.g., yoga, Pilates, sports, dance, swimming, fitness, etc.) 52% Leisure enrichment activities (e.g., pottery, painting, photography, cooking, etc.) 25°% Community education (e.g., babysitting certification, CPR, health and wellness lectures, etc.) 24% a~ L U 14 N N U7 l° C O Z O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 30 Recreation Plan Survey A F'r Wolff April 2009 Question #6 Did at a city Did at a Did at a Did a In the past year, have you or any member of your household of Boulder nonprofit private another participated in any of the following activities? facility facility facility city's facility Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 13% 4% 1011o 4116 Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 37% 9% 21% 9% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play features) 25% 2% 8% 7% Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 6% 1% 5% 2% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim i 19% 4% 12o ) /n 5/0 Children and teen summer swim team 2% 0% 2% 1% Dance classes/instruction 7% 2%~ 7% 1% Competitive dance team/company 1% 0% =3% 1% Gymnastics classes/instruction 6% 0% 3% 0% Competitive team gymnastics 2% 0% 1% 0% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) 19% 8% 23% 3% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais 4% 1% 4% 1% "Drop-in" exercise (weights, exercise machines, etc.) 25% 10% 26% 4% "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates 11% 4% 15% 2% Educational health and wellness classes 6% 3% 4% 3% Drop-in basketball or volleyball 12% 3% 6% 1% Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) 20% 5% 6% 4% Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgeball, basketball, etc.) 13% 5% 8% 2% Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, mini-sports) 7% 1% 3% 1% Golf lessons/ instruction 3% 0% 2% 2% Golfing 11% 2% 10% 5% Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) 3% 0% 6% 1% Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) 6% 3% 4% ? 3% Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, music, - drama, etc.) 5% 1% 8% 1% Children's summer day camp 5% 2% 4% Q% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring break, holidays) 2% 1% 1% 0% Pottery instruction/classes 4% 0% 2% 1% "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab 3% 0% 1% 0% Youth Services Initiative 1% 0% 0% 0% EXPAND - 20 0% 0% 0% B c Community event 5% 0% 2% 0% L3 S ~ "Drop-in" to a reservoir 40% 1% 3% 3% "Drop-in" to a reservoir for boating 8% 1% 1% 3% Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp 4% _ 0% 1% 1% Small watercraft rental 5% 0% 1% 2% z a 0 cv C~ Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 31 Recreation Plan Survey A F:-r April 2009 Question #7 How Important, If at all, do you believe it Is that the city of Boulder offer each of the following activities to the Very Somewhat ' Not At All Don't community? Essential Important Important Important Know Total Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 40% 35% 22% 1% 2% 100% Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap I swim) _ 43% 38% 17% 1% 100% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play features) 25% 29% 35% 8% 3% 100% Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 22% 31% 39% 5% 3% 100% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 32% 35% - 26% i 5% 2% 100% Children and teen summer swim team 22% 35% 32%' 6% 5% 100% Dance classes/instruction 12%' 33%' 41% 10% 4%1100% Competitive dance team/company 5% 1no- 42%' 32%1 10% j 100% Gymnastics classes/instruction 16%1 32%i 39°%' 8°%! 4°%,100% Competitive team gymnastics 7 17°% 1 39% j 29% 8%100% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) 46j 37% 13561 2% 1% j 100% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais IN/0+1 30% 37%+, 13% 9% _100% "Drop-in" exercise (weights, exercise machines, etc.) 53% 1 31% 1 13% 2% 2% 100% "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates 29% 41% 1 20% 6% 4% 100%° Educational health and wellness classes 26% 38%I 29%' 4% 3% 100% Drop-in basketball or volleyball 23% 37% 32%' 4% 4%1100% Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) 26% 41%j 27%' 3% 2%1100% Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgeball, - basketball, etc.) 23% 41% 1 32%1 2% 2J100% Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, mini- sports) 16% 35%' 40% 6% 3%1100% Golf lessons/instruction 7% 16%, 40% 33% 4% 100% Golfing __1 10% 13% 38% 34% 5% 100% Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) ! 7% 17% 42% 29%, 4% 100% Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) 36% 33%' 25%' 3% 2% 100% Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, music, drama, etc.) 15% 34% 34%. 14% 3%100% Children's summer day camp 35%. 36% i 20°J° 5% 49C 100% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring break, holidays) 30% 31% 25% 9% 4% 100% Pottery instruction/classes 10% 27% 40%I 17% 71% %100% "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab ' 10% 23%II I 40% , 18% 100% Youth Services Initiative 34% 36%I 23%I 4%'' 3% ° _ 100% EXPAND ____36% - - 32% 21%' 3% 6% 100% a~ Community event 12% 21% 41% 17% 8%'100-% "Drop-in" to a reservoir _ i 42°/° 317% 3% 3% 100% "Drop-in" to a reservoir for boating - 1 25% 25% 31%; 14% 5°% 100% N Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp - i 12% 27°6'- 45% 10% 5%1100% M Small watercraft rental 13% 27°x6' 45% 9% 5%-~ 100% o z m 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 32 Recreation Plan Survey j3SAFT solo, Aprii 2009 Question #8: Suggestions For Recreational Offerings What suggestions, if any, do you have for other recreational offerings the city of Percent of Respondents Boulder might provide that it does not already provide?* Who Gave an Answer Bicycling 4% Activities for children/youth i 2% Outdoor classes/programs 2% Hiking 1% Other classes/programs 24% Tennis (indoor tennis, lighted courts, more courts) 5% Fields 4% Ice rink 4% Outdoor pool 3% Disc golf 2% Dog park 2% Other facilities 7% Lower fees g% Services/facilities for Gunbarrel f 1% Compliments to Parks and Recreation _ 5% None 7% Other - - - - ~ 19% Total 100% * Note: Respondents could answer this question in their own words. This table represents the broad categories into which responses were classified. The verbatim answers given by respondents can be found in Appendix B: Responses to Open- ended Survey Question. iu G U a) N h N N r O 2 rn O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 33 Recreation Plan Survey A F:lr April 2009 Question #9 A fee is required to use most of the city of Boulder's recreation facilities and programs. These fees generally do not cover the full cost of offering the program. If a program Is fully funded by tax dollars, there Is no fee for the program. If a program receives no tax funding, the fees cover the entire cost of offering the program. Naturally, if all programs were fully funded by tax dollars, this would require a greater commitment of public funding (taxes) than if all program costs were covered by fees. For each of the following items, please indicate what you believe is the appropriate percent of costs that , 70%- 3596- 15%- 0%_ should be recovered through fees. 100% 100% 70% 35% 15% Total Youth Services Initiative 7% I 8% 18% 20% 46% 1100% EXPAND - - 6% 9% 19% 27%° 39%~ 100% "Open swim" (drop-in) for adults and seniors 12% 24% 36% 20% 8% 100% "Open swim" (drop-in) for children and teens 8% 21% 37% 25% 10% 100% Swim lessons or water exercise classes for adults and seniors 16% 28% 38% 14% 4% 100% Swim lessons for children and teens { 11% 24% 31% 26% 8% 100% "Drop-in" exercise for adults and seniors 13% 27% 33% 19% I 9% 100% "Drop-in" to the gym for adults and seniors 15% 24% 37% 160X 100% "Drop in" to the gym for children and teens 9% 20% 35% 24% E 12% 100% Sports classes or teams for adults and seniors ~ 1900 -1 32°% ~ 33% ~ -13% ° I 4%-.i 100% - --/1 1 Sports classes or teams for children and teens 10% 27/° 37% 21/° 5/° 100% Beginning or intermediate level recreation classes for I - adults and seniors 19% 28% 37% 13% 4% 100% Advanced or elite level recreation classes for adults and seniors 38% 30% 21% 8% 4% 100% Beginning or intermediate level recreation classes for f children and teens 10% 20% 36% 26% 7% 100% Advanced or elite level recreation classes for children and teens 22% 28% , 34% 12% 4% 100% Golfing for adults and seniors 46/ o 27% I 14% 7% ' 5% 100% Golfing for children and teens 34% 28% 26% 6% 6% 1100% Pottery classes for adults and seniors 30% 30% i 26% 10% !l 3% 100% Pottery classes for children and teens 23% 27% 35% 12% 4% 100% Pottery "drop-in" studio for adults and seniors 32% 29% ' 22% 12% ' 5% ' 100% Pottery "drop-in" studio for children and teens 24% 28% 30% 12% 6% 100% Community groups using pools 27% 31% 27% 10% 5% 100% s Community groups using gyms ~25% 29% 30% 12% 4% 100% Community groups using fields or courts 26% 26% 30% 13% 5% 100% L o aN N C O Z Q> O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 34 Recreation Pian Survey n-SAFT MOOF April 2009 Question #10 If it were up to you, how would you allocate $100 In taxes across the following types of programming to best meet the needs of the Boulder community? Average Dollars Recreational programs at the beginning and intermediate level ("learn-to" programs) $35 Recreational programs at the advanced and elite levels ("competitive" programs) $14 Providing one-day community events at city recreation facilities $13 Reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups (e.g., Little League, synchronized swim team, etc.) $24 Reducing rental rates for adult community groups (e.g., Masters Swimming, Adult Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) $14 Question #11 Please indicate your level of support 1 , for or opposition to the following sources of funding to help fund recreation facll[ties and programs in Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Don't the city of Boulder. Agree Agree Disagree Disagree Know Total Renew existing sales taxes for parks and recreation when they expire 65% 25% 3% 3% 4% 100% A new sales tax IIII) 6% t 32% 32% 1 22% 7% 100% Grants and donations, which require f raising matching funds from the community on a portion of the monies received 33% 49% _ 7% _ 2% 9% ; 100% Partnering with other municipalities, - f school districts or nonprofits to develop joint use recreational facilities or programs 50% 35% 8% 2% 5% 100% Partnering with private organizations - I to develop recreational facilities or programs 38% 39% 10% 6% 8% 100% U C 61 C N U t V l6 d W O C O 2 O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 35 Recreation Plan Survey April 2009 Question #12 Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following funding policies for recreation facilities and programs Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Don't the city of Boulder could pursue. Agree Agree Disagree Disagree Know Total The city of Boulder should seek corporate sponsors in order to supplement parks and recreation funding (e.g., signage with advertisements on baseball fences, use of event banners with logos or advertising during events or games, naming of facilities, etc.) 32% 37% 16% 12% 3% 100% Recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees 6% 31% 38% ! 21% 3% 1100% Profitable or popular programs (such as sports leagues and swimming lessons) can help pay for less profitable programs (such as therapeutic, senior and youth programs) 30% 51% 12% 1 5% 2% 100% Individuals living outside Boulder should pay higher fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities 48% 29% 13% 7% 3% 1100% Individuals who live outside Boulder but work or own a business in Boulder should pay resident fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities 28% 42% 15% 9% 6% 100% v U U M N N N R C O Z O) O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 36 Recreation Plan Survey A FT NOW April 2Q09 Question #13 If the city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department did get some additional funding beyond what is needed to provide the current levels of programming and maintenance, please indicate your level of support for or opposition to the following uses of additional most funding. Then indicate which ONE Important of the following you think would be Strongly somewhat somewhat Strongly (check one most important Support Support Oppose Oppose Total only) Maintain and update existing facilities and equipment 70% 29% 1% 1% 100% 46% Lower user fees 32% 43% I 20% 5% 100% 19% Offer additional recreation programs 18% 52% 24% 5% 100% 6% Build new recreation facilities or renovate existing facilities 27% 41% 24% 8% 100% 10% Question #14 How do you find out about city of Boulder Parks and Recreation programs? (Please Percent of check all that apply.) Respondents* Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide (quarterly publication) 62% Boulder Camera newspaper 28% Channel 8 (the municipal cable TV channel) 4% Other 17% Informational flyers 21% The city of Boulder Web site 42% E-mail groups/listserves 7% * Percents may add to more than 100% as respondents could give more than one answer. Question #15 What is your preferred way find out about city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Percent of programs? (Check one.) Respondents Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide (quarterly publication) 42% Boulder Camera newspaper 11% Channel 8 (the municipal cable TV channel) y 1% Other 3% C Informational flyers 6% The city of Boulder Web site 30% E-mail groups/listserves 7% Total 100% 8 z O O h Q Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 37 Recreation Plan Survey g3FzAf:lr III April 2009 Question #16 How would you rate the availability of information about the city of Boulder's Percent of recreation offerings to the community? j Respondents Excellent 24% Good 48% Fair 17% Poor 5% don't know 6% Total 100% Question #17 Have you or any member of your household registered for a recreation class or Percent of program with the city of Boulder In the previous 12 months? Respondents Yes 34% No _ 62% Don't Know 4% Total - - - - - - 100% Question #17a The time you most recently registered, did you register online, over the phone, or in- Percent of person? (Please check all that apply.) Respondents* Online 39% On the phone 25% In-person 39% Don't know - - - - ~ 7°fo * Percents may add to more than 100% as respondents could give more than one answer. Question #17b Percent of How easy or difficult was it to register? Respondents Very easy 49% Somewhat easy 43% Somewhat difficult 3% Very difficult 0% Don't Know 4% Total - - - - - - ~ - - 100% U L V R QN~ N C O 2 O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 38 Recreation Plan Survey nrZAFT solo, April 2009 Question #18 l Median Standard 25th (50th 75th Length of Residency Average Deviation Percentile Percentile) Percentile About how long have you lived in Boulder? 13 I 13 j 3 8 20 Question #19 Percent of Do you rent or own your residence? Respondents Rent 48% Own 52% Total i 100% Question #20 Please check the one box which most closely describes the type of housing unit you Percent of live in. Respondents Adetached single-family home 52% An apartment in an apartment complex I 22% An apartment in a single-family home 2% Acondominium or townhouse 22% A mobile home 0% Other 1% Total 100% Question #21 Standard Persons per Household Average Deviation Counting yourself, how many people live in your household? 2.4 2.4 Question #22, #23, #24 Presence of Children and Older Adults in the Household Yes No Total Do any children age 12 or younger live in your household? 18% 82% 100% Do any teenagers ages 13 to 17 live in your household? 8% 92% 100% r U Are you or any other members of your household aged 65 or older? 11°% 89% 100% s v r v U L U R v t/l 76 C O NN Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 39 Recreation Plan Survey RAFT April 2009 Question #25 About how much was your household's total income before taxes in 2008? (Please include in your total income money from all sources for all persons living in your Percent of household.) Respondents Less than $24,999 18% $25,000 to $49,999 21% $50,000 to $99,999 34% $100,000 or more 28% Total 100% Question #26 Percent of Which of the following best describes your age? I Respondents 18 - 24 11% 25-34 39% 35-44 14% 45-54 19% 55 - 64 9°% 65 years or older s 8% Total 100% Question #27 Percent of What Is your gender? Respondents Female 48% Male - - - - - - - - i - - - - - - Total 100% U C y C U L U N N~ N l9 C O i' O Z Q~ O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 40 Recreation Plan Survey April 2009 APPENDIX B: RESPONSES TO OPEN-ENDED SURVEY QUESTION Following are verbatim responses to the open-ended question on the survey, which asked "What suggestions, if any, do you have for other recreational offerings the city of Boulder might provide that it does not already provide?". Because these responses were written by survey participants, they are presented here in verbatim form, including any typographical, grammar or other mistakes. The responses are in alphabetical order. ♦ 18-hole disc golf course. + Art classes in conjunction w/open studios artists a lot ♦ A big public outdoor pool area (what we have is more choices than you have now. insufficient), with grass around it, pool for actual + At this time of economic crisis, the city of Boulder swimming and a pool for kids adjacent. should look towards tightening its budget. Users of + A decent tennis facility with indoor courts! Better programs should pay for them. Boulder is way too lax maintenance of existing outdoor courts! in permitting the deadbeats of society take advantage Particularly Tom Watson Park! of the hard-working taxpayers footing the bill. No • A more cutting edge marketing approach more further offerings should be provided. style, hip ♦ Bicycling-related ♦ Aerial fabric or trapeze ♦ Boating swimming lessons ♦ All ages need to be considered but children & ♦ Boulder could benefit from a large community outdoor young people - teen - school age need the most pool that is suitable for all ages baby, toddler, school attention. age etc.. Or even small baby pools like Longmont. # All the facilities are located in the Boulder City Also, babysitting is too expensive - check out proper. No park, no recreational facility in the Longmont. Boulder County. We pay tax too, but no park, no + Boulder is pretty awesome at what they provide. facility, no program. By the way, I live in Classes for the physically disabled will be especially Gunbarrel. important w/people returning from war. + Allow private personal trainers at all rec centers at + Bowling alley in Boulder. Provide baseball no add'1 cost opportunities for boy/girl that cannot afford the dues & + Am concerned about unsafe motor boating on registration resevoir since it is so small, Rec. centers has great • Bridge lessons; wii active games introduction dance- programs for small children & families and a dance revolution type machines budget. Flatirons golf course is well run too, ♦ Build more mountain bike trails. ♦ An artist studio for shared use. Preferablely ♦ City of Boulder needs to have more baseball facilities w/kilns. for youth sport use. There are very few well- ♦ An outward bound type day trips and/or maintained baseball facilities. overnights (at minimal cost) for older teens (16- ♦ Climbing, skiing, mtn biking! 24). Being 21 currently I see too many peers ♦ Community bike rides looking to do something local such as this. It also ♦ Competitive baseball league where one person has a is a good alternative to the many poor choices chance to get on a team - open tryouts would be willing people my age make when they have "nothing" to to conduct - 520-591-6961 do. Also, pottery studio time or lessons would be + Cycling - instructional & safety for children & teens. amazing! Safe place for teens to "play" on bikes -jumps, dirt ♦ Another disk golf course track, etc, Place for community organizations to safely ♦ Anything that will interest & help the lower hold instructional class & training for mt bike & 0 income community that most often cannot even cyclocross afford to use the rec, Centers. They are treated ♦ Dance classes - Latin American, tango, line dancing (that part of Boulders population) as if they etc. Salsa! barely exist in this town. ♦ Dog parks are very important ♦ Areas in local parks designated for fenced dog ♦ Dog park facilities are provided, but are being used and parks, with users responsible for maintenance and clean up accessed past their current capacity. Dog park facilities Z are very important and popular in this o N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 41 Recreation Plait Survey C - " Aprrt 2009 subculture/demographic. Extra facilities for better ♦ I believe we offer a diverse variety already. Let's focus shade and water would be appreciated. on quality of instrction and accessibility by reducing ♦ Doing a great job! fees as well as updating & maintaining equipment & ♦ Don't have any - the city provides great resources facilities. for recreation at all levels. My kids enjoyed many ♦ I do not know all that the rec. Centers offer, so I can't happy days in gymnastics, swimming & summer suggest anything more. camp ♦ I love the Bldr rec systems my daughters are now 31; ♦ Drop "annual" cost for private business. Day use! 28 & 25 & we enjoyed many activities via the rec Too expensive to use tax paid facility!! Makes us centers the entire time they were growing up mad!! ♦ I love the nia classes and swim! Although I don't have ♦ Drop-in gynmastics facility including rings, kids myself, I love seeing mothers use the child care horse, high-bar, vault, mats, etc. facilities. ♦ Educational tours, walking tours, historical ♦ I need "wilderness first responder" training. tours..etc... ♦ I really the partnership with the Boulder Nordic Club ♦ Enjoyed the playgrounds with visiting relatives - for xc skiing. I think we could use a velodrome and/or especially picnic areas. This, for me in the most criteruim course. important offering of the parks & rec. Programs. ♦ I think Boulder has always offered a wide selection of ♦ Everything about Boulder is about revenue - activities - in which I have participated from time to lower fees, a bus to the reservoir in the summer so time over the last 50 or so years more teens/youth have access. ♦ I think the city of Boulder does a great job with the rec ♦ Expand to Boulder County, not just Boulder City centers at a reasonable price for resident fees ♦ I think the city of Boulder needs to put in another ♦ Fenced in running track or loop course with ultimate frisbee golf course. measured distance markers, away from bikes, ♦ I use the pottery studio/lab for all of my Boulder leisure peds, baby joggers, skates. Well designed recreation. I feel it is important to pay for this level of cross country course. services! It is an awesome program - attracts all ages. it ♦ Fencing instruction! could be expanded. ♦ Fields for ultimate frisbee! ♦ I wish there was a rec center closer to north east ♦ Gardening, or sustainable living classes Boulder - (Gunbarrel area) ♦ Growing veggies 1 hour classes on fixing things ♦ I would like the city to be more supportive (ie. Lower ♦ Hands down - indoor tennis! Boulder has many usage fees) of non-profit groups that fill a void in the tennis players but still no indoor facility in a city's rec offerings - such as little league, masters swim, winter climate! It could purchase and cover the junior crew. little-used cu tennis courts or at least provide use ♦ I would like to see more leisure enrichment classes for the public. Night lights would be 2nd most offered at a lower price ie partially funded with taxes important. Hint: look at Melbourne, Australia - ♦ I would love another option for a yoga class, only warmer climate but much more indoor - access because your offerings never fit my schedule ♦ Heated pools for sr citizens, hydro-therapy for something 8-9 p.m would be awesome people w/arthritis... ♦ Ice hockey! • Hiking 101 - how to enjoy the mtn parks and ♦ Ice skating tread lightly/leave no trace. Cross- ♦ Ice skating & hockey - figure skating if/when we get a agency/department recreational programs more rink outdoors oriented. ♦ Ice skating, diving ♦ Host an ultimate frisbee tournament ♦ Ice-skating rink (indoor/outdoor); waterpark (like ♦ How about some rock climbing classes at east Broomfield "bay"); x-country ski track and restrooms Boulder rec? And maybe some kayaking in the @ all p&r parks! ! creek... ♦ I'm not sure if this is already a service, but: horseback ♦ I am very disappointed at the direction that park riding lessons/family trails. C & rec has taken recently (Valmont-East Boulder). ♦ (Indoor) badminton! Parks & rec does not consider nature in its ♦ Indoor soccor facilities. planning. Why destroy wildlife habitat for bikers d & parking lots. There are many who want the ♦ Indoor tennis courts, drop-in senior basketball nature back in parks & less of the human built facilities, ♦ Indoor tennis more tennis courts squash courts `s ♦ Indoor tennis!!!! Please!!! z rn 0 N N Report of Results (2000.04-24) Page 42 Recreation Plan Survey ' April 2009 ♦ Intermed/advanced yoga at east on Fridays ♦ Most important are activities when kids are out of ♦ It is a tragedy that we have only one golf course school: after school, spring break, holidays, and in Boulder. Golf is a great exercise (particularly summer. Especially kids from low-income families, as one grows older) and is not a snob sport ♦ Mountain biking and hiking group programs (contrary to current "Boulder liberal" image. ♦ Need art classes. Such as drawing, painting, affordable ♦ It is not the city's job to provide these facilities. ♦ Need more effective outreach. I just assume the ♦ It's wonderful & amazing all that the rec center Boulder rec. Costs too much, so it never occurs to me offers for its community members. I hope that the to seek information. fee is reasonable & fair for all Boulder County ♦ Neighborhood outdoor movies citizens. ♦ No ♦ Jewelry & metalworking; hoop classes (hula- ♦ None hooping/dance); woodworking/wood crafts; ♦ None sculpture ♦ Just better cleanliness of facilities - that is why we ♦ None go to private club ♦ None ♦ Keep boating @ res ♦ None ♦ Keep it affordable • None - keep doing what you are doing well. ♦ Keep outdoor pools open longer in year ♦ None at this time ♦ Keep up the activities for the elderly & the • None! children especially during the summer ♦ None! ♦ Keep up the good work! ♦ Nordic skiing & facilities ♦ Kundalini yoga drop in ♦ Not much in senior services, meals on wheels, eercise ♦ Lets get back to keeping the parks clean & for seniors - etc you are about to get slammed with mowed senior boomers! ! ♦ Lighted tennis courts (south or east rec centers) ♦ Open space learning programs ♦ Local running/biking races or group rides/runs; ♦ Open water swim lessons team with open space programs; volunteer ♦ Other art classes opportunities ♦ Outdoor pool areas ♦ Make this survey shorter! ♦ Pass for the Boulder Res. For the summer, discounted ♦ Make used bicycles available at various points for student rates during summer months temporary use ♦ Please rent space (fields) to ultimate frisbee league ♦ Marriage lessons - before pregnancy lessons - (called grassroots ultimate) to avoid gasoline and before emissions from those players traveling to Broomfield ♦ More baseball fields, more basketball courts, or farther away. more soccer, football & lacrosse fields ♦ Please! Expand takes a disproportionate share of city ♦ More classes at the table mesa facility attention & resources. I say this as a former member of ♦ More classes in the evening/weekend for children the boards of pnp organizations serving people of working parents. w/disabilities. Back it off & use the resources elsewhere. Awards aren't everything. ♦ More community involvement/volunteer well l publ publyissizezed. er ♦ Provide support for little league! More soccer fields! opportunities. Ideally w ♦ More dance classes, aka salsa, ballroom, swing ♦ Re: city of Boulder website - could be a little more user friendly. E.g. Going more directly to specific rec. ♦ More equitable sponsorship of youth team sports Center, then getting big schedules. ♦ More family oriented community events to get ♦ Really nice, new outdoor pool like other nearby cities, families outside & active. Place for families, teens, community in the sumer. Nice ♦ More fields available for rugby practice/games landscaping, shade areas etc ♦ More frisbee golf courses ♦ Recycle classes, especially bicycle maintenance and ♦ More indoor swimming lanes! emergency repairs. ♦ More late evening hours (till 10 p.m.) And classes • Replace the diving board at nbrc, it is dangerous in its L (8 p.m. Or later) for those of us w/little kids or current condition. late work hours, please. ♦ Rock climbing, x country skiing, trail running (and ♦ More open swim time at outdoor pools other types of outdoor recreation that are available and ma ♦ More spinning/cycling classes plentiful in our area) o ♦ More time for women's only drop-in volleyball ♦ Self defense and karate classes z rn O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Q Page 43 Recreation Plan Survey 404 Ir April 2009 • Senior masters league volleyball & basketball. + Tennis facility Please continue to provide the childcare services + The city needs an ice skating rink. The city council is at east & north centers & the Nordic ski trails against this but it is poplar with the public and an throughout the city. income source. ♦ Shorter surveys + The city should reduce excessively wasteful spending ♦ Shouldn't provide more has enough already! in recessionary times ♦ Since there is no other room for comment I'll use + The Friday night programs should be for teens (14-18) this space to say that I work for KGNU. Please not pre-teens. Teens need somewhere w/o drinking to use us as a venue to help raise funds - especially hang, be active, have fun. Why not let them use the rec for those who cannot afford to use the facility. center from 9-12 p.m.? ♦ Skateboard classes/camps for youth, beginner to + There are very few swimming pools & soccer fields in intermediate Boulder! We appreciate using sbrc & ebrc ♦ Slack-living course. Skate plaza. + To be sure that girls have some advantages as boys - in ♦ Some areas of Boulder County are not considered all activities. residents, so fees are higher. It would help to have 4 Trail walking, hiking a flat fee so all residents of Boulder County can + Ultimate fri sbee 'drop-in' for youth 10-16 yrs. Old in benefit from the programs. the spring/summer months. ♦ Sometimes not all activities, like dancing or ♦ Use of indoor pools at reduced rate for seniors (not gymnastics, are available for males and females. I sure if already provided think that should change. + We've never used city of Boulder facilities & are not + Stop wasting our tax dollars. city residents (county) so I really don't think there's + Subsidize use of sports fields for youth sports to much value in completing this survey keep prices lower and attract more kids in ♦ Winter camping skills Australia a 10 year old pays $80 for a 20 week + YMCA has gone way downhill - classes equip, soccer season cleanliness, hygiene - pool is grimy & showers moldy - ♦ Survey too long. I think you will have more spending on wrong stuffl ! success and participation if you shorten it. + You do an amazing job meeting the needs of the ♦ Take a poll of kids between Easter and vacation community-we couldn't be happier! to determine what they want and take it from there. + Technology classes/internet etc N L U N d N O f0 C O Z O O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 44 ..tip a f Recreation Plan Survey i~ -7- April 2009 APPENDIX C: RESPONSES TO SELECTED SURVEY QUESTIONS BY GEOGRAPHIC AREA The city of Boulder has divided the city into nine subcommunities for planning purposes. A map of the subcommunities can be found on page 69. Survey respondents were classified into one of the nine subcommunities. Some were outside the subcommunity areas, and others could not be classified into a a subcommunity. Some of the subcommunities have fewer residential addresses, and only a few respondents were in those subcommunities, so subcommunities were combined into larger areas so that the minimum number of respondents in any geographic area was 52 (Gunbarrel). The table below shows the five geographic areas into which respondents were classified (plus a sixth for the respondents outside the boundaries or unknown), and the number and percent of respondents in each. The remaining tables in this appendix present selected survey results by respondent geographic area. Percent of Respondents in Each Geographic Area Geographic Area Number of Respondents Percent of Respondents Central, East, CU or Crossroads 232 37% Gunbarrel - i - 52-T-- 8% North Boulder or Palo Park 73 12% South Boulder 97 16% Southeast Boulder 104 17% Outside boundaries or unknown 63 ; 10% Total _6M1,__ 100% Highlights from the report tables in this appendix include: • Generally, the "mission statement" endorsed by the highest percent of respondents was that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to its residents to maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population, followed by an emphasis on providing positive activities or recreational opportunities for youth, senior adults, adults and those with who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities. However, in Gunbarrel, providing positive activities for youth received the greatest endorsement by respondents. ♦ Generally, a majority of respondents believed the parks and recreation facilities should be mostly available for public drop-in use (likely earning lower revenues) instead of being mostly programmed with leagues and other activities (likely earning higher revenues). However, in Gunbarrel, a slight majority (51%) felt that facilities should be mostly programmed with pre- planned activities. ♦ Among all survey respondents, about half felt the Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and not replicate them, U and half felt the Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs identified by residents, regardless of whether they are provided by other agencies in or near a) Boulder. There were some differences by subcommunity: those in North Boulder/Palo Park, cr South Boulder and Southeast Boulder were more likely to choose providing programs and facilities identified by residents regardless if they are provided by others, while those in z rn 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 45 Recreation Plan Survey n;ZAF:T April 2409 Central/East/CU/Crossroads, Outside and in Gunbarrel were more likely to choose providing facilities and programs that complement and do not replicate others. Gunbarrel residents, in particular, were more likely to choose this option (69%). ♦ Households in Southeast Boulder were less likely to have participated indoor and outdoor swimming activities than were those in other subcommunities. ♦ Households in CentraUEast/CU/Crossroads and North Boulder/Palo Park were more likely to have participated in yoga and Pilates than were households in other subcommunities. ♦ Households in Gunbarrel were less likely to have played drop-in basketball or volleyball, field sports or indoor court sports than were residents in other subcommunities. ♦ Those living in North Boulder/Palo Park were more likely to feel indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes were essential than were those living in other subcommunities. ♦ Residents in Gunbarrel were less likely to feel fitness/health or wellness classes were essential than were residents of other subcommunities. ♦ Those living in Central/East/CU/Crossroads and North Boulder/Palo Park were more likely to rate drop-in pottery and pottery instruction as essential than were households in other subcommunities. ♦ Residents of Gunbarrel were less likely to support various funding options than were residents of other subcommunities; however, 51 % did say they would strongly support renewing existing sales taxes for parks and recreation when they expire. ♦ Residents of Gunbarrel (many of whom live outside city limits) were less likely to agree that individuals living outside Boulder city limits should pay higher fees for city of Boulder recreation programs and facilities than were those in other subcommunities. ♦ Those living in Gunbarrel gave less positive ratings to the availability of information about the city of Boulder's recreation offerings than those living in other subcommunities. ♦ Those living in CentrallEast/CU/Crossroads were as likely to prefer obtaining their information about the city's parks and recreation offerings from the city of Boulder Web site as the Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide. Those living in other subcommunities were most likely to prefer the Guide. U C N C N U U 1C y N 10 C O .m `L O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 46 Recreation Plan Survey A FT mono, April 2009 Question #1 by Geographic Area Cities offer recreation facilities and programs to their residents for a variety of reasons and purposes. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree that the city of Boulder should offer Central, North Outside recreation facilities and programs to its East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries residents for each of the following purposes. Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community 83% 71% 84% 82% 62% 72% 78% To provide opportunities to make social connections; to strengthen the "social fabric" of the community 37% ' 21% 1 409 41% 29% _ 27% _ _34% To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the community 28% 18% _ 28% 17% 25% 17% 24% To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities (e.g., people with disabilities or people with low incomes) 59% 52% 57% 60% 44% 48% 55% To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 and younger) 70% 73% 75% 76% 57%1_- 68% 70% To provide recreational opportunities for adults (20 to 59 years old) 56% 45% 65% 64% • 51% 55% 57% To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 and older) 53% 43% 67% 75% 53% 59% 58% Percent of respondents rating as "strongly agree. " C O U r U C7 VI d b C MO Z M O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 47 Recreation Plan Survey nFzAF ~ moor April 2008 Question #2 by Geographic Area The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the statements may reflect values that are important to you, from each pair of statements below, please indicate Central, North Outside which ONE of the two statements you believe is East, CU or Boulder or South i Southeast boundaries more important for Boulder. Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Consider parks and recreation a human service that contributes to the physical, emotional and I social welfare of the whole community, and I therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax dollars. - - 91% - -68% _ 85% 84% 79% 78% 84% Consider parks and recreation a business which should attract and serve as many people as possible who can afford to pay for the services provided, and therefore offers more services funded primarily through user fees. 9% 32% 15% 16% 21% 22% 16% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Parks and recreation program offerings should be - at many different skill levels, i.e. beginner through very advanced- - -68% 62% 75% 61% 58% 63% 65% Parks and recreation program offerings should focus primarily on introductory classes at beginning and intermediate levels. 32% 38% 25% 39% 42% 37% 35% Total 100% 100% 100% - 100% 100% 100% 100% Parks and recreation facilities should be mostly programmed with leagues and other pre-planned activities or events, with some drop-in use, likely I earning greater revenues. 33% 51% 38% 44% ! 37% 29% 37% Parks and recreation facilities should mostly be available for public drop-in use, with some active programming, likely earning lesser revenues. 67% 49% 62% 56% 63% 71% 63% Total 100% 100% r 100% 100% 1 100% 100% 100% 0 z rn 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 48 Recreation Plan Survey April 2009 Question #2 by Geographic Area (continued) The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizingthat all the statements may reflect values that are important to you, from each pair of statements below, please indicate Central, North I Outside which ONE of the two statements you believe is East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries more important for Boulder. I Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Parks and recreation program offerings should focus mostly on popular sports and fitness (e.g., aerobics, yoga, softball, soccer, basketball, etc.) because those serve the most number of people. 39% 44% 31% 46% 39% 33% 39% Parks and recreation program offerings should r offer some popular sports and fitness activities, but also include diverse opportunities like arts and crafts, and classes (e.g., cooking, tai chi, etc.). 61% 56% 69% 54% 61% 67% 61% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 1 100% 100% The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and not replicate them. 52% 69% 41% , 43% 41% 55% 49% The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs identified by residents, regardless of whether they are provided by other agencies in or near Boulder. 48% 31% 59% 57% 59% 45% 51% Total 100% 1009/. rt 100% 100% 100% I 100°/% 100% U C N C N V L V l0 d N N R C O ig 2 a) O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 49 Recreation Plan Survey n Ft A F" April 2009 Question #3 by Geographic Area Please rate how important you think it is for the Central, North Outside city of Boulder to provide recreation programs East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries for each of the population groups below. Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Children age 12 and younger 52% 51% 56% 53% 44% 41% 1 50% Teenagers 13 to 19 years old - 54% 30% 58% 49% 44% _v 42% 1 49% Adults (20 to 59 years old) 27% 29% 39% 34% 28% 22-/.T 29% Senior adults (age 60 and older) 31% 27% 35% 54% 25% 25% 33% Families together as a group 239% - 22% 36% 23% 22% 16% 23% People with disabilities 40% 28% 34% 50% 34% 33% 38% People with low incomes 50% 29% 41% 56% 37% 30% 44% Percent of respondents rating as "essential." Y C N U L (,1 M CD N QI° C O m z O) 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 50 Recreation Plan Survey A F~ IWO, April 2009 Question #4 by Geographic Area When planning for the use of its various recreation facilities (recreation centers class space, gym space, pools, fields, etc.), the city of Boulder has to consider a variety of priorities and community needs. What do you think Is the appropriate allocation of time for Central, North Outside each of the following purposes at the city's recreation East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries facilities? Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Opportunities to "learn-to" (skill-building; beginner and intermediate classes) 22% 21% 25% 24% 21%1 23% 22% Opportunities for advanced or elite programs (advanced classes or competitive opportunities) 12% 14% 13% 12% 12% I 11% 12% Opportunities for city-sponsored leagues to use the I " facilities (e.g., softball leagues, adult soccer leagues volleyball leagues, youth football leagues, etc.) 20% 159° 20% 18% 20% 18% 1 19% Opportunities for community groups to use the facilities (e.g., Little League, Master Swimming, youth soccer clubs, Boulder Rugby Club, etc.) 17% 21% 16% 16% 19% 18% 17% Opportunities for drop-in use (e.g., swim laps, shoot baskets, lift weights, etc.) 30% 29% 25% 31% 28% 31% 29% Question #5 by Geographic Area The city of Boulder has to consider a wide variety of needs in our community when planning the recreation classes to offer. About what percent of classes do you think the city of Boulder should offer Central, North Outside to the community in each of the following three East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries categories? Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall C "Active" physical recreation (e.g., yoga, Pilates, sports, dance, swimming, fitness, etc.) 51% I 50% 48% 57% 50% 56% 52% U Leisure enrichment activities (e.g., pottery, painting, r photography, cooking, etc.) ' 25% 27% 27% 22% 24% 22% 25% N Community education (e.g., babysitting certification, CPR, health and wellness lectures, etc.) 25% 22% 25% 20% 26% 22% 24% 0 z 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) @ Page 51 Recreation Plan Survey .FzAF:_r NOW" April 2009 Question #6 by Geographic Area In the past year, have you or any member of your Central, orth Outside household participated in any of the following Fast, CU or Bo Nulder or South Southeast boundaries activities? Crossroads ; Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes _ 32% 25% 24% 18% 13% 26% 24% Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 64% 39% 54% 60% 29°% 54% 53% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play - features) ; 31% 33%34% 36% 26% 27% 31°% Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 13% _ 18% . 9% 10% 6% 10% I 11% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 35°% 28% 22% 33% 24% 34°% 310 Children and teen summer swim team 4% 12°% 4% 6% 2% 5°% Dance classes/instruction 15°% 7% 14% I 25% 12% 15% 15% Competitive dance team/company 6% 10/, ' 1°% 8% 4% 1% 4°% Gymnastics classes/instruction - 11°% 10°% E 5% 12°% 3% 8% ' 9°% Competitive team gymnastics _ 5% 0°% 1% 2% I 0% 3°% 3% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) _ 46%~ 40% 45% 37% ; 37% 49°% 43% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais 9% 5% 9% 8%4% 10°% 8% "Drop-in" exercise (weights, exercise machines, r i etc.) 57% 49% 60% 46% 42°% 41% 51% "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates 33% 21% 32% j 20°% 21°% 21°% 26°% Educational health and wellness classes 14% 5% 1496 11% 11°% 7% 12% Drop-in basketball or volleyball 24% ` 5% 12% 24% 14% 16% 19% Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) 31% 7°% 25% ! 25% 31% IT 12% 25% Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, a dodgeball, basketball, etc.) _ 27% 9°% 18% 28% 18% , 17% 22°% fr Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, i o mini-sports) j 10% 5°% 7% 11% 11°% 11% 10% z C) 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 52 Recreation Plan Survey p FT April 2009 Question #6 by Geographic Area (continued) In the past year, have you or any member of your Central, North Outside household participated in any of the following East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries activities? i Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Golf lessons/instruction 7% 8% 6% 2% 0% 10% I 5% Golfing I 16% 14% 20% 9% 1 17% i 20% 16% Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) 9% 8% 14% 11% 4% 10% 9% Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, 1 Babysitting, etc) 16% - 9% I 11% 10% 11% 9% 12% Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, music, drama, etc.) 17% 7% 17% 16% 7% f 6% 13% Children's summer day camp 7% 1 7% 10% 9% I 6% ' 11% 8% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring break, holidays) 4% 5% 4% 3% 2% 5% 4% Pottery instruction/classes _ 5% _ 4% • _ 7% 10% 4%3% 6% "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab 4% 6% 7% 3% 2% 4% 4% Youth Services Initiative 3% 0% ! 1% ' 1% 0% 1% 2% EXPAND 5% 0% 2% 0% 2% 3% 3% Community event 7% 1 0% 4% 15% 7% 5% 7% "Drop-in" to a reservoir 44% I 46% 43% 37% I 37% ' 36% 41% "Drop-in" to a reservoir for boating 12% I 8% 4% 110/0 2% 15% 9% Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp 1 8% 0% 5% 3% 0% 7% 5% Small watercraft rental 8% 2% 4% 6% ./.T- 8% 6% U C N H C N U L U W N N G1 d' r C O 16 Z O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 53 Recreation Plan Survey r2 FLA 000, April 2009 Question #7 by Geographic Area How important, if at all, do you believe it is that Central, North Outside the city of Boulder offer each of the following East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast I boundaries activities to the community? Crossroads Gunbarrel i Palo Park Boulder I Boulder or unknown Overall Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 40% 25% _ 61% 36% 36% 43% d 40% Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 41% 38% 58% 46% 34% 57% I 44% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play ' - - - - - features) 22% 21% 30% 31% 21% 41% 26% Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water ~I exercise classes 26% 9% 33% 20% 20% 26% - ! L- 23% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 30% 26% 41% 33% i 731% 40% I 33% Children and teen summer swim team _ 25% j 16% 41% 20% 14% 23% 23% Dance classes/instruction 12% 9% 27°/' 0 11% 120/ 8% 13% Competitive dance team/company 8% 5% 10% 3% 2% 5% 6% Gymnastics classes/instruction 19% j -~18% 23% 15°,6 10% 13% 17% Competitive team gymnastics 10% 2% 12% 6% 5% 6% 8% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) 42% 35% 60% 55% 49% 45% 47% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais _ 13% j 8% 17% ! 13% 6% 16% 12% "Drop-in" exercise (weights, exercise machines, r etc.) - - - f _ 51% _ 50% , 65% 58% L 48%j 54% 53% "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates 30°1° 33% i 37% i ~ 34% I 26% I 23% 30% Educational health and wellness classes 31% 21% ° ° ° o Drop-in or volleyball 24% j - - 12% 270° 22/0 28/0 25/0 _ 27% U _ 29 /0 21% 26% 27% 24% 5 Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, - soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) 24% 13% 40% 29% 33% 26% 27% Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgeball, basketball, etc.) 24% 12% 1 31% 24% 29% 17% 24% Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, ! _ o volleyball, mini-sports) 15% 11% 18% 19% 21% 15% 17% z rn 0 0 cw Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 54 Recreation Plan Survey A FT Apri12009 Question #7 by Geographic Area (continued) How important, if at all, do you believe it is that Central, North Outside the city of Boulder offer each of the following East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries activities to the community? Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Golf lessons/instruction 9% 5% 12% 2% 7% 3% I 7% Golfing 13% 4% 12% _6% 14% _ 11% I 11%° Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) 9% 2% 9% 7% 6% 3% 7% Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) - l 41% 41% 41% 26% 38% I 32% 37% Leisure enrichment class (cooking, an, photography, music, drama, etc.) 19% 18% 20% 8% 17% 4% 16% Children's summer day camp i 30% 1 33% 48% 43% 36% 40% N 36% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., T spring break, holidays) 29% 31% _ 39% i 38% 1 27% 33% 32% Pottery instruction/classes 15% 4% 20% 4% ~7% 6% 10% "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab - 15%rt 13% 21% 1 _ 3% 3% 11% Youth Services Initiative 35%1 _ 26% 45% 38% 34% 30% 35% EXPAND 44% 23% 47% 47% 34% 37% 41% Community event 17%T 4% 19% 6% 14% 3% 13% "Drop-in" to a reservoir 45% 43% 55%0 42% 39%^ 31% 43% "Drop in" to a reservoir for boating 33%~ 34%T 18% 18% 26% 19% 26% Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp 18% 5% 11% 7% 14% _ 11% ` 13% Small watercraft rental 1 15% 12% 14% 9% j 18%~ 17%° 14% Percent of respondents rating as "essential. " U G N C N U L V M N LO co C 0 Z 01 O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 55 ~ Recreation Plan Survey nFzAF April 2009 Question #10 by Geographic Area If it were up to you; how would you allocate $100 in taxes across the following types of Central, North Outside programming to best meet the needs of the East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries Boulder community? Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Recreational programs at the beginning and intermediate level ("learn-to" programs) $34 $38 _ $35 $41 $33 $36 $35 Recreational programs at the advanced and elite levels ("competitive" programs) $15 $15 $15 $15 $12 $10 $14 Providing one-day community events at city recreation facilities $13 _ $10 $12 _ $10 $17 $14 $13 Reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups (e.g., Little League, i synchronized swim team, etc.) $24 $23 $26 $21 $23 $25 $24 Reducing rental rates for adult community groups (e.g., Masters Swimming, Adult Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) $14 $14 $12 $13 $16 $15 $14 Question #11 by Geographic Area Please indicate your level of support for or opposition to the following sources of funding to Central, North Outside help fund recreation facilities and programs in the East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries city of Boulder. Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park' Boulder I Boulder or unknown Overall Renew existing sales taxes for parks and recreation when they expire 72% 51% 82% 66% 61% 59% 68% A new sales tax - - 8% 2% 12% 8% 4% 3% _ V 7% Grants and donations, which require raising matching funds from the community on a portion I of the monies received 37% 20% 47% 39% 29% 39% 36% Partnering with other municipalities, school t districts or nonprofits to develop joint use recreational facilities or programs 51% 44% 56% 63% 44% 56% 52% Partnering with private organizations to develop Z recreational facilities or programs 45% 22% 43% 40% 34% 49% 41% o Percent of respondents rating as "strongly support. " z M 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 56 Recreation Plan Survey AFT April 2009 Question #12 by Geographic Area Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following funding policies Central, North Outside for recreation facilities and programs the city of East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries Boulder could pursue. Crossroads I Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder i Boulder or unknown Overall The city of Boulder should seek corporate sponsors in _ I - order to supplement parks and recreation funding 32% 35% 24% 28% 37% 51% 33% Recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees 6% 11% 3% 2% 9% 12% 7% Profitable or popular programs can help pay for less profitable programs 31% 36% 39% 34% 25% 23% 31% Individuals living outside Boulder should pay higher fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities 52% 24% 67% 59% 44% 33°x6 50% Individuals who live outside Boulder but work or own a business in Boulder should pay resident fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities i 26% 33% 38% 24% 27% 47% 30% Percent of respondents rating as "strongly agree. " Question #13 by Geographic Area If the city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department did get some additional funding beyond what is needed to provide the current levels of Outside programming and maintenance, please indicate your Central, North boundaries level of support for or opposition to the following uses East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast or of additional funding. Crossroads i Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder unknown ; Overall Maintain and update existing facilities and equipment 72% I 70% _ 74% 72% 58% j 76% ; 70% lower user fees 37% J1 _ 22% 28% 30% 340/. 29% 32% Offer additional recreation programs 18% j 13% 17% 17% 20% 'I 25% ! 18% Build new recreation facilities or renovate existing facilities 29% 6 24% 33% 28% 24% l 22% 27% Percent of respondents rating as "strongly support. " z rn 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 57 Recreation Plan Survey nFzAF:T spow April 2009 Question #15 by Geographic Area What is your preferred way find out about city of Central, North Outside Boulder Parks and Recreation programs? East. CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries (Check one.) Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder i Boulder or unknown Overall Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide (quarterly publication) 33% _53% - 47% 48% 41% 56% 42% Boulder Camera newspaper 14% 4% 10% 7% 88% 13% 11% Channel 8 (the municipal cable TV channel) 1% 3% 0% 0% 2% j 1% 1°% Other 0% 4% 1°% 2% 7% 6% 3% T Informational flyers 9°% 0% 2% 3% 8% 5% 6% The city of Boulder Web site I 35% 34% 31% 26% 31% j 13% 30% E-mail groups/listserves _ 8% 3% 9% 13% 2% 7% 7% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Question #16 by Geographic Area How would you rate the availability of Central, North Outside information about the city of Boulder's East, CU or Boulder or South Southeast boundaries recreation offerings to the community? Crossroads Gunbarrel Palo Park Boulder Boulder or unknown Overall Excellent 22% ! 19% 31% 26% 21% 32% 24% Good - 52% 38% - - 38°% - - 59% 40% - - 49% 48% Fair - 15°% 35°% 22°% i- 7°% 24% 6°% 17% Poor 6% - -1% 1 4% 3% 2% 9% 5% Don't know 5% 7% 5% 50/. 13% 3°% 6% Total 100% 100°% 100°% 100°% 100% 100°% 100% U t U f6 N Vl l° C O W z Q1 O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 58 Recreation Plan Survey -.0, , "o k : 0 April 2009 APPENDIX D: RESPONSES TO SELECTED SURVEY QUESTIONS BY PRESENCE OF CHILDREN OR TEENAGERS IN HOUSEHOLD The table below displays the number and percent of respondents whose household includes children or teenagers. The remaining tables in this appendix present selected survey results by the presence or absence of children and teenagers in the household. Percent of Respondents with Children or Teenagers in Household Geographic Area Number of Respondents Percent of Respondents Household includes children or teenagers 141 j 23% Household does NOT include children or teenagers 471 77% Total - - - - - - 612 100% Differences of note between those households that include children or teenagers compared to those households that do not include: ♦ A larger proportion of those whose households included children or teenagers "strongly" agreed that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs in order to provide positive activities for children and teens than did those whose households did not include children and teenagers. However, even among respondents in households without children and teenagers, a strongly majority (67%) strongly agreed that providing positive activities for youth was an important mission for Boulder Parks and Recreation. ♦ Respondents living in households that included children or teenagers were more likely to rate providing programs to children, teenagers and families together as a group as "essential" than those whose households did not include children or teenagers. ♦ Those whose households included children or teenagers were more likely to think the Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs identified by residents regardless of whether they are provided by other agencies than were those who lived in households without children or teenagers. ♦ In general, households with children or teenagers had higher participation rates for most recreational activities compared to households without children or teenagers. A couple notable exceptions included leisure enrichment classes (similar participation rates among both groups) and educational health and wellness classes (somewhat higher participation rates among households without children or teenagers). U C N C N U t V ID G1 N O1 D' 10 C O 10 Z m O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 59 Recreation Plan Survey , Fir April 2009 ♦ In addition, households without children or teenagers gave lower importance ratings to most recreation activities compared to households with children or teenagers. The activities given the highest importance ratings among households without children and teenagers differed somewhat from the activities given the highest importance ratings among households with children and teenagers. Most important activities to: Households with children or teenagers Households without children or teenagers * Drop-in exercise * Drop-in exercise * Indoor swimming pool swim lessons * Fitness or health and or water exercise classes wellness classes * Indoor swimming pool "open swim" * "Drop-in" to a reservoir * Fitness or health and wellness classes * EXPAND * Indoor leisure pool * Indoor swimming pool "open swim" * "Drop-in" to a reservoir * Certifications * Children's summer day camp * Youth Services Initiative *EXPAND * Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes ♦ Generally, those living in households with children or teenagers gave stronger support to various funding options for parks and recreation than did those in households without children or teenagers. ♦ Households with children or teenagers were more likely to prefer the Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide as their information source for city of Boulder Parks and Recreation programs (63%) than were those in households without children or teenagers (35%). ♦ Those in households with children or teenagers rated the availability of information about the city of Boulder's recreation offerings more positively than did those in households without children or teenagers. C U L U t9 O N 41 d' f0 C O M O Z rn O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 60 Recreation Plan Survey ri-SAFT Door Apri12009 Question #1 by Presence of Children or Teenagers In Household Cities offer recreation facilities and programs to their residents for a variety of reasons and purposes. NO child(ren) Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree that the Child(ren) or or city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to Teenager(s) teenager(s) its residents for each of the following purposes. In Household in Household Overall To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well- being of the general population of the community 81% 77% 78% To provide opportunities to make social connections; to strengthen the "social fabric" of the community 38% 34% 35% To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the community 23% 24% 24% To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able to participate in recreational activities (e.g., people with disabilities or people with low incomes) 66% 52% , 55% To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 and younger) 79% ! 67% 70% To provide recreational opportunities for adults (20 to 59 years old) 66% 54% 57% To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 and older) 64% 56% 58% * Percent oj'respondents rating as "strongly agree. " U C m C d U L G NN N c0 C D Y l6 z Q O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 61 Recreation Plan Survey F:T April 2009 Question #2 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for ' future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the NO child(ren) statements may reflect values that are important to you, from Child(ren) or or each pair of statements below, please indicate which ONE of the Teenager(s) teenager(s) two statements you believe Is more important for Boulder. in Household in Household Overall Consider parks and recreation a human service that contributes to the physical, emotional and social welfare of the whole community, and therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax dollars. 81% 85% 84% Consider parks and recreation a business which should attract and serve as many people as possible who can afford to pay for the services provided, and therefore offers more services funded primarily through user fees. j 19% 15% 16% Total 1 100% 100% 100% Parks and recreation program offerings should be at many different skill levels, i.e. beginner through very advanced. 61% 67% 65% Parks and recreation program offerings should focus primarily on introductory classes at beginning and intermediate levels. 39% 33% 35% Total 100% 100% 100% Parks and recreation facilities should be mostly programmed with leagues and other pre-planned activities or events, with some drop-in use, likely earning greater revenues. 40% 37% 38°% Parks and recreation facilities should mostly be available for public drop-in use, with some active programming, likely earning lesser revenues. 60% 63% 62% Total 100% 100% 100% Parks and recreation program offerings should focus mostly on popular sports and fitness (e.g., aerobics, yoga, softball, soccer, basketball, etc.) because those serve the most number of people. 41% 38% 39% Parks and recreation program offerings should offer some popular sports and fitness activities, but also include diverse opportunities like arts and crafts, and classes (e.g., cooking, tai chi, etc.). 59% I 62% 61% Total - - - 100% 100% 100% The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and not replicate them, 41°% ' 52% 50% The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs identified by residents, regardless of whether they are provided by other agencies in or near Boulder. 59% 48% 50% Total 100% 100°% 100°% U C d C V L U 16 U N N lO C Z O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) ° Page 62 Recreation Plan Survey A f:-r April 2009 Question #3 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household NO child(ren) Please rate how important you think it is for the city of Boulder to Child(ren) or or provide recreation programs for each of the population groups Teenager(s) teenager(s) below. I in Household in Household Overall Children age 12 and younger 71% 43% 50% Teenagers 13 to 19 years old 53% 48% 49% Adults (20 to 59 years old) 32% 28% 29% Senior adults (age 60 and older) 39% 31% 33% Families together as a group 34% 20% 23% People with disabilities 49% 35% 38% People with low incomes 48% 43% 44% *Percent of respondents rating as "essential. " Question #4 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household When planning for the use of its various recreation facilities (recreation centers class space, gym space, pools, fields, etc.), the city of Boulder has to consider a variety of priorities and NO child(ren) community needs. What do you think is the appropriate allocation Child(ren) or or of time for each of the following purposes at the city's recreation Teenager(s) teenager(s) facilities? In Household in Household Overall Opportunities to "learn-to" (skill-building; beginner and intermediate classes) 25% 22% 22% Opportunities for advanced or elite programs (advanced classes or competitive opportunities) 13% 12% 12% Opportunities for city-sponsored leagues to use the facilities (e.g., softball leagues, adult soccer leagues volleyball leagues, youth football leagues, etc.) 18% 19% 19% Opportunities for community groups to use the facilities (e.g., Little League, Master Swimming, youth soccer clubs, Boulder Rugby Club, etc.) 16% 18% 18% Opportunities for drop-in use (e.g., swim laps, shoot baskets, lift weights, etc.) 28% 29% 29% Question #5 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household The city of Boulder has to consider a wide variety of needs in our NO child(ren) community when planningthe recreation classes to offer. About Child(ren) or or what percent of classes do you think the city of Boulder should Teenager(s) teenager(s) offer to the community in each of the following three categories? in Household in Household Overall U "Active" physical recreation (e.g., yoga, Pilates, sports, dance, swimming, fitness, etc.) 55% 5171, 52% Y Leisure enrichment activities (e.g., pottery, painting, photography, cooking, etc.) 23% 25% 25% Community education (e.g., babysitting certification, CPR, health and wellness lectures, etc.) 22% 24% 24% 5 0 m z rn 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 63 Recreation Plan Survey lA A F~ April 2009 Question #6 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household Child(ren) or NO child(ren) In the past year, have you or any member of your household Teenager(s) in or teenager(s) participated in any of the following activities? Household in Household Overall Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 47% 18% 24% Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 72% 48% 54% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play features) 68% 20% 31% Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 23% 7% 11% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 57% 23% 31% Children and teen summer swim team 11% 2% 4% Dance classes/instruction 23% 13% 15% Competitive dance team/company 4% 5% 4% Gymnastics classes/instruction 26% 4% 9% Competitive team gymnastics 3% 3% 3% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) ( 50% 41% 43% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais 6% 9% 8% "Drop-in" exercise (weights, exercise machines, etc.) 51% 51% 51% "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates 30% 25% 26% Educational health and wellness classes 68% , 13% 12% Drop-in basketball or volleyball 22% 18% 19% Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) 27% 25% 26% Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgeball, basketball, etc.) 28% ' 20% 22% Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, mini-sports) 22% 6% 10% Golf lessons/instruction 11% 4% 5% Golfing 17% 16% 16% Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private ' golf lessons, personal training, etc.) 16% 1 7% 90/c Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) 15% 12% 13% Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, music, drama, etc.) 12% 14% 13% Children's summer day camp 25% 3% 8% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring break, holidays) 8% 3% 4% Pottery instruction/classes 7% 5% 6% "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab 5% 4% 4% Youth Services Initiative 1% 2% 1% EXPAND 1% r 3% 3% Community event 12% ' 6% 7% r_ "Drop-in" to a reservoir 51% 41% r ~ s "Drop-in" to a reservoir for boating 9% 9% I 9% A N Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp 6% 4% 5% Small watercraft rental 7% 5% 6% o . 16 z m 0 0 n Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 64 Recreation Plan Survey 10A FT April 2009 Question #7 by Presence of Children or Teenagers In Household Child(ren) or NO child(ren) How important, if at all, do you believe it is that the city of Boulder Teenager(s) in or teenager(s) offer each of the following activities to the community? Household in Household j Overall Indoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 60% 33% ' 40% Indoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 59% 39% 44% Used an indoor leisure pool (pool with water play features) 53% 17% 26% Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes 37% 19% 23% Outdoor swimming pool "open swim" (drop-in swim or lap swim) 45% 28% 32% Children and teen summer swim team 23% 23% 23% Dance classes/instruction 22% 10% 13% Competitive dance team/company I 7% 5% * 6% Gymnastics classes/instruction 27% 13% 16% Competitive team gymnastics 11% 7% 8% Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) 56% 44% 1 47% Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Feldenkrais 14% 12% I 12`y° "Drop-in" exercise (weights, exercise machines, etc.) 65%~ 49% 53% "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates 34% 29% 30% Educational health and wellness classes 33% 25% 27% Drop-in basketball or volleyball 29% 22% 24% Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate frisbee, etc.) 26% 27% 27% Played indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgeball, basketball, j etc.) 27% 23% 24% Sports instruction/classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, mini-sports) 27% i 13% 16% Golf lessons/instruction - - 8% 6% 7% Golfing 13% 10% 11% Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) 8% 6% 7% Certifications (e.g., CPR, AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) 42% 36% j 37% Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, music, drama, etc.) 15% 16% 15% Children's summer day camp 48% 32% ' 36% Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring break, holidays) 42% 28% 31% Pottery instruction/classes 9% 11% 10% "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab i 5% 13% ~11% Youth Services Initiative 39% 34% 35% EXPAND 46% 39% 41% U Com m u n ity event 11%~ 14% 13% "Drop-in" to a reservoir 49% 42% 43% "Drop-in" to a reservoir for boating 29% 25% 26% Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp 19% 11% 13% 0 Small watercraft rental 18% 13% 14% z *Pereent of respondents rating as "essential. " p N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 65 Recreation Plan Survey A F:lr moor April 2009 Question #10 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household If it were up to you, how would you allocate $100 in taxes across Child(ren) or NO child(ren) the following types of programming to best meet the needs of the Teenager(s) In or teenager(s) Boulder community Household In Household Overall Recreational programs at the beginning and intermediate level ("learn-to" programs) $40 $34 $35 Recreational programs at the advanced and elite levels ("competitive" programs) $13 $15 $14 Providing one-day community events at city recreation facilities $13 $13 $13 Reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups (e.g., Little League, synchronized swim team, etc.) $24 $23 $24 Reducing rental rates for adult community groups (e.g., Masters 1 Swimming, Adult Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) $11 I $15 $14 Question #11 by Presence of Children or Teenagers In Household Please Indicate your level of support for or opposition to the Child(ren) or NO child(ren) following sources of funding to help fund recreation facilities and Teenager(s) in or teenager(s) programs In the city of Boulder. Household in Household Overall Renew existing sales taxes for parks and recreation when they expire 73% ; 66% 68% A new sales tax 10% } 6% 7% Grants and donations, which require raising matching funds from the community on a portion of the monies received 42% 35% 37% Partnering with other municipalities, school districts or nonprofits j to develop joint use recreational facilities or programs 52% 53% 53% Partnering with private organizations to develop recreational facilities or programs 43% 40% 41% * Percent of respondents rating as "strongly support. " Question #12 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with I Child(ren) or NO child(ren) each of the following funding policies for recreation facilities and Teenager(s) in I or teenager(s) programs the city of Boulder could pursue. Household in Household Overall The city of Boulder should seek corporate sponsors in order to supplement parks and recreation funding 40% i 31% 33% Recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees 1% I 8% 7% Profitable or popular programs can help pay for less profitable programs 32% 31% ! 31% Individuals living outside Boulder should pay higher fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities 54% 48% 50% Individuals who live outside Boulder but work or own a business in - Boulder should pay resident fees for participating in city of M Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities 37% 28% 30% * Pei-cent of respondents rating as "strongly agree. " m Z M 0 O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 66 Recreation Plan Survey A FT SO&V April 2009 Question #13 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household If the city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department did get some additional funding beyond what is needed to provide the current levels of programming and maintenance, please indicate Child(ren) or NO child(ren) your level of support for or opposition to the following uses of Teenager(s) in or teenager(s) additional funding. Household in Household Overall Maintain and update existing facilities and equipment 72% 69% 70% Lower user fees 29% 33% 32% Offer additional recreation programs 19% 18% 18% Build new recreation facilities or renovate existing facilities 29% 26% 27% * Percent of respondents rating as "strongly support." Question #15 by Presence of Children or Teenagers In Household Child(ren) or NO child(ren) What Is your preferred way find out about city of Boulder Parks Teenager(s) In or teenager(s) and Recreation programs? (Check one.) Household in Household Overall Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide (quarterly publication) 63% 35% 42% Boulder Camera newspaper 1 9% 11% 11% Channel 8 (the municipal cable TV channel) I 1% 1% 1% Other - - 3% { 3% 3% Informational flyers 2% 8% 6% The city of Boulder Web site 18% 34% 30% E-mail groups/iistserves 6% 8% 7% Total 100% 100% f 100% Question #16 by Presence of Children or Teenagers in Household Child(ren) or NO child(ren) How would you rate the availability of information about the city of Teenager(s) In or teenager(s) Boulder's recreation offerings to the community? Household In Household Overall Excellent 34% 21% 24% Good 46% 49% 48% Fair i 11% 19% 17% Poor 3% 5% 5% Don't know 5% 6% r 6% Total 100% 100% 100% 2 U t V 71 W QI d' r C O Z rn O 4 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 67 Recreation Plan Survey d T 90, April 2009 APPENDIX E: SURVEY METHODOLOGY Developing the Questionnaire The questionnaire was developed by the staff of NRC, with input from the city of Boulder Parks and Recreation staff. The team reviewed previous surveys conducted on behalf of the city as well as questionnaires conducted on behalf of other jurisdictions. Based on the information needs and issues faced by the city, the specific questions were drafted by NRC staff. The questionnaire was reviewed and revised until the final version was accepted. Selecting Survey Recipients "Sampling" refers to the method by which survey recipients are chosen. The "sample" refers to all those who were given a chance to participate in the survey. All households located in the Boulder Valley, defined as zip codes 80301 through 80305, were eligible for the survey. Because local governments generally do not have inclusive lists of all the residences in the jurisdiction (tax assessor and utility billing databases often omit rental units), lists from the United States Postal Service (LISPS), updated every three months, usually provide the best representation of all households in a specific geographic location. NRC used the USPS data to randomly select a sample of households to receive the survey. Attached units were over sampled as residents of this type of housing typically respond at lower rates to surveys than do those in detached housing units. An individual within each household was randomly selected to complete the survey using the birthday method. The birthday method selects a person within the household by asking the "person whose birthday has most recently passed" to complete the questionnaire. The underlying assumption in this method is that day of birth has no relationship to the way people respond to surveys. This instruction was contained in the cover letter accompanying the questionnaire. The addresses selected to receive the survey were geocoded as residing in one of the nine planning subcommunities as defined by the city of Boulder. A tenth area was defined as those addresses outside the subcommunity boundaries. The map on the next page displays the subcommunity boundaries and the location of addresses selected to receive the survey. U C N C N U t U f0 d V1 A C O Z O O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 68 Recreation Plan Survey u- I Apni 2009 Map of Subcommunity Boundaries and Addresses Selected for the Survey* it ~ - - - 1 • 1 • i -73 I unbarrel • 7 • L, Litaffel t • i + . 40 • LNorih Boulder r ~t « • ~ • 665 sra~d5 East Boulder Ce~nfral~B" alder 4ti •+s• • • • • t ~ • Colorado Unlye~rsiiy Ift•; 1 is • t• • M t soot`east moulder ` • - 1 1 a • • - 1-T Lafayette r % sou1h'BouEiie~1 t • W+E J= J S • Eldorado rtn s'- ~'ullaaioi7 * Blue dots represent addresses within subcommunity boundaries; red dots indicate addresses outside subcommunity boundaries. Survey Administration and Response Each selected household was contacted three times. First, a prenotification announcement was sent, informing the household members that they had been selected to participate in the Boulder Recreation Survey. Approximately one week after mailing the prenotification, each household was mailed a survey containing a cover letter signed by the city manager and the department director enlisting participation. The packet also contained a postage paid return envelope in which the survey recipients could return the completed questionnaire directly to NRC. A reminder letter and survey, scheduled to arrive one week after the first survey was the final contact. The second cover letter asked those who had not completed the survey to do so and those who have already done so to refrain from turning in another survey. The cover letter contained instructions in Spanish directing Spanish-speakers to a Web site where they could complete the survey online in Spanish, if they wished. No survey recipient chose to complete the Spanish version of the survey online. The mailings were sent in March 2009. Completed surveys were collected over the following weeks. About 4% (121) of the 3,000 surveys mailed were returned because the housing unit was vacant or the a postal service was unable to deliver the survey as addressed. Of the 2,879 households who received a survey, 622 completed the survey, providing a response rate of 22%. 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 69 ar-O Recreation Plan Survey ,rw April 2009 The 95% confidence interval (or "margin of error") quantifies the "sampling error" or precision of the estimates made from the survey results. A 95% confidence interval can be calculated for any sample size, and indicates that in 95 of 100 surveys conducted like this one, for a particular item, a result would be found that is within ±4 percentage points of the result that would be found if everyone in the population of interest was surveyed. The practical difficulties of conducting any resident survey may introduce other sources of error in addition to sampling error. Despite best efforts to boost participation and ensure potential inclusion of all households, some selected households will decline participation in the survey (referred to as non-response error) and some eligible households may be unintentionally excluded from the listed sources for the sample (referred to as coverage error). While the 95 percent confidence level for the survey is generally no greater than plus or minus four percentage points around any given percent reported for the entire sample, results for subgroups will have wider confidence intervals. For each subgroup from the survey, the margin of error rises to as much as plus or minus 14% for a sample size of 52 (in the smallest) to plus or minus 6% for 232 completed surveys (in the largest). Where estimates are given for subgroups, they are less precise. Survey Processing (Data Entry) Mailed surveys were returned to NRC directly via postage-paid business reply envelopes. Once received, staff assigned a unique identification number to each questionnaire. Additionally, each survey was reviewed and "cleaned" as necessary. For example, a question may have asked a respondent to pick two items out of a list of five, but the respondent checked three; NRC staff would choose randomly two of the three selected items to be coded in the dataset. Once all surveys were assigned a unique identification number, they were entered into an electronic dataset. This dataset is subject to a data entry protocol of "key and verify," in which survey data were entered twice into an electronic dataset and then compared. Discrepancies were evaluated against the original survey form and corrected. Range checks as well as other forms of quality control were also performed. Survey Analysis Weighting the Data The demographic characteristics of the survey sample were compared to those found in the 2000 Census estimates for adults in the city. Sample results were weighted using the population norms to reflect the appropriate percent of those residents in the city. Other discrepancies between the whole population and the sample were also aided by the weighting due to the intercorrelation of many socioeconomic characteristics. The variables used for weighting were respondent gender, age and housing situation. This decision was based on: ♦ The disparity between the survey respondent characteristics and the population norms for these variables ♦ The saliency of these variables in differences of opinion among subgroups ♦ The historical profile created and the desirability of consistently representing different groups over the years L The primary objective of weighting survey data is to make the survey sample reflective of the larger population of the community. This is done by: 1) reviewing the sample demographics and comparing them to the population norms from the most recent Census or other sources and 2) comparing the o responses to different questions for demographic subgroups. The demographic characteristics that are z least similar to the Census and yield the most different results are the best candidates for data o 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) a Page 70 .W.W . Recreation Plan Survey - April 2009 weighting. A third criterion sometimes used is the importance that the community places on a specific variable. For example, if a jurisdiction feels that accurate race representation is key to staff and public acceptance of the study results, additional consideration will be given in the weighting process to adjusting the race variable. A special software program using mathematical algorithms is used to calculate the appropriate weights. A limitation of data weighting is that only 2-3 demographic variables can be adjusted in a single study. Several different weighting "schemes" are tested to ensure the best fit for the data. The process actually begins at the point of sampling. Knowing that residents in single family dwellings are more likely to respond to a mail survey, NRC oversamples residents of multi-family dwellings to ensure they are accurately represented in the sample data. Rather than giving all residents an equal chance of receiving the survey, this is systematic, stratified sampling, which gives each resident of the jurisdiction a known chance of receiving the survey (and apartment dwellers, for example, a greater chance than single family home dwellers). As a consequence, results must be weighted to recapture the proper representation of apartment dwellers. The results of the weighting scheme are presented in the table below. Percent In Population Characteristic Population Norm* Unweighted Data Weighted Data Sex and Age 18-34 years of age 53.7% 23.9% 50.0% 35-54 years of age 30.7% 38.0% ' 33.0% 55+ years of age 15.6% 38.1% ' 17.0% Female 48.3% 61.8/0 47.8% Male 51.7/0 38.2% 52.2% Females 18-34 24.4% 15.3% 22.0% Females 35-54 15.2% 25.2% 16.9% Females 55+ - - - 8.7% 21.3% 8.9% Males 18-34 29.4% 9.0% 28.7% Males 35-54 15.4% 13.0% 1&2% Males 55+- - - - 6.9% - 16.3% - - 7.3% Housing Own home 51.9% 68.7% 51.9% Rent home 48.1% 31.3% ` 48.1% Detached unit 52.0% 54.0% 52.0% Attached unit 48.0% 46.0% 48.0% *Source: 2000 Census Analyzing the Data The electronic dataset was analyzed by National Research Center, Inc. staff using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). For the most part, frequency distributions and mean ratings are presented in the body of the report. A complete set of frequencies for each survey question is contained in Appendix A: Responses to Survey Questions. Also included are results by geograpic subarea (Appendix C: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Geographic Area) and presence of 76 children in household (Appendix D: Responses to Selected Survey Questions by Presence of Children s or Teenagers in Household). Z rn 0 0 N Report of Results (2000-04-24) Page 71 Recreation Plan Survey,► ■ April 2009 APPENDIX F: SURVEY MATERIALS The following pages contain a copy of the questionnaire that survey participants were asked to complete. U C N C N U L U M Nm N rC O i% l9 Z O) O O N Report of Results (2000-04-24) o Page 72 y 01 Baty~P Estamos haciendo un examen y quisieramos escuchar su opinion. Lea el final de esta carts para mAs informaci6n. r~ 1 Dear Resident, Recreation programs and services are an important part of Boulder's quality of life and the city of Boulder offers numerous and various types of programs. We are working on a recreation program plan for our community, and we want to hear from you to understand your perspectives and preferences so that we can best meet your recreational needs and interests! That is why your household has been randomly selected to participate in this survey. Please take a few minutes to fill out the enclosed questionnaire. We request that an adult (age 18 or older) in your household most familiar with the recreational activities of all household members complete the survey. Your responses will remain completely confidential. Please return the completed survey in the postage-paid envelope provided to National Research Center, Inc., 3005 30th St., Boulder, CO 80301, who will be compiling the results of the survey. We are making important decisions and will use these survey results to help guide us. We have mailed surveys to only a small percent of Boulder households, so your response is extremely important in helping us make decisions about recreation facilities and programs for the entire community. If you have any questions about this survey, please contact Sarah DeSouza at 303-413-7205. Please help us make Boulder an even greater place to live! Thank you for your help and participation. Sincerely yours, Jane S. Brautigam Tracy Winfree City Manager Interim Director, Parks and Recreation Department 1La ciudad de Boulder esta trabajando en un programa de recreaci6n para nuestra comunidad y queremos escuchar su opinion para poder entender sus perspectivas y preferencias de modo que podamos de la mejor manera posible atender a sus necesidades a intereses recreacionales! Usted puede conseguir la ayuda de un amigo o unfamiliar que hable ingNs para contester la encuesta o usted puede it al sitio de Internet al http-//www.n-r-c.conVRecreationSurvey para contestar ahi la encuesta en espanol. Si usted no tiene una computadora con acceso a Internet en su hogar, usted puede it a una de las bibliotecas y utilizar una computadora gratis ahi. Usted necesitara escribir este UserName (Nombre de Usuario): para poder completar la encuesta. iGracias! City of Boulder Recreation Survey 1.Cities offer recreation facilities and programs to their residents for a variety of reasons and purposes. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree that the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs to its residents for each of the following purposes. Then rate which you think is the MOST IMPORTANT reason the city of Boulder should offer recreation facilities and programs. Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Most Important A ree Areee _ Disagree Disagree (check one only) a. To maintain and improve the physical health and mental well-being of the general population of the community ................................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ b. To provide opportunities to make social connections; to.strengthen the "social fabric" - of the community ..........................1 2 3 4 ❑ c. To enhance the economic vitality of the community by offering special events that draw visitors from inside and outside the commur ty............1 2 3 4 ❑ d. To provide recreational opportunities to people who might not otherwise be able -to participate in recreational activities (e.g., people with disabiliies or people with low incomes)...' 1_111- - .....1 2 3 4 ❑ e. To provide positive activities for children and teens (age 19 and younger) .1 2 3 4 ❑ f. To provide recreational opportunities for adults r~ f,t (20 to 59 years old)......................................................... 3 ❑ 111, g. To provide recreational opportunities for senior adults (age 60 and older) .................................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ 2.The city of Boulder is determining important guiding principles for future parks and recreation programming. Recognizing that all the statements may reflect values that are important to you, from each pair of statements below, please indicate which ONE of the two statements you believe is more important for Boulder. a. ❑ Consider parks and recreation a human service that contributes to the physical, emotional and social welfare of the whole community, and therefore offers limited services funded primarily through tax dollars. ❑ Consider parks and recreation a business which should attract and serve as many people as possible who can afford to pay for the services provided, and therefore offers more services funded primarily through user fees. b. ❑ Parks and recreation program offerings should be at many different skill levels, i.e. beginner through very advanced. ❑ Parks and recreation program offerings should focus primarily on introductory classes at bcgiru-~ing and intermediate levels. c. ❑ Parks and recreation facilities should be mostly programmed with leagues and other pre-planned activities or events, with some drop-in use, likely earning greater revenues. ❑ Parks and recreation facilities should mostly be available for public drop-in use, with some active programming, likely earning lesser revenues. d. ❑ Parks and recreation program offerings should focus mostly on popular sports and fitness (e.g., aerobics, yoga, softball, soccer, basketball, etc.) because those serve the most number of people. ❑ Parks and recreation program offerings should offer some popular sports and fitness activities, but also include diverse opportunities like arts and crafts, and classes (e.g., cooking, tai chi, etc.). e. ❑ The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs that complement others in the community and not replicate them. ❑ The Parks and Recreation Department should provide facilities and programs identified by residents, regardless of whether they are provided by other agencies in or near Boulder. Citti, of f>~-~uldcr- R~creatlon Survey f a~~ 1 y 3.Please rate how important you think it is for the city of Boulder to provide recreation programs for each of the population groups below. Then indicate which one or two population groups you think should receive the hijzhes priority. Very Somewhat Not at all Highest Priority Programs for: Essential Important Important Important (check two only - r - - - 17 a Children_ag `e} 7 2 "Momm b. Teenagers 13 to 19 years old ........................................1 2 3 4 ❑ d. Senior adults (age 60 and older) .................................1 2 3 4 ❑ EN - f. People with disabilities ................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ 4.When planning for the use of its various recreation facilities (recreation centers, class space, gym space, pools, fields, etc.), the city of Boulder has to consider a variety of priorities and community needs. What do you think is the appropriate allocation of time for each of the following purposes at the city's recreation facilities? % Opportunities to "learn-to" (skill-building; beginner and intermediate classes) % Opportunities for advanced or elite programs (advanced classes or competitive opportunities) % Opportunities for city-sponsored leagues to use the facilities (e.g., softball leagues, adult soccer leagues volleyball leagues, youth football leagues, etc.) % Opportunities for community groups to use the facilities (e.g., Little League, Master Swimming, youth soccer clubs, Boulder Rugby Club, etc.) % Opportunities for drop-in use (e.g., swim laps, shoot baskets, lift weights, etc.) 100% TOTAL 5.The city of Boulder has to consider a wide variety of needs in our community when planning the recreation classes to offer. About what percent of classes do you think the city of Boulder should offer to the community in each of the following three categories? % "Active" physical recreation (e.g., yoga, Pilates, sports, dance, swimming, fitness, etc.) % Leisure enrichment activities (e.g., pottery, painting, photography, cooking, etc.) % Community education (e.g., babysitting certification, CPR, health and wellness lectures, etc.) = 100% TOTAL City of Boulder Rectvation Survey Page 2 6.In the past year, have you or any member of your household participated in any of the following activities at a city of Boulder recreation facility (e.g., North, South or East Boulder Recreation Centers, Scott Carpenter Pool, Pleasant View Fields, Boulder Reservoir, etc.), at a nonprofit facility (e.g, the YMCA, etc.), at a private facility (e.g., RallySport, 24 Hour Fitness, Flatiron Athletic Club, etc.), or at another city's recreation facility (e.g., Lafayette Bob L. Burger Recreation Center, Erie Community Center, etc.),? Please check all that apply. Did at a city of Did at a Did at a Did at another l~auldcr facility nont.rofit f..~ i9itti~ l~rivatc facilitt city'; t 1~ility a. Indoor swinuning pool swim lessons or water exercise classes ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ b. Indoor swimming; pool "open s~ im" dro in swim or lap swi(m) ....yam ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ C•l T '•-1~C. ~_1~~W1t11Ws1u.,.e _ 7-MIN W. FINOW, d. Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise dasties ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ e. Outdoor swimming pool "open swim t " t ■ dro in swim or la swim) ❑ f. Children and teen surnIller swim team ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ;x ;g. Dance elan; mpistructxan flaw. h. Competitive dance team/company ❑ 2 ❑ ❑ C?yiItI7aSf1C~i C121Sr5e$~]It$tr_tlftl02t y. r ■ - j. Competitive team gymnastics ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ , Fitness or hea dnd w° essclasses - e. aerobics, yoga, weight tra~ etc.) 1. Tai Chi/Chi Kun~,g/Feldenkrais ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ M.. "Drop ut" ex'ereis-6 (weights)exercise rnachxnes etc:}; C1 0 n. Drop in" yoga/Dilates... ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ o: Educaff~healtk and wellness classes h _ p. Drop-in basketball or volleyball ❑ ❑ D ❑ q. Played field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ r. Played indoor court sports (e.t;., t oli:~ l all, dodgeball, basketball, etc) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ s. Sports instruction/ classes (e.g. tennis, volleyball, mini-sports) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ t. Golf lessons/instruction ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ u. Golfing . ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ v. Private lessons/instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc,) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ w.Certifications (e.g., CPR; AED, First Aid, Babysitting, etc) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ x. Leisure enrichment class (cooking, art, photography, music, drama, etc.) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ y. Children's summer day camp. ❑ ❑ ❑ z. Children's day camp on school days off (e.g., spring break, holidays) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ aa. Pottery instruction/classes 0 _ ❑ bb. "Drop-in" to the Pottery Lab... ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ cc. Youth Services Initiative (a community based after school and summer program for youth living in public housing) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ dd. EXPAND (Exciting Programs Adventures and New Dimensions, a program that helps people who have disabilities improve anti gain new recreation and leisure skilts through prog7•0111s or inclusion) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ee. Community event (e.g., Father-daughter Valentine's Day dance, Halloween Carnival, Flick and Float, etc.) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ff. "Drop-in" to a reservoir jor sw m iinT g, 1111-0-dll biking, ~•vindsui frog, etc.) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ gg. ,.Drop-in" to a reservoir for boating D ❑ ❑ ❑ hh. Siva ii watercraft classes/instruction/camp (e.g-, sailbnat~, canoes, paili3lcbaats, saillanards, ctc.j ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ii. Small watercraft rental (e.g., sailboats, canoes, paddleboats, sailboards, etc.) ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ Cite of Boulder Recreations Survey Pabt 3 7.How important, if at all, do you believe it is that the city of Boulder offer each of the following activities to the community? Very Somewhat Not at all Don't , SS itial Im, a. Indoor`,'§; lessons 1 "!law ltnporiant Inipoi tanl Know ..lessons water e; FrA~blswim • 1 2 3 4 0 b. Indoor swimming pool "open swim" -(drop-in swim or la swim) .......................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ F^i, _ree~:Je ?if;~ 4: •:,~=I+" rte., Rim =EMI go M_ W d. Outdoor swimming pool swim lessons or water exercise classes ..............................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ min p O or Iapsw 4 ❑ fM1WW§4M__,0z m f. Children and teen summer swim team ..1 2 3 -1 J h. c 7 Tom etitive dance team/company 1 2 3 4 O C~n3t~e~ s e ainstrucho7t j. Cin1l1('titiVL' tVaIn byninastics _ .............................................1 2 4 ❑ k. Fitness or health and wellness classes (e.g., aerobics, yoga, weight training, etc.) 1 2 3 4 ❑ 1. f ei CI ri,, Cl Ii Kuri,; j FeIdenkrais .............................................1 2 3 4 ❑ m. "Drop lIt" exerelse.(w e.Igj1 Q ~ - W6 n. "Drop-in" yoga/Pilates ...........................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ o. Educatiorial health and welly P. Drop-in basketball or volkuvhall .............................................1 2 3 4 ❑ q. Field sports (e.g., baseball, softball, soccer, football, rugby, lacrosse, Uldniate Frisbee, etc) .......................................1 2 r. Indoor court sports (e.g., volleyball, dodgeball, basketball, etc.) ...........................................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ s. Sports ctsoir/ )'f 3 t. Golf lessons/ instruction ..........................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ v. Private lessons/ instruction (e.g., private tennis lessons, private golf lessons, personal training, etc.) ...............................1 2 3 4 ❑ 111111 :r~ ;w. Certif_icatibns ((e CPR AED First .4id Baliys iEuig' t Y k " ` ~ s? x. Leisure enrichment classes (cooking„ art, photography, music, drama, etc. ...............................1 2 3 4 ❑ y. Children's summer day camp 2 _ Z. Children's day camp on school days off (e g., spring break, holidays) ......................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ aa: Pottery instruction/classes 1 2 ? ; 1 ❑ lpip "Dror-in' [o the Pottery Lab.... cc. Youtli Services Initiative (a eomAnunity based after school and summer program for youth living in public housing) ...........1 2 3 4 5 dd. EXPAND (I~ro£ar.uns rni/or inclusions for Y1cut1lr %%Ith 1;i';;ahi3itics) .1 2 3 4 ❑ ee. Community events (e,g., Father-daughter Valentine's na p Day dance, Halloween Carnival, 1'llcle and Float, etc,) 3 ff. "Drop-in" to a reservoir (for swimming, running, biking, windsurfing, etc.) ...........................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ gg• "Drop-in to a reservoir for boating hh. Small watercraft classes/instruction/camp (e.g., sailboats, canoes, paddleboats, sailboards, etc.) ................1 2 3 4 ❑ ii. Small watercraft rental (e.g., sailboats, canoes, paddleboats, sailboards, etc.) ...1 2 34 ❑ 8.VQat suggestions, if any, do you have for other recreational offerings the city of Boulder might provide that it does not already provide? City of Boulder Recreation Survey Page 4 9.A fee is required to use most of the city of Boulder's recreation facilities and programs. These fees generally do not cover the full cost of offering the program. If a program is fully funded by tax dollars, there is no fee for the program. If a program receives no tax funding, the fees cover the entire cost of offering the program. Naturally, if all programs were fully funded by tax dollars, this would require a greater commitment of public funding (taxes) than if all program costs were covered by fees. For each of the following items, please indicate what you believe is the appropriate percent of costs that should be recovered through fees. No tax funding--------- ---Full tax funding Percent of costs that should be recovered through fees: 100% 70%-100% 35%-70% 15%-35% 0%-15% a. Youth Services Initiative (a community based after school and summer program for youth living in public housing) ........................1 2 3 4 5 c. "Open swim" (drop-in) for adults and seniors ..................................1 2 3 4 5 e. Swim lessons or water exercise classes for adults and seniors .........1 2 3 4 5 g. "Drop-in" exercise (e.g., weights, exercise machines, etc.) V for adults and seniors ...........................................................................1 2 3 4 5 h. "Drop-in" to the gym (e.g., basketball, volleyball, etc.) for adults and seniors ...........................................................................1 2 3 4 5 i. "Drop-in" to the gyre (e.g., basketball, volleyball, etc.) for children and teens ........................_...................................................1 2 3 4 5 k. Sports classes or teams for children and teens ....................................1 2 3 4 5 1. Beginning or intermediate level recreation classes for adults. and seniors (e.g. fitness, dance, music, drama, cooking, photography, etc.)...1 2 3 4 5 m. Advanced or elite level recreation classes for adults and seniors (e.g. fitness, dance, music, drama, cooking, phuhogr iphy, etc-) 1 Z 1 4 n. Beginning or intermediate level recreation classes for children and teens (e.g. fitness, dance, nuisic, drama, cooking, photography, etc.)....... 1 2 3 4 5 o. Advanced or elite level recreation classes for children and teens (e.g. fitness, dance, music, drama, cooking. }photography, etc,) ...............1 2 3 4 5 p. Golfing for adults and seniors ....1 2' ` _7' 3 5 q. Golfing for children and teens 3 4 5 r. Pottery clas5es;for adults and seniors i 5 . Mks s~A s. Potterv classes for children and teens ..................................................1 2 3 4 5 t:. Pottery "drop m%'studio fof adults and seniors 5 u. Pottery "drop-in" studio for children and teens .................................1 2 3 4 5 v ::Commuruiy gr gspools (e.g., Masters:Swimmzng) 2 w.Community groups using gyms (e.g., leagues, etc.) .........................1 2 3 4 5 ic.nu~zutyngoug usiigrfilds or c utts:(e;g Adult Rugl3r)s:..!fir 2 r3~'''i 10.If it were up to you, how would you allocate $100 in taxes across the following types of programming to best meet the needs of the Boulder community? $ Recreational programs at the beginning and intermediate level ("learn-to" programs) $ Recreational programs at the advanced and elite levels ("competitive" programs) $ Providing one-day community events (e.g., Father-daughter Valentine's Day dance, Halloween Carnival, SpringFest, Flick and Float, etc.) at city recreation facilities $ Reducing rental rates for children and teen community groups (e.g., Little League, synchronized swim team, etc.) $ Reducing rental rates for adult community groups (e.g., Masters Swimming, Adult Ultimate Frisbee, etc.) $ TOTAL City of Boulder Recreation Survey Page 5 11.Please indicate your level of support for or opposition to the following sources of funding to help fund recreation facilities and programs in the city of Boulder. Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Don't Support Su ort Oppose Oppose Know a. Renew existing sales taxes for parks and reereation when y~,~fj ~~~s t~ zt they expire . Saw b. A new sales tax c. Grant and donations, which require raising matching funds from the community on a portion of the monies rec:eived......... 1 2 3k 4 ❑ d. Partncring vvith other municipalities, school districts or nonprofits to develop joint use recreational facilities or programs ..............1 2 3 4 ❑ e. Partnering with private organizations to develop recreational facilities or programs :......_..1 2 3 4 ❑ 12.Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following funding policies for recreation facilities and programs the city of Boulder could pursue. Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Don t Agree Agee Disagree Disagree Know !a. The city of Boulder should seek corporate sponsors in order to supplement parks and recreation funding; (e.g., signage with advertisements on baseball fences, use of event banners with logos or advertising during events or games, naming of facilities, etc.) 1 2 3 4 ❑ b. Recreation programs must pay for themselves through user fees ............................................................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ c.-Profitable or popular programs (such as sports leagues and swimming lessons) can help pay for less profitable programs (such as therapeutic, senior and youth programs) .....................1 2 3 4 ❑ d. Individuals living outside Boulder should pay higher fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities ......................................1 2 3 4 ❑ e. Individuals who live outside Boulder but work or own a business in Boulder should pay resident fees for participating in city of Boulder recreation programs or using city of Boulder recreation facilities .............................................................1 2 3 4 ❑ 13.If the city of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department did get some additional funding beyond what is needed to provide the current levels of programming and maintenance, please indicate your level of support for or opposition to the following uses of additional funding. Then indicate which ONE of the following you think would be most important. Strongly Somewhat Somewhat Strongly Most Important Support' Support Oppose Oppose (check one only) a. Maintain and update existing facilities and equipment ..1 2 3 4 ❑ b .Low eusezifees~ 1 2 c. Offer additional recreation programs ...............................1 2 3 4 ❑ d. Build new recreation facilities or renovate ' existing facilities ................................................................1 2 3 4 Citv of Boulder Recreation Su rvo), Page 6 14.How do you find out about city of Boulder Parks and Recreation programs? (Please check all that apply.) ❑ Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide (quarterly publication) ❑ Informational flyers ❑ Boulder Camera newspaper ❑ The city of Boulder Web site ❑ Channel 8 (the municipal cable TV channel) ❑ E-mail groups/listserves ❑ Other 15.What is your preferred way find out about city of Boulder Parks and Recreation programs? (Check one.) ❑ .Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide (quarterly publication) ❑ Informational flyers ❑ Boulder Camera newspaper ❑ The city of Boulder Web site ❑ Channel 8 (the municipal cable TV channel) ❑ E-mail' groups/listserves ❑ Other excellent good fair poor don t know 16.How would you rate the availability of information about the city of Boulder's recreation offerings to the community? ..............1 2 3 4 ❑ 17.Have you or any member of your household registered for a recreation class or program with the city of Boulder in the previous 12 months? ❑ Yes ) 17a. The time you most recently registered, 17b. How easy or difficult ❑ No did you register online, over the phone, was it to register? ❑ Don't know or in-person? (Please check all that apply.) ❑ Very easy ❑ Online ❑ Somewhat easy ❑ On the phone ❑ Somewhat difficult ❑ In-person ❑ Very difficult ❑ Don't know ❑ Dori t know ~4p~d4~ . ' NO Ote IF-r 14.. y9 } r+rh c~ ti -L~~Y~` fP JFttr~~C'~•': ' i:n. li sstT 18.About how long have you lived 25.About how much was your household's total in Boulder? years income before taxes in 2008? (Please include in (Please mark "0" if less than 6 months) your total income money from all sources for all persons living in your household.) 19.Do you rent or own your residence? ❑ Less than $24,999 ❑ Rent ❑ Own ❑ $25,000 to $49,999 20.Please check the one box which most closely ❑ $50,000 to $99,999 describes the type of housing unit you live in. ❑ $100,000 or more ❑ A detached single-family home 26.Which of the following best describes your age? ❑ An apartment in an apartment complex ❑ 18 - 24 ❑ 45 - 54 ❑ An apartment in a single-family home ❑ 25 - 34 ❑ 55 - 64 ❑ A condominium or townhouse ❑ 35 - 44 ❑ 65 years or older ❑ A mobile home ❑ Other, please specify 27.What is your gender? 21.Counting yourself, how many people ❑ Female ❑ Male live in your household? people des no 22.Do any children age 12 or younger The city of Boulder greatly appreciates your live in your household? ❑ ❑ responses! Please return the survey in the enclosed 23.Do any teenagers ages 13 to 17 postage-paid envelope to the independent live in your household? 13 13 organization analyzing the results at: 24.Are you or any other members of National Research Center, Inc. 3005 30th Street your household aged 65 or older? ❑ ❑ Boulder, CO 80301 City of Boulder Recreation Survey Page 7