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1 - Overview of the West Trail Study Area Planning Process MEMORANDUM TO: Open Space Board of Trustees FROM: Mike Patton, Director of Open Space and Mountain Parks Joe Mantione, Acting Planning and Technical Services Division 147anager RE: Overview of the West Trail Study Area Planning Process DATE: September 24, 2408 West Trails Study Area Project Purpose The purpose of the West Trail Study Area (TSA) Plan is to provide the management direction and implementation strategies which will protect natural and cultural resources, improve the visitor experience, and provide a physically and environmentally sustainable trail system in the West TSA. Study Session Goal To obtain Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT) comments and feedback on the overall West TSA planning process, the scope of issues to be addressed, and key plan considerations. Questions for the West Trail Study Area Open Space Board of Trustees Introductory Study Session At the outset of the West TSA Plan, we request OSBT comments on the following questions: • Do you have any comments or suggestions regarding the overall planning process? Planning goals? Project approach and planning steps? Project deliverables and schedule? • Does the working list of issues and identified priority issues reflect your thinking? • Do you have any comments or suggestions on the key plan considerations? Any suggested changes? • Does the proposed public involvement process meet your expectations? Any suggested changes? Lead Project Staff Project 11'Ianager -Joe Mantione, Environmental Planner Project Sponsor -Eric Stone, Resource Systems Division Manager Project Management Core Team - Chris Wanner, Forest Ecologist Am7ie McFarland, Visitor Access Coordinator Matt Jones, Environmental Planner Julie Johnson, Cultural Resource Program Coordinator Mo Valenta, Resource Information Analyst Dean Paschall, Communications and Public Process Manager Steve Armstead, Visitor Master Plan Implementation Coordinator 1 Table of Contents: 1. West Trail Study Area Natural Resources, Cultural Resources, and Recreation Opportunities and the Challenge of Balancing Resource Protection and Recreational Use .................................................2 2. What's Different about the West TSA Planning Process ..............................................................3 3. West TSA Planning Goals .................................................................................................4 4. Overall Planning Approach and Flow of V4'ork for the West TSA Plan ............................................5 5. The West TSA Planning Framework Llsing Targets, Attributes, and Indicators ..................................5 6. Project Deliverables for the West TSA Plan ............................................................................6 7. ?Vest TSA Plan Project Schedule ........................................................................................6 8. Public Involvement Process for the West TSA Plan ...................................................................7 9. Planning Issues and Key Plan Considerations for the West TSA ....................................................8 9.1 Natural Resource Protection 9.2 Cultural Resource Protection 9.3 Recreational Access and Opportunities 9.4 Trails and Trailheads 9.5 Neighborhood Access 10. Attachments A: West Trail Study Area Map ....................................................................................13 B: Planning Process and Public Involvement Steps for the West Trail Study Area Plan ..................14 C: Working List of Issues for the West Trail Study Area Plan .................................................18 D: Key Plan Considerations for the West Trail Study Area Plan ...............................................27 1. West Trail Study Area Natural Resources, Cultural Resources, and Recreation Opportunities and the Challenge of Balancing Resource Protection and Recreational Use Overview. The West Trail Study Area includes Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) lands west of Broadway and SH 93 from Linden Avenue to Eldorado Springs Drive. See the West TSA Plan Map in Attachment A. The West TSA is a large area (11,254 acres) that contains multiple Visitor Master Plan management areas-Passive Recreation Areas (1,500 acres), Natural Areas (5,244 acres), Habitat Conservation Area (3,960 acres), and federal land where a management area designation may be added at a later time (550 acres, including National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institute for Standards and Technology, and National Center for Atmospheric Research). The large size of the t7Vest TSA requires an area- wide planning approach to address habitat protection and connections at a landscape level and address trails and trail connections in a larger geographic context. The West TSA contains a highly diverse set of forested and grassland ecosystems at the juncture of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains and is one of the most biologically diverse areas in Open Space and Mountain Parks, the Colorado Front Range, and the interior Llnited States. The West TSA mountain backdrop and transitional area to the plains are an exceptional natural resource heritage to preserve and enjoy. The West TSA also contains many historic and paleontological resources worth preserving. At the same time, the West TSA contains many high-use visitor areas, receives a high proportion of the total visitation on OSMP, and is a regional draw for recreation. The West TSA offers a wide range of exceptional recreational opportunities. In addition, the West TSA shares boundaries with many city neighborhoods and many residents recreate in the West TSA very frequently. The juxtaposition of high resource values and very high visitor use at the doorstep of the city creates many challenges to sustaining the health of ecosystems and providing high-quality visitor opportunities that are compatible with resource protection. 2 Natural Ecosystems. Many of the ecosystems in the West TSA are healthy and functioning naturally. The West TSA contains many rare, sensitive, and unique plant species and communities and a wide array of wildlife species, some of which are highly sensitive to human presence and visitor use. In the ever increasing urbanization of the Front Range, the West TSA provides extremely valuable habitat and a certain amount of refuge to sensitive species. Some of these natural assets are or will be threatened by high and increasing visitor use and increasing dispersal of the use. A major focus of the West TSA Plan will be to maintain or increase the level of natural resource protection, in order to maintain the balance between resource protection and recreation. Cultural and Geological Resources. The West TSA contains a wide range of important historic, paleontological, and geologic resources. Cultural resources include cultural features and sites important to indigenous people, sites and structures indicative of European settlement and mining, and trails and structures constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) for use by visitors to OSMP lands. The West TSA geological formations, such as the Flatirons and Red Rocks, record geological history, are well known, and provide beauty to the mountain backdrop. Some of these cultural and geological resources may require a higher level of protection, in order to enable long term stewardship of the resource. Recreational ©pportunities. Most visitors to the West TSA (and the OSMP system as a whole) report a high quality of experience, and innumerable visitors greatly enjoy the natural setting for passive recreation. Recreational opportunities abound in the West TSA, and many consider it a world-class recreational destination. The range of recreational activities covers the gambit, with the most popular being hiking /running, dog walking, rock climbing, and nature study. However, increasing levels of visitor use over time have degraded the visitor experience with loss of remoteness and increased visitor conflict. A second major focus for the West TSA plan will be to maintain and improve the quality of visitor experience. Trail System. The West TSA contains an extensive trail system, with many mountain backdrop trails built in the early 20th century, and a high density of trails in many areas. Many of these trails were not located or built to be physically and environmentally sustainable. Many trails were built in canyon riparian areas, which are some of the most ecologically sensitive lands in the West TSA. A third major focus for the V4~est TSA Plan will be on making the existing trail system more sustainable and on reducing the extensive network of undesignated trails. A backlog of deferred trail rebuilds and reroutes in the West TSA needs to be addressed. Expanding the current level of visitor access by building trails in un-trailed areas is not likely to be a focus. 2. What's Different about the West TSA Planning Process The completion of the first two TSA plans and implementation of these plans have provided many lessons. Building on what has been learned to date, several adaptive changes to the planning process for the West TSA are being implemented: • Expanded Natural Resource Inventory and Assessment. The planning process will use applicable conservation targets and strategies in the Grassland Ecosystem Management Plan and new targets and strategies that will be developed for the forest ecosystem. Key habitat areas in the grassland and forested areas of the West TSA will be identified where public access should be avoided or minimized. The consei•~~ation targets will structure the natural resource inventory and assessment. This new work will provide environmental suitability information for the location of special resource protection measures, trail reroutes, and new trails as well as priorities for closure /restoration of undesignated trails. Consultant assistance from ERO is helping staff in identifying habitat requirements for management indicator species and developing the natural resource inventory. • New Planning Framework. The planning framework uses natural, recreational, and cultural resource targets to identify existing resource conditions, define desired conditions, and develop strategies to bring existing conditions into alignment with desired conditions (parallels the targets, attributes, and indicators framework for the Grassland Plan). See sections # 4 and # 5 (page 5) below. 3 • Best Qpportunity Areas. The planning process will identify best opportunity areas where resource protection and recreational opportunities are likely to be most compatible. • Final Trail Alignments. Where possible, more detailed on-the-ground determination of trail alignments, trail reroutes, and management actions for undesignated trails will be developed prior to submitting the plan for OSBT review. The intent is to avoid a separate lengthy trail alignment and public involvement process during plan implementation and reduce the time required to actually implement changes on the ground. For the Eldorado 1~lountain-Doudy Draw {EMDD} TSA Plan, trail alignments were intentionally completed after plan adoption. • Community Collaboration in Shaping the West TSA Plan. The community involvement process is designed to be more inclusive and encourage a higher level of collaboration with and among community interests. Public im~olvement opportunities are provided at key steps in the planning process, which is designed to sequentially move foitivard and build on staff work and community collaboration. Public input will be sought in the inventory of existing conditions, definition of desired conditions, formulation of management objectives and strategies, and development of the plan itself. Community meetings in the near future will involve the public in the identification of desired conditions for natural, recreational, and cultural resources. See section # 8 (page 8) below. • Decision Making Transparency. Better transparency of how plan decisions are made will be provided with enhanced documentation and justification of decisions. 3. West TSA Planning Goals These goals are not all inclusive and may be revised or expanded in the future. At the outset of the West TSA Plan, these goals help define the scope of the plan. 1. Provide a high level of protection for valuable and fragile natural resources. Visitor travel will be channeled to trails and areas where visitor use impacts on natural resources can be avoided or minimized. Where needed, natural resource protection measures will be implemented to avoid or minimize impacts, such as setbacks or buffers from sensitive resources, seasonal wildlife closures, and activity-specific restrictions that modify or preclude certain types of uses in sensitive areas. 2. Enhance recreational opportunities where a high quality experience can be provided, the activity is compatible with resource protection, and visitor conflict can be minimized. Expanded access or improved facilities may be considered to support the wide range of different passive recreational activities. Educational / interpretive opportunities may be enhanced for natural and cultural resources and for low-impact visitor use techniques. 3. Provide an appropriate balance of resource protection and visitor access matched to the specific natural and recreational qualities of different areas. This approach involves accommodating higher levels of recreational use in areas where visitor use impacts can be minimized and providing more limited recreational opportunities in areas with higher ecological values. The Visitor Master Plan management area designations {Passive Recreation Areas, Natural Areas, and Habitat Consen~ation Areas) provide general guidance in balancing resource protection and visitor access opportunities. However, more specific guidance will be developed for subareas where appropriate. 4. Ensure that ne«~ or rerouted trails and trail connections provide trail locations and designs that protect natural and cultural resources, provide a high quality visitor experience, are physically sustainable, and encourage visitors to stay an-trail. Trails are intended to provide access to major visitor destinations, concentrate visitor use in travel corridors where resource impacts can be minimized, and allow closure and reclamation of user-created undesignated trails. The intended use, design, and alignment of trails will be matched to the specific management area and setting. 5. Retrofit and improve the existing trail system to make it more physically and environmentally sustainable. The West TSA contains many trails that were not built to be sustainable, and these deficiencies will be addressed by trail rebuilds and reroutes. In addition, the extensive network ofuser-created undesignated trails has created unacceptable resource impacts. Undesignated trail management actions will significantly shrink this network of undesignated trails with retention and designation of certain undesignated trails and closure and restoration of others. 6. Prioritize management actions to protect, maintain, and restore the integrity of historic resources. The West TSA contains many lustoric resources. Protections will be implemented when appropriate to maintain or preserve their historic significance and values. 4 4. Overall Flanning Approach and Flaw of Work for the West TSA Plan A complete description of the planning process and public involvement steps for the t~'est TSA is in Attachment B. A simplified version is: Phase 1: Inventory Existing Conditions • Define key plan considerations. • Define natural, recreational, and cultural resource targets, attributes, and indicators (see definitions below}. • Using this planning framework, inventory existing conditions for natural, recreational, and cultural resources. Phase 2: Define Desired Resource Conditions, Management Objectives, and Strategies • Define desired resource conditions using the targets, attributes, and indicators. • Set management objectives and thresholds of acceptability for the indicators. • Assess what resources meet or exceed desired conditions and what resources fall short of desired conditions. • Identify what strategies could be used to maintain desired conditions and bring existing conditions up to desired conditions. Phase 3: Develop the Plan • Develop and evaluate specific proposals and alternatives to maintain desired conditions and bring existing conditions up to desired conditions. • Develop a cohesive plan and implementation program {including monitoring) for the West TSA. Because of the size and diversity of natural resources and recreational opportunities in the West TSA, planning subareas ~-i11 be defined. For these subareas, management goals and objectives will be formulated, geared to the specific needs in the subarea. The planning subareas are: Sanitas, Red Rocks, Flagstaff, Flatirons, South Mesa, Western Mountain Parks Habitat Conservation Area, and Boulder Falls (see West TSA Plan Map in Attachment A). The federal properties adjacent to Boulder Mountain Parks, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), are included in the West TSA Plan. The planning and implementation horizon for the West TSA Plan is ten years. Plan revision and course correction will be considered as experience is gained in implementing the Plan. 5. The West TSA Planning Framework Using Targets, Attributes, and Indicators A new planning framework is being used for the West TSA Plan, which uses targets, attributes, and indicators (TAIs). The West TSA planning framework is very similar to the one used by the Grassland Ecosystem Management Plan, which is based on The Nature Conservancy's (TNC) conservation action planning (CAP). The TNC planning framework has been around for a long time, is used by many of TNC's partners, and is being used by many other public agencies. The West TSA planning framework will adapt the TNC model to meet the specific context and needs of OSMP. The TNC planning framework has been applied to a variety of planning settings, focused not only on biodiversity conservation targets, but also recreational and other targets. The Lorimer County Parks and Open Lands Department is one example of a public agency currently using the TNC's planning framework. In their Red Mountain Open Space Resource Management and Implementation Plan, they are planning for ecological conservation, cultural resource conservation, western heritage conservation, and outdoor recreation targets. If you are interested, you can find this plan at httn://www.co.lari~ncr.co.us/naturalresourcesllaramie foothills.htm. In Phase 1 of the West TSA planning process, targets, attributes and indicators v~~ill be used to characterize and assess existing conditions for natural, recreational and cultural resources. In Please 2, TAIs will be are used to define desired conditions and identify strategies to bring existing conditions in line with desired conditions. In Phase 3, the results of earlier phases will enable development and evaluation of specific plan proposals that will eventually be incorporated into a cohesive plan. Some definitions are in order. Targets broadly define what we are planning for, such as quality of the visitor experience, visitor infrastructure, ecological systems, and cultural resources (these targets were identified in the Visitor Master Plan). Attributes are defining or key characteristics of the targets, which if degraded could result in the eventual loss ofthe target. Indicators are measurable aspects of the attribute. They allow comparison of existing to desired conditions, as well as tracking the condition of attributes as they change over time. Definition of desired natural, recreational, and cultural resource conditions involves setting guidelines or standards for the indicators. Standards identify a minimum or maximum numerical value for the indicator measures that defines a threshold beyond which conditions may change from acceptable to unacceptable. These definitions are hard to comprehend without examples. At the OSBT study session, the staff will explain the West TSA planning framework and provide some TNC examples of targets, attributes, and indicators. 6. Project Deliverables for the West TSA Plan The anticipated set of project deliverables is: 2008 • Report summarizing West TSA policy direction and key plan considerations • Report summarizing West TSA natural, recreational, and cultural resource targets, target attributes, and indicators • West TSA inventory and assessment 2009 and 2010 • Issue papers on key topics {possibilities include management of climbing access trails / undesignated social trails, dog management, Walker Ranch bicycle trail connection, seasonal resource protection measures) • West TSA plan alternatives evaluation report • West TSA Plan (draft and final plans} 7. West TSA Plan Project Schedule The timefratne for the West TSA Plan project is anticipated to be approximately 24 months. This timefi•ame is based on the large geographic size of the West TSA, the wide range and complexity of issues to be addressed, the anticipated high degree of community interest in the plan, and expanded expectations for the plan (based on what was learned from experience after the Marshall Mesa-Southern Grasslands TS A Plan and the Eldorado Mountain-Doudy Draw TSA Plan. 6 An initial schedule for each of the major project milestones and associated deliverables is as follows: Table 2: Schedule for West TSA Plan Project Milestones and Deliverables Note: * * Indicates Public In ut for that Deliverable M11eStOneS and th st nd rc~ th st 2nc nd rd 4 Q 1` Q 2 Q 3 Q 4 Q l Q Delive~rable~s 2 Q 200 3 Q 200 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2010 Q 2010 West TSA Plan Project Project Project Start-Up Description Organization and Launch Review of Begin Policy/ Policy Existing Policy Plan Direction / Direction and Considerations Plan Key Plan Work Consid*r*tions Considerations Report Identification of Target Targets, Resource Targets Identification Attributes and Target and Attributes Indicators Report Im~entory and Inventory of Desired Inventory Assessment of Existing Conditions and Existing ;`Desired Conditions Work Assessment Resource Work Started Report** Conditions Design of Plan Begin Plan Proposals and Design of Proposals Alternatives Plan Working Proposals Draft Evaluation of Analysis of Plan Plan Proposals Plan Altematives and Alternatives Proposals & Evaluation Alternatives Report Writing of the Selection of Draft Draft TSA Plan Preferred TSA Document Plan Plan Alternatives Public Review, Final Revision, & TSA Adoption of the Plan** Trail Study Area Plan 8. Public Involvement Process for the West TSA Plan (some dates may change) For the t~'est TSA Plan, an effort is being made to streamline the public process. The intent is to enable staff to do the technical work using their expertise, make the process time-efficient for public involvement, and provide formal public involvement opportunities at key planning steps. The progression of planning steps will provide timely windows of opportunity for the public to offer ideas, concerns, and suggestions. Moving forward toward completion of the West TSA Plan will be emphasized in considering and incorporating public input at the right time. This process is designed to sequentially complete each planning step in a timely way, and previous planning steps will not be revisited. 7 The formal opportunities for public involvement include: 1. Community Meeting to Introduce the West TSA Plan, October 1, 2008 Goals: 1) Introduce the West TSA plan by providing information on the overall planning process and opportunities for community involvement; and 2} Provide an opportunity far the public to ask questions and provide feedback. 2. Public Comment on West TSA Plan Project Information, October 2008 Electronic or written comments, public input after the introductory West TSA Plan meeting. Goal: Obtain the public's comments on more detailed project information made available for review. 3. Public Comment on the West TSA Summary Report for Natural, Recreational, and Cultural Resource Targets, Attributes and Indicators, 4th Quarter 2008 Electronic or written comments. Goal: Obtain the public's comments on the targets report, with a focus on "Did we get it right? Anything we missed?" 4. Series of Community 11Zeetings to Help Define Desired Conditions, 4th Quarter 2008 Goal: Obtain the public's ideas on desired conditions far natural, recreational, and cultural resources. Separate facilitated community meetings will individually focus on: 1) natural and cultural resource protection (with break-out groups for natural and cultural}; 2) biking; 3) hiking /running; 4) horseback riding; 5) dog walking / no- dog opportunities; 6) climbing / bouldering; and 7} neighborhood access (one meeting with break-out groups for clusters of neighborhoods). In addition, informal non-facilitated meetings with the public to discuss desired conditions for other recreational activities will take place. 5. Community Meeting to Review the West TSA Inventory and Assessment Report, 1St Quarter 2009 Goals: 1) Educate the public about the high value natural and cultural resources and how planning for visitor access and recreational use is grounded on resource protection; and 2) Ask the public "Did we get it right? Anything we missed?" 6. Issue Focused Working Group Meeting on Selected Issues, 3'~d / 4th Quarter 2009 Goal: Provide the opportunity for interested community members to provide analysis of issues and possible solutions, which will help staff evaluate TSA plan alternatives and document staff recommendations. 7. Community Meeting to Re~zew the West TSA Plan Alternatives Report, 1St Quarter 2010 Goal: Review the staff's evaluation of plan alternatives and ask "Did we miss any pros and cons of the alternatives? Any new alternatives to consider? 8. C"ommunity Meeting to Review the Draft West TSA Plan, 1St Quarter 2010 Goal: Obtain comments on the draft plan. 9. Public Hearing at the OSBT Meeting on the Draft ~'4~est TSA Plan, 2"d Quarter 2010 Goal: Obtain comments on the draft plan. 10. Public Hearing at the OSBT Meeting on the Fuial West TSA Plan, 2"d Quarter 2010 Goal: Obtain comments on the final plan. A more detailed explanation of the public involvement process is in Attachment B (Planning Process and Public Involvement Steps for the West Trail Study Area Plan). 9. Planning Issues and Key Plan Considerations for the West TSA A wide range of issues will be addressed in the V4~est TSA. Identification and prioritization of these issues will be determined and adjusted as needed during the TSA planning process. The complete working list of issues to be addressed in the West TSA Plan is in Attachment C. For some of these issues, OSMP staff has identified key plan considerations. The list of key plan considerations for the West TSA is in Attachment D. These key plan considerations provide up-front guidance to OSMP staff and the public on the scope and focus of the West Trail Study Area Plan. These key plan considerations are derived from policy and management direction provided by adopted plans (Visitor Master Plan, Mountain Parks 8 Visitor Use and Resource Protection Plan, Open Space Long Range Management Policies, Forest Ecosystem Management Plan, and the Grassland Ecosystem Management Plan), from the City Council and the Open Space Board of Trustees, and from the professional judgment of OSMP staff. Some of these key plan considerations represent a departmental judgment about what options will be given consideration and ones that will not. Staff will follow this direction unless new information supports a change in a key plan consideration. Some of the more important issues and key plan considerations (not all-inclusive) are: 9.1 Natural Resource Protection Issues: 1. High Trail Densities that Create Significant Habitat Degradation and Fragmentation • What are the priority areas where high trail densities {resulting from the combination of designated trails and undesignated trails) should be reduced to improve habitat block size and effectiveness? 2. Need for Special Natural Resource Protection Measures to Avoid or Minimize Visitor and Dag Impacts • What natural resource protection measures are needed (and where) to conserve forest and grassland conservation targets or other sensitive /rare wildlife (given high and increasing levels of visitor use)? 3. Higher Level of Natural Resource Protection far the Area south of Shanahan Ridge that Was Taken out of the Proposed Eldorado iVlountain HCA Boundaries • What new resource protections I visitor use restrictions are needed to prevent degradation ar allow restoration of natural resources in this area? Key Plan Considerations: • Up-Front Consideration of Resource Conservation Needs. Conservation planning for the West TSA {based an the Grassland Ecosystem Management Plan and the Forest Ecosystem Management Plan) will identify conservation targets, priorities, and strategies. This planning will enable identification of areas where trails and visitor access are not compatible with resource protection or are compatible to varying degrees. This information will be a key consideration to guide where undesignated trail closure /restoration actions, undesignated trail designations, trail reroutes, and new trails will be considered. 9.2 Cultural Resource Protection Issues: 1. Protection Needs of Cultural Resource Features and Artifacts • What cultural resources need protection? What actions should be taken? 2. Historic Structure Stewardship Needs • What actions are needed to stabilize, protect, ar preserve the large number of historic structures in the West TSA? Which are the highest priority actions`? Key Plan Considerations: • Cultural Resource Protection. Protection and long-term stewardship of cultural resources and historic facilities will be key considerations to guide decisions on managing visitor access and recreational use. 9 9.3 Recreational Access and Qpportunities Issues: 1. Managing Access for Rock Climbing and Bouldering • What changes to climbing access management should be made to reduce the network of undesignated trails and support habitat protection and restoration? 2. Management of Bicycle Access • Are there opportunities far possible expansion of biking opportunities, which minimize natural resource impacts and visitor conflict`? • Where is the best place to consider a bike trail connection to Walker Ranch? • Is there an appropriate place to provide a north to south bike access connection from Boulder to South Mesa Trailhead? 3. Management of D©g i~Valking • Are there trails where dogs should be pralubited to provide additional opportunities for visitors to avoid dogs and increase the overall proportion of na-dog trails in the West TSA? Key Plan Considerations: • Climbing Access. C)SIV1P will maintain access to "historic" climbs in the Western Mountain Parks HCA. Where possible, the physical and ecological sustainability of climbing access will be enhanced by designating, physically improving, and rerouting climbing access trails or reducing the density of climbing access trails through closure and restoration. • Walker Ranch Bike Trail Connection. A bike trail connection from Eldorado Canyon State Park through OSMP to Walker Ranch will be considered in the West TSA Plan. This potential trail connection could involve use of the existing Eldorado Canyon Trail. This trail connection could potentially meet the long-standing desire for a trail connection that allows bicyclists to access the Walker Ranch bike trails without traveling up Flagstaff Road. Other passible bike trail connections to Walker Ranch that involve riparian corridors in Boulder I1•Iountain Parks will not be considered (i.e., Bear Canyon and Gregory Canyon}. • North-South Bike Trail Connection. Options far a new north-south bike trail connection from South Mesa Trailhead to the north will be considered in the West TSA Plan. Such a potential trail connection will not be located on the Mesa Trail or trails west of the Mesa Trail, due to steep terrain, sensitive natural resources, and high levels of visitor use. This potential trail connection would likely require a combination of trails, service roads, and bike lanes, due to the physical and environmental constraints involved. • Dog Access on the Bear Canyon Trail. OSMP will not consider a change to the on-leash requirement for the Bear Canyon Trail. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR} abides by a firm federal policy requiring dogs to be on-leash. • No-Dog Trail Opportunities. V4'ith the goal of slufting the balance of dog and no-dog opportunities, new na-dog trail opportunities will be considered in the West TSA, with possible application to existing trails and new trails. 9.4 Trails and Trailheads Issues: 1. Extensive Backlog of Trail Rebuilds and Rerr~utes • Where should trail rebuilds and reroutes be implemented to: 1. Bring trail conditions into compliance with Trail Management Objectives {T1VI(_)s). 2. Reduce trail braiding and widening and undesignated trails. 3. Channel visitors away from sensitive resources and areas. • What are the highest priority projects? 10 2. Extensive Networl~ of Undesignated Trails • Where are the highest-priority needs far closing /restoring or designating undesignated trails, which will improve natural resource conditions and the visitor experience? 3. Opportunities to Construct New Trails • Are there places in the West TSA where new trails could provide desired visitor access, enable reduction of the undesignated trail network, reduce visitor use resource impacts, and reduce visitor conflicts? -l. Opportunities to Expand Trail Access for People with Disabilities • Where are the best places to expand trail opportunities for people with disabilities? S. Trailhead Parking Congestion • What are the desired levels of service for trailhead parking capacity? • Are there opportunities to consider possible trailhead parking area expansion to deal with congestion and safety concerns? Key Plan Considerations: • Trail Planning Focus. The primary trail planning focus for the West TSA is to create a more sustainable trail system by: 1) reducing the network of undesignated trails and restoring undesignated trails that are closed; 2) retaining and designating undesignated trails, if that is the best solution for improving resource conditions, reducing undesignated trail networks, and enhancing visitor experience; 3} rerouting and rebuilding existing trails in order to improve resource conditions, physical sustainability, and visitor experience; 4) constructing very few new trails, limited to situations where the trail benefits outweigh the trail impacts. • Push to Trail Alignments. Wherever possible for trail reroutes and new trails, the West TSA plan will not only identify the conceptual trail corridor but also identify a more detailed trail alignment. Determining trail alignments in the West TSA planning process, Fvhen possible, will avoid a separate lengthy trail alignment and public involvement process during plan implementation. • Single Activity Trails. In general, OSMP does not support building and maintaining trails for single modes of visitor travel (e.g., pedestrian-only, biking-only, or horseback riding-only trails). In rare circumstances, trails that accommodate only a single made of travel may be considered if that is the best solution to avoid or minimize unacceptable resource impacts or visitor conflict. • Trailhead Parking. Improvements to existing trailhead parking will focus on more efficient configuration of parking spaces, which will improve visitor safety and convenience. Only limited expansion of trailhead parking areas will be considered, given the physical constraints of most trailhead parking areas and the desire to focus parking improvements on enhancing movement of vehicles through trailheads, increasing vehicle and pedestrian safety, and providing additional spaces for equestrian trailer parking. For many of OSMP's trailheads in the West TSA, opportunities for expansion of trailhead parking areas are constrained by environmental sensitivities, topography and other physical constraints, and OSMP land ownership. • Accessibility for People with Disabilities. Expanding trail and trailhead access for people with disabilities will be considered and implemented in the most suitable and desirable locations in the West TSA. 11 9.5 Neighborhood Access Issues: 1. N~anagerner~t of ~S1VfP Non-Trailhead Foints of Access • What management strategies should be employed for specific non-trailhead paints of access and associated undesignated trails? • How should direct access by adjoining property owners be managed? • Are there places where facility and access improvements should be made to non-trailhead access points? Should any of these non-trailhead accesses be designated as trailheads? 2. Access Conflicts between Neighborhood Residents and ©ther Visitors • Where are these types of conflicts occurring, and how should they be addressed? Key Plan Considerations: • Neighborhood Access. Neighborhood access issues will be addressed with the involvement of neighborhood and homeowners associations, neighborhood residents, and the public at-large in the West TSA planning process. 12 Attachment A Nest Trail Study Area Map (Appended to Back of Memo) 13 Attachment B Planning Process and Public Involvement Steps for the West Trail Study Area Plan Revised 9/15/08 Step 1: West Trail Study Area (TSA) Plan Project Organization and Launch This step launches the West TSA Plan project and establishes the overall project structure and organization. Tl~e West TSA Plan Project Description def nes project goals and scope, major issues to be addressed in the plan, project budget, project deliverables and schedule, task team assignments, and the public involvement process. Product: West TSA Plan Project Description Step 2: Review of Existing Policy Direction and Identification of Key Flan Considerations This step establishes a common understanding of previous management direction and key plan considerations for setting new management direction later in the planning pyacess. • Review and document existing policy and management direction from the Forest Ecosystem 1Vlanagement Plan, Grassland Ecosystem Management Plan, Visitor IVlaster Plan, Open Space Lang Range 11~Ianagement Policies, and the Boulder Mountain Parks Resource Protection and Visitor Use Plan. • Identify key plan considerations that provide up-front guidance to OSMP staff and the public on the scope and focus of the plan. Products: Report on Existing Policy Direction and Key Plan Considerations far the West TSA ©SBT Input: • An OSBT study session will be held in advance of a community meeting. The OSBT will discuss: o West TSA Plan Project Description o West TSA Key Plan Considerations o A brief introduction to the West TSA Resource Targets: 1) define what are targets, attributes and indicators, and how they will be used; and 2) provide same illustrative examples far natural, recreational and cultural resources, and climbing access and neighborhood access. • OSBT has the opportunity to attend the subsequent community meeting. Public Input: • West TSA Plan project overview material is distributed ahead of the community meeting via email and the OSMP website. • A community meeting will follow the OSBT study session. a. Staff will provide contextual information about the West TSA's natural, recreational, and cultural resources, the importance and challenges of balancing resource protection and recreation, an overview of the West TSA planning process, and opportunities for public involvement in the project. b. The public will be asked to provide feedback and articulate their expectations for a successful process and product for the ~~~est TSA Plan. • At the conclusion of the meeting, the public will be provided mare detailed information about the West TSA project (handouts at the meeting, information distribution through email and the OSMP website) and asked to submit any comments within two weeks (electronically or in writing). 14 Step 3: Identification of Natural, Recreational, and Cultural Resaurce Targets, Attributes, and Indicators This step identifies targets, attributes, and indicators for natural, recreational, and cultural resources. Targets broadly define what we are planning for, such as quality of the visitor experience, visitor infrastructure, and ecological systems (these targets were identified in the Ili,sitorMasterPlan). Attributes are defining or key characteristics of the targets, which if degraded could result in the eventual loss of the target. Indicators are measurable aspects of the attribute. They allow comparison of existing to desired conditions, as well as tracking the condition of attributes as they change aver time. The targets, attributes, and indicators organize and focus the resource inventory and assessment work and support future development of the plan. Product: Summary Report on Natural, Recreational, and Cultural Resource Targets, Attributes, and Indicators Public and Open Space Board of Trustees Input: • OSMP distributes the Summary Report for the West TSA Natural, Recreational, and Cultural Resource Targets, Attributes and Indicators via email and the c_7SMP website. • Public and OSBT electronic or written comments will be requested. A summary of public comments will be made available to the OSBT and the public. The focus is on asking "Did we get it right? Anything we missed?" Comments will inform any fine-tuning of the targets, target attributes, and indicators. Step 4: Inventory and Assessment of Existing and Desired Conditions This step applies the defrned resource targets, attributes, and indicators to characterize existing resource conditions, define desired future condition, and identify strategies to bring existing conditions in line with desired conditions. Several intermediate deliverables will be completed and then incorporated into the West TSA Inventory and Assessment Report: • Information on Existing Conditions for Natural, Recreational, and Cultural Resources • Definition of Desired Conditions far Natural, Recreational, and Cultural Resources • Assessment and Comparison of Existing Resource Conditions to Desired Conditions and Identification of A~Ianagement Objectives and the Range of Strategies to Bring Existing and Desired Conditions into Alignment Definition of desired natural, recreational, and cultural resource conditions involves setting guidelines or standards for the indicators. Standards identify a minimum or maximum numerical value for the indicator measures that defines a threshold beyond which conditions may change frarn acceptable to unacceptable. Product: West TSA Inventory and Assessment Report Public Input on Desired Conditions: A series of facilitated community meetings will involve the public in setting desired future conditions for natural, recreational, and cultural resources. OSBT has the opportunity to participate in the community meetings. Previously identified targets and target attributes will help structure the public input. The whole spectrum of the community will be invited to participate in separate facilitated community meetings that will individually focus on: • Natural and Cultural Resaurce Protection-one meeting (with breakout groups for natural and cultural) • Recreational Activities (biking, hiking /running, horseback riding, dog walking / no-dog opportunities, rock climbing / bouldering}-five separate meetings, one for each of the major recreational activities • Neighborhood Access-one meeting, with break-out groups for clusters of neighborhoods In addition, informal, non-facilitated meetings with the public to discuss desired conditions for other recreational activities will take place. 1~ Public Input on the Report: • The West TSA Im~entory and Assessment Report is distributed and public comments can be submitted via email ar through the OSMP website. • A community meeting to review the report will be held in advance of an OSBT study session. OSBT Input on the Report: • OSBT has the opportunity to attend the community meeting. • OSBT study session on the Report. Step 5: Design of Plan Proposals and Alternatives Designing plan proposals involves creatively identifying on-the-ground possibilities that are aligned with previously identified management direction, inventory and assessment information on resource targets, and resource management opportunities and needs. Plan proposals may include: • Special resource protection measures, (e.g., seasonal wildlife closures, trail setbacks or buffers from sensitive resources} • Restoration actions {e.g., closure /restoration of undesignated social trails or intensive weed control) • Enhancements to recreational opportunities (e.g., new no-dog opportunities, new biking opportunities) • Trail rebuilds and reroutes that improve physical and environmental sustainability, encourage visitors to stay on trail, and enhance visitor experience • New trails or designation /retention of existing undesignated social trails, which enhance visitor access, protect natural resources, enable closure of undesignated trail networks, and provide acceptable neighborhood access • Improvements to visitor concentrated use areas /site facilities, which enhance visitor access, services, and protect natural and cultural resources • Specific activity management measures to reduce or avoid impacts on resources or visitors (e.g., areas or trails with limited or na access for specific activities, on-trail use, seasonality /hours of use, alternate bike days, dogs on-leash, dogs on-trail or on-corridor, no dogs) Step 6: Evaluation of Plan Proposals and Alternatives Evaluating plan proposals and alternatives enables identification of the best opportunities to integrate natural and cultural resource protection and recreational use. Evaluating plan proposals and alternatives involves analyzing the benefits, feasibility, impacts, impact mitigation measures, and costs of the various alternatives (including na action). Not all plan proposals involve consideration of multiple alternatives. • Write issue papers to analyze selected issues, evaluate possible solutions, and help decide and document how difficult issues and choices are dealt with. • Evaluate plan proposals or multiple alternatives {presenting different choices) far special resource protection measures, new recreational opportunities, new trails, and trail /facility improvements. • Use Trail Suitability Analysis and Evaluation Criteria. as a tool to evaluate plan alternatives. The suitability criteria address factors related to the quality of the visitor experience, physical sustainability, environmental sustainability, and protection of natural and cultural resources. Piocluct: West TSA Plan Alternatives Evaluation Report Public Input: • Issue-focused working groups will be selectively used to analyze issues and possible solutions that help staff evaluate TSA plan alternatives and document recommendations. • West TSA Plan Alternatives Evaluation Report is distributed and public comments can be submitted via email or through the OSIVIP website. • A community meeting to review the report will be held in advance of an OSBT study session. 16 OSBT Input: • OSBT has the opportunity to attend the community meeting. • An OSBT study session will follow the community meeting. Step 7: Writing of the Draft Trail Study Area Plan Document This step involves selecting the plan proposals crud alternatives that will be translated into plan recommendations, based on resource information, evaluation of alternatives, and ideas crud suggestions offered by the public. Selection of plan alternatives involves assessing the trade-offs among the different plan alternatives and deciding the best package of plan components that integrates resource protection and visitor use. This step also involves developing the draft plan document, which integrates all relevant management direction, goals, information, analysis, results, and recommendations into a coherent whole and providing some implementation details. • Develop plan implementation strategies. • Produce details on design, cost, and phasing. • W1ite the draft plan document. Product: Draft West Trail Study Area Plan Public Input: • The West TSA Plan is distributed and public comments can be submitted via email or through the OSMP website. • A community meeting to review the plan will be held in advance of an OSBT meeting. OSBT Input: • OSBT has the opportunity to participate in the community meeting. • An OSBT meeting with a public hearing will follow the community meeting. Step S: Revision and Adoption of the West Trail Study Area Plan Finalizing the plan involves decisions by the OSMP Management Team with input from the public, the Open Space Board of Trustees, and possibly City Council. • Revision of the draft plan, with consideration of public and board comments. • OSBT review of revised West TSA Plan • Possible City Council call-up of the Final West TSA Plan. • Adoption of the Final West TSA Plan by the OSMP Management Team Products: Revised West Trail Study Area Plan Final West Trail Study Area Plan Public Input: • The revised West TSA Plan is distributed and public comments can be submitted via email or through the OSMP website. OSBT Input: • An OSBT meeting with a public hearing will provide OSBT recommendations to the revised plan. 17 Attachment C Working List of Issues for the West Trail Study Area Plan Revised 9/15/08 Notes: 1. This list of issues to be addressed in the West Trail Study Plan ~vill be refined over the course of the planning process. 2. Priority issues to be addressed have been identified and are indicated by bold italics. These priority issues will be given the most attention in the West TSA planning process. 3. Some issues will require asystem-wide context or determination of resource targets before they can be addressed in the ?Vest TSA Plan. Issue Definition of Issue Passible Ways to Deal with the Corrunents Identified Issue in the 1~Vest Trail Study Area (TSA) Plan Natural Resources Need for Special What natural resource Use natural resource targets and Special resource protection 1~'atural Resource protection measures are management objectives to inform decisions measures were identified as P?•oteetion needed (and where) to on where special resource protection one strategy that would apply Measures to conserve forest and measures will be implemented (e.g., selectively in Passive Avoid or grassland conservation seasonal wildlife !resource closures, Recreation Areas, Natural targets or other sensitive / seasonal limits on Habitat Conservation Areas, and Habitat MininaiZe Visitor rare wildlife? Area off-trail permits, seasonal on-trail or Conservation Areas (HCAs). and Dog Impacts dog restrictions, or closures for sensitive / restoration sites). Identify the best trails (existing and new) where no-dog restrictions or seasonal on- leashrequirements should be considered. High Ti•ail What are the priority areas In order to reduce overall trail densities to Several areas within the t~rest Densities that where high trail densities improve habitat functioning, decide where: TSA contain high or very high Create Significant (resulting from the 1. Existing designated trails should be trail densities. Habitat combination of designated rerouted Degradation and trails and undesignated 2. tUhere undesignated trails should be trails) should be reduced to designated, closed /restored, or Fragmentation improve habitat block size retained and effectiveness? 3. tUhere neiv trails should be constructed to provide managed trail access and reduce overall trail densities. Trails in Riparian Where should changes to the Reduce trail proximity and impacts on The West TSA contains many Corridors trails network be made to the riparian corridors. Strategies benefiting designated trails in riparian better protect riparian areas? riparian corridors could include rerouting corridors, which pre-date existing trails away from riparian corridors, concerns about human impacts closing and restoring undesignated trails in on these sensitive areas. riparian corridors, and locating new trails where impacts on riparian corridors are avoided or minimized. Weecl Dispersal by What are the priority areas Complete the Rapid Assessment Mapping Rapid Assessment Mapping People, Horses, for intensive weed control (Rr1M) for weeds and use that information for several high-priority areas and Dogs efforts and other methods to to prioritize weed control efforts in specific within the West TSA is being avoid or minimize the spread places. completed during 2008. These of riorit weeds ecies? riori areas include: existin 18 Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area (TSA) Plan Implement. weed control best management trail corridors, areas where practices along trails and in other areas. trail reroutes and new trails Determine whether the strategy of may be considered, and high encouraging or requiring weed free hay for visitor use areas. horses should be considered. New ecological best management practices for trail design, construction, and maintenance address weed control. Higher Level of What new resource Determine what special natural resource Council directed that resource Natural Resource protections /visitor use protection measures are needed in this area protection and restoration Protection for the restrictions are needed to and implement them. should be a priority in this Area south of prevent degradation or allow area. Shanahan Ridge restoration of natural that Was Taken resources in this area? out of the Proposed Eldorado Mountain HCA Boundaries Natural Resource How can Open Space and OSMP can develop an agreement with Discussions with NIST, Management for Mountain Parks (OSMP) NIST, NOAA, and NCAR that provides a NOAA, and NCAR are the National best collaborate with NIST, framework for collaboration on the West underway. Institute for NOAA, and NCAR on TSA Plan and ongoing natural resource Standards and natural resource protection management. Technology and management? (NIST), National (Agreements already exist Oceanic and for visitor access and trail Atmospheric management.) Administration (NOAA), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research {NCAR) Properties Preventing What road runoff measures OSMP will be addressing the Flagstaff Degradation of Long Canyon Erosion and along Flagstaff Road (to Road runoff problem and restoration of Creek from Flagstaff Road Sedimentation and prevent further degradation) Long Canyon as part of a new ecological runoff has been identified as a Restoring Habitat and what ecological restoration initiative. If any coordination serious problem for many in Long Canyon restoration measures in Long needs with the West TSA Plan are years. Working with the Creek Canyon should be identified under the restoration initiative, Boulder County implemented? they will be considered. Transportation Department and seeking external funding What is the appropriate for the project will be pursued. venue to address these needs? 19 Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area TSA Plan Recreation Resources Managing Access What changes to climbing Collaborate with the climbing community Flatirons Climbing Council for Rack access management should and other interested stakeholders in (FCC) is already working with Climbing and be made to reduce the developing a system of climbing access OS1~LP to help assess the Bouldering nettuork of undesignated trails that provide low-impact /sustainable situation and identify trails and support habitat access to desired destinations. Actions solutions. protection and restoration? include: • Constructor retrofit existing climbing Should OSMP identify new access trails so that they comply with bouldering opportunities / appropriate design standards (dealing areas with potential resource with physical and environmental concerns where OSNIP can sustainability). proactively protect the • Retain and improve existing climbing resources? access trails that have limited capability to be made sustainable but are the best low-impact solution to maintain access to climbing formations. • Consolidate the network of climbing access trails by designating preferred climbing access trails and closing / restoring selected climbing access trails. Additional Bolted Are there places where new Reauthorize the Flatirons Climbing Council FCC and OSMP are discussing Climbing Routes low-impact, sustainable (FCC) cooperative memorandum of FCC's requests for new areas bolted climbing routes could understanding (MOU), and limit expansion for bolting. Some of these be provided? of climbing formations available for new requests may be appropriate bolted routes to those that meet current for a decision by the time the sustainability criteria. FCC MOU needs to be extended (end of December 2008). Other requests may be best considered at a later time in the context of the West TSA Plan. Low-Impact How can the use of low- Continue to tivork with FCC to expand Leave-No-Trace (LNT) Climbing impact climbing practices be outreach and peer pressure to encourage principles provide guidance Practices expanded? Are there expanded use of low-impact climbing for low-impact climbing particular areas where this techniques. techniques. should be a focus? 1Ylanagement of Are there opportunities for Work with the mountain biking community The Walker Ranch trail Bicycle Access possible expansion of biking to set priorities for the top tier of new bike connection and north-south opportunities, which opportunities that OSMP should evaluate. connection from Eldorado minimize natural resource Springs to Shanahan Ridge impacts and visitor conflict? and parts north have previously been identified as top priorities by Boulder Mountain Bike Alliance. Where is the best place to Continue to evaluate the possible Eldorado consider a bike trail Canyon Trail bike connection to talker connection to Walker Ranch. Ranch? Is there an appropriate place For any new bicyclist access on existing or Any new bike access on to rovide a north to south new trails, determine the range of strategies existing trails in the West TSA 2~ Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area (TSA) Plan bike access connection from to employ that will minimize bicyclist will require provisions to Boulder to South Mesa impacts on resources or other visitors (e.g., minimize conflict with other Trailhead? trail design and construction techniques, visitors. collaboration among various user groups, signs, outreach, separation of uses, etc.). Management of Should trails in the West Decide what trails should be designated and Trail Management Objectives Equestrian Access TSA be designated and maintained for equestrian use and (TIvIOs i are being developed maintained for equestrian implement retrofits and new trail designs for each trail and trail segment use? that implement this decision. in the West TSA. These TMOs will define what trails Where should off-trail Designate where off-trail access for are designed and / or managed access for equestrians be equestrians should be allowed and not to accommodate sustainable allowed and not allowed? allowed. equestrian use and what trails should not allow horses. Equestrian Trailer Are there places to consider Evaluate existing and potential new South Mesa Trailhead is one Parking passible expansion of trailhead parking areas for possible place that has been identified equestrian trailer parking? expansion of equestrian trailer parking. by the Boulder County Horse Association (BCHA) as a high desire area for new equestrian arkina. Designated Site{s} Are there any feasible and Work with the user groups to evaluate the The West TSA may not offer a for Paragliding sustainable locations for possibilities. suitable location for and Hang Gliding designated launch and paragliding and hang gliding landing sites in the West on the OSiU1P system, given TSA? extreme topography and safety concerns. More No-Dog Are there trails where dogs Identify the best opportunities for no-dog OSMP has not yet set a Ti•uils should be prohibited to trails on both existing and new trails in the standard defining the desired provide additional West TSA. proportion of no-dog trails in opportunities for visitors to the system as a whole. OSI~•IP avoid dogs and increase the will evaluate no-dog trail overall proportion of no-dog opportunities and constraints trails in the West TSA? in the West TSA and determine its contribution to meeting a possible systemwide standard for the overall proportion of no-dog trails. In Council hearings on the V"isitor Master Plan (V1VIP), staff indicated an emphasis on providing new no-dog trails in those situations where existing trails run parallel to the same destination. OSMP's Regional What is OSMP's current Examine the respective regional In comparison to Jefferson and Role or Niche for regional role or niche uz opportunities, "niches", strengths and Boulder Counties, OSIvIP Recreation providing opportunities for weaknesses of OSMP and other currently provides more Services specific passive recreational jurisdictions in providing specific passive extensive dog walking activities? Does OSMP recreational opportunities. Some other opportunities (especially off- want to maintain this providers of passive recreation leash opportunities) and less regional role or change it opportunities include Boulder, Jefferson, extensive bicycling (i.e., increase or lessen and Larimer counties, Eldorado Canyon opportunities. OSMP and OSMP's role) in the context State Park, and the LJS Forest Service. Eldorado Canyon State Park of the larger regional are premier rock climbing recreation system? Use that information to identify the focal or destinations. These kinds of 21 Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area (TSA) Plan The relative availability and unique recreational opportunities or niches comparisons tivill be evaluated spatial distribution of that OSMP should continue to provide or and documented for the OSI~•IP passive recreational consider changing, and decide what role the system as a whole. They will opportunities provided by West TSA should play in providing these provide some context for the various jurisdictions in recreation opportunities. evaluating existing and the region may be a potential new recreational consideration affecting opportunities in the West decisions about what TSA. opportunities OSMP should rovide. Provide the How can OSMP use the Use ROS to help identify the existing and OMSP is currently assessing Opportunity for Recreational Opportunity desired future mix of recreational how to apply the ROS concept Various Kinds of Spectrum (ROS) framework opportunities and experiences within to the OSMP system. Its Experiences to further define or guide different management areas and TSAs, application, especially decisions regarding including the West TSA. regarding the relative recreation opportunities that availability and spatial should be provided in Identify conditions and requirements distribution of recreational different management areas needed to provide these varying recreation opportunities within the (Passive Recreation Areas, opportunities and experiences with respect OSMP system, as a whole and Natural Areas, and Habitat to compatibility with resource protection by TSAs, will be evaluated. Consen~ation Areas) and needs. within different TSAs, including the West TSA? By providing different kinds of recreational settings and accommodating different types of use, OSMP provides a diverse and wide range of recreational opportunities and ex eriences. Trails Erosion and Where should improved trail Decide the specific solutions that will be Trail Management Objectives Gullying due to design and maintenance be implemented in specific places to improve {TMOs) will provide a Unsustainable implemented? trail physical sustainability. structured framework for Trail Design and setting standards to build and Maintenance maintain sustainable trails. OSMP is now using the TMO approach. The Visitation Study survey indicates that visitors believe that trail erosion and gullying is an issue needing reater attention. Extensive Where should trail rebuilds Evaluation should start with projects The Trail Assessment and Backlog of Trail and reroutes be implemented identified in the VMP and the Trail Prioritization Report contains Rebuilds and to: Assessment and Prioritization Report. Sort criteria to evaluate and Reroutes 1. Bring trail conditions out which projects could be considered in prioritize projects and costing into compliance with 2008 with existing Trail Assessment and approaches. Trail Management Prioritization Report resource information Objectives {TMOs). and which ones need to wait unti12009 The scale of the needed trail 2. Reduce trail braiding when the West TSA resource inventory is rebuilds and reroutes and the and widening and completed. funding needed to address undesignated trails. them will likely mean a long 3. Channel visitors awa Prioritize and develo more detailed ro~ect time frame for im lementin 22 Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area (TSA) Plan from sensitive resources designs and cost estimates. Develop a them (10+ years j. and areas. mare detailed long-term CIP to fund the What are the highest priority projects. projects? Extensive Where are the highest- Use the existing process to prioritize The extensive network of Network of priority needs for closing / undesignated trail management actions, undesignated trails indicates Undesignated restoring or designating which will take advantage of new West that the existing trail system Trails undesignated trails, which TSA information an natural resources and does not serve all popular will improve natural updated undesignated trail mapping. visitor destinations, and it has resource conditions and the created unacceptable visitor experience? Designate undesignated trails if they meet environmental impacts (e.g., an unportant access need and can be made habitat degradation and environmentally and physically sustainable. fragmentation). Develop along-term program to close and restore unclesignated trails in the West TSA. Opportunities to Are there places in the West Decide where the benefits of new trails The trail focus for the West Construct New TSA where new trails could outweigh their impacts, and design TSA is to create a physically Trails provide desired visitor alignments for these trails. and environmentally access, enable reduction of sustainable trail system; the the undesignated trail focus is not on expanding the network, reduce visitor use trail system with new trails. resource impacts, and reduce visitor conflicts? Road Crossings What design solutions and Start with those road crossing safety The high cost ofgrade- improvements are needed to improvement needs identified in the VMP separated road crossings will improve the safety of road and the Trail Assessment and Prioritization require external funds and crossings? Report. agency cost-sharing in many cases. What resources can be Prioritize and obtain internal and external obtained to construct funds to implement safe road crossings. solutions? Opportunities to Where are the best places to Evaluate and prioritize opportunities for OSIvIP is committed to Expand Ti•ail expand trail opportunities for both existing and new trails. provide trail access for people Access for People people with disabilities? with disabilities where with Disabilities Phase in improvements over time. practical and feasible. Facilities Ti•ailhead What are the desired levels Start with the identified needs in the ~~MP Addressing the issue of Parking of service for trailhead and the Trails Assessment and parking capacity requires that Congestion parking capacity? Prioritization Report. OSIv1P balance providing enough parking to deliver an Are there opportunities to Determine where additional equestrian acceptable level of service but consider possible trailhead trailer parking could reduce congestion or not too much parking beyond parking area expansion to increase capacity for non-trailer parking. which parking capacity causes deal with congestion and unintended negative safety concerns? consequences (such as creating increased visitor conflict, unacceptable environmental impacts, detracting from the "undeveloped" character of open space, and supporting a cycle of expanded parking 23 Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area (TSA) Plan capacity that gets filled up and results in a new round of congestion). Ti•ailhead What are the highest-priority Complete a more in-depth assessment of OSMP will use new Trailhead Improvements trailhead improvements the trailhead improvement needs identified Classes and Standards to (providing safety, services, in the VIvIP. Assess and prioritize the assess the existing trailhead amenities, accessibility), and needs and obtain funds to implement improvements needed to bring how should they be improvements. them up to standard and addressed? develop priorities for Conduct outreach to neighborhoods to improvements. OSIVIP will identify desires for trailhead improvements also be deciding what and access management. trailheads should be upgraded to a higher class to better meet visitor desires and needs. Management of What management strategies Management strategies for non-trailhead There is a multitude of non- OSMP 1Von- should be employed for points of access include: trailhead access points into the Ti•ailhead Points specific non-trailhead points Allow access points to continue to be West TSA, with designated ofAeeess of access and associated used as is. accesses and undesignated undesignated trails? . Consolidate and % or close some non- accesses from the hundreds of trailhead access points in order to properties that abut the West How should direct access by channel use to designated trails and TSA. The concern is that the adjoining property owners allow undesignated trails to be closed network of undesignated trails be managed? and restored. cannot be reduced unless some • Upgrade the level of service to some of the non-trailhead access Are there places where non-trailhead access points, which may points are consolidated and / facility and access or may not involve making them or closed. improvements should be designated trailheads. made to non-trailhead access points? Should any of these non-trailhead accesses be designated as trailheads? Access Conflicts Where are these types of Conduct outreach to neighborhoods to Some neighborhood residents between conflicts occurring, and how identify these types of problems and experience impacts from Neighborhood should they be addressed? determine which situations require visitors accessing the West Residents and management actions. TSA at designated access Other Visitors points and road rights-of-way in their neighborhoods and want OSMP to reduce these impacts. Other visitors are frustrated with insufficient legitimate access opportunities in s ecific nei hborhoods. Need for What areas would benefit Develop comprehensive site plans for Site plans would provide Comprehensive most from comprehensive selected concentrated visitor use areas. guidance for the design, Site Plans for site plans? Which areas improvement, and Selected should be planned as part of Fund these plans in 2009. management of concentrated Concentrated the West TSA Plan? visitor use areas (e.g., Flagstaff Summit, Visitor Use Areas Chautauqua, and Red Rocks / Anemone Hill). The approach is to comprehensively assess and plan for the physical, safety, resource protection, and ameni needs in areas 24 Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area (TSA) Plan with high visitor use and a concentration of trails, trailheads, structures, and visitor services, and thereby manage visitor use and services in an integrated way. Signs and What improvements should Identify needed improvements for existing OSMP is in the process of Trailhead Board be made in the West TSA for signs /trailhead boards using OSMP's sign developing its sign standards. Improvements signs and trailhead boards standards and determine priorities for OSl~LP has initiated a program (addressing regulatory, phased improvements and retrofits. to improve OSIvIP's interpretive, information, connection with the and ~vay-finding needs}? Identify ~.uhere new signs should be placed. community and a project to What new signs are needed? improve the public's understanding and cooperation What are the improvement for protecting Habitat priorities, and how should Conservation Areas. Specific improvements be phased in changes to signs and trailhead over time? boards in the West TSA will take advantage of new direction and strategies coming out of these work efforts. Facility Where are the best places to Evaluate and prioritize opportunities for OSMP is committed to Improvements for expand opportunities for both existing and new facilities. provide ADA accessibility to People with people with disabilities using its facilities for people with Disabilities OSMP facilities? Phase in improvements over time. disabilities, where practical and feasible. Large Group Should OSMP identify sites Evaluate how existing facilities in the West OSIv1P first needs to decide Activities and and facilities in the West TSA are or could be utilized for large group what kind of large-group Facilities TSA which can activities. Evaluate possible new sites or activities are suitable on the accommodate large group facilities for suitable large group activities. system. activities? Large group activities that If so, where? occur outside of designated facilities that can accommodate them (such as the Sunrise Amphitheater on the Flagstaff Summit) require a special use permit (for groups larger than 25). Restroom What are the highest-priority Complete an assessment of restroom needs Visitor satisfaction is highly Improvements needs for restroom and improvements associated with dependent on modern, bright, improvements or new trailheads. Assess and prioritize the needs low odor and clean bathrooms. restroom locations and obtain funds to implement Restrooms have not been an (providing safety, improvements. Consider installing modern OSMP priority. Many are cleanliness, low odor, composting toilets. Increase maintenance outdated and are unpleasant to accessibility), and how schedule. use. Evidence suggests that should they be addressed? some trailheads need a toilet. Other options are to refurbish and more OSMP will inventory restroom regularly maintain restrooms up to conditions and develop standard. improvement /replacement priorities. This work will be conducted in conjunction with trailhead improvements. 2~ Issue Definition of Issue Possible Ways to Deal with the Comments Identified Issue in the West Trail Stud ~ Area TSA Plan Cultural Resources Historic Structure What actions are needed to Inventory and assess the current and long- Stewardship stabilize, protect, or preserve term protection, maintenance, and Needs the large number of historic restoration needs of the historic structures. structures in the West TSA? Which are the highest Set priorities for management actions and priority actions? obtain internal and external funds to implement them. Proposed Historic Does OSMP desire to pursue Im~estigate the pros and cons of the This historic designation was Landscape District a historic landscape district designation. recommended by the Boulder on the Flagstaff designation for the Flagstaff County Historic Preservation Summit Summit? Decide whether to move forward. Officer. Will this designation be beneficial or required to obtain funds for improvements? Are there any downsides to pursue the historic lands district on the Flagstaff summit? Fi•otection Needs What cultural resources need Inventory and assess the cultural resource Many cultural resource of Cultural protection? protection needs. artifacts have been lost over Resource time. Features and What actions should be Decide what actions will be implemented. Artifacts taken? Interpretive opportunities could be expanded to foster appreciation of cultural features and historic structures in the West TSA. 26 Attachment D open Space and Mountain Parks • ENJOY. t~~= PROTECT. West Trail Study Area Plan Key Flan Considerations ~~vl~vl~v.osm~.org intrauveb.ci.bou Ider.co.us /os Revised 8129108 These key plan considerations provide up-front guidance to Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) staff and the public on the scope and focus of the West Trail Study Area Plan. These key plan considerations are derived from policy and management direction provided by adopted plans, from City Council and the Open Space Board of Trustees, and from the professional judgment of OSMP staff. Some of these key plan considerations represent a departmental judgment about what options will be given consideration and ones that will not. Staff will follow these decisions unless new information or direction supports a change in position. Key Plan Considerations Comments General Management Area Designations. Visitor Master Plan (VMP) VMP designations in the West Trail Study Area (TSA) include Management Area Designations provide the framework for Passive Recreation Area, Natural Area, and Habitat implementing stir•ategies for natural and cultural resources Conservation Area (HCA). protection and provision of recreational oppordznities, visitor access, and infrastructure that are compatible with resource protection. The Management Area Designations define the geographic context for deciding what visitor activities are most suitable in a given area and what conditions will minimize impacts on other visitors and resources. Property Agreements and Easements. Consistent with its legal OSMP is inventorying all the various agreements and easements obligations, OSMP will abide by existing property agreements with affecting the West TSA. private and public land owners adjacent to OSMP lands and by existing utility and other easements on OSMP lands. For private lands where OSMP holds a conservation easement, the property owners do not allow public access. Consequently, conservation easement lands in the West TSA will not be included in the West TSA planning area. Cooperative Planning with NIST, NOAA and NCAR. OSMP These federal properties are adjacent to residential will seek a cooperative arrangement for joint planning of the neighborhoods, are popular portals for access into OSMP, and natural area properties managed by the National Institute for experience a high level of visitor use. OSMP holds a Standards and Technology (NIST ,the National Oceanic and conservation easement on much of the NIST property, which Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Center for already delegates significant management responsibility to Atmospheric Research (NCAR), which are adjacent to the West OSMP. Cooperative agreements withNCAR and OSNIP TSA. With the cooperation of NIST, NOAH and NCAR, these already delegate trail management responsibility to OSMP, but properties will be included in the West TSA planning area. OSMP has yet to definitively assign resource management 27 Key Flan Considerations Comments Significant benefits to the public, OS1~rIP, and the federal agencies responsibility for the natural area. It is a goal of the plan to are anticipated to accrue with integrated natural resource planning create such an agreement with each of these property owners. and visitor management planning for OSIvIP lands and these federal lands. HCA Boundary. The only changes to the Western Mountain The VIvIP, adopted in Apri12005, designated Management Area Parks TSA boundary that will be considered are possible boundaries. HCA boundaries resulted from staff analysis, expansions to incorporate newly acquired properties and minor public input, and Council direction and represented an overall boundary changes that refine the HCA boundary to reflect finer- compromise between resource protection and visitor use. scale management considerations. Boundary changes that significantly alter the proportion of the TSA lands in Passive Recreation Areas, Natural Areas, and the Habitat Conservation Areas will not be considered. V~Test TSA Plan Project Timeframe. The projected timeframe is The reasons for the 24-month planning timeframe include: approximately 24 months. This will be an aggressive timeframe given the complexity and wide range of issues in the West TSA. The large scale of planning needed for the West TSA. The Consequently, the planning process will continually assess large scale of planning is based on the large geographic size and priorities so that the most important plan components and issues diverse management needs in different areas within the TSA, are addressed in the West TSA Plan. the wide range and complexity of issues to be addressed, and the anticipated high level of community interest in the West TSA. Expanded expectations for the West TSA Plan. Expectations include: • Amore comprehensive in-depth natural resource inventory and assessment component (based on identification of conservation targets and management objectives). This expectation will extend the overall timeframe for the TSA inventory but will provide enhanced guidance for visitor use and access decisions and better resource protection. Planning for trails and closure /restoration of undesignated trails will largely wait until the natural resource guidance is developed. • Development of more detailed on-the-ground determination of trail alignments, trail reroutes, and management actions for undesignated trails. This expectation will extend the timeframe for the design of trail proposals but overall will reduce the time required to actually implement changes on the ground. A second field season in 2009 will be needed to complete the more detailed design of trail alignments, trail reroutes, and undesignated trail management actions. Long Timeframe for Plan Implementation. Implementation of The scope of work to be completed on-the-ground to reduce the undesignated trail management actions and existing 1 new trail existing undesignated trail network and improve the existing improvements will take 10 years or more and require a significant trail system is very large. amount of new funding. Natural and Cultural Resources Up-Front Consideration of Resource Conse?•`ration Needs. Experience from the first two Trail Study Area plans suggested Conservation planning for the West TSA (based on the Grassland the need for more robust natural resource planning to guide Ecosystem Management Plan and the Forest Ecosystem decisions on trail access and management of visitor activities. Management Plan) will identify conservation targets, priorities, and strategies. This planning will enable identification of areas where trails and visitor access are not compatible with resource protection or are compatible to varying degrees. This information will be a key consideration to guide where undesignated trail closure /restoration actions, undesignated trail designations, trail reroutes, and new trails will be considered. 28 Key Flan Considerations Comments Cultural Resource Protection. Protection and long-term The West TSA contains many historic shelters and other stewardship of cultural resources and historic facilities will be key structures. Physical improvements to these structures or other considerations to guide decisions on managing visitor access and cultural features will be implemented to maintain or restore their recreational use. historic si nificance and values. Recreation Resources Climbing Access. OSMP will maintain access to "historic" climbs Council directed that access to "historic" climbs be maintained in the Western Mountain Parks HCA. Where possible, the physical in the HCA. and ecological sustainability of climbing access will be enhanced by designating, physically improving, and rerouting climbing Many undesignated trails are created by hikers following the access trails or reducing the density of climbing access trails climbing access trails, reaching a dead end, and then continuing through closure and restoration. their travel off-trail. ~?~jalker Ranch Bike Trail Connection. A bike trail connection The potential Eldorado Canyon bike trail connection to Walker from Eldorado Canyon State Park through OSMP to Walker Ranch Ranch is the only option that will be considered in the West will be considered in the West TSA Plan. This potential trail TSA Plan. A detailed examination of this option will be connection could involve use of the existing Eldorado Canyon conducted, in order to support a decision on whether or not to Trail. This trail connection could potentially meet the long- proceed to detailed alignment planning. standing desire for a trail connection that allows bicyclists to access the Walker Ranch bike trails without traveling up Flagstaff The Boulder Mountain Park canyon options for a bike Road. Other possible bike trail connections to ~Alalker Ranch that connection to Walker Ranch will not be considered, given the involve riparian corridors in Boulder Mountain Parks will not be sensitive riparian corridors and rare plant communities, steep considered {i. e., Bear Canyon and Gregory Canyon). terrain that would involve many switchbacks, and significant existing visitor use. North-South Bike Trail Connection. Options for a new north- Mountain biking on the Mesa Trail and other trails in Boulder south bike trail connection from South Mesa Trailhead to the north Mountain Parks was disallowed by City Council in the mid- will be considered in the West TSA Plan. Such a potential trail 1980s, based on community concerns related to visitor safety connection will not be located on the Mesa Trail or trails west of and resource protection. the Mesa Trail, due to steep terrain, sensitive natural resources, and high levels of visitor use. This potential trail connection would A potential north-south bike connection would support the likely require a combination of trails, service roads, and bike lanes, City's Transportation Master Plan and Climate Action Plan in due to the physical and environmental constraints involved. reducing vehicle miles traveled and associated air emissions. A north-south bike trail connection could potentially allow visitors to avoid or minimize the use of vehicles to get the OSMP trail s stem. Dog Access on the Bear Canyon Trail. OSMP will not consider Many neighborhood residents would like OSMP to reconsider a change to the on-leash requirement for the Bear Canyon Trail. the on-leash requirements on the Bear Canyon Trail. However, The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) abides by at this point this issue is moot. OSMP staff recently completed a firm federal policy requiring dogs to be on-leash. a consultation process with NCAR and met with neighborhood residents who are interested in providing avoice-and-sight control opportunity along the Bear Canyon Trail. This process concluded there was no 0 ortunit for voice and si ht control. No-Dog Trail Opportunities. With the goal of shifting the Visitor Master Plan and Council direction was to increase the balance of dog and no-dog opportunities, new no-dog trail proportion of no-dog trails. Some of the best opportunities may opportunities will be considered in the West TSA, with possible involve an overlap of certain conditions such as: parts of the application to existing trails and nevv trails. trail network that have redundant trails allowing travel between the same destinations; trail locations that are accessible to the elderly, children, and other visitors who may appreciate no-dog recreational opportunities; and resource protection needs that could be better met with a reclusion of do s. New Seasonal Dog Leash Requirements. On a limited basis, Voice-and-sight control is an option on most trails in the tk'est OS1~r1P may consider new seasonal dog on-leash requirements for TSA. These determinations were made as part of dog existing and new trails, in order to provide enhanced resource management compromises for the Visitor Master Plan. New protection in priority resource conservation areas, as identified natural resource conservation planning may identify a limited rassland and forest ecos stem mono ement laps. number of trails where seasonal leash re uirements to rotect ~9 Key Flan Considerations Comments wildlife would be highly beneficial; these changes may be considered on a limited basis. Equestrian Access. In the West TSA Plan, decisions will be made Most trails in Boulder Mountain Parks are too steep or narrow on which trails will be retrofitted or managed for equestrian travel. for the comfort or safety of most equestrians. However, some In addition, decisions will be made on areas where off-trail trails could be retrofitted and managed to support horseback equestrian access will be designated and areas where it will not riding as a designated use. The Open Space Charter identifies allowed. horseback riding as a passive recreation use in areas specifically desi nated for that use. Nighttime Visitor Use Restrictions. In the tAlest Trail Study A voluntary nighttime curfew for visitors in HCAs is intended Area, OSMP will implement Visitor 1\rlaster Plan direction to to reduce visitor use and impact on wildlife sensitive to human continue the existing nighttime parking prohibitions {generally 11 presence during the nighttime hours, since many animals use the p.m. to 5 a.m., with some exceptions) and encourage a voluntary nighttime as solace and refuge from humans. nighttime curfew in the Western 1~Iountain Parks Habitat Conservation Area. Trails Trail Planning Focus. The primary trail planning focus for the The West TSA has a large existing trail network and high West TSA is to create a more sustainable trail system by: 1) densities of trails in many places. Many of the trails were not reducing the network of undesignatecl trails and restoring built to minimize natural resource impacts and meet standards undesignated trails that are closed; 2) retaining and designating for physical sustainability and therefore need to be rerouted or undesignated trails, if that is the best solution for improving improved. The extensive network of undesignated hails has resource conditions, reducing undesignatecl hail networks, and created many undesirable resource impacts. Only in a few enhancing visitor experience; 3) rerouting and rebuilding existing places, such as Anemone Hill, will new hails to be considered. trails in order to improve resource conditions, physical sustainability, and visitor experience; 4) constructing very few new trails, limited to situations where the trail benefits outweigh the trail impacts. Push to Trail Alignments. Wherever possible for trail reroutes Experience from the first two Trail Study Area Plans suggested and new trails, the tVest TSA plan will not only identify the the need for more efficient use of staff time and public input, conceptual trail corridor but also identify a more detailed trail which can be achieved when trail alignments can be deternlined alignment. Determining trail alignments in the West TSA planning as part of the West TSA Plan.. process, when possible, will avoid a separate lengthy trail alignment and public involvement process during plan implementation. Phased Trail Planning and Implementation. The West TSA Some of the trail improvement projects identified in the VMP inventory of natural, recreational, and cultural resources will be may be appropriate to begin planning for in advance of new completed in 2008. During the 200$ field season, an inventory of information that will be provided by the natural resource existing trail conditions will be completed and trail projects inventory and assessment. Phasing the trail planning to be able addressing trail deficiencies will be identified and evaluated. Trail to plan for these types of projects in 2008 `vill expedite when work that does not require new information on natural resource these projects will actually be implemented. benefits or impacts will be planned during 2008, and some of these projects may be implemented in 2009. Trail projects that are large in scope or need additional natural resource information to evaluate, as well as new trail construction projects, will not be evaluated or planned unti12009, with implementation phased over several years. The 2009 field season will focus on these types of otential trail rojects. Single Activity Trails. In general, OSMP does not support Most OSMP hails are open to multiple modes of visitor Navel, building and maintaining hails for single modes of visitor travel allowing pedestrians, bicyclists, and horseback riders. In order (e.g., pedeshian-only, biking-only, or horseback riding-only trails). to minimize trail densities and trail impacts, OSMP generally In rare circumstances, trails that accommodate only a single mode builds and maintains hails that are located and designed to of travel may be considered if that is the best solution to avoid or accommodate more than one of these modes of travel. This minimize unacceptable resource impacts or visitor conflict. approach minimizes the need for multiple trails to the same destination and supports the concept of multiple use hails that require all visitors, regardless of travel mode, to share the trail in com atible wa s. 30 Key Flan Considerations Comments Neighborhood Access. Neighborhood access issues will be Many individual property owners access OSIv1P lands directly aclckessed with the involvement of neighborhood and homeowners from their properties. Other visitors park on public streets in the associations, neighborhood residents, and the public at-large in the neighborhoods and enter OSMP lands through either designated West TSA planning process. or undesignated neighborhood accesses. Some neighborhood residents have reported negative situations or impacts from visitors using these accesses. Direct property owner access and unplanned accesses have created a large network of undesignated trails into the OSA~IP system. Because of the impacts on natural resources and neighborhood residents of these undesignated trails, OSIvIP will consider how to better manage neighborhood access. Management options include channeling visitor access to designated access points, creating "collector" trails, or restricting some direct access from individual ro erties. Facilities Flagstaff Road Parking Fee System. Expansion of the areas Previous Council direction was lukewarm to the idea of covered by the parking fee system will not be considered. expanding the areas covered by the parking fee system. Administrative and operational changes will be considered for situations where potential program efficiencies or services to the ublic can be enhanced. Trailhead Parking. Improvements to existing trailhead parking The experience of many parks and open space systems is that tivill focus on more efficient configuration of parking spaces, which responding to growth in visitor use by expanding parking will improve visitor safety and convenience. Only limited capacity can be justified to improve the level of sen~ice to the expansion of trailhead parking areas will be considered, given the public. But there is usually a point of limited benefit, when physical constraints of most trailhead parking areas and the desire parking expansion accommodates a level of use that is beyond to focus parking improvements on enhancing movement of what is feasible or desirable given resource protection needs. vehicles through trailheads, increasing vehicle and pedestrian safety, and providing additional spaces for equestrian trailer parking. For many of OSMP's trailheads in the West TSA, opportunities for expansion of trailhead parking areas are constrained by environmental sensitivities, topography and other physical constraints, and O SMP land ownership. Accessibility for People with Disabilities. Expanding trail and Many trails and trailheads in the West TSA could be retrofitted trailhead access for people with disabilities will be considered and to better accommodate people with disabilities. Retrofitting implemented in the most suitable and desirable locations in the existing facilities to improve accessibility is a commitment from West TSA. the Visitor Master Plan. 31 ATTACHIVIENT A i ~ ~ ~i ~ i 1 N ®West tS~4 Boundary trails Managed By OSMP Managew~ent Zone Designations West t$l~ SUb~reaS ~ Niking Trail Habitat Conservation Area = Multi-Use Trail ~ Natural Area ~ of BoGC Other Government Lands =paved Path ~ Passive iZecreafion Area V a ti~allheadS Climbing Access to Be Deter~xined - trails Not Managed gy OSMP o OSMP Conservation Lasew~ent V ~ 1 2 Miles revised: 9119l200B n - .I ~ - ~ - - , _ + - ~ - 1 L J ~ _ ~ Cottansruad i ~ ~ I I - n'o _ l_' I a ~ I J tlogon JaF. ~ - - - I Four' ~ L' `~1~~-' +I. ~ ~ - - I ~ ti. _ t- 1 + I • - ~ ~ - i ~ ~.~I ~ ~ ~ ii ulgar pia ~ ~ .i. _ _I ~ r 1 1 \ (1 l ~ ~ 1 I~ l I 11 Crntrnn[nl - ~ I u.wno6 - ~ ~ " ~ ~ ~l• g -ATaunP ~ '3 Fird Rucks + Sanllm t ~ 1 SJ ~ i i _ _ Elr hang Sc" Itlir s _ P Y+~' i t .j~Flutress I'arlJRril ti F i i i ~ 1 _ dtt Rocks - . ~ 1 S , - _ . r nt ~ I - _ - u°" n~~le~r ~ J i ~ _ - Gs - •}Inuxr, Ram,ramal if i I i +"n ol. _ \ - ao spa FlagstaR~ a 'I I i ~ ~1 _ ~ - I I - y 1 F Int ~ - 1 SivumFtl FYdcA O -~1 ~ +'C~I allfa U( USI t IMx.Jll~1UJ CI- ~ Enchanted _ ~ ~ )t 1J"1511117.J~ ~ YF Gr ynn ~ I ~7 7 o co - ~ - - •Polnt y7 Canrnn ~~i ~-i- !i ~.'f _ - F _ .Mesa - - - a I - FU - / i 1: _ a _ i.o5t cmrn I X o~. ~ , - ~ - - I Calhedrnl 1, 1 ~ _ - _ - y,~ '~v of f I~ ~ t~ ~ ~ yl~ - - I 'I - - ~ . c,~ >4~ sl«a tx. _ - - ~ o~~,ooc °^•n j ~ ,a •0.•q ~ 1 . c i .~/iNhJIY+{JW 'ab'-+ r I ~ - IiPIC _ ~ l.~ilr r a ~ " . o 0 al~~J Llll~.lr't1 Gtr I - - ~ ~n~ Conlon _ ( _ 8r0r _ ~ ~~RrA i-- 111 ~ ~ ~ % / f _~..i`~ - %////f-~~~ Boulder ~ .I !c. ry s ~ 1111..A.liLtJ1U ~ UlA:.2r0 X~ .:1 a r an~ ' - 6rcck \Vrst ~ . f ~ J + ,9. ~ ~ 1 e., - ~ No o+,,.a.m x ~ ~ ' f \trsa i _ _ 4~ I ; , 1 ~ ~ '~1csa-.Fs~ 1 ~ - ~..•1 ~ 'I J / TJE r if f I i 1 \ r.OIhID Lbd Nrts~G.u.a+ ,.~C~/ ~~I 1 , .FK.r.Nmi itir.o rt~.s~ i ~ 'I ~ ~ it.V~yei~Imi.l naYwn~ehv a Kvm..enw'f.•.s~r+~. nom i + ~rtrnm ucawJw p~.uta• E..w.~1~.~.9.~~,~~..r~~~~.~~anxi~w