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5 - 2007 City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Integrated Pest Management Annual ReportCITY OF BOULDER OPEN SPACE BOARD OF TRLJSTEES AGENDA ITEM 11'IEETING DATE: May 14, 2008 AGENDA TITLE: 2047 City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Integrated Pest Management Program Annual Report PRESENTER: Open Space and Mountain Parks Michael D. Patton, Director Jim Reeder, Division Manager, Land and Facilities Services Laurie Deiter, Natural Resource Specialist, IPf1 Coordinator Eric Fairlee, Natural Resource Specialist, IPM Coordinator EZECUTIVE SUNINIARY: The Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program is managed by IPf1 Co-Coordinators, Laurie Deiter and Eric Fairlee. Highlights for the year: OSMP contributed to, and distributed, the 2008 Colorado Weed Calendar as an aid to inform the public about the scope of weed problems in Colorado. The 2008 edition of this calendar focused on weeds in more urban settings. OSf1P distributes these calendars to our lessees, adjacent landowners, staff, volunteers and Board members. Volunteers again helped OSMP weed control efforts immensely. Volunteers spent over 800 hours, covering over 1500 acres, assisting staff in weed control efforts. The two largest volunteer projects were coordinated with Wildland Restoration Volunteers (WRY-' ). The first was the third aimual shoveling of fleditei~ranean sage in which over 50 volunteers shoveled flediteiranean sage on 200 acres of OSfIP land. This project, in combination with other volunteer and staff efforts, resulted in the removal of Mediterranean sage from all known infested OSI~1P properties in 2007. The second project involved the removal of myrtle spurge from two locations near the South Mesa trailhead. (lore than 100 Wildland Restoration ~--'olunteers amassed over 400 volunteer hours removing this species. Over 1400 pounds of myrtle spurge were removed from the native grassland at these two sites. WRV plans to return to these sites every year to assist. staff in our efforts to eliminate this species from these properties. Staff continued mapping invasive species on the OSMP land system using the Rapid Assessment flapping (RAM) technique developed at Utah State University (UTU). A total of 7,848 acres were mapped by OSMP seasonal field mappers in 2007. The five most widely spread species identified from the 2006 and 2007 mapping efforts are: 08-0514 IPl~-12007 report memo AGENDA ITEM # 5 PAGE 1 diffuse knap~weed (2908 acres), Canada thistle (7~0 acres), common chicory (731 acres), sulfur cinquefoil (668 acres), and Dalmatian toadflax {482 acres). Eurasian watermilfoil removal efforts continued in 200)7 with two Wildland Restoration Volunteers events and crew surveys and removal in Boulder Creek, Bear Canyon Creek and Cottonwood Pond. Two presentations on using volunteers to control aquatic nuisance species were given at the annual Aquatic Nuisance Species workshops, one in Lakewood and the other in Alamosa. In addition, Aquatic Nuisance Species signs were developed by OSMP staff and a partnership was formed among multiple local governments, Colorado State Parks and the Colorado Division of Wildlife to disperse the signs throughout the state. Staff continues to monitor the spread of jointed goatgrass (JGG} on our system. It is estimated that 200 acres of city lands, predominately trail corridors, are occupied by this species. The open Space and A~Iountain Parks Department held aone-day round table with local land managers and Dr. Dana Blumenthal, Research Scientist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service, to discuss JGG and its threat to Boulder County natural areas and to identify alternative control methods and research needs. Aonitoring of invasive species and evaluating alternative control methods are essential to any land management agency. Research and monitoring projects on OSMP lands were carried out by staff, researchers or consultants. Control methods used in 2007: 1. ItiZechanical control was used on 294 acres. This required over 3200 hours of «~hipping, pulling and shoveling. These activities resulted in over 469 bags of weeds being collected. 2. Cultural control {timing of cattle grazing, timing of alfalfa cutting and tillage of fallow fields). These agricultural practices were used on approximately 428 acres. Cattle grazing was used as a weed management. control method to a lesser extent in 2007 because lessees sold cattle earlier than normal, decreasing the availability of cattle as a management tool. 3. Staff continues to manage lands in a manner that ~~~ill both adequately control weed species and promote any biological control agents that are present. Staff plans to release and monitor a Dalmatian toadflax stem-mining weevil in May 2008. Staff also continues to work with the academic community, Boulder County and federal agencies to further advance biological control research in the region. 4. Chemicals were used on 868 acres. The number of acres where chemicals are used fluctuates from year to year as new infestations of species already present are found and/or new invasive species are discovered on our lands. Additionally, new properties acquired by C~SNIP may harbor new infestations or new species. As part of the city of Boulder IPM Policy, the process of approving and removing certain chemicals to the approved list was finalized in 2006. In early 2007, the IPA-I Sub- committee and city staff convened to research, review and make recommendations to the Chemical Approved List. By recommendation from the IPNI Task Force, a toxicologist 08-0514 IPl~-12007 report memo AGENDA ITEM # 5 PAGE 2 report by the EPA was performed on current and proposed chemicals. After a public meeting ~~•ith the IPI~1 Sub-Committee was held in I~7arch, several pesticides were added to the approved list and some were deleted fiom the approved list. Fiscal Impacts: Budgetary: The non-personnel (NPE) budget for the IPM program in 2007 was $38,000. In addition, $112,680 was spent on seasonal staff. Staff time: The IPM program is staffed by 1.75 standard positions. Staff recommendation: No action is being requested of the Open Space Board of Trustees. Staff appreciates the support shown to the program and is looking forward to accomplishing even more in the coming year. Any guidance or suggestions from the Board are welcome as staff continues ~~=•ork on the 2008 work plan. Submitted by: Michael D. Patton, Director Jim Reeder, Division Manager Laurie Deiter, IPM Coordinator Eric Fairlee, IPM Coordinator Attachments: A. 2007 IPM Report for DSMP B. 2007 Treatment Summary Pie Chart C. Four Year Treatment Comparison 08-0514 IPl~-12007 report memo AGENDA ITEM # 5 PAGE 3 2007 IPM Report for OSMP Prepared by Laurie Reiter and Eric Fairlee m b r*i rfa V`1 -s 'r (Native grasslands (Rapid Assessment Mapping (In-house) of high priority grasslands I 7800 Hospital CE, Bear Canyon Creek apeciesr i reaunents Eurasian Watermilfoil- screening, benthic mats Change from Previous Established in 05, creek ditched for drainage, monitoring stopped. Boulder Creek Eurasian Watermilfoil- Manual removal, GPS, Photo plots Established In 05, 95% success North Boulder Valley (multi- sites) Mediterranean sage - shoveling rosettes Established in 2004, stopped in 2007. North Bounder Valley {BLIP I + Foothills Business Park Mediterranean sage- shoveling effects! seedling establishment Established in 2005, stopped in 2007. Daman (forest) Orange hawkweed- transline, transectJ species composition Established in 1999: 99% control Dunn 1 Dunn II (Dowdy Draw Trailhead) Orange hawkweed- Rodeo trail, visual only Jointed goatgrass -Plateau -total species diversity Established in 06, 10 seedlings, one adult in 07 Established in 2006, 99% control Shanahan Ridge Myrtle spurge -GPS locations, removal Established in 2007 Whittemyer Ye(Iow toadflax + total species, wick Telar, Perm plot Established in 06, results available Burke I and Gebhard Common teasel photo points to track treatments Established D8, results visual available fall D8 Church of Christ Russian olive photo points to track treatments Established 07 results visual available fall D8 Hodges Common teasel photo points to track treatments Established 07, result visual available fall 08 Southern grasslands Seastedt, T. diffuse knapweed bio-control inventories Established 03, on-going Souther grasslandslTallgrass West Tharayil N. {LIMAS Amherst) Allelochemicals on soil in different diffuse kna weed atches Established 07, results not yet received souther grassland properties Jamieson and Bowers (CU) Nitrogen and invasibility of dalmatian toadflax and im acts on bioconfrol Calo hasia Established 07, results not yet received Mediterranean Sage all properties Use treatment polygons and density classes per polygon , Established D7, results avaialble 08 (Prairie Dog veg monitoring (ESCO) (Native and non-native veg. trends Idnnninn Tallgrass Natural Areas-Veg J J monitoring Native and non-native veg. trends Ongoing Van Vleet (Staff) Canada thistle plus native flora and fauna: fire, mowing, grazing Ongoing Superior Associates (CSU) Diffuse knapweed, measuring tumbling distance and seed dis ersal Established in 2004 2007 Summary Report 5_5_08 Page 1 :.~ n~ m _~ r~ ~~ -s y 2007 IPM Report for OSMP MECHANICAL TREATMENTS Location Target Species Method Area Treated (acres) HourslBags Canada thistle, Common teasel, Dalmatian toadflax, Diffuse HOURS: knapweed, Eurasian watermilfoil, Garlic mustard, Jointed Hand-pulling, weedwhip, head 2281.3 Goatgrass, Mediterranean sage, Myrtle spurge, Perennial cli m shovel pp g' 2184'6 BAGS: sweetpea, Russian olive, Scotch thistle, Sulfur cinquefoil, 334.3 Grassland- Native/ Semi-native Tamarisk/Salt cedar Canada thistle, Diffuse knapweed, Jointed goatgrass Scotch Large mower 169.7 thistle, trailside, Volunteer rye Native species enhancement Prescribed fire 0.0 Forest Burdock, Canada thistle, Diffuse knapweed, Foxglove, Jointed HOURS 974 goatgrass, Musk thistle, Myrtle spurge, Leafy spurge, Poison Hand pulling, weedwhip and shovel 373.9 BAGS: 135 Hemlock, Russian alive, White Campion Canada thistle, Volunteer rye Large mower 225 5 Restoration/CRP Annuals, Biennials, Tamarisk/ Salt cedar Hand pulling 0.5 HOURS: 16.5 Hrs: 3271.8 Hand/whip: 2559 Mechanical Treatment Subtotals Bags: 469.3 Mower: 395.2 P. fire: 0 Mechanical Treatment Summary 2,954.20 CULTURAL TREATMENTS Location Target Species Method Area Treated Hours Weeds in dryland fallow Tillage 254 Ag ricuiturallC ropland Alfalfa weevil Early cutting of hay 44 Nativelsemi-native and Cheatgrass Thatch Canada thistle Cattle/goat/ late winter, spring 130 116 AUMs Agricultural/croplands , , grazing (CATTLE) Cultural Treatment Summary 428 Total Mechanical, Rx Fire, Cultural Treatments for 2007 3,352.2 2007 Summary Report 5_5_08 Page 2 6~ 2007 IPM Report for OSMP CHEMICAL TREATMENTS Product Trade Active Area Treated Quantity of Product Location EPA Category Target Pest Name Ingredient (acres) Used (gal.) Grassland- Native/Semi Herbicides Escort Mutsulfuron methyl III-Caution Common tansy 2.5 O.OD1 Garlon 4 Triclopyr Ill-Caution Crack willow, Russian olive, Tamarisk/Salt cedar 111 2.700 Milestone Aminopyralid III-Caution Common teasel, Cutleaf teasel, Diffuse knapweed, Ox-eye daisy 91 0.6 Transline Clopyralid III-Caution Diffuse knapweed 12.3 2.000 Plateau Imazapic III-Caution Jointed goatgrass, Leafy spurge 9 0.680 Rodeo Glyphosate III-Caution Purple loosestrife, Russian olive, Tamarisk/Salt cedar 105 3.460 Telar DF Chlorsulfuron III-Caution Yellow toadflax 0.1 0.001 Grassland Herbicide Subtotal 330.90 9.44 Forest Herbicides Garlon 4 Triclopyr III-Caution Bladder Senna 20.6 3 Milestone Amino nlid pY ~ III-Caution Absinthe wormwood, Canada thistle Orange hawkweed 0.2 D.001 Talar DF Chlorsulfuron III-Caution Yellow toadflax (research) 2.6 0.005 Transline Clopyralid III-Caution Canada thistle 3.6 0.430 Forest Herbicide Subtotal 27 3.4 CRP/Restoration Herbicides 0 0 CRPIRestoration Herbicide Subtotal 0 0 Total Non-Cropland Pesticide Summary 357.9 12.88 2007 Summary Report 5_5_08 ..~ P~ ~`} ~ 'g i CHEMICAL TREATMENTS 2007 IPM Report for OSMP Location Product Trade Name Active Ingredient EPA Category Target Pest Area Treated (acres) Quantity of Product Used (gal.) Alfalfa Herbicides Roundup Glyphosate III-Caution Assorted 35.8 0.47 Alfalfa Herbicide Subtotal 35.8 0.47 Insecticides Raptor & Warrior T Imazamox/ Lambda- cyhalothrin III-Caution, II-Waming Annuals !Weevil 44 3.30 Warrior T Lambda- h to hri II-Waming Alfalfa weevil 153.2 6.40 Alfalfa Insecticide! mix Subtotal 197.2 9.70 Alfalfa Pesticide Summary 233 10.17 Corn1 Silage Sorghum Herbicides Status Diflufcn~opyr & dicam6a III-Caution Annuals 86.4 6.90 CornlSilage Sorghum Pesticide Summary 86.4 6.90 Small Grains Herbicides 5tarane Fluoxypry-meptyl II-Waming Annuals 142.2 18.60 Small Grains Herbicide Subtotal 142.2 18.60 Insecticides Starane & Warrior T Fluoxypry-meptyl+ Lambda-cyh:ilothrin II-Waming, II-Waming Annuals/ Leaf hoppers 48.5 8.25 Small Grains Insecticide Subtotal 48.5 8.25 Small Grains Pesticide Summary 190.7 26.85 Total Cropland Pesticide Summary 510.1 43.92 Total Pesticide ldsa ~e fr®r 2007 $6$ ~~:.e3~P, 2007 Summary Report 5_5_08 2007 TREATMENT SUMMARY Percentage of Total Acres Treated (4250) Cultural ~nni n th'1 z Mech 70 Cropland ~°/n Non-Cropland $% rrm a _:, ra ~1 i~ 4500 4000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 n Four Year Treatment Comparison (in Acres) 2004 2005 2006 2007 ^ Mechanical ®Cuftural ^ Chemical a c~ r~