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5A - Handouts - Landmark Alteration Certificate for 14 Kinnikinic Rd (HIS2010-00124)COLORADO CHAUTAUQUA ASSOCIATION 900 BASELINE ROAD, BOULDER, CO 80302 P 303.442.3282 F 303.449.0790 WWW.CWAUTA000A.COM July 19, 2010 City of Boulder Landmarks Board c/o Mr. James Hewat Historic Preservation Planner City of Boulder 1739 Broadway Boulder, CO 80302 RE: LAC Application by Kristin Lewis Architects for owner Trudy Hutchings, Cottage #14, Chautauqua Park (LB consideration / action scheduled for July 21, 2010) Dear Landmarks Board Members: This is to advise you that the plans (dated 6/17/10) and written project description (dated 6/18/10) submitted as part of a Landmark Alteration Certificate application by Kristin Lewis Architects on behalf of the owner of Chautauqua Cottage #14, Trudy Hutchings, have been reviewed in detail by the Building & Grounds Committee of the Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA) Board of Directors. The committee has apprised the full Board of its consideration. The CCA Board of Directors met on July 16 and unanimously concurs with its Building & Grounds Committee's support of the project as submitted in these plans and descriptions. This position is predicated on the assessment that the proposed new construction is compatible with the historic character of the Chautauqua Historic District Design Guidelines and also is in conformity with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation. We are particularly pleased that the new design will reintroduce a front porch to this cottage, a defining and beloved characteristic of many Chautauqua cottages and lodges. Sincerely, , Meyer I President, Board of Directors Colorado Chautauqua Association cc: Trudy Hutchings Kristin Lewis E S C A P E, ENGAGE, ELEVATE To the Landmarks Board My grandfather had Cottage 16 in Chautauqua Park built in 1941 and my 3 brothers and 2 sisters and I have been coming to Chautauqua all of our lives, in my case since 1943. I moved with my own family to the house year round in 1981, and lived there for 17 years until I moved out to Gunbarrel. We didn't rent the house out during the winters for 60 years until the taxes and fees became too high for us to handle. We now rent it in the winter and the rent almost covers those expenses. When Trudy Hutchings purchased # 14 her cousin was on the Chautauqua Board, and at one point was President of the Board, so Trudy had to have known she should have gotten this Board's approval before gutting the house. Now she is asking to double the size of the house she originally purchased and I do not think she should be rewarded for putting this board in such an untenable position. This could set a precedent for anyone to come along and buy a smaller house and then double it in size by building a basement, which is clearly something the past Landmarks Boards would never have allowed. It seems unfair to me that someone who bought a 100 year old house 2 years ago, and who should have gone through all of this before purchasing it, would be able to set new precedent over those of us who have followed all of the rules for 60 + years. David Phelan and Mary Ann Edson Bonnell, Juliet From: Hewat, James Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 11:32 AM To: Ipab Subject: FW: cottage 14 See message below. From: Virginia Smith [mailto:vosgina @yahoo.com] Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 11:31 AM To: Hewat, James Subject: cottage 14 I approve the plans for Trudy Hutchens house on chautauqua. Virginia smith 803 Bonnell, Juliet From: Hewat, James Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 2:13 PM To: Ipab Subject: FW: Cottage 14 Chautauqua - - - -- Original Message---- - From: Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 11:55 AM To: Hewat, James Subject: Cottage 14 Chautauqua I am the owner of Cottage 20 Chautauqua Park and cannot attend the Landmarks meeting tonight. I would like to state for the record that I have seen the plans for the construction of Cottage 14 and enthusiastically support them. Thank you, Alice C Thomas Cottage 20 Chautauqua Park Sent from my Verizon Wireless B1ackBerry 1 Bonnell, Juliet From: Hewat, James Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 2:13 PM To: Ipab Subject: FW: #20 Chautauqua proposed change request - - - -- Original Message---- - From: Maud Huey- Kenyon Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 2:03 PM To: Hewat, James Subject: #20 Chautauqua proposed change request Jim, I live in #18 Chautauqua and support the proposed changes by the owner of Cottage 20. I hope you will find her proposals acceptable so she can move forward with her plans. Sincerely, Maud Huey Kenyon 900 Baseline Road Chautauqua #18 Boulder CO 80302 1 Bonnell, Juliet From: Hewat, James Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 2:23 PM To: Ipab Subject: FW: Chautauqua cottage number 15 From: JLKenyon @aol.com [mailto:JLKenyon @aol.com] Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 2:23 PM To: Hewat, James Subject: Chautauqua cottage number 15 1 am a neighbor to cottage #15 residing year long in Chautauqua Cottage number 18. 1 support this proposal. The proposed changes to the building will enhance the neighborhood not take away from it as it currently does. Sincerely, Joh,wxe,wyawv Cell and text # 805 798 0886 Fax 720 406 3515 ®TRUCTURAI Phone: 303 447.9122 Fax: 303.447.3281 6asestruttutal.cam 2551 IN Slre Boulder, Colerah 80901 July 21, 2010 Ms. Kristin Lewis Kristin Lewis Architects 1928 14' St. #200 Boulder, CO 80302 Re: #14 Chautauqua Cottage, Boulder Project # 10043 At your request I visited the site to observe the site conditions for the proposed construction. I understand that the existing cottage is to be demolished and a new one -story cottage built to essentially the same footprint. The new cottage will have a full basement. The natural grade slopes from south to north at approximately 10 degrees. The site also slopes from west to east approximately 5 degrees. The house to the south is a 2 -story with crawl space. It's main level is approximately 5ft. above the proposed structure and is10' -2° clear. The house to the north is a 2- story with crawl space. It's main level just slightly lower than the proposed structure and is 14'4° clear. With the proposed basement construction the excavation to the south will result in a .83:1 slope cut. The excavation to the north will result in a 4:1 slope cut. For this type of sandy clay soil, the angle of stability varies from .67:1 to 2.75:1 (horizontal:vert). After demolition, the soil can be tested to obtain a more precise stability angle. The south cut may need special care (shoring) during excavation to stabilize the cut. The north out is completely stable even for the worst case (factor of safety = 1.45 for worst case). The cut will have no affect whatsoever on the north property's foundation. Should large boulders requiring blasting or jack- hammer operations be encountered during excavation, their location will determine what affect, if any, their removal would have on the adjacent properties. In general, anything encountered that is approximately 30ft. away from the south property and 1 Oft away from the north property will have no impact on the adjacent properties foundations, assuming the worst conditions. These numbers may turn out to me much lower after soil testing. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions. Sincerely, BASE By: Geri Bo6ne, P.E., F Structural Engineer O L /C% .4 Q. � •¢ 1 - al - as Z � Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview TEMPLE B'NAI IsR O K LA H O M A C I T Y fi I e://!C:/ Documents% 20and %20Settings /kk/My %20Documents /Temple... 1 L' Search Our Site Search Home / About 11 5 / Temple History / Berenice Blatt Interview / Interview with Rabbi Blatt's daughter Si te Map July 21, 2010 10 Av 5770 Interview maybe in 1984 of Mrs. Berenice Blatt, who was Rabbi Joseph Blatt's daughter. She was Mrs. A. Ebner Blatt. The person who asked the questions at her Indianapolis, Indiana, home was her son. In this interview, she refers to her brother as brother. His name is A. Harold Blatt. THE BEGINNING Question: How did your dad end up going to Oklahoma City? Blatt: For five years after he and my mother were married, they lived In Georgia, Columbus Georgia, in small town there, and the congregation in Oklahoma City was looking for a new Rabbi. Somehow or other they heard that he wanted to move so they sent a delegation down there to interview him. And then brought him back to Oklahoma City for a trial sermon, you know that sort of thing. He liked it, and they moved there. The congregation had only had one Rabbi before him for a very short time. He was a young man who died very quickly after he had taken the job... So they really founded the congregation practically. The Temple had been built when they got there but Oklahoma was still not a state. Question: What year? Blatt: It must have been 1905 because Oklahoma became a state in 1906 (editor's note: 1907). And in things that I heard over the years, Dad had opened the Constitutional Convention with prayer. So he was there prior to that. Question: do you think it was pretty frontier like at that time? Blatt: It must have been although I knew many people who came there, but I really didn't know anybody who was a Sooner, who beat the gun in., you know, that's why they called them Sooners. But no, they were as civilized as people I know today and lived in nice homes. So how far back that went, I don't know. It wasn't a cow town. Question: your brother..? Blatt: (My) Brother was born before they moved there. And then I was born In 1910, and I guess it was a sizeable city by then. I don't know. Question: How large was the congregation when you first remember going there? Blatt: I don't know. I know that when I left there In 43, it seemed to me there were about 250 families. RABBI BLATT'S SERMONS Question: Tell me about your father's sermons, 1 remember your telling me that they were so popular. Blatt: He spoke. He had a gift of being able to use the language well and he chose his.., his sermons always had a lesson in them, it wasn't just..; if they were based on a topic today, then there was something to be learned from that. And he always tried to keep them around 20 minutes, but there was one sermon which came much later in his life when I was grown. A sermon that he gave during the Depression. He gave it to a Rotary Club meeting I believe. And it was based he told me on meadowlinks( ?) The blue bird and it was about when it's darkest, you know, you can see the light. He was invited from that to give that sermon over 100 times around the state in various places, That's the one I remember. Question: You mean for a long time he was away? Blatt: This one it was like a speaker's bureau. One rotary club would say you come on such and such a date and speak. Question: he actually gave it at dinners, not just as a sermon. Blatt: it was for Rotary Club primarily but he had used it the same thing In sermons In Temple. I of 9 7/21/2010 12:12 l Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview file: / / / C:/ Documents% 20and %20Settings /kk/My%20Documents /Temple... He also during those early years, it was almost IIke an Itinerant minister because the town of Ardmore Oklahoma which was maybe 100 miles or so had a small congregation but couldn't afford to keep a Rabbi. He would go down twice a month, and he confirmed children and married people and so on. And then there was no Rabbi in Tulsa for awhile and he would go there occasionally. So he really... During the First Word War, I don't remember It but I've been told that he was in uniform for Fort Sill which was in Lawton, Oklahoma, and would go down so many Friday evenings to conduct services for men who were in uniform. So he did a lot of traveling. Question: Did you ever go with him on those. Blatt: No, WHERE THE BLATTS LIVED Question: Where were you living at that time? Blatt: I lived In one home —as far as I know until I was 8 years old that was 17th and Sharml.and it was like areas in any city, big nice 3, 4 bedroom homes. But everybody you knew lived within a radius of three or four blocks, all the families were friends...... And the streetcar ran by there. I remember that. Had a big yard with cement benches, walnut trees. Walnuts were always falling... And then after I was 8 ... that house we rented after I was 8 we moved to another home on west 24th street (901 NW 24) and that's where I lived until I was married. Question: they bought that? Blatt: Yeah. SUNDAY AFTERNOON TEAS Question: Did people From the congregation come by the house a lot? Blatt: Oh yes. And my motheralways did a very Interesting thing. She would have Sunday afternoon teas once a month, very fancy. And she would invite just a certain number of people but she did it alphabetically so there was a mixed group, not just friends together. Question: but always in..? Blatt: (They were) not selected so that they knew one another before hand necessarily and would be cliquey. But they would come from 5 to 7 and she always had a lovely set up and people looked forward to it. She went through the congregation list once a year regularly. POWER BEHIND THE THRONE Question: Did your father consult her a lot about the problems people would have? Blatt: Yes. We always said she was the power behind the throne. Nobody ever knew it, but some of the things that he did which ingratiated him so to the people were due to her. She would remind him, "Do this, do that." He did one thing which people had never gotten over.. and that was on his desk was a calendar with the page that you Flipped and every morning he'd look at it and if there was a name of anyone who he had married, and believe me in 45 years he had married their children and their grandchildren and so on, he would call them and wish them a Happy anniversary and they all looked forward to that. Question: was that Fannie's idea? (Fannie was Rabbi Blatt's wife) Blatt: That was her idea And he wrote his sermons for the holidays. We used to go away every summer to Boulder, Colo., to Chautauqua, and he would spend his summer when he wasn't going to classes at the university or visiting with people who were speaking, writing his sermons for the holidays in the fall so that they were really well thought out and well prepared and had a theme all the way through. But in addition to that, he was very active In the community. He was the president of the Rotary Club, he was pres of chamber of commerce, he was on all of the big committees, and he was on the board of two banks and a local federal loan ..savings and loan. And so always. so he was always at meetings. Question: was he good at business? 2 of9 7/21/2010 1212 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview Blatt: No, my Mother had to handle the finances. file: /// C:/ Doclunents% 20and %20Settings /kk/My %20Documents /Te mp I e... Question: was it considered unusual for a Jewish person to be on all those community.., Blatt: Well, I think it was kind of, .I hate to say this, but there has been always a sort of token Ism whether it was religious or racial, and he was probably the most outstanding Jewish man in the community and everybody wanted to have somebody on their board. But as far as being elected to offices and being honored as he was, that was purely because he was well thought of. Question: you went to Sunday school in that Temple. Did your mom teach in the Sunday school? Blatt: No, she didn't take any part really except attend meetings, but she never would hold an office or do anything. He didn't even have a secretary. After I graduated from college 1 used to try and help him type his sermons. Most of them he wrote out by hand. Question: you still have any of them. Blatt: I think I have one on a record. Whether it's any good or not, probably wouldn't play on a stereo. COLORADO IN THE SUMMERS Question: when did you start going to Boulder in the summers? Blatt: When I was 5.They bought a little cabin up on the Chautauqua.... we used to go there every summer because it was terribly hot in Oklahoma City-and it was a rest. But Dad would go back and forth if there was a funeral or wedding of any iimportance-they'd send for him and he would make the trip back. Question: Fly? Blatt: No, train. Then we would stay from the end of June until Labor Day and come home. And that was very pleasant because the same people came back every year with a little Chautauqua, and they had speakers all the time and entertainment. Everybody knew everybody else. It was second home. And I went there until after I was married, until 1943. Question: Every summer? sionwaso Blatt: No. I take it back. A few summers (we) went to California ..You know I showed you the place in California, in Long Beach and one summer we went to Atlantic City to be with brother and his wife. But otherwise every summer. Question: when was it you went to California? Roughly, do you remember, was it in the 20s? Blatt: Had to have been before the 2nd World War so it must have been in the 30s. MOVIE STUDIO Question: And that's when you went to the movies studio? Question: Can you remember who you saw? Blatt: A member of the congregation's brother was loan Blondell's Secretary. And so of course when we went out we knew him and he arranged for us to come on the lot several times and watch some filming and have dinner with loan Blondell and Dick Powell. That was while we were there for the summer. BERENICE'S TRIP Question: When was that trip that you made across the country, some drive you made with a friend of yours? Blatt: When I graduated from college.. which (Ed Note: the trip maybe ?) was really unheard of in those days. I graduated. I guess I was about 19 or 20 and she(Ed note: the other girl) had graduated the year before and she was going to law school and first woman in the law school in Oklahoma, and so they let us drive from Oklahoma City to New York City in a car by ourselves and stay in a hotel. We stayed in a hotel, we stayed at the place you stayed at, and It was then an all girls place. Question: ... Bargashon Plaza? (Ed note: spelling might not be right). Blatt: We were there about 2 weeks and then came back. Question: Any adventures? Blatt: No, not really. Of course there wasn't any crime so to speak of then. Not many parents would have allowed 2 girls to go out that way. She (Ed note: the othergirl) later became mayor of a little town of Wetumka, Oklahoma. 3 of 9 7/21 /2010 12:12 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview file: / / / C:/ Documents% 20and ° /o20Setdngs /kk/My %20Documenls /Temple... Question: Do you remember her name. Ruby Kalady (spelling ?). And then she married a lawyer in San Francisco, and they practiced together. She came through here (Indianapolis) once with him. He was on his way to try a case in the Supreme Court. That's the First time I met your Father, I think, because we stopped in Indianapolis. Question: And you just looked him up because of family? Blatt: stayed with them. Question: Did you like him then? Blatt: Uh, all right. BERENICE'S COLLEGE EDUCATION Question: I know you went to Northwestern first For a year. Blatt: Not quite a Full year because I took sick and my rather came up and got me and I went home and finished out the semester at Oklahoma and then graduated from there. A couple of summers I went to school at the University of Colorado, took some courses. One summer I stayed home for a month or so and stayed with Babs and Dick and took some Shakespeare courses I wanted to take at Oklahoma City University. After I had my BA. Question: You went to Oklahoma to get your bachelors degree. Was campus in Norman? So you didn't live at home? Blatt: No. In Fact I was home very little. It was only 25 miles or so but you got involved in school. I didn't come home, they used to come down and to see me except for special occasions. Question: After college you moved back to Oklahoma City to teach. I can't remember the name of the school. Blatt: I started out teaching at Taft Junior High School, which was a new junior high school and they really didn't have any room for me. They just put me in and I got $50 a month as a sort of a teacher's helper. All 1 did was take, if there was an absentee teacher, I would teach that class and it was very hard.. I never knew the subject matter or anything until I get there. So the next year I had a full time job at a junior high school, Harding Junior High School, and I stayed there until 1 was married, teaching social studies and English and I enjoyed it tremendously. I did go back to It after your Father went overseas about a year and a half. (Other side of tape). Question: Did you go to those schools? (Harding, Taft) Blatt: No, they were not built when I was In school. I went to Central High School. Yes, I did go to Harding, when it was built, it was built as a senior high school. Central High School was down further. Harding was farther north and I went there for my last couple of years and then they made It Into a junior high school. And when I taught there It was a junior high. Question: That's where you taught French? Blatt: 1 taught French and Social Studies and English. There was beginning to be a lack of interest in language at that point and so there weren't enough classes to keep when I was in my freshman year and sophomore year, I was the only one in French classes. They just gave them for me. I had one teacher taught me one on one in the advance of French things. By the time 1 started to teach there really wasn't that much of a demand for French. Question: when did you graduate from college? Blatt: 29 or 30.I was supposed to graduate when I was 16 (from high school) they didn't want me to go away then so I stayed back, that's when I took those extra classes.. I think It was about 31. Question: So the Depression started. Was it hard to get ateaching job ?. Blatt: I could have gotten a teaching job sooner, but I had a peculiar experience. The night before school opened my first year ready to teach, I was signed up as a teacher. As I was leaving the house to go out, my father said "jokingly, don't stay out too late, because you might get a call to teach tomorrow morning." 4 o1'9 7/21/2010 12:12 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview And that was it fil e: / / / C:/ Documents% 20and°/ o20Settings /kk/My %a20Documents/Temple... Sure enough at 7 o'clock in the morning I got a call to report to a grade school way out on the edge of town, teach first grade. So I went out there and it seemed that the teacher was ill and they hadn't been able. she couldn't start the classes but they wanted someone to take it on. So I stayed for three or four days and finally I went in to talk to the principal and tell him my teaching experience was at the junior high level and I really didn't feel prepared to teach this. So he said, oh all right...oh I know what it was—the teacher was not going to be able to keep her commitment... she was too ill to came back. So he said, well, he'd have to look for someone else then and that was it For the rest of that year I didn't get a single call. So my father who knew everybody on the school board talked to the president, told him this story, and wondered why I had never gotten another call. And Wiley Richardson said, well he would look Into It and see. And he called my father afterward and said they got the impression from the fact that I had turned down this job that I really didn't want to teach. So when he heard the right story, then that's when they sent me to Taft Junior High School THE DEPRESSION Question: was there much evidence of the Depression in Oklahoma City at that time, lot of people out of work. Blatt: I really wasn't aware of It to tell you the truth. I heard talk about It but wasn't that aware of it, not amongst our friends. Not like people who lived In New York who knew people who jumped off buildings, and things like that. RABBI'S SELF IMPOSED PAY CUT Question: do you remember your Pop (Ed Note: took pay cut). That was true. He took a big cut in salary because dues collection and money was hard to come by so he volunteered to take a cut In salary. At that time, Brother had already gone to Harvard I guess, yeah, when I was 8 years old he went to Harvard and he kept staying on scholarships. So he took the cut and things went on for years and suddenly someone happened to realize that they had never reinstated the salary they should have given him. He never spoke up for that. Question: I'm surprised Fannie didn't say... Blatt: No. She managed, I don't know how but she did. She was a good manager. Question: did other people live in that house you owned, did you have boarders? Blatt: No, not boarders, but one man lived with us. Uncle A.D.(Engelsman) who had always lived with the family. He wasn't related, he was a good friend. Had been a lawyer, went into the insurance business, never married. In those days I guess everybody had somebody who lived with them if it wasn't a grandmother or an uncle or an aunt, so he lived with us. That's who David is named after. Question: when did your brother set up in D.C.? When did the banks close, was that 327 Blatt: Yes, that works out right. When I didn't have any work to do that year, no teaching, brother said come back to Washington with me and spend the year with me because he had an apartment large enough. So I did and that was a fascinating time because that was just when Roosevelt came into office. We had a nice apartment and Brother taught at Howard. And he stayed there until Queens ...New York University opened the Queens branch and he had an Invitation to come there and went on there. Question: Your were in D.C. a year? Blatt: Yes, about a year. Question: How did you meet Therese? (Brother's wife). Blatt: Some way I met someone who invited me to a sorority alumni meeting and they said there is a member who lives right across the street from you and we were on Rock Creek Park . and she'll pick you up and bring you. That was Therese and brother married her later. Question: then you introduced them? 5 of9 7/21/2010 12:12 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview file: / / / C:/ Documents°/ a20and %2OSettings /WMy%20DocuTnents /Temple Blatt: Yeah. Question: You then went back to Oklahoma and started teaching again? The period I know least about. Blatt: There isn't anything to tell about in that period. I did some traveling down to Mexico in the summers and Hawaii, oddly enough your father and 1 were both in Hawaii at the same time before we were engaged to be married and didn't know it. And traveling in this country and going back to school In summers. It wasn't anything major that went on, just the teaching which I was enjoying. Question: Did you go to Hawaii with family? Blatt: No, just a friend. Question: For the whole summer? Blatt: No. Three weeks. We went by ship In those days. When we got to Honolulu .I met somebody on the boat who wanted to be nice to us. He was with some airline company so he arranged to fly and I wouldn't go without her so the two of us he took us on a seaplane to all the other Islands. RABBI BLATT'S AIRPLANE TRIP Question: you were saying your father took an airplane trip. Blatt: That was way back when Jody( ?) was born in Washington D.C. and he was going to see his first grandchild, and I really can't place the date on that. So this man who had gone to school to my father.. My father also taught history in high school as when he first became a Rabbi there to eke out an existence. He had to do something else. And he must have been a very fine history teacher because I was always hearing from people who talked about his classes, High School classes. But this one man who had been a student of his and always liked him very much was at that time head of American Airlines In Indianapolis and it was In the beginning of the airline days In Oklahoma City. He thought it was a good publicity stunt. He offered to fly dad to Washington D.C. to see his grandson and it was all set up with the red carpet treatment plus the fact it was a sleeper plane, it was an overnight flight from Oklahoma City to Washington D.C. and of course there were pictures in the paper of him taking off which was a good publicity stunt. Question: were there pictures taken at other end. Blatt: I suspect we have those around someplace. Question: There were two other people, (friends ?),. Blatt: One was the guy who owned the supermarkets. Oh, Sylvan Goldman.. He and his brother were children of an Alsatian couple who had been in this country many years and they never lost that beautiful Alsatian accent. The two brothers married two sisters and went into the grocery business. And became tremendous success. He was later became president of International Supermarkets and National Supermarkets. He was the one who Invented during the war when we had to put factories to other uses, he Invented the market basket from wiring they had there. He just died recently... at about age 80. (Editor's Note. Sy/ Goldman died 11- 25 -84, one week to the day following his wife, Margaret Goldman's death on 11- 18 -84. This possibly means that the interview with Mrs. Blatt was in 1984). The airport in Oklahoma City... he had made a bust of WIII Rogers airport and Syl gave that to the city. Question: Did you and your father ever meet Will Rogers? Blatt: I'm sure my father did, I didn't. That's interesting. The Oklahoma Hall of Fame was started In 1928 and Dad's name and Will Rogers' name were both added to it In 1932, so just four years after. Question: isn't there a tree or something? Blatt: There's a lot of things named. There's a street named after him, where it is I don't know because he worked during the Depression in what was really a tent city taking care of people who were wiped out of their homes. And in that area, which I don't know what's happened to It now, there was a street named after him. Also on main street in Oklahoma City it was closed off to traffic —high rise buildings and all - -no auto. And they had huge 6 of 7/21/2010 12:12 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, I - Berenice Blatt Interview file: / / / C:/ Documents% 20and %2OSettings /kk/My %20Documents /Temple... cement pots spaced down the sidewalks and each one has a name plaque of outstanding citizens during growth of the I period. And his is on one of those. Question: at that time were there still oil rigs right in the city? Blatt: Not right in the city but close, the capitol grounds, which was maybe 10 or 12 blocks from where I lived. The state capitol. Just off capitol grounds were big oil wells. I don't know if they're still in production there or not. Question: When did your teaching and traveling in the 30s, when did things sort of change. When did the routine of your life change? Was it 1941 when war started. Blatt: Had to be in 41.For instance, the June 6 44 was the invasion. That summer we did not go to Colorado. I was back at home then because Edner (her husband) had gone over overseas, was jumping (Ed. Note: Edner was a doctor In an Army Airborne unit, probably the 101st). We moved downtown to a hotel, travel just wasn't up to it. Question: Give me your version of his calling you up to propose. I don't even remember it. He says he did. When he came through, I had seen him once here when family went through here and we'd had soft of a slight romance but it sort of dried out with letters. But then he went in the service with the 32d General Hospital, he went to Louisville, I think Fort Knox. Then he got orders to go down to Texas and decided if he was going there he'd drive through Oklahoma City and see me. So he did, And that's when we decided to get married. But he says he called long distance from camp afterward to ask permission but I don't remember that. Question: When he went through Oklahoma on his way to Texas. Blatt: I had just come back from Atlanta. Question: (after tape change) .we're talking about Pop coming through. When was that? Blatt: He came through in 42, the beginning of 43, and we were married in April 43. I think we only had only about nine so- called times together. We were married at Fort (Bowie) in Brownwood, Texas. Question: Did all of your friends come? Blatt: Uncle A,D. came and gave me away. Babs and Dick couldn't come. I wanted to be married of course in Oklahoma City because that was my life. They wanted a big Temple wedding with everybody, but cousins couldn't be married In Oklahoma. The only way we could do that was to go to Texas, get married in a civil ceremony and then come back and have a wedding which I thought was utterly ridiculous so we just decided to be married at the Army post. And no, it was all the people from Indianapolis because Pop was then wlth the 32nd general hospital and they were all his medical school friends and doctors. The wedding must have been about 70 or 75 and i didn't know any except his family and my family. Dr. Carr, the dentist from here (Indianapolis) was In that unit and there was someone who was connected with the films from California who was there in that unit, not an officer. They took pictures of the whole cemmony...which you have on tape, driving from chapel, wedding chapel to the officer's club and the dinner and so on, but it was very professionally done so that was kind of fun. RABBI BLATT AND HIS DAUGHTER'S WEDDING RING Blatt: Only Interesting thing about that was my father, when he married people, always took the ring from the best man before the wedding because he said it bothered them because they never could remember where they put it. He wanted to be sure it was there. So he took my ring the night before the wedding, my wedding ring, when we were all at dinner. Only one he ever lost. Just before the ceremony, he came in and said, "sweetheart I have something terrible to tell you, I can't find the ring, I've lost it. So 1 was married with my mother's ring and it wasn't until we went to New Orleans on our honeymoon we bought another ring. We went to New Orleans and Edner had put in for parachute troops so the first rooming we were there, he got a wire that he'd been accepted and we were called home to get ready to move to Fort Benning (Ga.) for his parachute training. We were there In Fort Benning, well, he had to make 13 jumps. We must have been there about .three months, and then he left to go overseas, and I went home and went back to teaching. I didn't know when he left or how he left. When he left, something happened to the ship outside Nova Scotia and so me didn't get any mail and I didn't hear from him until October. And of course the waters were full of submarines. ..It was very frightening and everybody was waiting for me to hear. 7 of9 7/21/2010 12:12 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview file: / / / C:/ Documents% 20and %20Settings /kk/My %20Documents /Temple... I finally got a letter, one of those little V letters, explaining they had boat trouble. And then I didn't hear again until they landed in England. I think they tried to leave port three times and each time they would line up and call off numbers and the something would happen. So that's why we didn't hear. They were so long on the way. Question: Were letters censored? Blatt: Oh Yes, lots of them cut out and blacked out. Question: How did you write to him? Blatt: He had an APO address. When he got to England, he looked up brother who was there who was with the OSS so they saw one another a couple of times. D -DAY Blatt: Fortunately on D -Day when Edner flew into France, not fortunately for the young man, but one of his aide men was injured and sent right back to London and he went and got in touch with brother and told him Edner was all right so brother cabled me. That's how I knew he made it through D -Day. Question: How did you first hear about D -Day? Blatt: That was the summer we were living at the hotel. Of course there had been a lot of talk. About 4 o'clock that morning the phone rang and someone called and said "turn on your radio." We turned on radio, it's D -Day. First recording I heard was made In the airplane and the man who was speaking as they were flying over was Ebner's commanding officer so I knew he was in that plane. (Got to see him in 43) His mother was ill, was dying; we were trying to get him home. I came up here (Indianapolis) and stayed for quite a while and finally I had to get back to my job. By time Red Cross finally got him out, she had already died and they sent him home on a 10 -day leave. I went to Washington D.C. And we went to the Pentagon and were able to get the leave stretched out some and have time to go to Oklahoma City and see my family. We did that. Then he was told to go back to New York and report to Fort Dix, New Brunswick, to wait for a shipment back overseas. He left me in New York and he went to Fort Dix and sent me home on a train. The train left New York in the evening and took two nights and I got to Oklahoma City the second morning. When I got there, I had a call from him to come back. They couldn't send him. They had no way to ship him back. Syl Goldman got me on a train. He had lots of connections because of his business with railroads. It was Impossible to get on trains then. We (she and Ebner) had about four weeks in Fort Dix before they found a ship to take him back. During that time was the Belgium thing, Bastogne, so he missed it. (He) got back just after that. Every time he went to the post we just never knew if he'd come back that night or not. That's the time I thought he was leaving that night from New York We heard the Queen Mary was leaving with a load of soldiers so we got a cab and drove around and we could see the three smoke stacks. There were signs all around, "be careful what you say, you may cause the death of somebody," and so on. The taxi man was not very happy about taking us down there. It was just me and a friend. He didn't know what we were doing so we had him drop us at Columbus Circle on the way back and we took another cab home because we were afrald they'd catch us. Question: You went back to teaching? Blatt: Also Travelers' service and SSO, Red Cross rolling bandages and I was in charge of young high school girls who were hostesses at USO parties. FANNIE BLATT DIES 8 of 7/21/2010 12:12 PM Temple B'nai Israel, Oklahoma City, OK - Berenice Blatt Interview file: / / /C:/ Documents% 20and %2OSettings /kk/Myo /o2ODocwnents /Temple... Question: When did your mom get sick? Blatt: my mother had surgery and that must have been in 45 In July and died. And then he (Ebner) came home in fall of 45 and decided to open an office In Oklahoma City because my father was not well. Spent time in Hawaii so we were called home because father was ill so we stayed there. Edner opened an office and got it all ready, built it, had a partner and was ready.(to open It). The day he was ready to open the office my father died so then we decided to come back here to Indianapolis where his father was because his father was ill. We rented a place and then we started building a house and it was finished the day you were born. Question: Dad must have gone right to work. Was it difficult to meet people? It was difficult to meet people since his (Ebner's) Mother wasn't living to introduce me. I met wives of some who had been at our wedding. They were very nice. I had one connection of a family in Oklahoma City. It didn't take long; .Everybody called and wanted me to go to work. I taught Sunday school and I worked for the Federation which I later on was president of for 2 years and just jobs like that. ( was) President of sisterhood after you were born, on the Temple Board four different terms, United Way board. Question: When did you stage that play that you and pop were in? Blatt: In the 50s. NEW TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL IN OKLAHOMA CITY Question: when did the idea came up of building a new Temple and naming it after your father? Blatt: That must have been in the 50s.when I took you down for the- Aldn't we go for the opening of it? , you were 6 years old, 48 and 6 Is 54 (1954). Same congregation built a new Temple Farther north just like they do everything. The Temple wasn't named after him; the sanctuary was named after him. Question: You'd only been away from Oklahoma about 8 years? Been there acouple of times? Blatt: Just very short visits. RABBI BLATT'S RETIREMENT AND DEATH Question: So your Father was head of congregation over 40 years? Is there anything you remember we haven't talked about on his role and responsibilities? Blatt: He (her father Rabbi Batt) felt it was time for him to retire because he always had the feeling that a Rabbi and assistant Rabbi would never work out since he had been there so long. When weddings came along, and funerals and children's births, that people would want the same man to carry through with their family, and it would hurt the feelings of the young man so he just retired and he took sick and died shortly after that. 0 2010 Temple B'nai Israel -Oklahoma City, OK© 2010 Temple Wnaf Israel - Oklahoma City, OK � Member of the Send mail to webmaster with U questions or Comments about this web site. Reform Judaism 9 of 9 7/21/2010 12:12 PM ease rradition Has Been Followed liy Jewish Priest's Family Since Time of Marcus Blatt in Europe in 1800 The first son of a first son of a first son of a first son tf a first sun — and all five of them rabbis. That is the ancestry of Dr. Joseph Blatt, rabbi of Tom- lie Rhai Israel, SIP Rroadsvay Orcle- "Why did I become a minister?" he aak& "What else ere Were to do? Heforc I. Wass — d enough to tmnk'r was bold that moat do wxbul aad CIVIC ewrk hen I new up I Wolud bk 6 mint. � b Well. The 110Id 16 feC WIdN -- OOUng else over entered my mind. and for more udpona0frciao ever 'was all settled Icon before Z Web ., -- Xinbatcr for Nanett TL. I)rar. member M the Bio:t famhy of wlmm Wets¢ a racaN, Alarms IJ3att, wag rabid Of fcostah MoreVte, a tiny tedupcadent trmx anby absorbed by Crsmosmyetlu ally' we Wmdd War. TJR first RAM Blatt, saeatdne His cd it son and eldest Brmd- mn Wh ware rebbde In Europe. The Oldest snmt,grandsoa, Rabbi Josap{t Blast's father, tuso was a runs. =A was W the Dvitm states in ft79, s Ltliag m cincmnati, O. There Web born, W Isis, the tint soil, although three ststem had Preceded h1m. 6 flrady einabnshed etas the Old JeVdeh cla- tom at We eldest an becoming a mbbl Mgt he did not question it. Dufbs of Office Bspaad "It Was aryy a matter. of bow goad a rabbi I was oft '40 be;' he eays. • "Rabbi' Cow meadr soon a dlftermt tall" than It wr'a�dld. "In the early dusEmy of the retie. a rabb! Wu a ors, C,. it b only !C the Pat: few decades that tie has hemmer a paftr also. *'Now, moceerfm rabbiA as U tTb Caro with aucee OiNj r' telomt Mon. In admudn In We datles as paatm find m an artise orlc Wo'ser, Dr KMt has loured tone arses 1915 to [oath a part -Elie ronme m the Oklahoma BChool of iecisnon at Norman, which Is in eenluncdeu ufth the University of OYlattomi DI.A r of Chamber gi�� 111nCty 1sst Year pm- m taying ao acUvO rk he mmtetc W gat nR i!fOte loss, Re dw board Ol dl yea of , Md l We Ohs:n:va' CO hon- Jr , and teat month n x 1 W en oton ary memyes I:- In We R o t or, Ol the ub. ?" rs i:� �4as been on she cxeontive committee of the Cam - mumty Chest Ptmd. Dr. xnd Mrs. Blatt, 0110 live at 901 NW 24th-A. are the pareivs of a son and a daughter, Albert Har- old, spa an easComt. proleaaet In Howard University, WmIariltow n C, and hl a Bernice Blatt_ an in- etnptor m Iisrdmg j dC, Hlth School. 3211d -at and N. Shane! -era. De. Blatt says his only hobby in Iaafiog as hla resin lie" BOWde, Colo., A few Weeb ducat,, Wa fir- mer. Vhy Z Rccame a Minister Eldest Sorer for Five GeneraLlions Was Jewish Chautauqua Society Understanding Through Education For Over 115 Years, theVewish Chautauqua Society has provided knowledge and education about Jews and Judaism, has brought about an appreciation of the Jewish people, their history, religion, and culture, and has built bridges of understanding between peoples of all faiths and cultures. From American Jewish Year Book 1893 - The Jewish Chautauqua Society, which was organized in 1893, with branches all over the country, has as its primary object the popularization of Jewish learning. Through the publication of manuals and course books and the establishment of study circles, the society has done much towards the spread of a? `Knowledge of.lewish literature and Jewish history, especially in the smaller communities. The work of the society in behalf of the teaching profession will be referred to later. From United States Jewry. 1776 -1985 1893 - In 1893, Rabbi Henry Berkowitz, now Rabbi of Philadelphia's prestigious Rodeph Shalom he founded the Jewish Chautauqua Society after sketching its contours to a Jewish group at the World's Parliament of Religions In a few years it became a national institution . At first it was closely allied to the Christian Chautauqua which itself was part of a larger national movement to bring culture to the American masses, to men and woman eager to improve themselves. From Jewish Education in New York City 1893 - An educational society of a very different nature was the Jewish Chautauqua Society, which began its activities in 1893, with Dr. Henry Berkowitz of Philadelphia as Chancellor.41 It was fashioned after the secular Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle. Its purpose was to assign books and courses for young people and adults "who have neither school nor teacher at hand." From Jewish Encvcloyedia.com - CHAUT.4IJ0U.4 SOCIETY, THE JEWISH: Mar 10, 1893 - Dr. Henry Berkowitz in an address before his congregation, the Rodeph Shalom, Philadelphia , March 10, 1893. Thc.lewish literary societies of that city appointed a " committee on oreanization." which formulated plans. An agreement was entered into with the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle convened at Lake Chautauqua, NY, for the use of the general methods of popular education known as the "Chautauqua System." From:The Menorah, Volume 31 By Jewish Chautauqua Society, B'nai B'rith June 15' I901.4Commencement exercises at the Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati. Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz of Philadelphia delivered the Baccalaureate sermon. The.graduates were: David Alexander, Moise Bergman, Joseph Blatt, Henry Englander, Morris Feuerlicht, Alfred G. Moses, Martin Meyer, Sol. C. Lowenstein, Leon Volmer and Elias Margolis. Mr. Alexander and Mr. Margolis were born in New York, Mr. Bergman in Shreveport, La.; Mr. Blatt and Mr. Englander in Austria, Mr. Feuerlicht in Boston, Mr. Moses in Livingstone, Ala.; Mr. Meyer in San Francisco, Mr. Volmer in Little Rock, Ark., and Mr. Lowenstein in Philadelphia. WTI f 4' - ' . •, `++ — . u:A.[ ' n. - ate] c.wlry qt w "K'1 t r } r4"r De Broadway Circle it OKLAHOMA CITY,. OKLA. Joseph- Blatt, Rabbi Elarly In Apr.fl, 1903, a iemporaly organization of the Sounders or Temple 8 rial ' Israel was effected. At a. meeting, held in the Mist Christfan.Church on May lot of that same yam, a permanent organization carne Into being: On May i4th, the "Gousra - ' - tution and By -IAws were adopted. Within a few days, the Te7liury of Oklahoma, granted a charter to Temple Blasi Israel: -. . - Services at this time were being conducted ,by;the laymen.' As the Maly Days ' were approaching, a decision was made to write to the Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati,, a - Ohio. in an attempt to secure a student to conduct these melees. The laymen were . : S - - successful in securing Mr; H. G. Freedman, who is now a Rai bl - ie — / In 1904, as the Holy Days were again near, the 'Hebrew Union College was again A _ . requested to send a student to officiate. The Congregation was fortunate in securing tt • ' - the services of Mr. Arthur LuMnsohn. He gave such universal satisfaction tbat, although i 10, he bad not yet finished His term at the College, .he was elected to serve as Spirituel be - Leader. He was elected in.Novemtier, 1904 and served faithfully and well nnlil. failing „ health compelled him to leave for Mexico. In March, 1906, he passed away, 1 - Again the laymen took charge and conducted services. EU15L In 1906, a decision the _ was made to secure a permanent - Rabbi and to build a Temple. Accordingly, Rabbi has Joseph Blatt of Columbus, Georgia, was, invited to _'•-a -: :.na -.a -h= _ -.,� =sera.... At that time, services were being held -In St. Luke's Methodist Ohurtb. Ra _ Blatt h 113 occupied the pulpit on February 23, 1906. On the .allowing Sunday, he was unoulmouslg - elected Rabbi of Temple B'nar Israel An immediate eamnaian was launched: for', the - . purpose of erecting a Temple building. Construction wag. started in July, 1907, and.. the cornerstone was laid August f tile' - on 19, 1907. Dedication ceremonies took place on'; January 17 -18, 1908. is ma ' Rabbi BIatt, who thus became the first ordained and permanent Rabbi, has kerved„ rector _ Temple B'nai Israel tmtn the present time. He has been elected for life. lyatem The The constant striving to better serve the apirltmi needs of the membership fs, ' .a his _ - by the addition of the 'Sabbath School of The Congregation shortly after organiutlon in 1903. A more recent manifestation of this principle is'aeeount4ble for the Community Howe, or Temple Center, which was built In 1926 and dedicated on ily and October Sth of that year. as for Present officials folloiu:' - OFFICERS TRUSTEES .' '. l Henry P. wii G, .C. Paul A. D. Enselsmen, Louie Herlovks - 'sten - Jack Israel. Preafdeat Mrs. Joseph Myer S. X. Hernatein - Simon Tannebaum, Vtce-P.ealdent Mrs. Jaecph D.V. S°hoaweld its Milton tARinaellll, TtMwunr llrbansky Mrs. Lori, Berkowitf Ampld T. Me% Seemtary Hen H. May 671Taa Mldmss - " ' bia +te - " r Mrs. Joseph Urbauskn Aee•i Secretary ` Aaron' welteenhalfer. D Lea L. Yooe a 9k � - aria LADIES' AID AND SISTERHOOD ' ' Mrs. Louts Berlowitr, President TEMPLE BROTHERHOOD . • - Lean Fiaher. President - - WTI f 4' - ' . •, `++ — . u:A.[ ' n. - ate] c.wlry qt w "K'1 t r } r4"r Friends ®f AU Faiths Pay Last R abbi l Preached First Chk �$es�ee�s ® it 9$ Rab B ¢t ^�'� zT R a bdv..•.w„-...` -q aerrPaon l me �a ure.h . - Jaw.alttd GentSl¢ gAthered Tlxu[86�Y bengaEtl p2IInri6U� The dean of Okl�pome C ry pasha In pout b[ hontlBUOUs ;uT is Tampla B'Nef Israel to bid farewnli at the bier of b Jadeph Blatt. - Trtend' service, Rabbi Joseph Blatt, D. n, to dead. Death ended his work after 40 Yeats as pastor of the temple at dawn Rabbi Hiatt„ the 6R -year -old Jewish mmister,. who.for 40 years the Temple V1W Israel, died of a steaks .at 6:15 n'c .sdav_ • In, body cans tageo from wader the — MY a few weeks afber Ala nuretoent was pastor of a. m. Tuesday In his home, 901 NW 24. - Venal Haft of Jewish history vd AiPAttton wMW ]sings ahosu the pN felY B. ILO suceesaor, Rabbl Jospeh le".. d,'1, Is -a former . enrps. fir. Blatt• rabbi eme19M led Beth rehsed Mete July S. at aneoharad biv x. M hie miNatry while a sew rabbi iota to tpn SFed e[ lobe yfoPheta ' Ixvdtag Ia goal man Ya us a oleo 11e. ato leu, - - a' was bock nee. 16, tale, to Ca- alohati. owe. and fsnvaed the Jew. Ise tfedlttav that the oldest sea W a Mean in, aevN ntaamev! In ileeem fi'J L ber. 1119 suceesbr, HIM J-V- Lev � n tnson, 88, b a mxmyr sty Cerra chop Y. late. r � 4 4 iLdn .. ' . Burial was at Fdlaleah ram stery: rabM ahW!d be- educated to bestow a; d the cad. asaunu na ,sty . sate nom horse statehood. . Fat more important to him, how- ever. who his adeisttp ed has family, x `a,wme hwe Gvu. Cvw�i11+1a, rJa., wltpart, o Wmpp, sin uvdentaeding IatereaE and warm fdtadfitp rot boo• ...fie lmmNlaklY aoa we aC.acm sal .1-1 f It e- wee ehtp at Petaens Identtfiad call& c8 1 only.aahnal that mb h became "be active c and leader In Me jea'a l 1 elanl f h er re Of Ch s •and 'ape which h dove ch t dispel pre,tudleta pad st g" hop whih c opPF erlated, a the , ego - rMdk na4! jhe age of 69 b a bay Fie ahlaed oboes, sold pa" Pen, stopped Inhacoo Itpwe attend- ed tau ashodu etmuilenaauely, and. in J901 was gnaduated from 'Bab. tfnton Cottage and Ohainnatl hei- verwy. Boon after his gaduatioa, he was marbled to Palms arena. hire. Blatt died Sate 93, 1998. Be is aneytval by Ala tch. Dr. A Sbtoid Blau, Yea Ysk; III daughter. Ian. A. Fbee Sfalt of the hone ad- d his glonoton, Jcel Blatt, a. New Y'k. Cams acts lo 19th a Sint, wed W reran shit whoa "a he prat clime b ohis that MIT sf son Iv 1900, a ➢leached his , le and that wbea h 3a Lukas ldatb� odts t metehen ! ettded a place N whkh Is wvrsbiP hat thole beading was t chrg erected } RP! 8 and Sbblvson; pie cvagrega- :UOV b"r� th e Pao hl In [ample le he w e'a sad she altUivdlsL congn- i If rottplped them for eledcat P tear. In 3006 wpen Ho Slau amp I lift sty. from C9luanb mbhe, Ga. In the 'fifth year o f his miwstry, he was - a -cbbl • ^�w.,,,t e e r,,,,.rn. pia flint a t ier l a tth d atlW u"ll. the b"t. Legal MtthedLt eLUrLp._ lheq M nonfatal la Harsh '$ititt coming beme item St. An- T1tn v hen, lu hilddle at Suet. Aber and Mnm Afe ubiers Hatcis S. Hln had been used. W pssd a the g mn apxmwtt6 and evardn9s a Porch aE fits home. Priande and n hborq seeing hen ]+et<. rprmed Uo hnblL d dtvpPtv6 w to help tp p' Thus be walled away the gas bad _ b t0 ge an,aucMle rlda tent short Rabbi Blatt awakened aW-t bzuu a. m. Tuesday, and sot P. Not taeaeg ,well he Ieturned to bad. als family nu hae wbea he died at 5:15 e. m. In bra to pea" In Oklahoma City. Rabbi Blatt had spoken in every ellhteb along BoMesnt. and On vat" Pea owadoua, Plekatanb minutes had %panto an bas whagogna Also Taeght HWOU In addition W his duxes a IabM, Blatt found tune to tenth butery, Central highschool, leash 1901 until M Be else, at one time, taught ?Bas be the School of Religim at e rleIvenity of Oklahoma. Dr.- Stan, a prominent 'mason, iayad a comb cho ': '^. is the. [ ,Rf, davelepmeac Be was on wrda a t d1teLW" WWa ebenbw of xvmarcc, UNted Provident 4-WA on, TubsscNloMe moiety. CamPfbe Iraq CnmmuolLy lull.. sad %than via o ahlgatic.. - Sure Oemmber 16, isle. In Om,w- a L ohio. he was the soa Male lbr Ilvq 6enerado. In the Blau IatNfy. Ov, Moot su. had beea n "bed. The Rest Bobbl Blatt, accord- ing to racebis p"servtd In the auwieh .Yhlopedia, was Mo. BIad, rabbi Pt BcYwi. Moravia. a. small, tale- pendant aoh&.b? abambed. by ceeW- a ,Okla offs to. I=t Wontj war. Be was Pastor of the li.•ly nation Item 1000 w 1859. Ba Shad➢ estobl bad was the Nd Jewish euaos of Poe eldest roe ba- coming %rabid that Josepb Blatt did, net euMtw Ib. 1fe had often sold, "It was only a metier of how good a rebM 1 Was going to W In the early days of his youth, m - Chrciseati. fie stated shoe& sold' papers, and stripped tabacce leave. For eight Tsars 'he - atteaded two .hoola slmaltaneoosly. 1 oeughobt Ns mgbacbohl ..t he skilled In the Hebrew Malin college, std this dual sithatbn carried over into hip college tire when lie atteudeq Chtcln- i nett unive sit. Gr¢daatbd w 1961 Dr. BLtt wee gmduatad Irom the Hebrew UNOA cortege iv tB01, at the t more L'.ma u h15 PuduaHOV fmm the university. Re -,elved the de9rs of Hathelhr of ifebren• LbersLUre, and the degrm of Haehely at artx sad Rabble Sw septembs. 1961, he look epatgt s eha Temple a. G B'Nnl jmael of Colum- bua„ he" he'rtnuuned —.1 Ahsuet. IM abet be "me to Okla• harm CF4�•.� e. sa s Blatt dlcd "Jump SB,.39w.' . ,bbl Blatt Ye rvlded by,bta:soa; A.. 11.1. B1M-bf leave Ywb and pls dsWMtab,, Kra. A. Bb- slvtt, a the hpa0. fwd bin Stand 3n1: San, .[tgbt or a. Took nabka Juscph Blau Honoree of Chamber Today, Rabbi Blatt, I s Real Liberal City to Recognize. a Man Who Grew Up With It. bit con wrlable home, Pdt l'erthx T eaty-fomth etreet, trt.wcy ill and look bright Places out of scmpbag of lab W"Oq — a mem that stretcher boot oast N year$ Oklelmma City. "1 eon r8membm.... - a deep, e mtesm ae hs vent Prer mIn -ugn °. ILtaa 30 rem, It n'al of Wae&I- Loeb biY.hdaa m IS06 the, Joseph Blatt Um! to OklahPma City as the Young rabbi of the Young canareer- Ilan B'Nei 1.0]. .111! Cbxmbcr of Commmre wlB devote Its tOrum lun- heoa Prlday to a Areor'ina honoring the thictiedh awlivecaary. Clucrehmeo and I MM. Jew", CaVWIfm end Pmtmlauto "Ll Join In a tribute to a Inman an who has wvm .,uut end tlfe me nucughout Etta mmmumFj. "I ran rebrrbu - he ...ten Plated. "eomfnt lets 011ahortm oity than first affcrccou end befog met AY frteMa who orated Lbat I jam them In we.g the P* at the Ovachnher theater. mun'.d wt went to %a Indiehoma O the top nest Of what Is new svj .Yt1Va. building. ee the :,Ming of Gee' I P.W. tht-Say attamei, to 31 r9le Cale in the af Lee- Ruchb. hood. It Rea an d.biiTla affair, with Sejaaa r mono ess]aeatmoater. They old thing.$ c3aborately thow daya:' Peal will be ors of the mm W PnY tribute to baclur 31att t.&Y. There ware they dare wbm late cm- gcegatloa held services in the old Don- nelly Aeid had at North"A Yovath street and fficadws , samda. and Inter on We'scraad nod, of the FTedcda- vun -Brah building oa Men, SUNt Then the aarneratohe for the 3'emple 13N.1 Bracl was ]old, In left wlet as lenprwive servtee M which Doctor Blatt std! hoe the original prinl program. There was s certain labor day as, ode In which the rabbi 'lonely remmn- nc w� eia m m. oa Ploneer, wear- - lde a hov bet red s I Rabbi Joseph Blatt t SO Years Ago ... And Today bigh schcots, several of the parents came in me to say that they, who had been my Pupils, had come 0 bear my tell to their graduating Ouldran.^ • s 'f�O 1'I' CFOR BLd bee scan x etir, 1J yudt.°ue of a raw boom town by ward hooera as L➢urles Celesrd, Sld- ne, Brock, Sol Petty, Walter Dean — all ble close frump. Tbare was one cltaruece when the Chamber of toed mecca was -.1 OT m•LCatabliab - tae. ' he $300,000� d In f an hour'$ time. wartime. and Rabbi Blatt became a 'xaur- minute man I - a memun be would like to erase. 'Tt was ail 0 faut. We were tr9- leg m retie money, sednng to arous, pamtonr, en the bads at what .we know now wee nothing but PIVPa -I funds, untruth." ]dia only Plesant' memory of net verdd was a meeting Blatt has sees 'the liquor undergo He several Phew le. '. ' w a s [f 1 8 this will enie once iaiate hoc You; P once hooked the w iai el- 1- lia be . o n n c with a Mile, but t I am oat of a An ad- t be of tes, ya, yes, B Z 40 Out pe➢ Ya ra "a e, c eye p°a na It a e the I o goad to as been- penun nae w ne see e Did uckem gulag euG R the right right way now, modish t, the unly way — aduuNOn and Paklmt teaching." von this exdtimt now land.. 0 1007 to 1013.I taught Wf 7 std hlghaehooi in Irvbat build- s relat w. 'aadly q dw tae- but what I ran into soma aid minx. now ea impoetant bua- a. Not long aga I delivmvil a unto .. Ibr• one ci Ibe . 1 an A Tall Man on of BY S➢ITB Jtle➢aSOSo and' ®Aahaa fn d to be i e ndia- N O` 'm t o It �ppbere i Y ¢ t Parsee Jf me. e, d-him aphere. e➢III m who going him, and 1aznC➢O III. going t➢ feel as. If his plate aCVer will be quite f1110d, E9fb a need iaPS .Rabbi Jakob Rlxtt who ' otter seva m month ie Inc es, di and d ot sou: Inds muednR• body In TwmPle Bvil tecrn mg SNlawi j a sendce Small w'hma Its lied mlplaterad band 4ePbd K bI Poblet e0 year[. ".ot Blatt war chat all -tae -sum 1n' ®na pbe- Ppmp;en wt roll ua idealist, sae who could vat he mprfl front pir Ldeadem.with mm he stood 'W& ar jl&%er buoy argue atamaldY " Id. co°rolOtlan that husmn +aluu should take P"' donee ovor matvrtal nabs 70' 'alt bus Lbougltts kept P Pl d a of ell arts and eoVagap$, m au P he far them Bb m We attitudes Ue-ed th IS w ollare was upper 'tb,V, m BLtw, was hie mans. �.. La, s of a e host'. Not m$ D did he Into thee, c f ¢tid Ana �buutt�hde gave al his mngex nneda +� R' People who took tbto Problwna cod S ttau- hi, he hire, their touditiva mould boohoos h po - List way It no t. the,' moon racoa0 d b sloe with - it the best they wold. _ e gaged m war rs •1 D Ud lRlVaughLePai ele tY arts ct t0 D, WaLt a boy wkc had 1.ans1tted Imga ,, Old . xrved Emu is ter fedaml cetocmato at M Rim. AdcePdng that respocutblYtatlbe for e10 b a hudneamad Is bis tOngregn he etforta YI bath men v ion was 'Ore", t farad Sot Me boy. abate he did not lit Into nt So sect io, Job was cbd. v mthou n Be. � °vaaLflto boyar Iau Sied shot . - Off , offclvg ' le sarytcra, Braving It to We he attend temp m svmehiP there LL he would. Beraus! f the Blatt belmd wsamaat rl� 1er o hmve11 yoyoueI aetcr= the boor w aO he another floc record. Vanier,, arv,, tb Owe rOtbl beJPad Always 'Vxcramad in lout mote ,ban one ambition student to Detain from a lcav Lund a amt to nmist bins m OomPletmt has odueadan. �aOB the Past 10 yea us of a° ties palglvua ec- F' tivitto eanuu OI the Chamber Of DOne- metoe hsa ' IctelUld al�iaaths otd�ead a by Lnvltin6 I iez w mCh"e"Vu Icatke At Ve re paofesmvt elaraYnsm, a Weise& m Pilot or I pWxoP and W. Blatt west d moss a U rr a tb� aabbl'a marloc Wdeus In SuW+lnaan. Borneo' p'So of St Dake Meth - total thatch, were the bright 1mtCm,U Jeatk aa � D t Lt t sk4L mane B Y ifeteaerl eyed0r. B Cr,,, l y y {a W and a9 an mthe.l.e Lt a- per oS ehe NO➢anbl Comer -ce e1 and Chrlstiuds J'.' ion of ta t -¢- hHPg➢ b,,c, U"0'4- matunl undorsfaad{ng and to on & friendlier rtlatgmahLPa Con=O.IY b0 u rged the Willi- of d ta- re . to est V eW tasoun t.Y cent, i rommY:d oPPh!t.'rha➢kb to hie Ia- enau c , ➢uepcP anti -Sowtb leafing 1. this dtf Is at - a espeetad every aid Pas- In Ulu. Aa be o : sans te1{t�are h le O.T. Pcefereneee, oe be 1n- rllMd that every Jew aryls pe a It tya+ Wa I cBOf Boas JOE, _avm'Y Catba➢c a devout, oaa s , *MY PfoLS$GnE vdMtrefisy Ialal vl d it gdprinCa M. unmed. W wP tt hh church m Lim Of the PO .1 tmpPriedt Jar O l Bad to the dnmmve a ntY u0. lab la^ i • flumUa pe erth ramehsin$ a WnP:vnto our 3 A tall Joel, n Plum amts. our pain- '- j