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6A - Update Memo September 2°d, 2009 TO: Landmarks Board FROM: James Hewat, Chris Meschuk SUBJECT: Update Merno Post WW-11 Residential Subdivision Survey and Context A draft of the context, survey, and management recommendations have been submitted by the consultant and are currently being reviewed by staff and the Colorado Historical Society. The information will be presented to the Board at the November meeting and presentations to the public will follow. Valmont Mill and Depot Staff has completed Colorado Historical Society historic structure assessment (HSA) grant application for the Valmont Mill. A Depot task force will be convened in the near future to review the Depot HSA grant application and commence planning for the rehabilitation and re- use of the building. Mapleton School Coalition A request to the Boulder Valley School District to lease the school for use as an early childhood learning center will be taken up by the school Board on October 13, 2009. Conceptual designs for the proposed addition and parking were reviewed by the Ldre on August 19th. 2009 CLG Grant Application The grant to digitize the survey forms and photographs is underway. New and Pending Land Use Review Applications None Planning Board Calendar See attached. Stay-of-Demolition Status Summary, Septeinberth, 2009 None Landmark Applications: Washington School designated a local Landmark JuIy7th, 2009. Second reading of 800 Pearl Street Landmark Designation, September 1st, 2009 Articles: The Alliance Review - News from the national Alliance of Preservation Commissions. July-August 2009 Issue. 1 Materials Mayhem FINDING OUR WAY THROUGH THE MATERIALS MAZE Drane Wilkinson, NAPC Executive Director Every decade brings its miracle products-aluminum siding, elastomeric coatings, liquid siding, vinyl- clad windows, EIFS, asbestos-cement shingles, masonite siding, cast stone, asphalt brick sheeting, fiber-cement boards, artificial slate, plastic picket fences, vinyl siding, insulating paint-the list goes on. Naturally, property owners will want to use these products if they believe that the result will be superior (and less expensive) to repairing the existing material or replacing in kind. What is a poor commission to do? Educate. Start with yourself. When a new product comes along, read the literature, ask questions, seek examples, and try to figure out if it really does what the manufacturer claims. When faced with an application to use an unfamiliar alternative material, table it until the commission has enough information to make an informed decision. Simply saying no because a material is unfamiliar doesn't help the commission win friends and may do the property owner a disservice. What if the wonder coating he/she has been sold is really nothing more than acrylic paint, and the special preparation that has to be done by a certified installer is just the basic preparation any good painter would do? Take the time to find out, and the commission comes away as a hero that saved the property owner a bunch of money. It may also be that the proposed material simply isn't suitable for use in a historic district because of appearance, durability, or reversibility of application. Again, take the time to explain the decision to the property owner. Better yet, educate the property owner in advance through your guidelines and other published materials. Property owners are less likely to propose using a material if they know that it won't be approved; and if they know why it won't be approved, they'll be less likely to resent it. Beware of blanket prghibitions. Applications proposing alternative materials must be heard on their own merits. Some alternative materials may be suitable for some properties or in some districts, but not in others (See "Fiber-Reinforced Cement Cement Siding Materials: Should They be Used on Historic Buildings" page 10). The key is to be consistent in how suitability is determined. If decisions aren't made in a consistent manner, using the same evaluation methodology, the commission not only opens itself up to accusations of being arbitrary and capricious; it also runs the risk of a district gradually losing integrity because inconsistent application of standards and guidelines results in inconsistent work. By adopting an evaluation methodology, a commission can use it to educate property owners and contractors so that they are more likely to plan projects that will pass muster. Our districts are not sterile collections of buildings. They are dynamic communities subject to the changes of time. They are also where preservation comes down from its ivory tower and meets the ground, so local preservation commissions are on the front lines of determining the suitability of alternative materials. It's a daunting task, but if we're consistent and clear in how we evaluate and decide, we'll get there. OFFICIAL NOTICE THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF PRESERVATION COMMISSIONS WILL BE HELD AT 12:00 NOON ON FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER 2009 IN THE WEST BALLROOM OF THE RENAISSANCE HOTEL IN NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE. Jul -Aug 2009 Materials Mayhem toric integrity of the property and its environment. Do not destroy historic materials...when constructing... exterior alterations. Differentiate the new work from the old and... protect... historic integrity...by requiring... com- patible... architectural features. Rehabilitation is defined as It is important to recognize that these are not the standards for Preservation or "the process of returning a Restoration treatments. Rehabilitation provides additional latitude. The Stan- property to a state of utility, dards are introduced with the definition of rehabilitation as "the process of re- through repair or alteration, turning a property to a state of utility...." The Standards further note that they "are to be applied in a reasonable manner, taking into consideration economic which makes possible an and technical feasibility." efficient contemporary use while preserving those portions The Goals of Integrity and Authenticity and features of the property which are significant to its The National Park Service acknowledges the authenticity of a resource as historic, architectural, and its paradigm. The introduction to the Standards explains that "the treatment cultural values." 'rehabilitation' assumes that at least some repair or alteration of the historic building will be needed in order to provide for an efficient contemporary use;. however, these repairs and alterations must not damage or destroy materi- als, features, or finishes that are important in defining the building's historic character." When adopting the Standards, a local government embraces this philosophy as a policy statement. It is, however, a difficult policy to apply. The preservation commission is the unit of local government that is called upon to implement this policy. It is im- portant for local commissions to recognize that the Standards were created to serve specific federal uses. "Initially developed by the Secretary of the Inte- rior to determine the appropriateness of proposed project work on registered properties within the Historic Preservation Fund grant-in-aid program, the Standards for Rehabilitation have been widely used over the years-particu- larly to determine if a rehabilitation qualifies as a Certified Rehabilitation for Federal tax purposes." [http://www.nps.gov/historylhpsltps/taxlrhblstand.htm] The commission, on the other hand, must be responsive to the local commu- nity's culture of regulation and enforcement, and the "will of the citizenry." The Standards cannot be applied by the commission in a vacuum detached from the local context, nor does the National Park Service suggest that they should be: "The Standards are neither technical nor prescriptive, but are intended to promote responsible preservation practices that help protect our Nation's irre- placeable cultural resources. For example, they cannot, in and of themselves, be used to make essential decisions about which features of the historic build- ing should be saved and which can be changed." [http://Www.nps.gov/history/ hps/tps/standguide%verview/choose treat.htm] The tools commonly available to commissions are the nomination documents, design review guidelines, and the process of design review. Ideally, thorough and thoughtful documentation in each of these three areas is available to the preservation commission for guidance in performing its duties. During the nomination process, the significant features of the resource (indi- vidual or district) are identified thus establishing how the resource meets the NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS Materials Mayhem criteria for placement on the local register. It also clarifies those features that are important to protect-that is, those elements essential to the integrity of The Secretary the Interior's the resource. Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties The design review guidelines establish the a::- The Secretary ceptable levels of change and where chang, of the Interior's can occur and do no harm to the resource.{.:_: ` Standards for They should also address the acceptability of the Treatment of x n.L n1 n,r - alternative materials-that is, where departure Historic Proper ' from-original fabric can be accommodated and = t' ties are common- R. sense principles in still retain authenticity. Because new materials non-technical Ian- and changing technology are a constant, n,:, guage. They were guidelines can provide a definitive list of a, developed to help ~ ceptable choices. ~kt -.lc protect our na- 1 ,nIC1, tion's irreplaceable sets out tcultural resources The process of d .s!;n rev e _ type of information necessary for a fair and sis promoting t preservan informed judgment as well as the sequences - - tion practices. for evaluating the acceptability of the material. During this process, the twin goals of rehabilitation-continued or restored The Standards may be applied to all properties utility of the resource(s) and preserving historic character-are balanced. The listed in the National Register of "trade off' between the two challenges many commissions. Historic Places: buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts. Toward An Evaluation Methodology The Standards are a series of concepts about maintaining, A"top ten" (but unranked) list of today's recurring requests might look like this: repairing and replacing historic 1. Exterior Insulation and Finish System (Dryvit and other "synthetic stuc- materials, as well as design- co" products) ing new additions or making 2. Fiber-cement siding (HardiePlank and related products) alterations. They cannot, in and 3. Metal roof systems of themselves, be used to make 4. Molded fiberglass/plastic exterior trim decisions about which features of a historic property should be 5. Replacement shutters preserved and which might be 6. Replacement windows changed. But once an appropri- 7. Roofing shingles (synthetic slate, and the like) ate treatment is selected, the 8. "Spray-on Siding" e.g. Liquid Vinyl and other exterior coating systems Standards provide philosophical 9. Wood/plastic composite lumber (Trex) consistency to the work. 10. And the growing interest in sustainable design expands the list to include. There are Standards for four a. Energy retrofit "packages" distinct, but interrelated, ap- b. Green roofs proaches to the treatment of c. Photovoltaic (solar) panels historic properties: preservation, d. Photovoltaic shingles rehabilitation, restoration, and reconstruction. e. Wind turbines Preservation focuses on the Since every community has its own preservation ethic, no one can provide the maintenance and repair of exist- commission with the "right answer." Moreover, today's list does not look like ing historic materials and reten- 1995's list, and it is unlikely to look like 2025's list. While commissions often tion of a property's form as it look to each other for examples of how to address difficult issues, in the long has evolved over time. c- tion and stabilization have ve now term, we are better served by developing the capability to make well-informed been consolidated under this decisions about these products as opposed to polling each other for pat an- treatment.) swers. Each commission ultimately has the charge to find the best answer for Continued on next page its local circumstances. [ Jul -Aug 2009 °f Materials Mayhetn Rehabilitation acknowledges Thus, the commission's decision will come down to'finding a community-ap- the need to alter or add to a his- propriate balance among a wide array of valid concerns, some of which may toric property to meet continuing stand in opposition to others. What is proposed, then, is a framework for com- or changing uses while retaining missions to organize the questions to be asked and to provide a means for the property's historic character. weighing and balancing multiple objectives. Restoration depicts a property A Sustainability Framework for Balanced Decision-Making at a particular period of time in its history, while removing evi- dence of other periods. True sustainability is much more than energy efficiency or various green rating systems for building construction, such as LEED (Leadership in Energy and Reconstruction re-creates van- Environmental Design). The "Three Fillars" framework for sustainability has ished or non-surviving portions three primary considerations to produce sustainable outcomes: economic, of a property for interpretive environmental, and social/cultural- Each of the pillars must be given proper purposes. weight to achieve a balanced result. Source: http://www.nps.govlhis- tory/NPS/TPS/standards guide- lines. htm Gn+ironntental IZespnnslbility 5u~glinuGl. Sustainable Economic Yntural iin+iroorncnt _ - and Built f lPn+irunnIVIII historic \ f tiutil;linu171c I)cr+aiilvnvnt ~ II, ~ tincial/Cultural `'S - J~ 1 Itl'111Unvlbllllt' Ecolmillic Resynu+iliiliiy Equitable Social E.ntironmcat The three pillars of sustainability-environmental, economic, and sociaU cultural responsibility-combine to ensure sustainable development. The trend is clear that we, as a global community, are moving toward a new decision-making paradigm-one that embraces these broader sustainability criteria as an umbrella under which individual decisions in a wide range of pursuits should be evaluated. With this background as our context, the next installment of this article will propose a means by which the framework of sus- tainability can be applied to the decision-making process when considering alternative materials and/or systems promoting sustainable design. NEWS from theNAT'IONALALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS Materials Mayhem YOU Can Host the Hest Party in Preservation! The NAPC is now accepting proposals for its 2012 National Commission Forum. Held every other year, Forum is the only National conference specifically for preservation commissioners, staff, and other professionals addressing local preservation commissions needs and issues. Previous Forums were held in New Orleans, Denver, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Indianapolis, Baltimore, and Forum 2010 will be held in Grand Rapids, Michigan! Each Forum has attracted over 300 participants and we expect more in 2010 and 2012. We are looking for cities with an attractive location, good community support, and a strong fundraising commitment to make Forum 2012 a success. Forum: • Is an interactive conference designed to let participants learn not only from experts in the field but also from their colleagues • Provides participants with the training they need to effectively enforce America's preservation laws. • Blends traditional educational sessions, interactive discussion panels, mobile workshops and tours. • Is supported by numerous partners including the National Conference of State Historic Pres- ervation Officers, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Preservation Action and the Na- tional Park Service. • Brings local commission members and staff from across the country together with representa- tives from federal agencies, state and local governments, and national, state, and local organi- zations. Local Partners: • Support the conference with fundraising efforts, program development and volunteers • Provide local volunteers to manage registration tables, help at social events, etc. • Help create a dynamic program that highlights the preservation issues facing the host com- munity. The NAPC works with the local community to develop tours, mobile workshops, and social events. If your community is interested in hosting Forum 2012, contact NAPC program Coordinator Drane Wilkinson at 7061542-4731 or by e-mail at NAPC@uga.edu to request a forum 2012 RFP information packet. Reminder: The Commission Data Project Survey on Track for August Release! As announced in the previous issue of The Alliance Review, the Commission Data Project survey, a joint venture of the NAPC and the National Park Service (NPS) that aims to identify, connect with, and learn about local commissions across the nation, will be up and running this August. NAPC members will receive notice of the survey in the mail, which will summarize impor- tant details and incentives. As it has been over ten years since NAPC and the NPS first conducted a similar survey, and as new technologies and issues have changed the face of local preservation practices, we encourage all NAPC members to help us complete this important project. The data we receive will prove invaluable for both the NAPC and its members in making the case for local preserva- tion efforts, and will provide NAPC and its national and state partners when advocating for better support and resources for local preservation commissions. NAPC counts on it members for support, so please spread the word that the Commission Data Project survey is on its way! Jul -Aug 2009 Materials Mayhem FIBER-REINFORCED CEMENT SIDING MATERIALS SHOULD THE-V BE USED ON HIST(P]C BUILDINGS"? Janet W. Foster Assoc. Dir for Urban Planning and Historic Preservation, Columbia University Although New York City outlawed wooden I)uildings in 1875, some still survive, like the house in Greenwich Village at 132 Charles Street, built > in 1819 (shown left). In the 1920s, the original wooden clapboards had been covered by a two-inch thick Portland cement stucco application in an attempt to make the building comply with fire-rating standards. By the time the building underwent a thorough rehabilitation in 2003-04, the architects for the project, ~rt■ r JHPA, determined that water infiltration between the original clapboard and the later stucco covering had so rotted the wood that it was unsalvageable. New _ York City Department of Buildings required a fire rating that prevented use of new clapboard in this dense urban location. So JHPA chose to use a fiber-reinforced 1W J SII i~ .,~,tr I i. cement siding material. Says Michael Devonshire, a JHPA partner, "Our office was a bit hesitant, but - - mock-ups proved to be quite reasonable. Until you tap it, you cannot tell that it is not wood. It certain) worked in that application, and has an ideal fire rating." - At the time of the application of the new siding, the house and its block were ` n - - not regulated b New York City Landmarks Law, although the were in included l ` i ' Y f• in the 2006 expansion of the Greenwich Village Historic District. The owners at the time of the 2003 renovation appreciated the historic character of the house, - - probably built by a carpenter named Matthew Armstrong. On their behalf, JHPA sought an opinion from the New York City Landmarks Commission (LPC) on « the use of the fiber-reinforced cement clapboard on the building, as it was in a 132 Charles Street in New York proposed historic district. The LPC endorsed the idea and approved of the final City is a rare example of a results, designating 132 Charles a contributing building within the expanded historic district. surviving wooden building. ' Photo:courtesy of the author In this application, and in many others on historic buildings around the country, fiber-reinforced cement siding is applied on a flat, solid surface. It may be attached to the diagonal sheathing SOME CAUTIONS WHEN US- often found on 1911 century buildings, or on new plywood underlayment. The result is a new, du- ING FIBER-CEMENT SIDING... rable exterior skin. Unlike the vinyl and aluminum siding used in the late 201, century to refurbish the look of wooden buildings, the reinforced cement clapboard does not cover the original siding. Unquestionably cementitious Thus it does not set up the possibility for increased deterioration of the building's original siding plank siding (fiber-cement sid- ing) and framing. through hidden leaks or unseen insect infestation. It allows original, wooden detail- ing) is growing in popularity, especially when compared to work atound windows, doors and cornices to project from the elevation, as they were intended to the inferior properties of new- do. Too often in the application of aluminum and vinyl siding, the wooden detail is shaved off in growth wood in use today. As the siding application, or, if it remains intact, lacks the depth that it once had. with many new substitute prod- ucts, though, fiber cement may There have also been heroic restorations across the country that removed aluminum or vinyl sid- not always be an appropriate ing from old wooden houses. With some repairs, the original wooden siding can often be made substitute for traditional wood clapboards and wood shakes. serviceable again. When fiber-reinforced cement siding is used, that is no longer an option, be- A few concerns to keep in mind cause the original siding material has been removed. However damaged, it contained information when considering it on a historic about a particular building, and about the materials and technologies of earlier construction cam- building: paigns. What kind of wood was used? How was it sawn or otherwise shaped for use as siding? Thinness of the material: What traces of original paint remained to tell of the finishes history of the building? Most cementitious siding is If you, follow the Secretary of the Interior's Standards (to repair, not replace; or if replacement is 7116" in thickness, which is no- necessary, continue to use the same materials), then fiber-reinforced cement siding is definitely ticeably thinner than most tradi- not an appropriate choice for historic buildings. But because of its fire-resistant qualities how- Continued on next page ever, it is a helpful choice for keeping the form and appearance of a historic wooden building in NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS 1 Materials Mayhem an urban setting where modern building codes demand a quantifiable fire rating; and that fire rat- tional cedar or redwood siding. ing is a valuable asset. Keeping buildings standing is, after all, the goal of historic preservation. Some premium product lines, however, offer fiber-cement Fiber-reinforced cement has also been recommended for repair or replacement of original sid- siding at 1.5 inches. Fiber- ing in places where termites have become a major threat to all wooden buildings. Places like cement shakes are also thin- Charleston and New Orleans, the earliest cities in the country to provide legal protection of their ner in section than their tra- historic buildings as an important part of their municipal land use regulations, have allowed prop- ditional wooden counterparts erties in their historic districts to use the fiber-reinforced cement siding for insect protection. In and-to a trained eye-they appear unacceptably flat on a the hot and humid climates of the American South, termites can quickly destroy wooden build- historic building. The flatness ings, and the insects care little about whether what they're eating is an architectural landmark in of the siding is also more pro- a historic district or a modern tract house. Repairs to siding, framing, and sills of historic buildings pounced if the planks are not can be expensive-and why invest in the restoration if the replacement wood is also a potential beveled (in section) to match termite attractor? Using fiber-reinforced cement siding, at least on the lower parts of building, traditional wood clapboards. makes a lot of sense, especially when the unseen parts of the building, like the sills and studs Some producers offer fiber- are also replaced with non-wood materials. The loss of architectural integrity through the foss cement siding with a beveled detail, but it costs more and of original material is balanced with the goal of preserving the appearance of the structure, and may not be readily available. indeed, the structure itself. Like wooden siding, fiber-reinforced cement can be finished with color. Unlike , ;`•~ti titi"~ wood, which must be painted for a long performance life, fiber-reinforced cement 4 siding may be ordered from the manufacturer with an integral color that never re- quires painting or upkeep, or it may be painted (and then repainted on a periodic basis) with colors of your choice. This feature is particularly important in historic applications, where early colors and finishes may be startlingly different from today's taste, and the presentation of those vibrant or unusual colors is an impor- tant part of the presentation of the building. Although aluminum siding and vinyl siding also offered the promise of being maintenance free, time has shown that aluminum siding's color will fade and turn chalky, and eventually disappear, Vinyl siding will also discolor over time. It may be that not enough time has elapsed for us to clearly see what happens to the integral finish of fiber-reinforced cement, but since it is also designed to be painted, its finish can be refreshed; just as wooden siding has been for centuries. So, fiber-reinforced cement siding is fire-resistant, rot-resistant, insect-resistant, Y, t and can be integrally colored or painted with a regular exterior paint. What, fora preservationist, is there not to love? Well, history may have some lessons. j' '~TJ•itll Y i4.}4 In the early 2011 century, there was a great deal of publicity and interest in a new material: asbestos-reinforced cement. By adding asbestos fibers into ce- New fiber-cement siding on 1657 Merced Co. ment, a light-weight but durable building material was created. It could be made (California) courthouse. into shingles, siding, and roofing, and it was fire-resistant, rot-resistant, insect- Photo courtesy of Mark Odell. resistant and it eventually was produced in a variety of colors. However, over the course of the century, people became aware of the devastating illness asbestosis, a fatal lung Problems with instatla- disease which develops from contact with friable asbestos particles. As the problems with asbes- tion: Some fiber-cement tos-laced products became evident, other composite materials were developed to fill the void. planks come in lengths as long as 16 feet. The mate- The "fiber" part of fiber-reinforced cement is silicon. One of the most abundant materials on earth, vial is also much heavier than silicon fibers lend strength while reducing the weight of the cement. Imagine pouring cement into long When installed over wood. long spans, it usually has a a mold to form a twelve-foot long, inch and a half thick "board." You don't have to have much ex- slightly uneven surface, and perience with cement as a building material to know that it would be very heavy, very brittle, and Continued on next page just about impossible to attach horizontally on the side of a building. Create a mix with silicon and Jut -Aug 2009 Materials Mayhein this "ripple effect" creates jag- you allow cement to be transformed into "boards" and other relatively thin, light-weight products ged shadow lines (unlike wood that can imitate wood. siding). An option is to install. the material in short lengths. "Grinder's disease" was a known affliction of potters and ceramic makers in the 19'"century. It is a Some manufacturers also ad- lung disease caused by inhalation of the fine particulate matter generated by ceramic production; vise against caulking the butt today it is known as silicosis. The particular material that irritates the lungs, and which eventually joints in cementitious planks to reduces breathing function, is finely ground silicon. Silicon lies embedded within cement when it allow adequate permeability is present from inside a build- resent In the composites that form the boards and lrimwork of fiber-reinforced cement prod- ing. To those accustomed to ucts, and thus the material is harmless. During installation however, cutting creates tremendous wood clapboards on a historic amounts of silicon dust on the worksite. Contractors, and especially do-it-yourselfers, are at risk house, these "gaps" in the butt for developing silicosis. The manufacturers of fiber-reinforced cement siding are very clear in joints are obvious change. their product literature that installation must be done following detailed instructions which include Corners: Fiber-cement siding the use of breathing rnasks and wetting of the product to minimize dust. But because of the visual is primarily designed for build- similarity of the product and its application to familiar, and less dangerous wooden siding and ings with cornerboards. On trim, it is hard to get all contractors to take a genuine health concern associated with its installa- houses with mitered andlor tion seriously. flared corners (e.g., Craftsman bungalows in the West), it pos- Asbestos-reinforced materials are also inert when they are present as a siding material. Thou- es problems. The planks-can sands of houses were built with asbestos shingle siding as an original finish in the mid-201h cen- be mitered, but the material is tury, and many older houses were also re-sided by the application of asbestos shingles. They more difficult to cut than wood present no problems until the materials are broken, and when they need to be removed. The (and it produces harmful silica dust when it is cut). To over- concern for asbestos and a mandate for its removal from locations where anyone may come in come this problem, the most contact with it has led to the virtual poisoning of real estate values for homes where asbestos common solution is to have siding is present. Will fiber-reinforced cement siding come to be similarly regarded in the future? exposed butt ends, which on a historic house is an inappro- The preservation of the Modern Movement confronts as one of its major issues the use of manu- priate substitute. Some new fpctured materials, which are not reproducible outside factory conditions. When the manufacturer product lines have interlocking corners. This option may be- stops making an item, or redesigns it, there is no replacement, and usually no possibility for re- come more widely available in pair. Fiber-reinforced cement siding may have a similar fate. the future. Traditional building materials work because we have a body of knowledge about how they per- Textured surface: Most sid- form in a variety of circumstances over a long period of time. As with any new, manufactured ing is offered with a smooth material, fiber-reinforced cement siding offers many promises, but any use should be considered surface or with an embossed experimental. The material holds great promise for particular applications where the appearance grain simulating cedar or red- wood. Upon close inspection, of wooden siding is desired but qualities of fire resistance or insect resistance take precedence; this graining tends to look arti- but in properties with the legal mandate to be preserved, the preservation of as much of the origi- ficial, and the smooth surface nal material and traditional building technology should also be highly valued. may be a better option. NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVA/T~ION COMMISSIONS "I i the • ALLIANCE o ! COMMISSIONS It's a Grand Rapids Rendezvous! Join us in beautiful, historic Grand Rapids, Michigan for the ONLY national conference dedicated to local preservation commissions! The National Commission Forum is a unique combination of breakout sessions, working roundtables, and mobile workshops that provide information from commissioners, staff, and others working on preservation's front lines across the country. Forum isn't just the best NAPC is already working conference for local preservation commissions it's also the most to make Forum 2010 the entertaining. So, for a good time, largest and best ever, mark your calendar today and so watch The Alliance plan to attend Forum 2010! Review for details in the months to come. Forum Hotel: Amway Grand Plaza, $124/night = Early registration (by June 18"), $140 We hope we'll see you in - a3 Grand Rapids! fORUM 2010 JULY 28 - AUGUST 1 io Materials Mayhew TAKING IT TO THE STREETS V11INNING 'I I- Iifn t'.>>1~~~ F 0 R W Iii 4 0kN5 Paul Trudeau, NAPC Program Specialist Let's face it: we live in a consumer culture where quick-fix, "maintenance-free" prod- ucts are all the rage. For preservation advocates, this mindset can spell trouble. The window replacement industry has led the charge by offering a variety of technologi- cally advanced models that claim astronomical energy savings and ease of use. For property owners with poorly-maintained, single-paned wood window sash, this oppor- tunity for a quick upgrade can seem like the best possible option, especially with the purported "greenness" of replacement touted by the window industry. A closer look at all the issues surrounding what is considered "green," however, reveals that restoring old wood window sash can be much more beneficial to the homeowner and the planet. Why the Focus on Windows? Before delving into the question of window restoration as a green concept, we should first consider the importance of old windows as an integral component of a historic building. Often referred to as the "eyes" of a building, windows can be one of the most important character-defining features by providing scale, profile, and composition to a facade. Preservation guidelines from the National Park Service advise that "win- dows should be considered significant to a building if they: 1) are original, 2) reflect the original design intent for the building, 3) reflect period or regional styles or building practices, 4) reflect changes to the building resulting from major periods or events, or 5) are examples of exceptional craftsmanship or design." ("Preservation Brief 9: The Repair of Historic Wooden Windows." Technical Preservation Services, U.S. De- partment of the Interior, 1981). All told, those "old windows" that property owners are repeatedly encouraged to discard have significant characteristics, from both from a visual and structural standpoint, that the majority of window replacement models can- not reproduce. Heightened public awareness of climate change presented the replacement window industry with an opportunity to market replacement windows as an environmentally sound product in the name of energy efficiency. Increasingly, local preservation com- missions are presented with C of A applications for replacement windows by well- meaning property owners who believe they will not only lower their heating bills, but also help the planet. Commissions must go beyond saying no because replacements aren't sound preservation, and help property owners understand why saving their ex- isting windows is better for the environment. This article provides the information you need to guide property owners to responsible decisions. The inherent "greenness" of wood window restoration can be broken down into two major categories: sustainability and energy-efficiency: Sustainability An important part of preserving historic buildings is the retention of original compo- nents. Like most structural elements of older, wood-framed buildings, historic wood windows were milled from old-growth lumber that can last centuries, even when not properly maintained. Their sustainability is complemented by the fact they were care- fully constructed with mortise and tenon joinery to fit tight into the window openings of a house with extreme care and craftsmanship. Mass-produced wood replacement windows are typically constructed of new-growth lumber, often with glued-together NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS if Materials Mayhem fingerjoints and are highly susceptible to rot. The preservation of an old window main- tains an irreplaceable, sustainable resource. In addition to craftsmanship and the durability of the wood, historic . - - r - wood windows are also sustainable in that they are easily repairable. 7r ?a-~ }F~r,,.'~ , With the abundance of allegedly "maintenance-free" replacement window options on the market today, it's not surprising that prop- owners are often inclined to do away with old wood windows. er y t+7= s'+r a w' ` "Maintenance-free," however, is a misleading claim. Any product that K` is in constant operation and is susceptible to seasonal fluctuation and weathering will need maintenance. Replacement windows typi tally have plastic and metal parts that become outmoded over time. 17 making them difficult if not impossible) to repair. Vinyl windows ar% ' prone to denting, warping, and fading in high temperatures. In me cases, wood replacement sash have aluminum or vinyl exterior clad ding meant to protect the wood. If, however, moisture finds its w l ` in, through weep holes or other infiltration sources, the new-grove', lumber shielded beneath the cladding can quickly rot. 'J. _A60 Another major claim of the window replacement industry is the benefit of insulating glass. Insulating glass involves two panes of glass with an inert gas sealed in the space between them; these windows are r •I ' n called "double-glazed." Their design, however, does not lend itself to ► ~a 1..~~-.-:, ` sustainability. Windows with insulating glass typically come with only a 15 to 20 year warranty. When the sealant fails, the window will lose its insulating quality, the glass will fog, and the entire window may have to be replaced. Historic wood windows with a single pane of glass can be repaired with tools found at a local hardware store and can last up to 10 times longer than a replacement model. Homeowners should be aware that the payback period for restoring wood windows No, that's not dirt and grime you and installing quality storm windows is significantly shorter than installing replacement see on the upper sash of this vinyl windows. In sum, the term "replacement window" means just what it says-it will have window; it's fog between the two to be replaced again and again.. panes of insulating glass due to seal failure. An inclusive view of sustainability has to be taken when considering the "greenness" of a Photo courtesy of the author product. Restoration of older wood windows reduces both landfill waste and the produc- tion of the energy-consuming, synthetic materials found in many replacement windows. Moreover, hiring a local window restoration specialist to work on your windows helps sustain local economies as labor intensive, opposed to materials intensive, concept. Energy-Efficiency Much like sustainability, energy efficiency is an important factor in the "green" discus- sion, and is often the primary reason homeowners look to replace their windows. The generally erroneous notion is that older wood windows are not as energy efficient as today's double-glazed replacement models. In making their case, window replace- ment companies will often compare their product to an unrestored wood window with little or no weatherstripping and a poor (or no) storm window. With proper repair and maintenance, coupled with weather stripping and a quality storm window, a single- glazed historic wood window will have a comparable level of energy efficiency to that Jul -Aug 2009 Materials Mayhem of a double-glazed replacement window. Industry guidelines indicate that the addition of a storm window to an existing single-glazed window will reduce the energy loss - through the window area by approximately 50%. As replacement window manufactur- f ers will attest, the best insulation on a small scale is dead air space. The extra dead air space created with a sealed storm window (typically 2") means more insulation and in- creased energy efficiency. Replacement window dead air space between the double- glazing is only 1/16 to 1/32 of an inch. Although it is often argued that storm windows have a negative impact on the historic character of wood windows, an important point " to consider is that storm windows have been used for over 100 years. Storm windows are a fully-reversible alteration that protect the original fabric of the building and can i make the window assembly as energy-efficient as replacement windows. f It is important to note that infiltration of air, rather than heat loss through the glass, is { i the principal culprit affecting energy efficiency; it can account for as much as 50% of the total heat loss of a building. Moreover, most of the heat loss in an old house oc- curs in areas other than windows. Insulation in walls, attics, and between floors, and weather stripping around doors will help prevent loss of heat. Replacement window x- t manufacturers also often misquote U-values as the value through the center of the glass (the location of the best U-value) and not for the entire unit. A U-value is a rating A restored double-hung sash of energy efficiency for all the combined components of a window or door-the lower window with a quality storm the U-value, the greater the efficiency. An optional feature of replacement windows is window provides energy-efficiency y' and maintains historic character. low-e" (low emissivity) glass, a microscopically thin, virtually invisible, metal or metal- Image courtesy of the Cambridge lic oxide layer deposited dire ;tly on the surface of one or more of the panes of glass. r/isto.Ica! commiss;on. The low-e coating reduces tha infrared radiation from a warm pane of glass to a cooler pane, thereby lowering the U-factor of the window. The :game effect can be achieved with low-e storm windows and/or energy-saving windov~ film that can be applied di- rectly to single-glazed windows. The Bottom Line Preservationists have always maintained that the "greenest" building is the one that al- ready exists. When one considers the numerous reasons why the restoration and ap- propriate retrofitting of historic buildings is good for the environment, the case for keep- ing old windows grows stronger. The Federal Government has taken notice, too; the passing of the American Clean Energy and Security Act by Congress in June included the Retrofit for Energy and Environmental Performance (REEP) program, which will provide incentives for homeowners to make energy upgrades in older buildings while maintaining historic character. Does every old wood window qualify for a restoration job'? Certainly not. Excessive ro and deferred maintenance may require the installation of new windows. But homeown ers should not be so quick to buy in to the "toss-out-the-old-windows" claims by the win dow replacement industry if their existing windows have a few broken panes of glass o loose glazing. Restoration can be time-consuming and in some cases more expensiv( (depending on the quality of the replacement model), but is much more environmental!, responsible; and when considering the long payback periods of replacement windows it is the best long-term option for the property owner. By reaching out to property own ers and contractors, local preservation commissions can help them understand the there is a perfectly feasible alternative to achieve the same claims by the window re placement industry. Remember, it's not good because it's old; it's old because it's gooc NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS i?j Materials Mayhem BIBLIOGRAPHY Cluver, John. "Still No Substitute." Period Homes (November 2006). Fisette, Paul. "Understanding Energy-Efficient Windows." Fine Homebuilding 114 (1998). Klems, Joseph H. "Measured Winter Performance of Storm Windows." Lawrence Berkeley National Library (2002) <http://repositories.cdlib.org/ibnl/LBNL-51453/> Leeke, John. "In Defense of the Old." Smart Homeowner Online (March/April 2002) <http://www_smarthomeowner.com/articles/4448/> Lord, Noelle. "Embracing Energy Efficiency." Old House Journal (September/October 2007). Mattinson, Bill, Ross DePaola and Dariush Arasteh. "What Should I Do About My Windows?" Home Energy 19/4 (July/August 2004). Myers, John. "Preservation Brief 9: The Repair of Historic Wooden Windows." Techni- cal PreservationServices, U.S. Department of the Interior (1981) <http://www,nps.gov/ history/hps/tps/briefs/brief09.htm> National Trust for Historic Preservation. "Historic Wood Windows: a Tip Sheet from the National Trust for Historic Preservation." <http://www.preservationnation.org/about-us/regional-offices/northeast/additional- resources/2009-Revised-Window-Tip-Sheet. pdf> Piper, James. "Windows: Repair or Replace?" Building Operating Management Online (January 2004) <http:l/www.facilitiesnet.com/bom/article.asp?id=1547&keywords=> Sedovic, Walter and Jill H. Gotthelf. "The Right Thing: What are the Facts and the Myths of the Replace vs. Restore Historic Windows Debate?" Traditional Building (June 2008) Sedovic, Walter and Jill H. Gotthelf. "What Replacement Windows Can't Replace: The Real Cost of Removing Historic Windows." Association of Preservation Technology Bulletin: Journal of Preservation Technology 36:4 (2005). Shapiro, Andrew M. and Brad James. "Creating Windows of Energy-Saving Opportu- nity." Home Energy Magazine Online (September/October 1997) <http://homeenergy. org/archive/hem.dis.anl.gov/eehem/97/970908.html> Author's note: A lion's share of this article derives from the Cambridge, Massachusetts Historical Commission's window preservation guidelines, written in various phases during my tenure as a staff member for the Cambridge Historical Commission. t am grateful to the staff and Commission mem- bers who edited and revised numerous drafts before final adoption by the Commission in 2009. View the guidelines online at: www.cambridgema.gov/Historic/windowglines_final.pdf. Jul -Aug 2009 1~ Materials Mayhem SHOD! ME THE MONEY! FUNDAMENTALS OF GRANT WRITING Roxanne Eflin, NAPC Board of Directors and Owner, Preservation Planning Associates Sally DelGreco, President and cc-founder, De/Greco Strategic Partners ",lust get a grant!" How many times have you heard this from a commission member or well-meaning volunteer as THE answer to fund a preservation project or fill that gap in your budget? While grants, specifically Certified Local Government funded-grants, can and do provide a key resource for preservation commissions, they are not without pitfalls. Commissions that are the most successful with both grant acquisition and grant management have done their homework and view grants as part of a broader long-term strategy. •'::iy~ So, what exactly are "grants?" Grants are a mechanism for federal and >'1 state government, foundations, and corporations to invest money in the community. Grants are typically available for specific projects versus funding to support general operations and overhead. Typically, municipal- ities and 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations are eligible for grant funding. 1 Obtaining grants requires that you first seek out grant opportunities and then make a formal request-usually in the form of a written proposal - to the funder. Federal grant opportunities can be found online at www. grants.gov. This is a searchable database for all grant opportunities avail- able from federal agencies. Foundation and corporate grant opportunities can be found on national websites such as the Foundation Center-www. foundationcenter.org; or through your state's community foundation or philanthropy center. The most likely resource for state funds is your state historic preservation tr i office; however, don't rule out other state agencies, such as tourism, arts, " y. and education. Contact those agencies directly to determine how and UiN when they post available grant opportunities. x l Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) are a key source o! funding for downtown revitalization projects. Work with your local munici pality to apply for these grants. Transportation Enhancement (TE) activities offer funding opportunitie: to help expand transportation choices and enhance the transportatioi experience through 12 eligible TE activities related to surface trans orta !ion, including historic preservation. A $100,000 TE grant was used tc leverage city and private foundation grants to restore the 1803 Portlanc Observatory, Maine's newest National Historic Landmark. In Tucson, Ari zona, the City successfully matched a few different sources for projects including direct congressional appropriations to rehabilitate their histori The PPortland Day, June 14, Observatory Flag Flag Day, u railroad depot and develop a larger archaeological park with Transport Fla Day is the traditional opening day tion Enhancement funding. The Tucson-Pima County Historical Commission reviewe for observatory seasonal tours, plans for all projects in compliance with City regulations requiring review regardless of th and Greater Portland Landmarks location, and especially if the source of funds is federal. hosts a community celebration with free Observatory and walking tours, music and fun activities for Save America's Treasures grants have been awarded to over 1600 projects nationwic families. and internationally. Save America's Treasures is a national effort to protect "America Image by: Bill Nall NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE of-PRESERVATION COMMISSIONS 1 Materials Mayhem threatened cultural treasures, including historic structures, collections, works of art, maps and journals that document and illuminate the history and culture of the United States." The Preserve America matching-grant program provides planning funding to designat- ed Preserve America Communities to support preservation efforts through heritage tourism, education, and historic preservation plan- Wing. The City of Steamboat Springs, Colo- rado matched a $24,000 PA grant to conduct a survey of 70 downtown commercial buildings, resulting in four National Register nominations X and architectural guide book for walking tour purposes. National Trust for Historic Preservation Grant funds can be used for a wide variety of - preservation projects and have assisted thou- sands of innovative preservation projects that protect the continuity, diversity, and beauty of our communities. (See "NTHP Grant Funds" w The Alliance Review March/April 2009.) Nonprofit partnerships are a highly effective ; _ - way to acquire project-specific grant funding. , = ur - • The Lowell (Massachusetts) Historic - - - - Preservation Board helped found the Steamboat Springs. Colorado used Lowell Heritage Partnership, a 601(c)3 nonprofit organization created to provide a Preserve America grant to survey its historic downtown resulting in a charitable means to acquire and disburse funding for preservation projects in four National Register Lowell. nominations and an • The City of San Antonio's Historic and Design Review Commission received a architectural guide book $50,000 grant over three years-for survey work from their local nonprofit advo- Photo by: Al Cannistraro cacy partner, the San Antonio Conservation Society. A portion of the funds was used to purchase laptop computers and cameras and to hire temporary staff and interns to assist with the survey. • The Buxton-Hollis Historical Society acquired a modest state historic fund grant from the Maine Historic Preservation Commission to leverage a match from the Town of Buxton to hire professional preservation planning assistance necessary to guide an all-volunteer effort in conducting a town-wide reconnaissance-level survey of all buildings over 50 years old. Don't overlook Certified Local Government funding for capital projects. CLG grants are the bedrock of financial planning assistance for Historic Preservation Commissions but can also be used for actual restoration. The Town of York, Maine was awarded $22,139 in CLG funds, matched by $28,011 in local funds, to restore the windows and shutters on the National Register Town Hall, and to replace the furnace and storm win- dows. The Town of Topsham, Maine also used several CLG grants to restore the Na- tional Register Cathance Water Tower. (See "My Favorite Matches" The Alliance Review March/April 2009). Jul -Aug2009 Materials Mayhem Once you obtain the grant request, then what? 1. Read the proposal instructions FIRST. Never assume that just because the title of the funding opportunity sounds like a fit that it is. 2. Prepare a checklist of all of the required components. Funders often get overwhelmed by requests for funding and look for reasons to narrow down the pile of proposals. Forgetting to include a required attachment may just get your proposal sent to the circular file! 3. Be clear and specific about the problem you are trying to solve, how you are going to solve it and why you are the best organization to do the work. Don't assume the reviewer knows the value of hiFtoric buildings, complexity of restoration, or the need for preservation planning. 4. Beware of using jargon or acronyms. Don't assume that the reader under- stands what you do or is even aware you exist. Spell out abbreviations and explain language that is unique to your work. 5. Commit only to activities you can fulfill. Don't over promise. Funders don't expect you to save the world on their dime alone. Be specific about the need you are trying to address and be reasonable about how much of an impact you can make with the time and resources provided. 6. Time your work so you are finished a few days before the due date. If you are still writing your proposal right up until the last minute, you are more likely to omit key information or required components. Give yourself a deadline that is a day or two before the proposal gets submitted. Take a 24-hour break and then go back and review it cover to cover for completeness. You may be surprised to see what got left on the printer! 7. Stay within the page, margin and font size requirement. Yes, they mear it! Just because you have more to say than can fit in the number of pages re quired, do not be tempted to fudge the margins or add on extra pages that arE not requested. If you can't follow instructions, the (under may be concernec about your ability to implement a major project. 8. Read and edit you proposal in its entirety. This means read and review EV ERYTHING - not just the project narrative. Make sure the budget is accurate the table of contents matches the proposal and your 9. Have someone not familiar with your program read the proposal for clan ity. You may think you have made your point about the problem you are tryin to solve and how this is going to make a difference but will an outsider "get it` Ask a co-worker from a different department or a friend to read it and be brutal honest about how well they understand what you are trying to accomplish. 10. Submit the proposal on time! Funders have no sympathy for lost docurnent printers that break down or key people who could not be found to sign the cov, letter. Your proposal must be received by the funder by the due date set by th fonder or it will NOT get reviewed. Period. Once the proposal is submitted, it may take several weeks to several months to he back from the funder. If you proposal is rejected, don't take it too personally. Rejecti can mean several things: the funder received many more proposals than they can ac ally fund; your project may not align closely enough with their priorities; or the propo: did not meet their expectations. The best thing to do in the face of rejection is to cunt: the funder and ask why the proposal was rejected. Often times this is the best learn experience and can actually help astaNlish a relationship with the funder which rest in a successful proposal the next time around, NEVUS frown the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS Materials Mayhem If your proposal is successful, congratulations! 1. - Hiring Help - What to expect Volunteer grant writers with experience and time to donate to your effort are precious commodities, de- serving of recognition and, at a minimum, very good I coffee! You may find these people in your city's Parks + t 6 and Recreation department. Many municipalities, P-b' t 1 however, do not have the time, expertise or staffing to dedicate to grant writing. In this case, a freelance 1 "grant writer for hire" can be very helpful. Here a few b- 3 c-Y,~ tips to keep in mind if you are looking for outside help: • Hiring a grant writer does not let you or, your staff off the hook. The grant writer will -f- ` I, s - ► - (hopefully) take the lead on organizing the 4 - ' ' ,»Jy t_ proposal development process and do the ac- tual writing but they are depending on you for the data, program plan and photographs that are the core of any good proposal. Many COTl,TTUSSIUII_~ LiSG GLG • Grant writers get paid whether you get funded or not. Most grant writers grants to send members and staff consider taking a "cut" of the funding to be unethical. Grant writing is work and to Forum and to host CAMP. that work needs to be acknowledged and compensated appropriately. Photo courtesy ofNAPC • Your prospective grant writer should provide writing samples and refer- ences. Ask around for recommendations. Successful grant writers do most of their business via referrals. • Ask them about their experience working with your client population or within your geographic area. It is helpful-although not essential-that they are familiar with what you do and how you do it. Grants often need to be turned around quickly and you can lose valuable development time getting the grant writer up to speed. • Work with the grant writer to develop a work plan for completing and sub- mitting the proposal. Agree to products and deadlines-when will they submit a first draft to you? And when will you review it and return with edits and input? Finally, remember to thank and acknowledge the (under. Invite them to tour your project and/or provide them updates on your progress. Many grants require a final report with cost accounting, which is vitally important to provide on time. Best Sources for Grant funding: Certified Local Government and State Historic Fund grants Contact your State Historic Preservation Office Federal Transportation Enhancement Grants http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/te/index.htm Save America's Treasures http://www.saveamericastreasures.org/projall.htm Preserve America http:www.preserveamerica.gov/ Jul -Aug 2009 ~4 + alt- ' tJEADS 411 THE HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND: WHAT'S AT STAKE AND WHAT YOU CAN DO Marla Collum Editor's Note: The following article was written during the author's tenure with Preservation Action. We look forward to future contributions from Marla as she pursues her new career with the National Trust for Historic Preservation. In 1976, our country was celebrating its bicentennial, sparking patriotism and renewed interest in our heritage and historic resources. The preservation movement was able to harness this energy and lob- bied for an amendment to the National Historic Preservation Act, ultimately establishing the Historic Preservation Fund. The amendment created a dedicated funding source for preservation initiatives in every state. Funded through offshore oil lease reserves for over three decades, money is funneled through the National Park Service to State Historic Preservation Offices for a variety of preservation programs. The fund ultimately finds its way to local preservation efforts, including certified local govern- ments, preservation planning, survey programs, and more. (See "Follow the Money-. From Offshore Oil Leases to Your Community," The Alliance Review- March/April 2009.) According to the United States Treasury Department, the current estimated balance at the end of FY2009 will be $2.7 billion. Yes, BILLION with a "B." The fund has grown steadily over time, accruing offshore oil lease revenue, and $150 million is authorized to be spent each year on HPF programs. Only the annual appropriated amounts may be withdrawn. Technically, the $2.7 billion balance may not be used for any other purpose than to fund the nation's preservation program. Congress has largely ignored this commitment to America's heritage. Indeed, almost from the begin- ning, Congress has never lived up to its promise to adequately fund historic preservation. It is up to us to persuade and remind Congress of the merits of historic preservation-of its important role in the economic and environmental health, livability, and heritage of our communities. Without our support and attention, HPF programs are threatened and may well be eliminated due to underfunding. Since 2001, funding appropriated to the HPF has been reduced from $94 million to $71 million. The reduction has had a severe impact on State Historic Preservation Offices. Funding to SHPOs dropped nearly 30% between 2001 and 2003, and this reduction was maintained for years. This decline, coupled with unprecedented state budget cuts is proving catastrophic in many communities. President Obama's FY2010 budget proposes $46.5 million for SHPOs-up $4 million from FY2009, which would return SHPO funding to its 2001 level. Tribal Historic Preservation Offices (THPOs) are also suffering greatly from lack of adequate funding. The proposed FY 2010 budget calls for the THPOs to receive $8 million -up $1 million from FY2009. The THPO program began with 12 tribal governments, each receiving an average award of $79,875. In FY2009, 16 new THPOs were added to the existing 76 THPOs that sought funding in FY2009. While a $1 million proposed increase sounds like a success, that funding must be divided and shared by many more tribes than ever before. The economic stimulus package now providing funds for capital projects throughout the United States provided NO additional funding for the States or Tribes even though it is likely that many of the projects funded by the stimulus monies will require review by the Tribal and State Historic Preservation Offices. Funds appropriated for Hurricane recovery in 2006 did contain additional funds needed by those af- fected states to ramp up their ability to carry out the required project reviews. q Jul - Aug 2009 l Materials Mayhem What is at stake? Under-funding seriously jeopardizes the federal preservation program and by extension State and local preservation efforts. As dollars and staff sizes shrink in SHPOs and THPOs, difficult choices must be made. There may be no alternative but to realign priorities and eliminate discretionary programs-public education, support for private sector non-profits, site visits to communities, marketing the rehabilitation tax credit-in order to have sufficient resources to address the activities for which SHPOs have no discretion: responding to rehabilitation tax credit applications and commenting on Section 108 cases. Further, HPF reductions also lengthen response times for such reviews-the work load remains constant while the num- ber of qualified staff declines. These examples-and there are many more-illustrate the debilitating consequences of underfunding and serve to suggest the incredible advances that full funding could secure. At a time when Americans, like never before, are searching to understand and celebrate the hallmarks of our democracy and our unique American experience, we have to hold the federal government to its responsibilities put into law decades ago. There is much that YOU can do. Have you contacted your legislator lately? Each year preservationists are called upon to defend the federal historic preservation program and this year is certainly no exception. We are demanded to explain the value and importance of this program that is constantly under attack-or simply misunderstood. Recent feedback from our March 2009 Lobby Day tells us that there are still misconceptions that exist sur- rounding the HPF. We must show the best and worst case scenarios-what has the program allowed to oc- cur? What progress has been made? What might have been destroyed had it not been for the programs that the fund enables? Preservation funding is continually pitted against numerous other worthwhile endeavors. We must continually educate our members of Congress and their staff about HPF programs and its dedi- cated fund. This funding and program is not a so-called "earmark." The annual appropriation withdraws a small amount from a very large fund of existing money that cannot by law be used for any other purpose. Our perennial "asks" come directly from this fund. There is no "offset" that must be designated. This money is not being ripped away from another worthy cause or recipient. Tell them about the important work that the HPF supports in THEIR district. There is perhaps no better illustration of the effectiveness of the HPF than local examples of the HPF at work. Every district has them-make sure your legislator is supplied with images, facts, and figures. HPF-funded programs have established a successful set of incentives, regulations, and assistance that fos- ter local decision making and direct private investment to maximize the viability of existing resources. Many activities are made possible by the HPF, but their effectiveness is increasingly compromised by staff layoffs, lack of funds for survey and documentation work, and slow turnaround times for reviews and certifications. Every district has a success story. What's yours? Let's put a face to preservation and work together to keep our politicians committed to America's heritage and history. Share your story with NAPC (email: napcC uga.edu) and Preservation Action (email: maiic@i preservationaction.org) so we can be armed with the best examples of preservation at work. The success in your community gives credibility to our cause, inspires others, and makes us better advocates for preservation. Specific examples of how these programs work in your community, and illustrations of the tremendous need for such programs will help reinforce the importance of adequate, increased funding for the States Tribes, and territories through the Historic Preservation Fund. NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE ofPRESERVATION COMMISSIONS a0 Going Green M ULTI-DISC1PLINARY r- - TEAM OF EXPERTS ISSUES POCANTICO PROCLAMATION ON SUSTAINABILITY AND . t HISTORIC PRESERVATION We are pleased to announce the release of the Pocantico Proclamation, for Sustainability and Historic Preservation. This document is the result of the Pocantico Symposium held in November 2008. Thanks to the generous support of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, 30 preservationists, architects, green builders and energy experts, including representatives from NAPC, gathered at Pocantico Conference Center in Tarrytown, New York for a retreat hosted by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Friends of the National Center for Preservation Training and Technology. The group met to discuss the future of historic preservation in light of global warming, and specifi- cally the implications of climate change for preservation policy. After two days of intense discus- sions,.the group developed the core of the Pocantico Proclamation for Sustainability and Historic Preservation . This document outlines six preservation-based principles to sustain our built and natural environment as well as action steps in which the preservation community should engage. POCANTICO PROCLAMATION on Sustainability and Historic Preservation Premise The historic preservation community has a deep tradition of stewardship for our built environment, emerging as leaders in sustainable practices. Consistent with this tradition, historic preservation practitioners resolve to face head-on the global human-caused ecological crises that threaten our built and natural resources. Historic preservation must play a central role in efforts to make the built environment more sustainable. To this end, we urge all policy makers to recognize the fol- lowing.- 1. The Climate Change Imperative - Human activity has increased and accelerated global warming putting the environment at risk. It is imperative that we immediately and significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions to begin reversing extreme cli- mate change patterns within a generation. 2. The Economic Imperative - Our current economy is based upon unsustainable con- sumption and an overreliance on finite resources. A new green economy must rest upon a conservation-based foundation to manage natural and cultural resources in a sustainable and economically beneficial manner. 3. The Equity Imperative - In recent years, economic inequalities between rich and poor have grown in the United States and abroad. The disproportionate levels of resource consumption and global pollution are unsustainable. Our consumption patterns must be altered to foster social equity, cultural diversity, and survival of all species. No v-Dec 2008 07-( Going Green The Pocantico Principles on Sustainability and Historic Preservation Therefore, in order to address the three above imperatives, we advocate the following: 1. FOSTER a Culture of Reuse Maximizing the life cycle of all resources through conservation is a fundamental condition of sustainability. The most sustainable building, community or landscape is often the one that already exists. Lessons learned from historic preservation are transferable to the en- tire existing built and landscaped environment. 2. REINVEST at a Community Scale It is not sufficient to address sustainability on a piecemeal basis through individual build- ing projects. We must consider the larger context of the built environment: our communi- ties. Reinvestment in existing, more sustainable neighborhoods - especially our older and historic ones - saves resources and promotes socially, culturally, and economically rich communities. 3. VALUE Heritage The design of older buildings, landscapes, and communities should inform future building practices. While new green building technology offers promise for reducing the environ- mental harms caused by new construction, traditional building practices provide a wealtl- of sustainable design solutions that are premised on sensitivity to local conditions, carefu siting and planning, and longterm durability, all of which provide essential models for the future. 4. CAPITALIZE on the Potential of the Green Economy Preservation economics provide a powerful model for shifting away from a consumption based and energy-inefficient economy. Reinvestment in our existing built environmen must become an indispensible part of America's new green economy. Per dollar spen rehabilitation activities create more new jobs than new construction. 5. REALIGN Historic Preservation Policies with Sustainability Today's challenges require that historic preservation move beyond maintaining or recover ing a frozen view of the past. Historic preservation must contribute to the transformation of communities and the establishment of a sustainable, equitable, and verdant world b'. re-evaluating historic preservation practices and policies, and making changes where ap propriate. Next Steps Consequently, we, the historic preservation community, recognize the environmental, eca nomic, and social challenges that face us and call for policies that will result in revising ou present course. We stand ready to offer an example for sustainability, while further challengin, preservationists to more fully accommodate sustainable practices. We call for our leaders an, fellow citizens to join us in taking immediate action. The Pocantico Proclamation on Sustainability and Historic Preservation was written by panic pants in the Pocantico Symposium: `Sustainability and Historic Preservation Making Polio November 5-7, 2008' based on materials developed at this symposium and the discussion that took place there. It reflects the views of the authors and not necessarily those of the Rocl efeller Brothers Fund. NEWS from the NATIONAL ALLIANCE of PRESERVATION COMMISSIONS a~7- Going Green Call for Nominations/Applications The National Alliance of Preservation Commissions (NAPC) is soliciting Nominations/Applications for member- ship on its Board of Directors. The Board is comprised of present and former members and staff of local his- toric preservation/landmark commissions and architectural review boards throughout the United States. These individuals are NAPC's direct link to the national network of more than 3,000 preservation commissions. The NAPC is a private, non-profit 501(C) (3) corporation established in 1983 and is dedicated to helping build strong preservation programs through education, advocacy, and training. The NAPC is committed to having an ethnically, culturally, geographically, and professionally diverse board to meet the needs and challenges fac- ing local commissions in the 21 st century. The organization draws from the expertise, experience, and energy of its board members to provide timely and meaningful technical support and information to local preserva- tion stakeholders. Areas of expertise currently needed include organizational development, preservation law, fundraising, and public relations/marketing. Board members are expected to be individual members of NAPC and make financial contributions to the organization. Participate in membership development and fundraising activities, as well as actively serve on committees and attend board meetings. The NAPC provides non-profit directors and officers liability insurance for members of its Board of Directors. Please forward this announcement to individuals within your state that meet the above criteria. The organiza- tion's nominating committee will evaluate Nominations/Applications. The committee's recommendations will be made and acted upon at NAPC's meeting in October in Nashville, Tennessee in conjunction with the National Historic Preservation Conference. Nominations/Applications must be postmarked no later than 1 September 2009 to be considered. Please submit Nominations/Applications to: NAPC NominationslApplications P.O. Box 1605 Athens, GA 30606 nape@uga.edu Nomination Requirements • NominationslApplications must be postmarked no later than 9 September 2009 to be considered. • Incomplete NominationslApplications will not be considered. Nominations/Applications must include the following: Cover letter stating the following- • Name, occupation, address, phone, fax and e-mail. • The population of community over which your commission has jurisdiction. • The name of your commission and the capacity in which you serve it and dates of service including when your current term expires if applicable. • A brief statement describing your interest in serving on the Board of Directors. Current Resume or Curriculum Vitae containing at least the following information. • Academic background-schools attended, degrees earned and dates. • Any professional certifications. • Professional experience. • List any awards and/or publications you have received/written. Nov-Dec 2005