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5A - Update Memo • January 7"', 2009 TO: Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board FR01~1: James Hewat, Chris Meschuk SUBJECT: Update Memo Revisions to Enforcement Provisions in Historic Preservation Ordinance The City Attorney's Office has drafted revisions (Attachment A) to the ordinance providing for changes to the criminal penalties that allow for the ability to impose up to the maximum penalty for each day out-of-compliance. Please review the revised ordinance (new language underscored) anal be prepared to comment. The second potential change to the ordinance would provide for an administrative remedy (ies) for violations which may include the judge as a hearing officer given the ability to impose restrictions on future development on a property where a violation has occurred. The City Attorney's Office is currently at work on proposed administrative remedies and draft language will be brought to the Board separately. Once the criminal and administrative penalties have been preliminarily reviewed and comment on by the Board, they will be brought to the Landmarks Board for formal review and recommendation and subsequently to the City Counci] for adoption, if appropriate. Post WW-II Residential Subdivision Survey and Context `l'l~e fieldwork for the reconnaissance survey has been completed with 4245 houses being recorded. Data entry of the information is currently and will be completed by the end of December. The reconnaissance survey information will be used to select the 110 examples that will be intensively surveyed. Mapleton School Staff has been attending meetings for the Early Childhood Education center proposed for the school. Proposed changes include construction of an elevatorlstair tower on the south elevation and the addition of approximately 40 parking spaces. City Council has dedicated $54,000 to the project from the Educational Excise Tax if the project moves forward. The Mapleton Coalition will present a concept plan to the Landmarks design review committee early in the new-year. In April 2008, the coalition will present to the Boulder Valley School Board, with view to securing a long tezm lease on the building. Valmont Mill Staff is working on a Colorado Historical Society condition assessment grant application. 2009 CLG Grant Application Update at meeting. New and Pending Land Use Review Applications St. Gertrude's Academy addition 1535 Spruce Street (new &Town venue) Planning Board Calendar See attached. I Stay-of-Demolition Status Summary, January 7"', 2009 Date of Date Stay Date of Address Construction Int osed E iration Current Status l-lave met with applicant to discuss alternatives. 607 forest c.1937 12/3/2008 04/06/2009 Applicant considers Avenue demolition only reasonable alternative to redeveloping ro ert . Landmark Applications Update: • 301 S Kalmia Avenue, landmark designation application submitted 9/ 4 /08 as a condition of Annexation & Site Review approval. • 800 Arapahoe Avenue: Awaiting City Council review pending a subdivision application. Grant contract executed. Continuance by board expires 04/30/09 • 1215 Cedar Street -Washington School: Postponed pending resolution of site planning issues. • Willard House, 125 Bellevue Drive, postponed until legal issues resolved • 2303 Mapleton/2316 23rd St designated as individual landmarks December 16d', 2008 Attachments: A. Draft Ordinance Amending Section 9-11-12, B.R.C. Regarding Enforcement and Penalties, and Setting Forth Related Details. B. Planning Board Calendar C. Cultural Resources of Valmont Park, Boulder County Colorado. Prepared by Peter J. Gleichman, 1997 v2 Attachment A ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 9-11-12, B.R.C. 1981, REGARDING ENFORCEMENT AND I'ENAI,TIES, AND SETTING FORTH RELATED DETAILS. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL Or TI-IE CITY OF BOULDER, COLORADO: Section 1. Section 9-11-12, B.R.C. 1981, is amended to add a new subsection (e) as follows: St-11-12 Landmark Alteration Certificate Required. (a} No person shall carry out or permit to be carried out on a designated landmark site, on a designated feature, or in a designated historic district any of the following without first obtaining a landmark alteration certificate: (1) New construction, alteration, relocation, or demolition of any building; (2) New construction, alteration, zelocation, or demolition of any designated feature; (3} New construction, alteration, relocation or demolition of any fence or other landscape features, including, without limitation, any deck, patio, wall, beam, garden structure, water feature, exterior lighting, curb cut, driveway, replacement of sod with a hard surface, or any landscaping that has the potential for damaging buildings or designated features; and Any activity requiring a building perrr?it pursuant to this code, except for buildin.~; permits required for interior work on a building. (b) In addition to the requireanents set forth in subsection (a) of this section, applicants must also obtain all necessary permits for the proposed work under this chapter as well as any other permits required by this code or other ordinance of the city. (c) The planning department shall maintain a current record of all designated landmark sites and historic districts and pending designations. If the building division receives an application for a permit to carry out any new construction, alteration, relocation, or demolition of a building or other designated feature on a landmark site or in a historic district or in an area for which designation proceedings are pending, the building division shall promptly forward such permit application to the planning department. (d) The city manager shall review any permit application the manager receives to determine whether a~landmark alteration certificate for the work proposed in the permit application has K:\plhd\ord to add each 24 hrs scp violation to code-488.doc been issued and whether the permit application conforms to the certificate. If a certificate has been issued on the permit application and the proposed work conforms thereto, the manager shall refer the permit application to the building division, which shall process it without further reference to this chapter. If no certificate has been issued, or if in the sole judgment of the manager the permit application does not conform to the certificate, the manager shall disapprove the permit application and shall not issue it until a certificate has been issued and the permit application conforms thereto. (el It shall be a separate violation of subsections al or ( for each 24~iir~eiod dtuin~ wl~tel~ t condition created in violation of this section ex is until X11 a landmark alteration certificate is obtaii l #~2' the c2nstruction, alteration, relocation or demolition performed: or (21 the work nerfQnned in violati o this section i`s restored tQth_e condition fliat existed prior to the violation and in accordance with all applicable provisions of this code. Section 2. This ordinance is necessary to protect the public health, safety, and welfare of the residents of the city, and covers matters of local concern. Section 3. The city council deems it appropriate that this ordinance be published by title only and orders that copies of this ordinance be made available in the office of the city cl.ezk for public inspection and acquisition. 1NTR.ODi~CED, READ ON FIRST READING, AND ORDERED PUBLISHED BY TITLE ONLY this day of , 20~. Mayor Attest: City Clerk on behalf of the Director of Finance and Record K:\plhd\ord to add each 24 hrs sep violation to code-488.doc ~ _ READ ON SECOND READING, PASSED, ADOPTED, AND ORDERED PUBLISHED BY TITLE ONLY this day of , 20_. Mayor Attest: City Clerk on behalf of the Director of Finance and Record K:\plhd\ord to add each 24 hrs sep violation to code-488.doc Attachment I3 December 2 0 0 8 Amended Qecember 19, 2008 Last Planning Board mee0ng December 18, 2008 1 2 3 4 S 6 CC M°eanq, fi pm cr. LB, 6 p.m. In CC PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC „°"w, T:~ r.°" r<,...~ ",.`~',`~'`rm M) PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. In 'TMP update (Chris MJ roT rni [h,,;,s NUr~ (c;wc, Z) Olmsted 'Boulder Mobile Manor (Kad ~T~iCw G4W r°t iw TwFi,.p Gnlw (E:nin M) ) ^om:r.> cay.y:waq,°w.s(Else,°M 1 Andrew Request for Leave - ~er :h~,-...drn°r.mra„iowruc,(M.,~.~w~a; Matters '1Y'elbrl D=~u~via)' ~'w~~w T,..+-lAa ,:rc,< l:~lio ( ) A Sophr;r to Chair 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 CC SS, 6 p.m. in CC BOZA, 5 p.m- in CC CANCELLED 1 IS 16 17 IS 19 20 CC Meeting, 6 p.m. In CC PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. in PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC '29th Streot Residential Sate '2nd Reading 2376 23rd Street and 2303 Olmsted h4apteton Ave. Landmark (James H.) RH 2 Zone Public Meeting, West Sr. Review (Kad G.} '2nd Reading Amendment to Title 10 far Ctr., Creekside Room, 6-8 p.m. Recommendation on potential LLC's next steps in the analysis of potentat future development for '2020 Upland Annexaticns (Charles F.) University Hill (Chadic Z.) 'Cor•~patibte Development Update (Julie J J - MaL'ers K Becker absent 2 22 23 24 25 26 27 CHRISTMAS EVE HOLIDAY (1I2 DAY) CHRISTMAS DAY HOLIDAY 2 29 30 31 Nov 2008 Tan 2009 LB Meeting, 1:30-3:30 p.m., In CC NEW YEARS EVE HOLIDAY (1(2 DAY) s:~t~rwTr•s sM'rwTrs 1 1 ? 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4 5 6 7 8 9 IU 9 10 I1 12 13 14 15 11 12 13 14 [5 16 17 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 18 19 20 2l 22 23 24 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 • 30 January 2 0 09 Amended December 19, 2008 Last Planning Board meeting December 18, 2008 D~e 2008 F~b 2tltlr~ 1 2 3 S M W T P S S M 'f t6' T r 5 New Years Day!!! 1 2 3 4 5 G 1 2 3 4 5 G 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 8 9 10 ]1 t2 13 t4 l4 15 l6 17 18 19 20 IS 1G 17 18 19 20 21 21 22 23 24 25 2G 27 22 23 24 25 2G 27 28 28 29 30 31. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 LB, 6 p.m. in CC PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. in 'Western Disposal/Brickyard Olmsted Annexation Concept Plan (Charles F.) Wetlands Public Meettng, 5.7 p.m, in Muni Lobby 'Washington Village 2 Site Review (Karl G.) 1 12 13 14 IS 16 17 Compatible CC Special Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC DDAB, 4 p.m. in Muni Lobby Compatible Development Developme Workshop West Senior 5.6 p. m. `~r Academy Process (Susan R.) Compatible Development Workshop Center 5:30-6 p.m. Open Open Boulder Hlgh School 5:30.6 p.m. House/ 6-8 p.m. Workshop House 'Call-up of 1580 Canyon Sile Reivew (Kad Open Housel 6-8 p.m. Workshop Muni C'') Lobby/ 6.8 'Call-up of Walgreens (Elaine M.) p.m. Presentatlc Council 1 19 20 21 22 23 24 Martin CC Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC Compatible Developmont Workshop PB MeeUng, 5 p.m. In CC LLther West Senior Center 5:30-6 p.m. Open '1st reading 1777 Broadway, Muni. Bldg. House! 6-8 p.m, Workshop (if needed) 'Orchard Grove 5 acre options King Jr. Landmark (Chris M.) (Elaine M.) Holiday •Rrcommendation on potential next steps in 'Recornmondalion on the analysis of potental future development PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. in wetlands mitigation policy and for University Hill (Charlie Z.) Olmsted use chart (Bev J.) 'NAP Zone District Ordinance (Louise G.) 2 26 27 28 29 30 31 CC SS, 6 p.m, in CC `CommerciaUResidential Green Building Code Updatu Public meeting (tire and fnc;alion TBD) February 2009 emended December 19, 2008 Last PLrnniny Board rneeGrg December 18, 2008 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 CC Meeting, 6 p.m. In CC LB, 6 p.m. in CC PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC '1st Reading Boulder Mobile Maror Spec. PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. in '800 Arapahoe Special Ord. Ordinance (Karl G.) Olmsted (Elaine M.) `1st Reading 896 171h Street (Chris M.) 'Call-up 1235 Mariposa (Katie 'tst Reading Weslem Disposal Annexation K.) (Charles F.) '2nd reading 1777 Broadway, Muni. Bldg. Landmark (Chris M.) 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 CC SS, 6 p.m. In CC 'CommerciaVResidenGal Green Building 'Joint Plannin Board/ Ci Council scud Code Update Public meeting (time and 9 4' Y location TBD) session on the Boulder Transit Vllege (BN) siie concepts? DDAB, 4 p.m. in Muni Lobby Sesquicentennial celebration 5:30-9 p.m 1 16 17 18 19 20 21 Presidents CC Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. in PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC Holida `1st reading 1918 1/2 Pearl Landmark Olmsted 'Fire Master Pian (Chris M.) Y (Chris M.) 'Prepare for Joint Study '1st reading of 800 Arapahoe Landmark & Session (Susan R.) Special Ord. (Chris M. and Elaine M.) '1st reading NAP (Louise G.) 'Direction on Wetlands Ordimance changes (Bev J.) 'Orchard Grove 5 aae options (Elains M.) '2nd Reading 896 17th Slroet (Chris M.) 2 23 24 25 26 27 28 CC SS, 6 p.m. in CC PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC 'Joint PB/CC Study Session CompaG6lo 'Recommendation on Development (joint?) (Julie J.) Compatible Dev. (Julie J.) Ian 2009 Mar 2009 S M 7' W '1' F S S M 'C W "C 1' S 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 4 5 G 7 S 9 10 8 9 10 1! 12 13 14 I1 ]2 13 14 IS 16 17 IS 1G 17 18 19 20 21 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 7.G 27 28 25 2G 27 28 29 30 3l 29 30 31 March 2009 Arrendcd December 19, 2008 I-ast F'1~3nmag I3o,ud rneeling Drcernbor'9, 200f3 1 2 3 4 S 6 7 CC Meeting, 6 p.m. In CC LB, 8 p.m. in CC PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC '2nd reading 1918 1/2 Pearl Landmark PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. in 'Chango to Height Mod. Slds. (Chris M.) Olmsted (Brian H.) '2nd Reading Boulder MotNle Manor Spacial Ord.(Kad G.) `Direction on Compatible Dev. (Julie JJ `2r.d Reading Western Disposal Annexation (Charles f 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 CCSS,6p.m.inCC 'Join) Planning Board! City Council study session on the Boulder Transit Village (BN) site concepts? 1 16 17 18 19 20 21 CC MaeUng, 6 p.m. in CC DDAB, 4 p.m. in Munl Lobby PB Meeting, 6 p.m. in CC '2nd reading of 800 Arapahoe Landmark & PB Agenda Meeting, 4 p.m. In Spacial Ord. (Chris M. and Elaine M.) Olmsted '2nd roading NAP (Louise G.) 'Change to Height Mod. Stds. (Brian li.) '2nd Reading Wostem Disposal Annexation (Charles F.) 2 23 24 25 26 27 28 CC SS, 8 p.m. in CC 2 30 31 Feb 2009 Apr 2009 CC SS, 6 p.m. In CC S M T W T F S S M T 1V 1' F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 G 7 8 9 10 II IS lG 17 I8 14 20 21 12 13 l4 l5 16 17 IS 22 23 24 25 2G 27 23 l9 20 21 22 23 2.4 25 2G 27 28 29 30 1 Attachment C NATIVE C UL fiURAL SERVICES CULTURAL RESOURCES OF vALMONT PARK - BOULDER COUNTY, COLORADO by . Peter J. Gleichman~ Prepared For: • . - I ;E% j ~ ~ ` Shapins .Associates, Inc. 1245 Pearl St., Suite 201 ( ~ Boulder, Colorado 80302 ir• / ~ , Prepared By: Native Cultural Services ' 4484 Hamilton Court Boulder, Colorado 80303 May 7, 1997 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a cultural resource investigation conducted by Native Cultural Services of the proposed Valmont Park. The study was conducted at the request of Shapins Associates, Inc., on behalf of the City of Boulder Department of Parks and Recreation, to assist in planning for the proposed park. The intent of the cultural resource study was to locate and document cultural properties within the proposed park, and assess their significance, so that appropriate management decisions may be made regarding their protection and interpretation. The study area includes approximately 128 acres, including 28 acres of the existing City Yards. It includes the SW; of the SE 4, and the W Z of the SE a of the SE a of Section 21; and the NE a of the NW 47 the NW a of the NE 4 / and portions of the SW~, of the NE ; of Section 28, in Township iN, Range 71W, of the 6th PM. The project area is located on the USGS Boulder 7.5' topographic quadrangle map, photorevised in 1979 (Figure 1). The field investigations were performed by Peter Gleichman, Phil Rice, and Hilary Reynolds-Burton. Peter Gleichman served as Principle Investigator. Phil Rice documented the architecture and construction of standing buildings. Ted Gleichman assisted with archival research and compiling historic data. Field notes are on file at the offices of Native Cultural Services. No artifacts were collected during this study. our thanks to Mr. Fettig, Mr. Helgoth, Dick Lyman, Mr. Neugebauer, KC Schneider, Dock Teegarden, Bruce and Mildred Vaughn, and Everett Wiehe for sharing their knowledge of the history of the area. Our thanks to Jody Corruccini, Wendy Hall, and Mary Jo Reitsema of the Carnegie Branch Library for Local History, for their assistance with archival research. EXISTING DATA AND LITERA.TiTRE REVIEW The known culture history of the general area is summarized in the overviews produced by the Colorado Historical Society for the eastern plains by Eighmy (1984) and Mehls (1984). The history of the Boulder area is presented by Fetter (1983), Schooland (1980), Smith (1981), and Dyni (1989). A file search conducted at the Colorado Historical Society's Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation indicated that no previous surveys had been conducted within the study area. Two sites have been previously recorded in the area: The Union Pacific Railroad (5BL469), and a farm house at 5098 Valmont Road (5BL5548). Neither is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places. ...r-. .',n i I ~J ~ 5195 . t •1 • JAY.. ~ ~ ROAD ~ , I • I SNO 517 ~ \ 52 i'i ~ .a l' Nl7ER0~~'" v,. p • 5250 0 W r+~lk .r; ~z ~ ail Ilo ~ 7• n ~ ~ t° O'll u 4 2II4 ~u 1 u PI ~ Viaw „ ~ u u ~ _ / ~ - ~ ~ ~ 119 ~ ke.,, ~ i ~ ~.~1d°'!~^'y., ~`SS _ • ~ 6 5288 p:: - t I ~ ni~~pal 9~• ~~r-~_ _ . 4u , ~ I irpor~,~ 16°~~i ! "~;ul, F ' • Y • ' - . •.r •1 • \ _ - I I ~.G` to = , - t- _ - 5BL68 2 L6gg0 ':~~a • _ `Q~-;(' ~ 'lye • • i '~^5250 ti J nil/~'.:~.r~i~^ - ~ r »-~^'a~.r.~l~~{ ! t • SBL6884 I ° ~~~Ill~:%~~ ~'~a3~~~,~~'ll l I ry y .t#~T~~ R O ~-~'cl ~IIi"I~_~,"~~.::'v~11VJ f'%~f ~4~1 ~ ~ ~ '•.,~I °I ° 5BL6883 :;.=a~--= Ttaa~t ~y r rl-- 1 tl ~ u ~ ~~Jtk' RIB ~ ~ j0 Jn2f ' I I / o \ \ ~ n 1/ SBL5548 /I ri~.l~da~c:J ~ _ a S 1 11. i - _ _ _ ~ e% STUDY AREA IL ~ '.C ~t:~~~ i ~r. - SBL6881 c7 ~ c~:="';`~ ~ ~ ~ ` r _ *a"'~ _ ~ ~ i ~ wra ET I ; . V 11 : Boulder ~ /Junction I Syr ,id I\j~~ ~ I _ FIGURE 1 - Valmont Park Cultural Resources Study Area. USGS 7.5' Niwot Quad, 1967/pr1979. Sections 21 & 28, T1N, R70W, 6thPM. r • OBJECTIVES AND METHODS The primary objectives of the study were to provide Shapins Associates and the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department with an inventory of cultural properties, to assess the significance of any sites located, and to produce recommendations on how to avoid adverse impacts to significant cultural resources from development of the park. Another objective was to assess the ability of the cultural landscape as a whole, or of individual cultural properties, to convey their historic association and their potential for interpretation through signs or brochures. In order to meet these objectives, cultural resources were defined and documented in the field. It was known that the proposed Valmont Park area contained several historic farm buildings, as well as recent or modern buildings. Two historic irrigation ditches traverse the area, as did the Union Pacific Railroad. Substantial portions of the study area's surface are covered by recent materials, such as junked cars at the Valmont Auto Parts parcel and modern buildings on the Boulder Valley Poultry Farm and at the City Yards. Other parcels have been recently cleaned up, with buildings and debris removed. Some of the land is in pasture. The long term historic agricultural and industrial use of the land results in the study area having a very low potential for containing aboriginal cultural resources. The extensive presence of recent materials coupled with the intentional cleanup of debris indicate that an intensive pedestrian survey of the area would be futile. Accordingly, a reconnaissance level survey was completed, to insure that all historic buildings and structures were located and documented. Historic buildings and structures are defined as those over 50 years old. These cultural properties were recorded using State of Colorado Cultural Resource Survey forms supplied by the Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation of the Colorado Historical Society (OAHP). A Management Data Form was completed for each historic property, and Historic Architecture Building/Structure Forms were filled out for standing buildings. A sketch map was completed for each site, and black and white photographs were taken of each building. Each cultural property was given a Smithsonian number (SBL...), assigned by OAHP. Historic research was conducted regarding the sites, involving interviews with persons knowledgeable about the history of the area and the sites, and archival research at the Boulder County Courthouse and the Carnegie Branch Library for Local History. The research was to ascertain details about dates of construction, persons associated with each cultural property, and the historical associations of each property. i3 RESULTS The study area contains five historic farm habitations, and segments of two historic irrigation ditches. The Union Pacific Railroad (formerly the Boulder Valley RR) used to cross the study area. The Inland Oil Company refinery also used to be in the study area, but no trace of it is extant. This study does not include a complete chain of ownership for the farm sites. Our research does indicate who was living at the farms at the time the extant historic buildings were constructed, and the sites have been named for those families. The historic farm sites include the Harper Farm at 4948 Valmont Road, currently owned and occupied by Mr. Helgoth of Valmont Auto Parts; the Roney Farm with two dortticiles - 5098 Valmont Road and 5172 Valmont Road; the Platt Farm at 5227 Valmont Road; and the Gilliam Farm at 5333 Valmont Road. One of the Roney houses, at 5098 Valmont Road, was previously recorded as site 5BL5548. While the City of Boulder owns the land, this house is not owned by the city, and is slated to be moved. It is thus not considered farther in this study. These cultural properties are discussed in an overview of their historic context by relating them to specific historic themes described below. Following that are site descriptions with a description of the physical manifestations of each cultural f property ,and detailed ,historic data regarding the property. The historic data for each site is primarily from census records, obituaries, newspaper articles, and oral histories. Additional information is present on the Colorado Cultural Resource Survey forms, a detached appendix to this report. HISTORIC CONTEXT AND OVERVIEW The Boulder Historic Context defines a series of historic themes which provide a framework for studying and understanding the history of the Boulder`Valley (Friedman 1989). The history of the Valmont Park area relates to the themes of Agriculture; Mining, Minerals & Extractive Industries; Water Resources; and Transportation. AGRICULTURE & WATER RESOURCES: -Patents to land in and around the area were issued between 1864 and 1880. Pioneers like Thomas Graham; James, Merritt and Frank Rhodes; and Thomas Jones came as miners or the family of miners, but within a few years had homesteaded farms or claimed land in this area of the Boulder Valley. Like others attracted by the gold rush, some had prospered at mining and retired to other interests, and some may have given up mining in frustration and returned to farming. Thomas J. (Tommy) Jones, for example, must not have attempted mining for very 1-t long - he identifies himself as a miner living in Boulder in 1860, but had claimed 150 acres of land along the south line of Section 22 (just east of the study area) in the fall of 1859 {McDowell and Ostwald 1993), and was living near Valmont Butte by late 1860. The pioneers in this area were part of the community of Valmont. Indeed, Tommy Jones built the first building in Valmont in 1860, a hotel and stage stop. The original structure was a one room log cabin, but this was expanded into a large vertical plank balloon frame building. Ernest Pease described it about 1870 as a "sort of . public house or Inn, with large stables fvr transients." (Pease 1933:28). The stage stop served the Overland Stage system, and according to Schooland, was on the "cut-off stage and wagon road from Ft. St. Vrain, via Burlington, to Boulder, and the Gregory Canyon road to Central" {1980:138). The original log Tommy_Jones Stage Stop still exists, within the standing portion of the vertical plank hotel, part of which is in ruins (Gleichman 1995, Rice 1995}. They are located about z mile east of the study area. Valmont was platted as a town in 1865. It was a farm community, and for a few years its growth surpassed Boulder's and it was a rival town. The Valmont Bulletin, 1866, was Boulder County's first newspaper. Valmont didn't continue to grow much after 1870, however (Dyni 1989:27,28). Development of water resources in this area is directly associated with agriculture. The construction of the North Boulder Farmers Ditch by 1862 and the Boulder and Left Hand Ditch by 1873 would allow irrigation, increasing the security of raising crops. The availability of irrigation water was undoubtedly important to early and continued farming in the area they traverse, north of Valmont Road. The area south of Valmont Road reportedly has a high water table, and some farms may have utilized runoff and well water in addition to or rather than ditch water. These homesteaders probably initially lived in log cabins, sod houses, or combinations of log, stone and sod houses. Rough sawn lumber would have been available by at least the early 1880s. No traces of the first pioneer houses are currently .visible in the Park area. The first families owning or occupying the land did not stay long. By the turn of the century and shortly thereafter new names take possession of the land. After working in the Niwot Mine in Ward, James Roney moved his family to the Valmont Park area by 1900. Robert Emmett Rea, who worked with James Roney at the Niwot Mine in 1890 also bought land in the study area, but apparently did not build a house or live there long. James Roney's sons, Robert and John, lived in separate houses on the Roney land and farmed for more then 50 years. James and Lucy Platt established a farm north of Valmont Road. Both were from farm families. James' father and uncle had brought their families from Iowa to the Valmont area to farm. By 1910-1913 the Harpers were farming and living in the study area. Slightly later, by 1921, Arthur Gilliam was farming and living in the area. The farm houses associated with these people still exist in the study area. Agriculture continued in the study area in recent time with the establishment of the Boulder Valley Poultry Farm in 1960`:' Mildred and Bruce Vaughn bought land from Arthur Gilliam, and originally tried to raise turkeys. They switched to raising chickens for eggs, and sold eggs to Joyce's Supermarkets, Miller's Supermarkets, and later King Soopers and Safeway. By the early 1980s they had 400,000 chickens at the first automated chicken ranch in the U.S. The Vaughns milled their o~m feed, and had the first pneumatic feeding system with underground piping from the mill to the chicken houses. MINING AND EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES: - While agriculture is the most prevalent undertaking in the area, extractive industry did take place here. Much of the North Boulder Valley is part of the Boulder Oil Field, where an "oil boom" took place shortly after the turn of the century. The Boulder Oil Field aka the Haystack Field is about six by two miles, extending northeast along the present Boulder-Longmont Diagonal. According to Smith (1981), the "Old Whiterock" well was sunk at the top of Gunbarrel Hill in 1892. Ferdinand V. Hayden, after surveying the area for the US Geological Survey in 1901 referred to Boulder County as lying over "a veritable sea of oil" (Smith 1981:139). Isaac Canfield hit oil in an exploratory well in January, 1902, and by April of that same year 117 oil companies were operating in the area of the Boulder- Longmont Diagonal. In the peak year, 1909, over 85,000 barrels of oil were produced. This boom was short-lived however, with production falling to 7000 barrels in 1914, and by 1923 only 12 wells were operating in the county. Of the 183 wells that were drilled during this period, 102 were dry, 76 produced oil, and 5 produced gas. By 1953 just 2500 barrels of oil were produced (Jenson 1954). It does not appear that much if any oil exploration or extraction took place in the study area, however, the Inland Oil Company constructed a refinery in the study area in 1907. The refinery was about where the current City Parks Maintenance building is. The refinery had two stills, each of 400 barrel daily capacity. Inland oil hit a gusher with its 13th well, located south of Haystack Mtn., drilled in December 1908. It had an initial production of 250 barrels/day, dropping to 160 barrels/day in January of 1909. Of the other wells drilled, eight were producing from 5 to 170 barrels/day. The refinery distilled the oil into gas, kerosene, gas oil, and wax oil (paraffin) (Washburn 1908). A water tank was placed on the hill in the center north of Section 28 ("Hurricane Hill" ) , with a pipeline for fire protection going to the refinery. ~ ~0 ~ 1 The oil boom may have had another economic effect on inhabitants of the area, that of providing employment. Perl Mosher, with his wife Mary, was residing in the study area by 1910, next to the Harper Farm, on the parcel currently owned by the Marcues. Two of his brothers were working as pump men on oil wells in 1910, and other people in the area may also have been employed by oil companies. The area where the refinery was later became a City of Boulder sewage treatment plant, and in 1987 the Parks Maintenance building was constructed. TRANSPORTATION: _ Valmont Road probably existed as a wagon road from the early 1860s. It was also apparently used for a spur of the Overland Stage Route. The presence of the road provided access between Valmont and Boulder, and was undoubtedly important to the general settlement of the Valmont area, and to the specific placement of farmhouses in the Park area (i. e. , most were built along the road). The Denver & Boulder Valley/Union Pacific RR traversed the study area by 1873, and had a depot in Valmont. This was undoubtedly important to local farmers for transporting farm produce and connections to urban areas. SITE DESCRIPTIONS Site SBL469 is the IInion Pacific Railroad. This line was abandoned in the 1970s, and the tracks in the study area were gone by the 1980s. Within the study area, the railroad bed has been removed, and the right-of-way now serves as flood control. Outside the study area, the railroad bed still exists, and in some places tracks are still present. Historic Data This segment of railroad grade was a part of the Union Pacific line that ran from Erie to downtown Boulder. It began operations in 1873 as the Denver and Boulder Valley Railroad Company. This company had been formed in 1870 by John Evans, Walter Cheeseman, William E. Turner, and William N. Byers. Subsequently the line was acquired by the Union Pacific Railroad which extended the line to west Boulder in 1881 and built the historic Boulder Depot in 1890 (Fetter 1983; Weiss 1981). The segment of the Union Pacific line in the study area was in service until the late 1970s. Site 5BL469 was recorded in 1981 by Manuel Weiss. Site 5BL6879 is the North Boulder Farmers Ditch. It is a bermed, U-shaped ditch, four meters wide and two to three meters deep. It is roughly parallel and south of the adjacent Boulder and Lefthand Ditch (5BL6880), flowing for a total distance of approximately 1,850 feet in the study area. Two modern concrete channeling structures were observed along the ditch in the study area, indicating some of the changes made to this still active ditch through time. The North Boulder Farmers Ditch has a date of decree of 1862, with a priority number of 11 for water from Boulder Creek, with an appropriation of 1200 acre/feet of water. It was first enlarged in 1863 and again in 1864 for a 1400 acre/feet appropriation of water. Site 5BL6880 is the Boulder and Lefthand Ditch. ' It i.s a bermed, U- shaped ditch, four meters wide and two to three meters deep. It is roughly parallel and north of the adjacent North Boulder Farmers Ditch (5BL6879), flowing for a total distance of approximately 1,900 feet in the study area. The Boulder and Lefthand Ditch has a decree date of 1873, with a priority number of 36 for 2000 acre/feet of water from Boulder Creek. It was first enlarged in 1876. The ditch is still active and maintained. Site 5BL6881 is the Robert and Ruby Roney Farm, at 5172 Valmont Road (Figures 2 & 3). The house, built about 1911, is the only standing building remaining at the farm. All barns and sheds have been demolished and debris removed.:• The house is a single-story vernacular wood-framed building with a hip roof. Two shed roofed additions are on the rear (south) of the house, which is rectangular, 41'4" x 24'5". The foundation is sandstone laid in portland cement mortar. The house is framed of 2 x 4's @ 16" on centers, with painted clapboard siding. Directly above the foundation is a 1 x 5" ribbon, and above this a water table projects 1 i". Clapboards are above this extending to the top fascia. The roof is steel over original wood shingles. A front porch of poured concrete is 8' wide, with a hip roof.. The back porch has been enclosed, it has a 2/12 single-slope roof. This is behind the first shed addition of about 4/12 slope. The front doar is in the center of the north facade, facing Valmont Road. The rear door is at the east end of the enclosed porch. Windows are double-hung wood sash, except fixed-sash windows on enclosed back porch. Historic Data The land containing this farm was originally homesteaded in 1865 by Joseph D. Fowler, about whom no information has been located. The property was owned by James Roney by the early 1900's. James Roney was a stationar-y•engineer in mining, and a farmer. He was born in 1865 in Illinois. He and his older brother John (born 1861 or 1862) had come to Boulder from Kansas by 1885, and both worked in a sawmill in Boulder at the time of the 1885 census. Both ~ . - . ~ _ - - - rt~,~ • - t - FIGURE 2 - Site 5BL6881, The Roney Farm house, 5172 Valmont. Road. View of the north & west elevations. -.;T- .i?` `.fir, 1 -r x-y;~•~` _ ~i ~ ~ \ ~ ' \ ! - ' ' _ 1~. y, - _ 1~ ~ a "S~_ Sf'~.. - r.~~: - - .c~,. t ~ ~ - " FIGURE 3 = Site 5BL6881, The Roney Farm house, 5172 Valmont Road. View of the east elevation. later became miners; Jim Roney and others were photographed in front of the Niwot Mine in Ward in 1890. John settled in Ward, and James moved to the Valmont property. James married Mabel Copes (born 1869 in Kansas) in 1887. James and Mabel (known as Minnie} had four children, all born in Colorado: Roy (born December 1890}; Curtis (Feb 1896-Mar 29, 1902), John (born June 1898), and Robert (born 1902}. The house at 5172 Valmont road was built by the Roney's about 1911 (communication from Ruby Roney to K.C. Schneider). Robert lived ` there and married Ruby in 1927. The house at 5098 Valmont was built about the same time, perhaps a few years earlier, It was occupied by Robert's brother John. According to Ruby Roney's oral history (tape 567, Carnegie), Robert and Ruby were dairy farmers, growing alfalfa and hay 'f or cows. They also raised chickens and horses, and the Roneys were original and long term participants in Boulder's Pow Wow Rodeo. Bob also worked for the Post Office, delivering mail to Caribou and Nederland. The Roney family maintained ownership of the site until the early 1970s. The Schneiders subsequently used the farm to store equipment from a mining company. Site 5BL6882 is the James and Lucy Platt Farm at 5227 Valmont Road (Figures~4~& 5). The farm consists of a house built about 1908, a guest house, an animal shed, a root cellar, and the collapsed remains of the barn. A modern garage is also present. The house is a story-and-a-half vernacular wood-framed building with a hip roof with sprung eaves. The house is 28 x 33'. The foundation is poured concrete. The house is framed of 2 x 4's @ 16" on centers, with painted drop siding. The roof is wood shingles. A single flue chimney rises from center of the roof. Dormers with double- hung wood sash windows are present in the roof on the north and south. The west roof has an enlarged dormer projecting out, a modification from the early 197os. The porch wraps a portion of the south (front) and east sides of the house, with a roof supported on "Tuscan" (Colonial Revival influence) wood columns. Doors are at the center of the south and north facades. Windows are double-hung wood sash. A shed to the northwest of the house is covered with dre,p siding and was probably built in the 1920s. It functioned at one time as a chicken coop, and more recently was used for horse stalls. A small gable-roofed building to the southwest of the house may be contemporaneous. Its original function is unknown, although it was reportedly used as a domicile during the depression. It was remodeled in the 1970s into a studio. The collapsed barn consists of a poured concrete foundation, with lower walls framed of rough- sawn 2 x 6's @ 16" on centers, sheathed with horizontal boards ,2~ fir: ~ 1 j` - - - - - - Wis. „a,~r; _ _ 1 N. , : ~ 9ottB+E _ 3~ ~E3~~\~~~.;~~.i~~~~ ri~~.iriJ~~n~:.~tG.''°-'..w .._;~...~..~.t- ""`,•...Yy~__.a2~ v FIGURE 4 - Site 5BL6882, The Platt Farm house, 5227 Valmont Road. View of the east & south elevations. _ \ _ , i ~ _ _ 1~ ` _ -~~7s~ll.~. _ per! i Z _ ~-J7 J1 P ti v_ _ ~ ~ r 1 1 , ~ a _xsr_-; `_[~h~~ ~w ~ ~ ; { 1 goys, _ ; FIGURE 5 - Site 5BL6882, The Platt Farm house, 5227 Valmont Road. View of the south and west • elevations. Note expansion of dormer room, ca. 1970. attached with wire nails. Upper wall panels are framed of planed 2 x 6's @ 24" on centers, and covered with spaced 1 x 12's. No shingles are present, but there are numerous 3d box nails which were appropriate for wood shingles. Historic Data The land was originally homesteaded by James J. Rhoads (also spelled "Rhodes" and occasionally "Rhoades"), a farmer. Born in Missouri in 1836, Rhoads was farming in the Valmont area by 1870 with his wife Rebecca, born in 1841 in Ohio, and their five-year- old daughter Mary, born in Colorado. James J. Rhoads was one of six children of Joseph (1812-1878) and Elizabeth Rhoads (born c. 1807), who came to Boulder in _1859; Joseph prospected on Gold Hill for three years, and moved into Boulder Valley to begin farming in 1862. James J. Rhoads patented the land of this site in 1872, but he did not stay in the Valmont area. He had relocated before 1880, and may have moved to Larimer County. However; two of his brothers, Merritt (born 1845) and Francis (Frank, born 1847) also homesteaded in the same area of Valmont. Merritt Rhoads and his wife and four children continued to farm in the area, and Frank became a blacksmith and moved into Boulder to live with his widowed mother. By 1896, the land had apparently been transferred to James M. Platt, a farmer and later County Water Commissioner. Platt was the second sbn of Henry Platt (1818-1903), the elder of two Ohio brothers who came to Boulder County from Iowa about 1870-76 to A farm. The Platt brothers, Henry and Isaac, settled in the Valmont area and had large families. Henry Platt is believed to have had six children, Isaac (1859-1905), the namesake of Henry's younger brother; James (1859/1860-1932), who built the house on the site; William, who married Jennie Andrews in Boulder County in 1879; Joe; Celestia (1880-1928), and perhaps Mary, who married James Wilson in 1876. Henry Platt's son James was born in Iowa in 1859 or 1860 (records conflict).. James's first wife died about 1882; they had one son, Roy G. (1880-1932), barn November 1880 in Iowa. James apparently then came or returned to Colorado; he married Lucy Lloyd (1870- 1926) in 1885; she also. came from a farm family. They had eleven children, Margaret (1886-1918), Charles (1888-1934), Harry (1891- 1946}, Laura (1894-1978), Herbert (1900-1941), Clara (1902-1929}, Richard (1905-?), Amy (1907-1918), Thomas Lloyd {1908-1982), Lillian (1909; died in infancy), and Raymond (1911-1942). In addition to farming, James M. Platt also served as Boulder County's first water commissioner, beginning in 1907. The Platt family demonstrated a long-term involvement with water resource issues; in about 1932, James passed the position of county water commissioner to one of his sons, Thomas L. Platt, who held it until his retirement in 1974. Thomas L. Platt also served as a volunteer daily weather observer and precipitation recorder for the National Weather Service for some 42 years, one of the two longest tenures • in that role in Colorado. Thomas L. Platt and his wife, Cleo Forester Platt, had one son, Thomas E. Platt, who apparently served as City of Boulder water superintendent beginning in 1961. And James M. Platt's first cousin once removed Nevin Platt (see below) was actively involved in water rights acquisition and sale in conjunction with the purchase and development of school properties in Boulder Valley. The Platt family farming tradition was carried on by at least one other of James M. Platt's grandsons; Carl D. Platt (1915-1980), one of four children of Roy G. Platt, farmed in Boulder County until 1978, maintaining membership in the Boulder Valley Grange and Valmont Presbyterian Church. Henry's younger brother, Isaac (1834-1908), lived in Boulder County from the mid- or late 1860s to 1886, when he moved to South Dakota, where he stayed until his death. However, several of his twelve children stayed in Colorado or returned. One son, John William Platt (1880-?), married Barbara Andrus, the daughter of another Valmont-area pioneer family; one of their children was Nevin J. Platt (1902-1991), for whom ,Plat 1 Middle School is named. Nevin Platt was a key figure in the~'-~onsolidation of school districts in the Boulder area; he served <<s the first superintendent of the Fairview `District on its creation in 1950, and as one of the first assistant superintendents of the Boulder Valley School District when it was established in 1959. By 1915, 12 acres immediately east of the Platt Farm had been acquired by Archdeacon Eleanor W. Sibbald (1859-1919), who came to Boulder to become pastor of St. John's Episcopal Church with his wife Edith Hungerford Sibbald (1871-1937) and their four children in December 1899. There is no indication that anyone lived on the parcel. At some point the Platt Farm was acquired by the Howe family (Howe Mortuary), and in the 1950s Goldine Howe lived in the ~ . house.' In about 1969 Fettig bought the property,. and immediately sold the house to Neugebauer. Tn 1976 Everett Wiehe bought the house and lived in it for 20.5 years. Site 5BL6883 is• the Arthur Gilliam Farm at 5333 Valmont Road (Figures 6 & 7). The house, built about 1920, and a storage building are all that remains of the farm. The house is a single-- story vernacular wood-framed building with a cross-gable roof, with three shed roofed additions. The house is roughly rectangular, 35'6" x 30'8". The first shed is to the north (rear) of the original house, extending about half the length of the house on the west end. This may have been part of the original construction or ~-3 ~ ~Y - _ ~y - ~ /fig. ~ _ ~ ~ Y - < i JC"-+. t rxh ~'~1 ~r~.4.'~ ~ -Y~c.. r^ } ~F-~i~iy95~L ~i~ ~ r-< <4 ti a_ ,p.;~+ _ J.. FIGURE 6 - Site 5BL6883, The Gilliam Farm house, 5333 Valmont Road. View of the south elevation. ~ r~~ + e~j~ f• •r t ~ i. ~ f . ti. } ' Y'~ v _ ,'sir • ~ ~ 1~ i ~ { l ~ _ , ~ _ ~ -I _ ~ = _ ~ ~ ~ nom. j-` - ~{~M. - ~ FIGURE 7 - Site 5BL6883, The Gilliam Farm house, 5333 Valmont Road. View of the north and west • elevations. ' was added in the 1920s soon after the original building. The headroom at the low (north) end of the shed is only six feet. Extending north of this shed is a poured concrete addition, with 12" thick walls. The poured concrete has the marks of horizontal 1 x 12 boards used for forms, thus it was built before plywood became commonly used for concrete forms ca. 1950. The roof of the concrete shed continues down from the lowpoint of the first addition. Therefore, in order to have adequate inside headroom, the concrete floor of the concrete addition is 4'6" below the wooden floor level of the house. The last addition is a wood- framed shed with its roof sloping down to the east. It was also built on the rear {north) side of the original, on the east end. It does extend slightly north of the concrete addition, and its easterly wall is 6' farther west then the east end of the original block. This addition is probably post-1946. The foundation of the house is not visible. The house is framed of 2 x 4's, and covered with painted drop siding. The roof is now steel, over wood shingles. A double-flue chimney of modern yellow brick rises from the gable roof at the north edge where the shed roof adjoins. The interior fireplace is of wire-cut brick, popular in the 1920s. A porch is present on the west end of the front, 7' x 2 0' , with a shed roof . Doors are in the center of the front (south), and at the northwest corner of the latest shed addition. Windows are double-hung wood sash with the top sash divided into three vertical lights. The last two additions contain aluminum sliders. The storage building is framed of rough sawn 2 x 4's @ 16" on centers, covered with drop siding. It has a gabled roof with a 3/12 slope, now covered with steel lying over sheathing of car siding on the south side of the gable, and close-laid 1 x 8's on the north side. Historic Data The land was originally patented by Thomas J. Jones in 1864, who brought his wife Sarah (born 1830 in Ohio) and three children to Boulder. County from Nebraska in 1859. Jones, born in 1820 in Illinois, came to Boulder as a miner, but by 1860 had built the first building in the Valmont area, a hotel and stage stop called the Valmont House (Dyni 1989), or the Tommy Jones Stage Stop, located about z mile east of the Gilliam Farm. He lists his occupation in the 1870 and 1880 census' as farming. Jones was apparently expanding his land holdings, and never lived on this parcel. - In 1904, Deborah Gilliam, a widow born in Missouri in 1858, moved to 640 Mapleton Street in Boulder, evidently to live with her younger sister, Loula M. Burrus. Deborah Gilliam and her late husband, Alfonso Gilliam (also from Missouri), had two children, Arthur W. (born 1894 in Missouri) and Leta (born 1898 in Colorado). The 1910 census defined her occupation as °has own income and interests." By 1915, the site was listed in Arthur W. Gilliam's ownership, but the house had not yet been constructed. Gilliam was apparently farming it during that period, however, while continuing to live in tawn with his mother; they were boarders at 1838 Pine Street by 1916. By 1921, Arthur W. Gilliam had married, had a house constructed, and moved to. the site. His wife, Marguerite, was an artist and was an instructor at the University of Colorado. Gilliam eventually owned 60 acres here, and raised corn. He farmed the land until 1960, when it was bought by Bruce and Mildred Vaughn, who established the Boulder Valley Poultry Farm. Arthur Gilliam.lived in the house until his death, and it has been occupied by tenants since. Site 5BL6884 is the Marcus and Susie Harper Farm, at 4948 Valmont Road (Figures 8 & 9). The house, built about 1910, and a barn remain from the farm. The house is a single story vernacular wood- framed building with a hip roof. The house is rectangular, 42'6" x 24'0". The foundation is fieldstone under most of the house, with a poured concrete cellar under the rear (south) 8' of the house, entered from outside. Th•' stone foundation supports 2 x 8 planed floor joists. The house is framed of 2 x 4's with clapboard siding. The roof is now roll roofing over wood shingles. A collapsed single-flue brick chim:ney.is at the center of the roof. A porch runs along the front (north) facade, with turned wooden posts supporting a shed roof. The porch floor is tongue and groove fir, and is collapsed. Front and rear doors are in the center of the north and south facades. Windows are double-hung wood sash. The barn is a saltbox frame with drop siding. A close inspection could not be made. Historic Data The entire northwest a of Section 28 was originally-patented by Thomas J. Graham in 1867. Graham, born in Pennsylvania in 1832, originally came to Boulder Country as a miner. He evidently did well at that, with the 1870 census listing the value of his personal property at $25,000, (a. large sum for the time) without real estate ownership. Graham apparently left mining (except perhaps as an investor or owner), and became a real estate and insurance agent in Boulder; he also performed delinquent loan collections and provided investment advice and management. In 1871, Graham sold the 160 acres to Charles Dabney. Dabney developed a subdivision to the southwest of this area, but F r ~ , ~i y~ • a +l. ~n. w Y v~~tL3th • _ ~ ~_'"i C" ~ yam, ~r ~I S."T ~ ox r'~1~h~,~1~ r~~~lti~d^ +{~'`Y~'1~ ~v ~~'~"~~4 •yy t ~ F~'- Ff ei Yr `1T~~% sir a'4r~r+. ~r^W~ •I,~7~~„~.~t4 Y'v ~.Y ~ N. r ~ faa1~: ~-~v ~b 1'! ~ r r a J~,~7 +t ~t+~c~'ti' tY1~ f'~-r fr _,i 'i,$id'~:~+r+~ ~t~~'t ~'~~~~~,;rt~i. ~kHkZ.~~ T ~~~~a rry~'/ ~-w tw•~"_' 2G'r~ mfr=~.~lrS.R.'rei.; .t..t. :.:i. ~r.,"~~ aR...w.-aT`.~s FIGURE 8 - Site SBL6884, The Harper Farm house, 4948 Valmont Road. View of the north elevation. ~ fib ter. - - - - .,~;,;r, _ ~ ter ~ ~1 i! • ~+M ~ 11 ./~`3 ~ ~ 4~~ 1'~}' _2` ~ ITj yJ ~r~~ ~ ,R ~~F~~ ~ ~ I _/~y~ i A s -;x .ray ` ,i'~'`,i ;r ~'.i ~ ~ i 4ti,~ . ~'~:~'k, +.w,~. t /,ti i..,,l~~l" iae+.,'+. ~+F'F'a-,~,~a~'is%1~~.~~ ~ ~ ~,,/3~~ 4 L .~~y,}r ~ _ 'f+ ~se`7 '~71'F .+8 5+-T ^.•-f(~~ y '~J r~r~ ti e 1. f^' _ e i. r ~ 'J`' Gtr. ( r( l , .(;fir mss, - a _ r i L t~ ~ l > ~ _ ~.tr-~b~.f' ~[•~5?Fa„~~`f ~:t-._~~hl/,t'apt-~~;.r,,ZY~i~~F,~"".'r,+.t,ft~~,~~Q~~~}~~iCt~~rt1 ~'~~~F'~~r9 !.i ~~NSy~y~,ae~~,~.~si-;~i~e~ 5 A~' ~%Y'hr i~[„',.`C+4~^..'huT`-i'S; ~it,,(~ -^~r~1 .,i - £ ~+~~?~~'a-tii ~`~lT i~~~~~~.~fr. a ryti~~ ~;y~ } Y Y K~4~.~r,,+.is~"~L.i ~.yr~ ~ 'Yv r f\~Ll,, ~ r~- J~ i~u~'~a'l~f-~~~~ -.S~-?ter ~ ~ r .c -t roe' Y + { - ~ L ai'~. c~C 1~.7 "rH?~'-~~--c .cirr =r r 1~ f~ ~ \ ~ ,,_J * ,~1 t r l; X1.7 I~ii'ct~=' _ . ~ . FIGURE 9 - Site 5BL6884, The Harper Farm house, 4948 Valmont Road. View of the east elevation. apparently did not do much here. Lewis W. Young (1866-1925), a divorced lawyer from a mid-western farming family, acquired the quarter section in 1907, and held it until about 1911. During this period, he evidently constructed two ditches_on the property; shown on the 1915 Drumm's Wall Map; these: ditches apparently no longer exist. The parcel was subsequently split, and by 1913 Marcus and Susie Harper, 'farmers, are first listed in the city directory as residents of what is now 4948 Valmont Road. The Harpers lived there until 1958, when it was purchased by the Helgoths who moved their auto salvage business to the property. Adjacent to the east is what is now 5022 Valmont, with a modern house owned by the Marcue Family. That building apparently replaced another historic farm, the Perl and Mary Mosher Farm. Perl J. Mosher (born 1888) and his wife Mary (born 1893) apparently moved onto the property in 1910; they were married the same year. In 1911, Young transferred the property to him, and it stayed in the Mosher family through variou~~ transfers to 1949. Perl's father, Philip S. Mosher, was a farmer. He and his wife Sarah were both born in New York, in 1866 and 1868 respectively. Perl was the eldest of their five children; the youngest, Ralph (born 1906} and his wife Margaret, were the final family members to own the house. Margaret transferred it to Garth and Mary Ellen Hill in 1949. 07`HIIt MANIFFSTATiONS There are several sheds and corrals in the study area, separate from the farm building sites. Most of these structures are recent, but some may be older then 50 years. Some recent sheds incorporate older boards, of dimensions no longer available. None of these structures are of archaeological or historical value. The materials used may be of value for restoration or rehab of other historic cultural properties, however. Strands of very early barbed wire were noted at the Platt Farm and in the pastures to the south (Fettig parcel). They are mixed with later varieties. The earliest is a ty~e_called Relly's Thorny.Fence.,. Gammon Variation by Clifton, with_.a_patent date of February 1868. ~.g RECONIMENDATIONS The cultural properties documented within the study area were evaluated for their significance and eligibility to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP), the State Register of Historic Propertied (SRHP), and far local Landmarking. Significance and eligibility of all sites is discussed below. Significance and Eligibility Assessments NRHP eligibility is judged according the criteria set forth in 36CFR 60.4 below: "National Register Criteria" means the following criteria established by the Secretary of the Interior for the use in evaluating and determining the eligibility of properties for listing in the National Register: The quality of significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering and culture is present in districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects that possess integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association and: (A) That are associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history; or (B) That are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past; or {C) That embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period or method of construction, or that represent the work of a master, or that possess high artistic values, or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose. components may lack individual distinction; or {D) That have yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in prehistory of history. The State Register of Historic Properties uses essentially the same criteria as above, with the addition of a fifth criterion, that being "geographical importance". Local Landmarking is designed to recognize cultural properties of local significance in Boulder County. Sites SBL6879 and 5BL688o, the North Boulder Farmers Ditch and the Boulder and Lefthand Ditch may be eligible to the NRHP for their association with the development of agriculture. They are relatively early, particularly the North Boulder Farmers Ditch, and essentially intact ditches. Ther-e are recent concrete gates, but the ditches retain the engineering and features of 29th century ditches. These ditches are protected by their own easements. None of the standing buildings at sites 5BL6881, 5BL6882, 58L6883, or 5BL6884 are eligible to the NRHP, nor are they likely to be eligible to the SRHP. They are undistinguished examples of common or vernacular architecture, and while they are associated with agriculture, they are not associated with significant agricultural events or innovations, nor are they associated with historically significant people. There are no architectural gems in the Park. The Park area as a whole retains the .feeling of a rural and agricultural area, however the cultural landscape has a limited ability to convey this association. None of the farms are completely intact as farm complexes, most of them no longer have standing barns or outbuildings,. The most..dramatic agricultural feature,of,.the built environment~is the grain elevators at the Poultry Farm, which are not yet old enough to be considered historic. Nonetheless, they may be of use to the Park. .'The houses at the Platt and Roney Farms, while not eligible to the NRHP or SRHP, are likely to be eligible for either city or county ocal Landmarking. The Platt Farm house, a simple vernacular building, is the most interesting architecture of the farm houses in the Park, but its integrity has been impaired somewhat by the expansion of the west dormer room. James. Platt can also be considered locally significant as Boulder Counties first Water Commissioner. If either of these buildings are of use to the park, they should be preserved. Landmarking will preserve the sites, but may constrain future uses or necessary modification or expansions to make the buildings useful. The pros and cons of Landmarking should be carefully considered in context with any future plans for the Park and the buildings. It may be of value to express the long history of agriculture in the area through brochures or trail signs. REFERENCES CITED Eighmy, Jeff 1984 Colorado Plains Prehistoric Context. Colorado Historical 5aciety, Denver. Dyni, Anne 1989 Pioneer Voices of the Boulder Valley. Boulder County ~s and Open Space Department. Fetter, Richard 1983 Frontier Boulder. Johnson Publishing, Boulder. Friedman, Paul D. 1989 Boulder Historic Context Project. City. of Boulder Department of Planning and Community Development. Gleichman, Peter J., and Scott E. Simmons 1994 Archaeological Investigations at the Tommy Jones Stage , Stop. Native Cultural Services, Report Submitted to Historic Boulder, Inc. Rice, Phil 1995 ftructural Evidence Remaining at the Tommy Jones Stage Stop. Native Cultural Services, Report Submitted to Historic Boulder, Inc. Jenson, F.S. (ed.) 1954 The oil and Gas Fields of Colorado. Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists. Mehls, Steven F. 1984 Colorado Plains Historic Context. Colorado Historical Society, Denver. McDowell, Kay Short, and Tim Ostwald 1993 The Descendants of Thomas A. Akins and Margaret Ross - Bt 2. Boulder Genealogical Society Quarterly 25(4):118-125. Pease, Ernest Mondell 1930 Boyhood of E.M. Pease: Autobiography. Manuscript on file, Carnegie Library, Boulder. Schoolland, John B. 1980 Boulder In Perspective - From Search for Gold to The Gold of Research. Johnson Publishing Co, Boulder. _ _ smith, Phyllis 1981 A Look at Boulder: From Settlement to City. Pruett, Boulder. Washburne, Chester W. 1908 Development in the Boulder Oil Fields, Colorado. Contributions to Economic Geology, Part II. 3~