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4B - Consideration of initiaiting individual landmark designation of 955 Broadway St MEMORANDUM January 7, 2009 TO: Landmarks Board FROM: Susan Richstone, Long Range Planning Manager James Hewat, Preservation Planner Allison Hawes, I iistoxic Preservation Intern Chris Meschuk, Preservation Planner SUBJECT: Public hearing and consideration of initiating individual landmark designation of 955 Broadway Street as a locally designated Historic Landmark, per Section 9-11-3, B.R.C. 1981. STATISTICS: 1. Site: 955 Broadway 2. Date of Construction: c. 1904, addition 1940 3. Zoning: RH-5 4. Owner: Colorado Acacia Fraternity House Corporation 5. Applicant: Landmarks Board STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends the Landmarks Board not initiate landmark de~,igr:a*~~::.: the property at 955 Broadway Street. Staff furthermore recommends that the Landmarks Board adopt the following motion: The Landmarks Board issue the demolition permit for 955 Broadway Street, conditioned upon submittal of fully annotated drawings of the existing building and archival quality photographs of the exterior and interior of the building consistent with NABS level I documentation requirements for archiving at the Carnegie Branch Libraxy for Local History. SUMMARY: ¦ The purpose of this hearing is for the board to determuze whether it is appropriate to initiate local landmark designation for the property at 955 S:\PLAN\dataUongrang\HIST\Demos\Broadway.9~5101.07.09 memo.doc Agenda Item #~I3 Page #1 Broadway Street. ¦ On September 3, 2008 the Landmarks Board reviewed an application to demolish the building at 955 Broadway. At the hearing, the board voted to issue astay-of-demolition for a period of ttp to 180 days, finding that there was "probable cause" to consider the property may be eligible for designation as an individual landmark (See Attachment Ii, memo to Landmarks Board). ¦ On December 3, 2008, the Landmarks Board voted to schedule an initiation hearing for 955 Broadway Street. • Staff recommends the Landmarks Board not initiate landmark designation of the property at 955 Broadway Street. CRITERIA FOR THE BOARD'S bECISION: ~I`he I Iistoric Preservation ordinance calls for the Landmarks Board to hold a public hearing to considex initiating landmark designation of. a property (9-11-3, BRC, 1981). Initiation hearings are legislative, not quasi-judicial. While not required, in reviewing whether to initiate the board may consider whethex: (1) There is probable cause to believe that the building or district may be eligible far designation a.s an individual landmark or historic district consistent with the purposes and standards in Sections 9-11- 1, "Legislative Intenf," and 9-11-2, "City Council May Designate Landmarks and Historic Districts," B.R.C. 1981; (2) There are currently resources available that would allow the city manager to complete all of the community outreach and historic analysis necessary for the application; (3) There is community and neighborhood support for the proposed designation; (4) The buildings or features may need the protections provided through designation; ' (5) The potential boundaries for the proposed district are appropriate; (6) In balance, the proposed designation is consistent with the goals and policies of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan; or (7) The proposed designation would generally be in the public interest. S:\1'LAN\data\longrang\HIST\Demos\Broadway.955\01.07.09 memo.doc Agenda Item #~{B Page #2 ANALYSIS: {1) There is probable cause to believe that the building or district may be eligible for designation as an individual landmark or historic district consistent with the purposes and standards in Sections 9-11-1, "Legfslative Intent," and 9-11-2, "City Council May Designate Landmarks and Historic Districts," 13.R.C. 1981; 9-11-1(a). "The purpose of this chapter is to promvte the public health, safety, and welfare by protecting, enhancing, and perpetuating buildings, sites, and areas of the city reminiscent of past eras, events, and persons in local, state, or national history or providing significant examples of architectural stt~les of the past. It is also the purpose of this chapter to develop and maintain appropriate settings and envirvnments for such buildings sites, and areas to enhance property values, stabilize neighborhoods, promvte tourist trade and interest, and foster knowledge of the city's living heritage". The original structure on this property was constructed in c. 1904 by Fred & Isabel Fair. In 1922, the Colorado Acacia Fraternity moved into the house, and completed the purchase in 1927. In 1939 they commissioned Henry Koch, a Denver architect, to design an addition to the house for the fraternity. The $23,000 addition was completed in 1940, designed in with influences of late art deco and international styles. The building has experienced a significant level of change over time, since its construction in 1940. In 1989 the flat roof of the building was replaced with a hipped roof. with wide eaves. A covered balcony was added to the facade, with the removal of a glass block window and the addition of a door. The original porthole windowed front door has also been replaced. Alterations. on both the south and north balconies have occurred, including the enclosure of the south balcony. After additional analysis during the stay of demolition, the alterations to the house represent a significant loss of character defining features and a resulting degradation of the historic architectural integrity of the building. While the association with the Fair family and the Acacia Fraternity are interesting, staff does not condier there to be "probable cause" to believe the building is eligible for local landmark designation. S:\PLAN\data\longrang\HIST\Demos\Broadway.955\01.07.09 memo.doc Agenda Item #l~B Page #3 (2) There are currently resources available that would allow the citz~ rnanager to complete all of the community outreach and historic analysis necessary for the application; The historic preservation program currently has extremely limited resources due to current workload. >:Iowever, if initiated, staff can complete the necessary work for this application. (3) There is community and neighborhood support for the proposed designation; Staff has received no neighborhood comment regarding support or opposition to the designation. (4) The buildings or features may need the protections provided throicgh designation; The building is proposed for demolition. However, staff considers that the architectural integrity of the building has been significantly altered to the extent that it does not qualify for designation as an individual landmark. (5) The potential boundaries for the proposed district are appropriate; Not applicable. (6) In balance, the proposed designation is consistent with the goals and policies of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan; or Policy 2.33 of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan States that," Buildings, districts, and sites of historic, architectural, archaeological, or cultural significance will be identified and protected. The city and county will encourage preservation of such resources through incentive programs, designation of landmark buildings ...design review, public improvements, and other tools." This policy encourages landmark designation when appropriate. There is no evidence to suggest that the property is of historic, architectural, archaeological, or cultural significance to the city, state, or nation. liurthermore, staff considers the architectural integrity of the building so compromised that it does not qualify for designation as an individual landmark. (7) The proposed designation would generally be in the public interest. Because of its lack of documented historic, architectural, archaeological, or cultural significance and because the historic architectural integrity of the house has been compromised., initiation of the process to designate this property as a landmark woLild not be in the public interest. S:\PLA'~t\data\longranglHIS1'\DemoslBroadway.955\01.07.09 memo.doc Agenda Item Page #4 DECISION OF THE BOARD: If the board chooses to initiate the designation process, it must do so by resolution. A draft resolution is included in Attad~trtzet~t D. If initiated, the application shall be heard by the Landmarks Board within 60 to 120 days in order to deterinile whether the proposed designation conforms with the purposes and standards in Sections 9-11-1, "Legislative Intent," and 9-11-2, "City Council May Designate Landmarks and Historic Districts," B.P.C. "1981. The owner must obtain a landmark alteration certificate prior to the submission of building permit applications for the property if they choose to proceed while the application is pending, or they may choose to wait until the application process is complete. ATTACHMENTS: A: Draft resolution to initiate designation B: September 2, 2008 memo to Landmarks Board including attachments _ . S:\I'L,r~N\data\longrang\HIST\Demos\Broadway.955\01.07.09 memu.duc Agenda Item #k~I; Page #5 Attachment A RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE LANDMARKS BOARD INITIATING THE DESIGNATION OF 955 BROADWAY STREET AS AN INDIVIDUAL LANDMARK. WI~REAS, on September 3, 2008 the Landmarks Board imposec! astay-of-demolition on the property at 955 Broadway Street for a period of up to 180 days, and WHEREAS, on December 3, 2008 the Landmarks Board reduested that all initiation hearing be scheduled for the property prior to the stay of demolition, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE LANDMARKS BOARD OF THE CITY OF BOULDER, COLORADO: Section 1. The City of Boulder Landmarks Board initiates the designation of 955 Broadway Street, finding probable cause to believe the building may be eligible for designation as an individual landmark consistent with the standards set out in 9-11-1, 9-11-2, and 9-16-1 of the Boulder Revised Code, and will schedule a designation hearing in accordance with the historic preservation ordinance no fewer than sixty days and no greater than one hundred-twenty days from the date of this resolution. ADOPTED this 7th day of January, 2009. Chair, Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board ATTEST: Secretary to the Board Attachment B MEMORANDUM September 3, 2008 TO: Landmarks Board FROM: Susan Richstone, Long Range Planning Manager James Hewat, I-Iistoric Preservation Planner Chris Meschuk, Historic Preservation Planner Allison Hawes, Historic Preservation Intern SUBJECT: Public hearing and consideration of a demolition permit application for the building located at 955 Broadway, per Section 9-11-23 of the Boulder Revised Code,1981. (HIS2008-00184) STATISTICS: 1. Site: 955 Broadway 2. Date of Construction: c. 1904, addition 1940 3. Zoning: RH-5 I 4. Owner: Colorado Acacia Fraternity House Corporation 5. applicant: Boulder University Hill Redevelopment LLC STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that tl-~e Landmarks Board adopt the following zxzotion: The Landmarks Board issue a stay of demolition for the building located at 955 Broadway, for a pexiod not to exceed 180 days from the day the permit application was accepted by the city manager, in order to explore alternatives to the demolition of the building, and adopts the following as findings of the board: A stay of demolition for the building at 955 Broadway is appropriate based on the criteria set forth in section 9-11-23(f) B.RC, in that fhe identified property: 1. Maybe eligible for individual landmark designation based upon its 1listoric, architectural, and environmental significance; 2. Contributes to the character of the neighborhood as an intact representative of the area's past; Agenda Item #yl3 Paae Memo to Landmarks Board 09/03/2008 ' Re: 955 I3roadway- Demolition Permit 3. Has not been demonstrated to be impractical or economically unfeasible to rehabilitate and add onto the existing building. Alternatives to be considered include rehabilitation of the building, incorporation of the existing building into redevelopment plans, moving the building, or withdrawal of the demolition permit. Staff encourages the applicant to consider landmark designation of the buildu1g and property and to incorporate it into redevelopment plans for the property. Landmark designation would make state tax credits available to help offset the cost of rehabilitation, as well as providing the waiver of sales tax on building permits. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Or? July 19, 2008, the Planning Deparhnent received a demolition permit application for the building located at 955 Broadway. The building is not individually landmarked or located in a designated historic district, but is over fifty years old and has been requested for demolition. On July 23, 2008 the Landmarks Design Review Committee (LDRC) referred the application to the Landmarks Board for a public hearing based upon the L DRC's finding of probable cause to believe that the buildings maybe eligible for designation as an individual landmark. The original building at 955 Broadway (previously 1712 S. Broadway) is believed to have been constructed around 1904 by Fred A. Fair. Mr. Fair was involved in the platting of t-he University Park Addition, upon whidl this building is located, and was a prominent engineer, surveyor, and citizen in Boulder. The Colorado chapter of t11e Acacia Fraternity, founded in 1911, leased various houses until 1922-1923, when they formed the Colorado Acacia Chapter House Corporation, and purchased the house at 1712 S. Broadway (now 955 Broadway}. In 1940, a significant brick addition was constructed onto the front of the existing house. The fraternity occupied the house until the mid-1980s, when the chapter dissolved. On May 5, 1990 the chapter was re-founded, and re-occupied the house. Based on fraternity records, the last initiates in the chapter were in 2000, and in 2002 the chapter's charter was revoked due to alcohol violations. CU graduate and Acacia Senior Dean Edward V. Dunklee.(1911-13) was a Colorado state senator, United Nations ambassador, and president of the Colorado United Nations from 1946-1962. Dr. Robed C. Lewis was the Colorado Chapter Advisor from 1923-30, National President of Acacia Fraternity from 1930-40, President of the Colorado Acacia Chapter House Corporation (1923-41) and Financial Advisor of the Colorado Chapter from 1939-41. The building's architect, Henry Koch, designed the Centerulial Racetrack, A<~enda Item Pa~~e g S:\PLAN\data\longrang\HIS1'\Demos\Broadway955\09.02.2008 LB meuio.doc Memo to Landmarks T3oard 09/03/2008 Re: 955 Broadway- De{nolition Permit Jefferson County Courthouse, around 35 schools in Colorado, and supposedly helped design the Pentagon in ~Nashington, DC. The Acacia Fraternity house survives as a moderately altered example of early Modernistic and International architectural desigzz in Boulder wil-h its smooth wall dominated surfaces, strong horizontal massing, wrap-around corner stall casement windows, and round "porthole" windows. Staff recommends that the Landmarks Board impose astay-of-demolition in order to consider alternatives to the proposed demolition. DESCRIPTION: Figau•e 1: Loccitio~a Map Located in the University Park addition in the University 1 Lill neighborhood, the 31,022 square foot lot is directly across from the ~ f ~ ~a University of Colorado campus on the west side ~ ~Ovv of Broadway. Sometime around 190~I to 1906, a ~ two-story craftsman style house was constructed on the lot, which was platted in 1906 by School District No. 3, and surveyed and ~ drawn by several people, including Fred A. Fair. Mr. Fair served as the Boulder Count}~ _ _ l Surveyor, and lived in the house until it was ~ ~ ~ ~ _ occupied by the fraternity, beginning in 1923. The fraternity signed a contract with Mrs. Isabel Fair in June of 1922, but did not record a Warranty Deed transferring ownership of the house until December 2, 1927. ~t - • ~ t~ . 3 ~ ~ ~ ~ i,~~r~1Y<.i ~ .5. _srli!~""R'r~_ ,1 II ~ :.y+~.: ~ ~';i I+ t fir..- ~~cw~ 7.~f ~ ~ - ~ ~ r Ic+!) 1V ~ ~ ~ t~ ~ ".'t}"<~1i 7 +r~i -}~,r7 ~:l .~y.. ~ t a r r t T ~q ~.c~ rtic ~}w.M.t..crt .i •:,b.°~ ~ i - x ~ . ~ ~ ~ ,r .c.r . a+; tab { 'G.(+~~~_ ` ~ ~ ~ ~ l < r ' ...{iz} 3''r.` F t ~ 'I f a 'a. C ~+'+r~ ~.SVpp~~~'~-'^ r w ~ + `\11'IC:.. ~ ,;Y~ ~ 1. fiA- i +~~'.x~i~'M4 y~:r ~ ,i _ 9 } ~ ' ti~~l Y~ ~ti~ at. ~t~''" ~ / r,~}~~ 3YlSp71.'zt I ri ..f ai:'J' S ~ ~ • it ' 1 ~ ? + 1_ . '"f~/~ :C ?itiZ`rr.f?~. - , % r~'',~t t'y_ '',i~ikte-~Zt f s `"r . r~ 3-Z ~ ~1,'resy ~~,-~,ti~~{ J _ 1712 Sua{th Ln n~ti~dll~u}~, 1> > 1. Photo courlc-sy the Carref;ie Branch Library fvr Local History, Boulder Historical +Svciery Collection. Agenda Item' ~ Page S:\PLAN\data\longrang\1-IIST\Demos\Broadway.955109.02.2008 LB memo.doc Memo to Landmarks Board 09/03/2008 Re: 955 Broadway- Demolition Permit In 1939, the fraternity commissioned Henry A. Koch of Denver to design an addition to the existing house. In January of 1940, work began on the $23,000 addition, which was reported in the 1940 Daily Camera summary of construction as the largest single building project of 1940. The Colorado Acacia "Forty-Seven" publication from 1941 stated that "A large addition running parallel to Broadway was built on to the front of the old brick building. The house has been completely remodeled snaking it impossible to distinguish old from new. The publication goes on to say that "Acacia's new house is the best equipped and most beautiful fraternity house on the hill and one of the finest fraternity houses in the country." The addition, bringing the total square footage to approximately 8,370 square feet, is considered to be an early example of the Modernistic/International Style u1 Boulder, with a flat roof, smooth wall dominated surfaces, strong horizontal massing, wrap-around corner stall casement windows, and round "porthole" windows. ~l r--- ~ ~ j~ ` ~ ~ ! 1 i s T'om' ='1'~'x •f~; _ ~ t ",Kn-r3.~ti ! 1 EIS[!+r~.~s~R'`i_rJ'.i!'... - _ . Figure 2: Acacia Fraternity house, 1941 Tax Assessor Plioto. Courtesy the Carnegie Branch Library for Local History. The building has undergone several alterations, the most significant of which was the removal of the flat roof on the addition, and construction of a hipped roof in 1989. In addition to the roof, a covered balcony was added to the facade of the building, the front door xeplaccd, a window covered, the south balcony enclosed with stucco and the roof extended over it, and several alterations to the back of the original house fox basement and second floor access. A~~enda Item~~ Pane _Q S:\PLAN\data\longrang\I-ITST\Demos\Broadway.955\09.02.2008 LB memo.doc Memo to Landmarks Board 09/03/2008 Re: 955 Broadway- Demolition Permit .r,~,~Y J \ ~ r>y i. i° 7t?'a 'fi'r s.~ . ~ y xr .y. t- ~,1'w e. cry _I' I,•: 1~.- y r ~ f t ,r Figure 3: Acacia Fraternity house, 2008 Figaa•e 4: Connection bettiveen 194Us addition and 1904 bi.rilding. Photo taken 2008 CRITERIA 1~OR THE BUARD'S DECISION: 'The Historic Preservation Ordinance states that the Landmarks Board shall consider and base its decision upon any of the following criteria [9-1a -23(f)J: (1} The eligibility of the building for designation as an individual landmark consistent with the purposes and standards in Sections 9-11-1 and 9-11-2, B.R.C. 1981; (2) The relationship of. the building to the character of the neighborhood as an established and definable area; (3) The reasonable condition of the building; and (4) The reasonable projected cost of restoration or repair. In considering the condition of the building and the projected cost of restvration or repair as set forth in paragraphs (3) and (4) above, the board znay not consider deterioration caused by unreasonable neglect. Information regarding the condition of the building or the cost of restoration or repair (criteria 3 and 4) has not been xeceived at this time. Fort i:his reason, staff has concentrated on criteria 1 and 2 in assessing the building's eligibility for landmark designation and its relationship to the character of the neighborhood. Agenda Iten~~ Pj Pale ~ j S:~F'LAN\data\longrang~I-3ISTU~euaos\Iroadway.955\09.02.2008 LB memo.doc Mezno to Landmarks Board. 09/03/2008 Re: 955 Broadway- Demolition Permit CRITERION 1: INDIVIDUAL LANDMARK ELIBILITY The following is a result of staff's research on the property relative to the significance criteria for individual landmark adopted by the Landmarks Board on September 17, 1975. See Attachment C• Individtcal Landmark Significance Criteria HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE: Summary: The building located at 955 Broadway has historic significance under criteria 1, 2 and 3. 1. Date of Construction: c. 1904, significant addition in 1940 Elaboration.: The Boulder County Assessor lists the date of construction as 1933. However, on the tax assessor card from 1941, it indicates the house was built in 1904, and remodeled in 1940. The original 1louse is believed to have been constructed just prior to or just after the platting of the University Park addztion in 1906.On February 7,1912 the Daily Camera reported that `Tred Fair is spending X2000 in remodeling his home at 1712 South Broadway. He has secured a building permit for this work." On January 8,1940, architect Henry A. Koch was issued a building permit for an addition to the fraternity house. According to the 1940 summary of consh uction from the Daily Camera, the remodeling of the Acacia Fraternity was the "largest single building project of 1940", at a cost of $23,000. The Colorado Acacia "Forty-Seven the fraternity's yearbook, stated that in 1941 "a large addition running parallel to Broadway was built on to the fiom of the old brick building. The house has been completely remodeled, making it impossible to distinguish old from new" and "the entire house was painted a beautiful. white with a blue-grey base." 2. Association with Persons or Events: Fred A. Fair, Edward V. Dunklee, Dr. Robert C. Lewis, Japanese Language School Elaboration: It is believed the house was constructed by Fred A. Fair, and his wife Isabelle. Fair was born in Iowa in 1880, and came to Colorado at the age of two. Although he didn't enter school until the age of 12, he graduated from the Colorado School of Mines in 1902 with an engineering degree. During college, he worked for his father selling sewing machines. I-Iis first job was in Breckenridge, but he quickly returned to Boulder and discovered the Isabelle and Fair Glaciers (named far himself and his wife) which shaddle the Continental Divide, and were named by Junius I-ienderson in 1910 as part of a glacier study. Fair and j.P. Maxwell designed and built Goose L ake Dam, one of the reservoirs in the Silver Lake Waterslled in 1904. Fair became the city engineer in 1908 to 1910, and again fiom 1912 to 1916. Phyllis Smith's book A Look at Boulder stated that in 1912 Fair proposed the idea of a connector road from Denver to Boulder, but it was discarded as the "engineering Agenda Item~~j'a~e /02- S:\PLAN\data\longrang\HIST\Deznos\Iiroadway.955\09.02.2008 LB menzo.doc ~1~~nic~ to LandtZZarks Buar~l i)~~jU3;21?US Kr: Broadway- Demolition Permit , ' problems seemed insurmountable at the time." Forty years later, the Boulder-Denver Turnpike opened for traffic. Mr. Fair assisted in the development of the Valmont power plant, development of numerous mountain roads, water rights and irrigation Glitches, and served as the consulting engineer of the Colorado State Planning Commission. Fred Fair died Apri122, 1935 in Englewood, Colorado. For more information on ~'Ir. Fair, see Attachment 1~: T)irectory and Deed research. "I he lair's sold the Douse to the /\~~~~ci~t k~r~ltcrnit~~, who produced several notable alums and had several notable advisors. Engineering professor Roderick L. Downing was a faculty advisor to the Acacia Fraternity, and was also a proponent of the connecting mad between t3oulder and Denver in 1928, and for many years afterward to~~.l< his students out ir~lr~ the field to survey potential routes for the ro~~d. I?r. 1Zobert C. Lewis was the Colorado Chapter Advisor from l~)?3-3U, National President of the Acacia Fraternity from 1930-40, President of the Colorado Acacia Chapter House Corporation (1923-4"1) and Financial Advisor of the Colorado Chapter from 1939-41. Dr. Lewis was the director of the Physiological Chemistry deparhnent at the University of Colorado, and a graduate of Yale. C:U graduate Edward V. Duxiklee was a charter member of the Colorado chapter of the Acacia Fraternity, and served as Senior Dean (Chapter Vice President) in 1912- 1913. Dunklee went on to be a Colorado state senator, United Nations ambassador, and president of the Colorado United Nations from 1946-1962. Just after the addition was completed, the United States Navy moved the Japanese/Oriental Language School (JLS) from the University of California at Berkeley to the University of Colorado. Due to the huge influx of students while the school operated from 1942 to 1946, the Navy commandeered several buildings, ' including fraternity houses, to use as classrooms and housing for students. Current manager of the Acacia Fraternity I-louse Corporation, and Acacia alum Ronald Mitchell recalls that the Acacia Fraternity house was one such building. In one of the oral histories gathered by the university in an archival project to document the school and its students, this oral history seems to be validated by James Gunn, who stated "...Earlier, while I was in the living room of the Acacia House in Boulder, we heard the news over the radio that Franklin Roosevelt .had died. fur experiences were measured by what we heard over the radio... At Stillwater, we were housed in dormitories, unlike the Acacia House in Boulder." The Acacia Fraternity established its first National Headquarters in Boulder in 1969, and had a building constructed at 910 28t'' Street, designed by Boulder Architect Agenda Itcm~g Page ?j S:\PL/\N\data\Iongrang\HIST\Dcmos\Broadway.955\09.02.2008 LI3 inexno.doc Memo to Landmarks Board 09/03/2008 Re: 955 Broadway- Demolition Permit Hobart Wagener. The National Headquarters were located in Boulder until 1981, when they were relocated to Indianapolis, Indiana. 3. Development of the Community: University of Colorado's fraternity movement Elaboration: The building at 955 Broadway is significant for its association with the fraternity movement at CU, having been the home of Acacia Fraternity, Sigma Pi Fraternity from 1985-86, and Theta Xi Fraternity from 1987-88. Acacia Fraternity is a national organization established in 1904 and associated with the Masons. In 1907, CU Master Masons rxtet al a house to organize as the University of Colorado Masonic Club with intent to petition for an Acacia Fraternity charter. 4. Recognition by Authorities: None observed Elaboration: ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE: Summary: The building at 955 Broadway has architectural significance Colder criteria 1, 2, 3and4. 1. Recognized Period or Style: Modernistic with Art Deco and International influences Elaboration: Tl1e Acacia Fraternity house is a two-story Modernistic building with both Art Deco and International style influences. The building has smooth wall dominated surfaces, strong horizontal massing, wrap-around corner stall casement windows, and round "porthole" windows. The facade of the building has been moderately altered, with the removal of a flat roof and addition of a hipped roof, a balcony added, a window covered, and the brick painted. 2. Architect or Builder of Prominence: Henry A. Koch Elaboration: Architect Henry A. Koch designed the addition to the Acacia Fraternity house in 1940. Koch was born in New Jersey, studied architecture at Columbia University, and came to Denver in 1923 and opened his own firm. Koch designed Centennial Race Track, the Jefferson County Courthouse, about 35 schools in Colorado and many residences. In 1942 he designed the chapel at the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center in Aurora. It is repor. ted in the designation application for the Hilltop Historic District in Denver that Koch helped design the Pentagon Building in Washington, D.C., but no evidence has been found to verify this. In the Hilltop District 11e designed 122 Albion, 530 Bellaire, 4330 L. Sixth, 5025 E. Sixth and 5310 E. Sixth. 3. Artistic Merit: Well-preserved example of early Modernism in Boulder Agenda Ttex~i ~ fj r'' ae S:\PLAN\data\longrang\HIST\Demos\Broadway.955\09.02.2008 LB memo.doc ~l~~mu to Landmarks Board U~J/U3%)_008 I:~~: 955 Broadway- Demolition Permit Elaboration: Prom the Colorado Acacia "Forh~-Seven" 1940-41, "the active chapter moved into a partly new and partly rebuilt house, the first completely mod~~rni~r~d house at the University of Colorado." 4. l~.xanlple of the Uncommon: Rare exanlpl~~ cif carly'~-lodernistic fraternity house u1 Boulder Elaboration: Constructed in 1940, the Acacia Fraternity house is a rare example of an early Modernistic designed fraternity house in Boulder. 5. Indigenous Qualities: None observed P.1vV1RONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE: Summary: The building at 955 Broadway has environmental significance under criteria 2. 7. Site Characteristics: None observed 2. Compatibility with Site: P.laboration: The building at 955 Broadway is compatible with the surroundu1g buildings in terms of height, mass, and scale. The other buildings on the block are a ~-oinbination of ap~irtments, fraternities, and University Full F1c~mentary School. 3. Geographic Importance: I\one ohs~~rvt~d 4. Environmental Appropriateness: None observed 5. Area Integrity: The building is located in the identified potential University Hill Historic District. Elaboration: When it was surveyed by Front Range Research Associates in 1992 it was recommended to be anon-contributing resource to the potential district due to its incompatible non-historic alterations including changes to the facade and addition of a pitch roof. CRITERION 2: RELATIONSHIP TO THE CHARACTER OF TH$ NEIGHBORHOOD: Today, the area in which t11e building is located represents a district that is a combination of old and new residential buildings and schools. University Hill Elementary's two buildings are to the north of 955 Broadway on the cast side of Broadway and to the west on 17~'~ St. Apartments ranging in age from the early 1900s to the late 1980s occupy the space south of 955. Beta Alpha Theta Fraternity is to the northwest and directly to the west is a former fraternity house. On the east side of Agenda Iten~~~j Pale S:\PL,AN\data\longrang\IIIS'itDemos\I3roadway.955\09.02.7008 I,I3 rnemo.doc Memo to Landmarks Board 09/03/2008 Re: 955 Broadway- Demolition Permit Broadway is the University of Colorado's Health Center. The Acacia Fraternity house is a Link to the history of the fraternity movement in the University's early years, and the pattenl of development of this area of Boulder. Though somewhat altered, the building contributes to the character of the immediate area and the potential University Hill Historic District as a whole. CRITERION 3: CONDITION OF THE BUILDING AND CRITERION 4: PROJECTED COST OF RESTORATION OR REPAIR: Because no information has been provided by the applicant about the condition of the buildu1g or cost of restoration or repair, staff concentrated on criteria 1 and 2, the buildings eligibility for landmark designation and its relatiozlship to 1-11e character of the neighborhood in making a recommendation on the appropriateness of demolition. NEIGIiBORHOOU COMMENT: Staff has received no e-mails or phone calls from neighbors or interested parties concerning this project. THE BOARD'S DECISION: If the Landmarks Board finds that the house proposed to be demolished does not have historic significance under the criteria set forth in Section 9-11-23(f) B.R.C., the city manager shall issue a demolition permit. If the Landmarks Board finds that the building proposed for demolition may have significance under the criteria set forth above, the application shall be suspended for a period not to exceed 180 days from the date the permit application was accepted by the city manager as complete, in order to provide the time necessary to consider alternatives to the building. [Section 9-11-23(h)). A 180-day stay period would expire on October 25, 2008. Should the board choose to issue the demolition permit, or if the permit is allowed to expire, staff recommends that demolition be conditioned upon submittal of the following to the Planning Department for recording with Carnegie Library: 1. A site plan showing the location of alI existing improvements on the subject property; 2. Measured elevation and plan drawings of the building depicting existing conditions, fully annotated with architectural details and materials indicated on the plan; 3. Black and white archival quality photographs of all exterior elevations. Agenda Ctem I'a~e i~p S:\I'LAN\data\longrang\HIS1'\Demos\I3roadway.955\09.02.2008 LB memo.doc lvTcm~~ to L,an~lmarks I3oar~l 09/(13/2005 l:c: 955 I;road~way- Denwlitic~n I'erniit FINDINGS: Staff recommends that the Landmarks Board adopt the following findings: A slay of clemc~lit-ion for the building at 955 Broadway is appropriate based on the criteria set f-orth in sec:tiotl 9-11-2:~(f) S.R.C, in that the identified property: 1. Niay bc~ eligible for individual landmark designation Uased upon its historic, architectural, and environmental significance; 2. Contributes to the character of the neighborhood as a relatively intact example of early Modernist architechtre and the area's past; 3. 1-has not been demonstrated to be impractical or economically unfeasible to rehabilitate anti add onto the existing bt.tilding. ATTACHMENTS: A: Historic Building Inventory Record 6: Directory and Deed Research C: Assessor Card D: Current Photographs L: Significance Criteria for an Individual Landmark F: architectural drawings of "1940 addition Aacnda Ilan I.f~j Pa~c S:\PLAN\data\longrangU3IST\Demos\Broad~vay.955\09.02.2008 LB memo.doc Attachment A COLOPADO HISTORICAL SOCIETY Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation NOT FOR FIELD USE 1300 Broadway, Denver, Colorado 80203 _ Eligible _ Nominated _ Det. Not Eligible T Certified Rehab. HISTORIC BUILDING INVENTORY RECORD Date PROJECT NAME: Boulder Survey of Historic Places, COUNTY: CITY: STATE ID NO.: 56L3664 1992 Boulder Boulder TEMPORARY NO.: 1463-31-4-02-001 CURRENT BUILDING NAME: OWNER: COLORADO ACACIA FRATERNITY HOUSE Acacia Fraternity X RONALD J BROTZDtAN 1810 30TH ST BOULDER CO 60301 ADDRESS: 955 BROADWAY Boulc~r, CO 80302 TOWNSHIP 1N RANGE 70EJ SECTION 31 NN 1/4 SE 1/4 HISTORIC NAME: U.5.G.S. CURD NAME: Boulder, Colo. Acacia Fraternity YEAR: 19b6 (PR1979) X 7.5' 15~ BLOCK: 2 LOT(S): 1-2 DISTRICT NAME: ADDITION: University Park YR. OF ADDITION: 1906 FILM ROLL NO.: 91-17 NEGATIVE NO.: LOCATION OF NEGATIVES: DATE DF CONSTRUCTION: BY: Roger Whitacre 34 Boulder City Ping. ESTIMATE: ACTUAL: 1933 SDl1RCE: Boulder County Assessor USE: PRESENT: Fraternity House - - - _ ` HISTORIC: T,~ _ - Fraternity House - CONDITION: EXCELLENT GOOD - x FAIR DETERIORATING _ EXTENT OF ALTERATIONS: MINOR x MODERATE MAJOR ' DESCRIBE: Originally had flat roof, now has hipped roof; balcony added; window covered up; painted brick. + - . T. . J ~,3~^ ',~h t~K z~~r r~--tv~tc?•+vc ry+~~-'-"`~ CONTINUED YES X NO STYLE: Modernistic STORIES: ORIGINAL SITE X MOVED 2 DATECS) OF MOVE: MATERIALS: Brick, wood, Concrete 50. FOOTAGE: NATIONAL REGISTER ELIGIBILITY 8258 INDIVIDUAL: YES X NO ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION: Two story brick building which originally had flat roof and now has low hipped CONTRIBUTING TO DISTRICT: roof with overhanging eaves. Large, multi-light casement windows with bands of YES X NO brick at sill and lintel level as well as betaeen windows on second story. LOCAL LANDMARK DESIGNATION: No klindows extend around corner. Center entrance has door with circular window and vertical column of glass blocks on one side of door. Cantilevered balcony above NAME: DATE: entrance is an addition; entrance originally had flat metal hood. One story bay on east. Two story wing to rear with one story bay behind. Second balcony on ASSOCIATED BUILDINGS? YES X NO west. Concrete foundatton. Ditch meanders through yard. ~ TYPE: IF FNVENTORIED, LIST ID NOS.: CONTINUED? YES X NO ADDITIONAL PAGES: YES X NO PLAN SHAPE: ARCHITECT: STATE ID NO.: 5BL3664 ~ Unknown ORIGINAL OWNER: Acacia Fraternity SOURCE: SWRCE: BUILDER/CONTRACTOR: Unknown THEME(S): SOURCE: Urban Residential Neighborhoods, 1858-present CONSTRUCTION HISTORY (DESCRIPTION, NAMES, DATES, ETC., RELATING TO MAJOR ALTERATIONS TO ORIGINAL STRUCTURE): Alterations to building are post-7949. CONTINUED YES X NO HISTORICAL BACKGROUND (DISCUSS IMPORTANT PERSDNS AND EVENTS ASSOCIATED 61ITH THIS STPUCTURE): This has been the chapter house of the Acacia Fraternity since its construction in 1933. The fraternity was founded at the University of Michigan in 1904 and established at the University of Colorado in 1911. A previous chapter house on 6roadway preceeded this building for the Acacia fraternity. CONTINUED YES X NO SIGNIFICANCE (CHECK APPROPRIATE CATEGORIES AND BRIEFLY JUSTIFY BELON): ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE: HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: REPRESENTS THE WORK OF A MASTER ASSOCIATED KITH SIGNIFICANT PERSONS POSSESSES fiIGH ARTISTIC VALUES x ASSOCIATED WITH SIGNIFICANT EVENTS OR PATTERNS x REPRESENTS A TYPE, PERIOD, OR METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRIBUTES TO AN HISTORIC DISTRICT STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: this building is significant for its association aith the fraternity rrlovement at the University of Colorado, having been the home of the Acacia fraternity since its construction in 1933. The building represents Modernistic influences through its horizontal belt courses, round window, glass blocks, and large casement windows. CONTINUED YES X NO REFERENCES (BE SPECIFIC): Boulder County Assessor records; Boulder Carnegie Library, Boulder County Assessor Collection; and Coloradoan Yearbook, 1930. CONTINUED YES X NO SURVEYED BY: R. Laurie Simmons AFFILIATION: Front Range Research Associates, Inc. DATE: Apr. 1992 / Q~ Attachment B 955 Sroadway Deed & Directory Research Owners of 955 Broadway Bold indicates long-term owners ' Dates Owners Pre- 1906 University Park Addition School District #3, Fred A. Fair 1906-1915 Fred A. Fair 1915-1927 Isabel Fair 1927-1941 Colorado Acacia House 1941-present Colorado Acacia Chapter House Corporation *The Colorado Acacia Fraternity House Corporation was created in 1952. *University Park Addition platted December 24, 1906 Residents of 955 Broadway Bold indicates long-term residents Dates Residents 1911 F.A. Fair and Cora, Frank, John J. & Ruth Walsh 1913 F.A. Fair & E.E. Sherman 1916 F.A. Fair & Lutitia Brace 1918 F.A. Fair & L.C. Schultz 1921 F.A. Fair, Mrs. Isabel Fair & L.C. Schultz 1923-1958 Acacia Fraternity ' 195.9-1963 Acacia Fraternity & Mrs. Mildred E. Glynn 1964-1965 Acacia Fraternity & Mrs. Laura King 1966 Acacia Fraternity & Mrs. Pauline Goodnight 1967 Acacia Fraternity & Mrs. Gladys Smith 1968-1969 Acacia Fraternity 1970 Bill Hofinan 1971 Stanly Grandslaff 1972 Ron Mitchell* 1973 No Return 1974-1976 American Youth Hostels Inc. 1977-1978 Broadway Counseling Center 1979 Vacant 1980-1981 Acacia Fraternity ly$3 Neal Putnam 1984 Andreas 1985-1986 Sigma Pi Fraternity & Hal Hereke* 1987 Theta Xi Fraternity & Chris Haggerman* 1988-1998 Acacia Fraternity & multiple renters 1998-1999 Church of Jesus Christ* 1999-2000 Not Listed 2000-2001 Donald Tucker 2001-present Not Listed * 1712 S. Broadway turned into 9SS Broadway between 1940-1943. a~Ei~raa Il'~1~~1 x~ wa~~ Daily Camera and Acacia Fraternity Yearbook Research -The Daily Camera: "Fred Fair is going to spend $2000 in. remodeling 1>is home at 1712 South Broadway. He has secured a building permit for this work." 2-7-12 "Fred A. Fair, b. Iowa in 1880. Came to Colorado at age 2. He did not enter school until age 12. fair worked his way through Colorado School of Mines selling sewing machines for his father who was an agent for the machines in Boulder. Mr. Fair graduated with a degree in engineering in 1902. His first engineering job was in Breckenridge. Goose Lake Daaxz was designed and built by Fair and J.P. Maxwell. In 1904 he discovered Isabelle (named for his wife) and Fair Glaciers." 4-5-27 "Fred Fair in 1913 and 1914 was employed under William Mulholand, chief engineer of the Los Angeles bureau of water and power." 8-8-28 "At one time Mr. Fair was interested in developuig a hotel and summer resort at Glacier Lake." 8-8-28 "In 1927 Mr. Fair attempted to secure approval of city council for construction of a toll road from the end of the Maxwell road at Rainbow Lalce to Arapahoe Pass with the hope of eve- ntually continuing road to Grand Lake." 8-8-28 "Those who knew of his great love for the mountains and desire to maintain their natural beauty could never understand Mr. Fair's tunnel under Isabel Lake to make that watex available for irrigation. Whatever clash of feeling he might have felt, it was an engineering job to him, and he did it well. To drill under a lake, to put in the necessary valves and then to blow open a hole for the water to escape through-tunnel was no easy task. Many such tunnels have been drilled in later years-the one by Mr. Fair was among the first." 8-8-28 "Fred Fair was employed to make survey for county for Memorial Road and Arapahoe Pass." 9-4-28 -Colorado Acacia "Forty-Seven" The Colorado Acacia Chapter house 1941: "Dr. Robert Lewis did a greater part of work which has made the house possible." "Acacia's new house is the best equipped and the most beautiful fraternity house on the hill and one of the finest fraternity houses in the country." "A large addition ruzuung parallel to Broadway was built on to the front of the old brick building. The house has been completely remodeled making it impossible to distinguish old from new." "The old fish pond and ditch were replaced by a new cement-lined pond just off the Northeast corner of the new house and acement-lined ditch zunzung close to the alley on the East side of the house." "The entire house was painted a beautiful white with ablue-grey base." -Colorado Acacia "Forty-Seven" History of the Colorado Chapter 1941: "On Febniary 2, 1907, a group of Master Masons, all students of the University of Colorado, met at a house maintained by Omega Upsilon Phi, medical fraternity. This group organized as the University of Colorado Masonic Club for purpose of petitioning for a charter in Acacia Fraternity." "Installation services for the Aleph Gimel Chapter of Acacia Fraternity, University of Colorado, took place on January 27, 191 l." "Charter members of Aleph Gimel or the Colorado Chapter of Acacia were...Edward V. Dunklee..." 1912-1913: "...officers who served during the year were: Senior Dean-Dunklee..." 1913-1914: "...chapter became known as the Colorado Chapter of Acacia, no longer being designated by the Hebrew letters Aleph Gimel." ~i~n~~~ed ~Iac~er as,~P~t~ ~~zs-_ ~1~u:rs~h~ T 111fff Born In Iowa-. ~/~~~©d1lS ~~~~~•6~ pf r, p'nir was•Morn In tow~a In i~ l 1880. He crossed tho plains from ~ 9 Towa to Lhc toot o[ Mosquito Pass ~ p ~ ~ :vlten J,ct was; Mttt lwd years of nee. I Y Nla parents, after lhreo~ yea^~. at lhJs iocatlon mov¢d' Lo Ohicr, a uil,iing town that ,few Coloradans now rrmembcr. Fred A. fair, Whose conU•ibutSon outs:d¢ of his sister who is two yearn oldeq he ditl not Irnow what t0 t11e deVC10pn1Cllt Of 730u1,1e1' :t was to bravo tlw c~mpani~~shlP A1r. ~P'atr b:clievea that w1 b! county was outstan(liug, died at St. of dahircn. ua wag I2 years oid aomettme could Me ran tlrroug be(oro -fie'•nllendad school. II¢ pmncl from tbo Nestern SI f~llli CAS 1lOSpltal Monday afLC)'110011 !¢nrtted fast and Melly enler¢d h,[o Four Mile canon, that Doul fl'01n iln infection of the left Ied, 1Bnst Denvc.: hiKh nchnol, then lh^- and the mounlnln region vva Colorado Scbnol o[ hilu¢n,~ being conllnue to grow !n ,1) said to havo been iiicurred years ~rndunt¢d u•nm urerr. in leoz. lie Dopn mr. tT ' ilgo while he was WOIia)lg 011 'SOUth e•nrked h{x wa to nn anglnCerlug that some day Boulder will hat'e' Y build n slotaga dam lower dad; A1net'ica an(1 to have become netIve dci;rco by sc,lling s¢w{ug ma,:Minos• than lhnso In tho Arnpahoo glcer' - age{n about 10 days ago. ~ eta father was the agent rm• Iha region and brat a rood to the- Ana mnchhres h, Lho,Bonldar dis49ct• nhoo or somo other glnclar will Ide e7ltered the host]ital iron] ht's Mininh Work connlructad and become lhr. mo?t Ills first efiFLtcerinlf lnM e•ns o + tempol•ary home in J?ngiewood Iasi D I clot drh•a In the state. T 11U1'Stl it ~5'lll'VIVit]g 111111 Al'C his wilh~n gnid Piacer mininK cam- ^I ~b¢grtn studying roclta, trees, pany at ~ilreckmuidge >,9,rro h¢ ns• givers and lakes when . T was• n li'idOw, 1111'S. R;Iby rftlI', f011 t' SOWS, staled In the conah•uetton ni ¢Iz chlkl:' Fnir ouco srtld. "i [onnd Fred '2...Tr., Solinc'Heury, Mal'l011 mllcs nt 61 Inch. PIVa." In 1.904 hn{in lh¢m the amusement l]mt nioa[ a17d {itiarles ZS ail', aid a SLStCt', bocnmo nssocintod with .T. P. Mnx•ichlidr¢n Ond fn la fag rvlth •boys Weil o[ lhls city, a plmrcar Colorn-tend girls o[ Ihelr own age. I had 111'S. Clal'a IYTASOn Of 1S2G L,hiCClu den, M vm9ow engtneerln, Prol- r ~ro such com Dantone except my street, Denver. ecls• with llw Would^_r water sys• sister .:nd while her testa ran !o t~i112C1'a.l iS tents Lively set for 3:30 tem. Fntr nercr missed an oppor- doiis and playing houso, utJno ran p. In. Wednesday at lht~ Speer F3oul- tunny to I>rnlso hfnxlveil. Ito to tho outdom's: CVat'il 71101'tUal'y Of (ile Olingel• corn- thought lint he was lho bast enrl• ?,ir. Fair was a menther o[ tba acct-ho'ev¢r Iq,ew,nnd admlrcd mountnini=clubs o[ the nlnto-;earl p:111y, 17e11Yer. hh» ~fclr 61s slnrting chainClCr`n`o'~i was a~pioucur In Iho dri•rinpriient 1~ G1' tW0 }'Cat's 11~t•. Fait' had hCCil - mrginearing acblevetnenls• o[ argnni:,ed urouulatn climbing. CGIISIIIIIno L'ng1llCCl' (1f llle QO101'atlq Coot'1, Lake clam woo rl¢signad Ito lasuetl eevaral books ndvC[Li5- 71at0 ~rlaill)lllg L'OintlliS:"a107], A pOSI- nod hunt by hfnxwall and I'alr•. Ing tloulder county and o[ other Tldr, Inko ~IS part of~ lho flouider r¢Kions In which 6o was fntcr- tion )list 11e was ivCll qualilled to n•ntr.r system. In loan Fnir wont estad. iitl heCilU5e Uf 1115 @11g141CC1'7lig abil• to !1;¢ llnoawcl! dam prolccf nt Thn r7er:rer sad Interurbmt coat lt}', 1115 gentti; !n plallnlrig, alld 1175 }'hoe;iix, Aria., in 190'7 Lo tho Goad pany, :citfch operated an electtlc ioYe for GOIOI'f1d0. Fletr7 Consol[aa2ad • IITM,Ing com' ilne behveen Boulder and Denver pany, worked up avast irrlgallon far many y¢nrs,-adep[ed lho nano 1~ Or several years ile had •beea system watch o:a carr!ed out as "C,'larier Rot:Lr;" at i+1c L'air's sug- Boulder county surveyol','•bllt at 110 lhn Tlenrl!Yr is rlgation dislrlct, gestlna. f.lll]C ill the last three )'eel's Was 110 Air. Fnlr was U, the service o[ Tlie firure 8 trolls hl the Arnpa• .fuck Cinrk lu Caribou mining prol• hao and nrictianan pass arens'rverc Cal1GCl Llpo» by tl1C COllltni5Si0ne1'9 rclx rand assisted Pro(.: George In rnado Inrgoly on lGo sugg¢sltnn of . CU Itlalle SUI'VeYS alld the Ofl1C0 lho geology work on.wbiclt Lhe Int• Mfr..-Falr..:-t ~:i.'%, . proved more hunarary than rentan: tcra report Is base!.' . erative, fits office as county In me Army surveyor, with whleh he kept in Tt,o can o['wo war rorma Close contact, was located in the r¢ndy to serve. uo :enns!¢ j lhmrgh past age [or a¢rvlce '1 Sullivan building, where t11C A7etal was comn,lssloned as n,a+ph Hitting association Ss also located. eriglnears nnd~.tyns station I The CattlCt'a ill a bi0g1'ap)ly C.nmP A: A. F(umpbreYS„Vn, 1l SILCLCII Of nzl•. r'air a I1 it I11hCr Of 11'asi,Inglon, ll. C. ~ , 7 hlexlcn next called. Afr. Fni ti { )'C.U'S ago Said: he did anglneering work In ~ ' 1'he Valmont power plant of the elalos 'o[ lhot Country. ~'roru 1. L 1'ubiic Service company was se- he wane to u,o unltoa Fo}eer I~ cured for :Moulder tlu'oagh the eE- pany In sovu, Cnrollnn;"H r- Bono enKlnccring \vork., in forts of D9 r. rain an(t Charles A. mgem,, orerm,, Arizona; ivenj ~:I Sem:•u.d, the taller then manager. ico, \vs•oming. 6nuth:Daknla of the bower Company in Boulder other atal¢s. ' » City Enninoer ~ T an(i now of a larger corl>oratiou in Gtr. Fair irag city ¢ngln¢er' g, SL Joseph, Mo. IOenver interests 19osa9to,' was ' wllh ' the' D( were seeking it for that city but ~ Poe•er aompnay m I9so•iz on . If4r, Fair's enginl:er_ report won tt eels thaC.'pioposed':,'to"ha takco ntitl atremns 'o[,°the'.'co ~ fOl' Boulder. I3e did mUCh Of the ~Inlo nn ' Immon se'_ producer .f~ engineering Rork on that great row¢r. ~Ilrom 1$12 to 1916 ho.wns cqq pl'01eci. - . englneei'.. Dilring thls'perlodl As an''•.'engtTieer;; a'.atr developed road that tho;[orestry.sarylca 1 $ w11fCr rt(;hte tt) Sdd't0 thA p-3'05(1@I'=`• Pleted [torn Ned¢rland to A:~ Pnrit was wrori(od oat; ~al¢o the .l; 11~Yr.iuf5;,lt~e._!rYaIIr;Y~, sttt'Yeyed.;t}ud' provemcnt o[ the.tiorttl Tad earistru~ted;'roalls;, lrhigatton ditch;: street road ar.d Luc s,ou2n sc. v es, and I'GF1C1'V011'f3 and engineCrfd~• ennon.• (Ho'Mr.cnmo.county.:;_-~ big •:n ining'ni'oject i;y; A~, a Cfizen', Weer, again in :9aa.) .he g'ava llbitrall . of„'Y715,. tIT[!0 and [lteenvered Glac;rrs T' " Y.,, Isabello and Fair Ktncl¢rn vii ~mOf1P,}',find iV Iii10, Othl31'9 ~iYet'ry COW- dlscovared My pfr. Felt in in04 ignt::3.,to drepm•~ of ~ gre'at things, were given )belt namce My ,S •t Junius d-[eaderaon, Cdnnci1y'p! 1 he not only dreamed but. a-temp- b. unlv¢rslty, who nrndo n stud ted to carry oµ1 projects which to lha ginaprs )p .191o rit:;htl•r,r• many seemed lmpractieal, ,'.The revues). ' pet proJr'ct of his dreams act yet carried cut is a road to the Arapa- hoe saddle, and. sucll..a road .will r.;. liege Lo como.If Botilder,le•to iualfe tho most. of Its advertisements con- cerntn~_ Ehe' _Ai~aplitioo:- g~acier`__ ' ;~cir~frJ:~1 1`f:sl~tl ~t-.-.~)~,t ~ - r 2.~ ~J ~A• t ~1 C~,J :~P ~1 P F ~'~y-C-1 i 1V ~ ITS UP TO`lUU CITIZENS NERE IS CIE SW1f2ERL4NU ~0 F(~iISN SNE _RuAD of MERtC~ ` F1niD {'l1 C~P1e 1' , a,JO sPEND 1 ~ I I 11 -1 I• \ / ~.~~MtupOtf Q`J T1EDE(tIAND ~ tl / ~ ~ ARAPRtaoi: GtRclet2~ ~ l~1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ' NO OSNE2 MAN ~1A5 DONE ~ ~ ~.>~'•~1_~~ P OSs 18~~{ Mp~t ~0 QC21tsG BEFORE tKt= WORLD •TP,E V.IOtJDt:2i•Ul- SCEt,11C ADVANTAGES ~ ~n pF `(yE Gt.AC1ER f;1:G1uN ~ RT Qot!1.~E1Z'S pAcic no tz _ ~ .r _ • , -"(Nir vALUF orTlieFt~~l= ~ ~ ~ % ~~•~~~r;,~ PtSl~t1C1~C'1 4fE HAS ~ F~ . ~'i E CU ~ ED 1S ESTIMA-S6o ~ii~ /~.%,1~~ ~ /l ~ ~ ~ i.. i Vii' : y t!r>~ ~ ~i/ t / l- />t F - HARNESSED ~ F~,T~ c ~ • ~NES~ WA1~RS It .J(I - - - t / ~I ~ /'L~ z`w ~ J . F hr Ij ~ ~ i I I~ r~ 1 r ~ , ~ h ~ fY.e ~ 4 \ \ Wiz. '~f ~ :./~..~1~/~.? ~ - tCC ct ~r j i r r ~ Q NS~RUCY SUMi: OF THE ,T~<_~'. K~,,, r ~ er ; • ~ . . 61GGES~ EN~It~EERWG tK,u.~, - P(Zo~EC~S fN THE WEST-- ~ -.~i, r.' j1 i ?CI '1''Icc C`~~l~rrnclrr :Lc•r.~c-~u "~'oe~t~-.5ct:r,tt,'' ,XT~\r ` `F t x-i~ t 1. ~ ~ CBS ld ~ - \'\-i q ~rfl f tr ~ ,ti~` i~r ~ / r .i G - L .Y g 7` ~zt~ ~ i ~,~~yf~l~, ' ~ _ ~ - - i Tiff HOIrSP., Li12 BRO:~D~'iCAY 1 ' r ` i ~I i I I~ r'-~~ li~l ~ l11 ~ ; ! ~ ~ It .r~ ` if I+ I?#- d ~ _ 1.Y ~i, isF i O~i . -1~+ SEVEN" I COL013A1~0 ACACiA "FORTY-SI~,V~.N" 9 :g the yr:,:,, tl~e ~:l~al>ter Pnt~r- ' Snapshots of the Year several social functions and ' ;tive part in university affairs. 1913-1913 i ~ ~ t i ~ ~ r7 who served during the year ~ it ; - 1 , ~ ` " .Dean, Charles F. Poe; Senior ~y, i ~J - i•~ ~ _ , ~r,~' • i ~t~{Y ~ ~ t~' - rard V. Dunklee; Corres. Sec'y, ! ; r. •`1 ` fit' , 1. Dickson; Record. Sec'y, Dean r •~-,~I -~w . % i 1: said 'T`reasurer, William R. ~ Y 1 ~ - - ivlembers initiated during the ' ,~~L~ (I'~~i~i i ~ ~ U'; • :r were: Dean A. Martin, Ralph j ~ - Dio Richardson, Howard Ii. t ~ :.i r • ;t - - ~omer C. Washburn, Elwood T3. • _ _ _ _ ' ~cil S. Clark, Paul S. Jolley, ~.r ;:.y:. S`~?` - 1 ~hnson; Harry D. McKinney, 11~ _ . ~ ~ tan Weinberger. A banquet in ~ i,~ the initiates for the year was - ~ ~ ~ , ~ ' • • he day of the second anniver- - - f ~ ' -r~- ' ;he installation of the Aleph `J~ / _ !~i _ I rf ~ \ ' .apter, on January 27, 1913. re no initiations held in the ~ ~ ~ - / spring quarter. Acacia began ~ I `a 1' _ a~ r I . more active part in affairs on = T ~ ' 1 f is including intramural sports. z ° • - , ~ 1? r„ -M•,t~'~`' t Acacians of the ear were: .rrs^. ~ ~ u ~ ' - Weinberger, General Manager I 3 TT~$' + cl ,former Fresident of the Stu- i = ,k•;~:~ = 4~; ~ Paul S. Jolley, Editor of the ~ I ,~y~y .._.r. 4~, Ma„azine; Fred E, T•iag•en, Sec- ~ 1 fa i -i ~F~ - ' i ~ ~ ' the University; Adolph G. ~ tst ~ l iF ~~.~r$ IJ'~~y ~ ~ ;oath of the Dramatic Club; ~ , .i~3>~: f~ _ asham, Dramatic Club leading ~ ~tY' j ~ ~ sz, ~ ~ U ~ ri•y 1~IcKinney, President Elec- ,4;., ~ ? _ ~ ~ ~ i ~ r zgineers, Secretary-Treasurer ( a) P Engineers. 1913-191.1 ~ j, • ~a ~ ,Y ~Lr +,~y . vvho served during the year ~ xrx;~ •-rs;:! ; ~ ~;,~3"? ` da, t. Dean, Eric Johnson; Senior 1 la i ~,t k ~ ~ rry i~. 1kLcKinney; Sec'y, Dean i a4~ f ~ i• aril 'Treasurer, William R. ~ ~ ~ ~ s fj Fred E. Hagen served as dele- i ' - ~ - to Eighth Grand Conclave held ~ " ` ~ • % ' M-~ ~ -r' tn, Wisconsin. Members initi- ~ ~ - f ~ t } ~ ~e fall were: Temple H. Cor- j _ ~ ~ ~ na W..Aughenbaugh, Herry R. ~ ~c r ;y~;"~~`"'_j ~,,.1}' ~ Arthur L. Olson, and Arthur f • • ~ , . The present official badge of r' ~ , ~ ~ ~~1- ~ - F ~~s k •nity was adopted in December, ~ ° ~ ,I ~ + ~ ~i ~ r ~ ~ .r„-, :hapter became known as the j;: 4 t~ " f N ~ - i°^2 rz+z~~-7j~i ' , ~`7 Chapter of Acacia, no longer ~ ~ - • f ~ ~ " K ~ x"°~~* t ignated by the Hebrew letters, i i t ~`7 ~ ~I ~ + f ~'4 i~ f ~~r~ Cha ter o£ Acacia. Fraternit T +~P ~ ~ ~ ~ `r`"` 1. 191 tpter held its third altnllal in- 9, iQ.~: -:r~u ii ~r sl et, C;:: C~::,d-r.u~- 12, 3anna--';. an o~eraa tli,_'; day banquet on January 27, 9. `vitiate; or faG quarter: (Left t,~ ri~hU h Joseph A. Davis as toast- Bilt rianra• Dave Rusk, Dan Aacidsou, 13. The house ti;hted up at Christmas thne.' olorado Chapter adopted a sys- Gilbert Walker, Geue Light and Carron rountin~~ used unifortnl b all Pusard. b Y Y 1~. Removing the dead tree behind the house. ors of Acacia. On May 15, x.914, I 10. Ou the porch: (Top to bottom) Dou Har- gill B1alcey dulls an aa. rs Day Banquet was held at ~ der, Eob York, Dick Harder. following new members Of ~ lt. On the front porch: (Lett W right) Art ~hapter were initiated: Yaul M. ~ Valitnn, 'Dvn Harder, f3ob York and Dick 1S. Jim S'Vilson's working: Blakey'loufs and Hardet•, smiles for the "birdie." (Continued on Page 19) I a • 2~ r , _ - J~ A~a~ia • - L"~~ r.`.q~S, a-~'- C: , I ..lv~: ' nSw ~ ~ fib,, ~'S b Acacia brethren continue to suffer the rig- ing, but the spirit remains -also the wet ors of Lake Acacia. Few members have Acacians. Prominent members are How- escapecl its chi11 waters, especially unruly and Whee1_er, president; Ralph Moore, Phi Mu Alpha; and Edward Meikel, Alpha Chi plecl~es and new chapter prexies.. This year a larder lake adorns the Acacia 5'qr="ia• grour>.ds in keeping with the modern build- t(~~ 77 ~ .i p^„~ 1.-'tY 'lye.`, l'-~ i~t ! ~.T,~. 1 7gi~D.- ~i~ ~ E_'_, 11 Its ~ j3 ` .,J~.~ t ~~r}~~ 1 io r 1,._i`,~ '~~5~~ =1 . ~ 1, ~ 4EC1' i { . i," ~ _ ~~4y ~ , ~,-~.5 r ~ ~ ~ fir:. l' ~ 1~ {.`n. y 'ir ~ ~ 1 is vv ~l ~ , 'V - t '~1:f L~r ~ ~j; 'may, _ , n L yti ~ ~ ~ ~d:'~` fi~~t°4~!{7th f1 f=.hr~ - '~~'V->< r-,' : - , ~ r ~ c. ~ , i d.` ~i1 1~" i fit ~ eft'' t• ~U_'41.-1' f Id~ ~i... ~`.~-_-.-\iL•iz• ~`t~._,~I, ,-1_Y-! ~J.~~_. a - 1 'Tn~ ito-..' ~r_,_:n, ~ . ~:u~i,~ai l;-h:_,,,,, f. I- L. °::;~is. Saccnd Ro.r. Light, ivleikal, t`4oora, Valitcn, Vdhealsr, 41%ilson~ OFFICERS HOWARD W. WHEELrR President itCY 3. LE\??IS Secretary JOHN F. LEWIS Vice-President ROY H. BERGMAN 'I reasurer FACULTY MEMBERS WILLIAM R. ARTHUR FRED G. DRUMMOND NORMAN A. PARKER HAMILTON I. BARNARD CLARENCE L,. ECI~EI, CHARLES F. POE JOHN S. BOUSLOG ALEXANDER GRANT WILLIAM H. THOMAN RALPH W. DANIELSON HORACE A. TONES CHARLES A. WAGNER PAUL M. DEAN ROBERT C. LEWIS HOMER C. WASHBURN MILO G. DERHAM HUGH E. McMILLEN RICHARD W. WHITEI-fEAD RODERICK ~ . DOWNING EDWARD R. MUGRAGE NORMAN WITT ACTNES Rcy H. Bergman, "41 Red Cliff, Colo. l~ulph C. Mcor~, '~lU i-ar:cver, N. N[sx. R. Herman Bergman, '42 Red Cliff, Colo. Robert F. Ncble, '42 Long-Wont, Co_o. _ Richard L. Boyd, '41 Boulder, Colo. Charles Staver_son, '40 Boulder, Colo. _ Raloh ~N. Cooke, '42 Dervar, Colo: Arthur P. Valiton, '42 Tv:~in Falls, Idaho , Herbert Coulson, '41 Tuisa, Okla. Reward W. Wheeler, '?U Avondale, Colo. _ John F. Lewis, '41 Denver, Colo. Jesse A. Vdilson, '42 Denver, Colo. Roy B. Lewis, '42 Denver, Colo. William A. Wilscn, '42 Salida, Colo. - William H. McConnell, '40 Hayden, Colo. Reber'. jJV. York, i3cise, Idfihb ' Edward J. hleikel, '41 Kersey, Colo. . i~G~SVf7l~ 11 fTl1~I ~~-,,~'rlta~ v2 D PLEDGES ~J. Daniel Davidso?z, 'a2 I3ould~r, Colo. Frili~ K;casa~>rcar, `43~Tglewood, Colo. t.rr v..:,>^ ~a..._~,a,..,., ~n i R~rrl,~,,.-~ ~ :~1~ E. Ettg~ne Light, '42 : Idaho Springs, Colo. - i -29 ~ ~~G~2 6- ~6~ - ~ere Aug 27 i,CS~. ` .''^t°"":ty wtll dedt- tl-.o h ~s~r~, of hhn f~afnrnify •an ' Cate its ne•,~ Natronal th^.adqua~- be•displayed. The nucleus of the An estimated ?50 delegates frem I let's building here on Saturday, archives well be on display for 35 activo chapters of elcacia fra• Sept. 13. the first time during the open terrify are expected..in Boulder Au- The ceremonies will begin at 2 house. gust 2i-20 for th~f ~i-annual uational p.m• at free ~i2:t,v"u"u Center at 9111 Tile ~ headquarters s[a1t of iii conclave of Acttcia~~ 28th St. ;adainisters the national organi- Colorado chaittjer is the host Acacians and Masons from,zation of 27,000 members with chapter for the conclave, with Jotu, throughout the state and country ~ chapters located an 52 cam- C. Luusford, n~.efocal ectitcr of wit[ be on hand when William I,. poses throughout the nation. The Acacia, froth tl iilder, as chairman Gobin, masonic grand master of staff haw is making plans to and Jita Jlurra$ o Boulder as stu. Colorado, will put the dedication bring the organization's 1970 dent rhairrt,atti,,:~ full three-day stone into place. Fcllowing the convention to Colorado_ program has been Planned for the ceremony, an open haute will be dele>ates. , held at `he new building. An;rtng fhCSr crhodniCd to ?f.- The Program i wlh {tegln with a (tend the dedication will be reception in the,,,_Cottirado chapter Charles Sink, the only 1•tv[ng house Sunday, ?Cu~ust 27 wlth -the ~ founder of 'the fraternity, and Denver acacia Auxiliary, headed f 1gt•s- Lucille Malcolm, widow of ' by D•Irs. ~Iae Tipton, as hostesses. :\Cler all-dry sessionsltonday, a the late George A. Mal:ohn, an- steak fry in the mountains Witt lother founder. The National climax the day. The conveution Council of the fraternity, who banquet will be at the Crass hotel ; headquartedscito nBt0ot1(I ove vhll i~ Estes Park. women To Be Entertained 'also be,present. Columbia Lodge ~'Vonten guests at the conclave 19 and Boulder Lodge •15 are n•ill Uo entertained at a series of handling the arrangements for bridgo ltartles, teas, and hutcheons the dedication ceremony. by the Boulder acacia Auxiliary, Founded In 1904 Stngle men delegates wlli bo _ ~ „ - Acacia Fraternity was found- a~ -t, , housed in neiehUoring fraternity ~ ed [n 1909 in Ann Arbor, IVI[ch., a :11 ha and Slo• -~..~'`~1 ~ ~ J - by a group of Masons. Until houses - PI I:app P ma Chi n•ith some in the Colorado 1933, R'Iasonic affiliation tvas a chapter house. Married couples will ~ intoulhenfrater itr Althoubh ?4fa be at the local hotels. y g National President Lloyd H. Rup• sorry is no ]onger a member- penthal of Kansas chapter will ship requirement, Acacia has head the delegatiaus, Also present close ties with il4asonic organi- will be former national president, zaEions from which its heritage Dr, Robert C. Lewis, of Denver. Was derived. Colorado chapter co,nntittee The college social fraternity heads ,working are Dale Natkin>, moved tQ Boulder in December Scottsbluff, Neb., housing; Loy D. ft'om Bvanston, Ill., where the Holman, Boulder, steak fry; ~~ilson National Headquarters itas been C. Aloulton, Denver, banquet; Char- located for 27 years. George F. Ies Amen, Loveland, registration; Patterson, Jr., from Cincinnati, Keuttetlt Kleiuholz, Boulder, ulil- - Ohio, national president of Aca- cia, saki that the council was ides' lockLtg [or "a locatimt at a pro- gressive university community with good transportation facili- ~a~~~~e O ~~~~~'~~~0~~ ties and agreeable climate and ~g g in close proximity to the large Gra~~ In 1~CgCQ~ ~~~aa~$•~~~ ~~~~'~I~'~~ty number of Acacia chapters lo- cated in the Nest. Boulder met Gj`- - .~r~'' these requirements." 'she Coicrado chctt;ter wasrreco~=` '1'ho scnol:n•si,ip cup was awarn° Harvey Logatt 13 exeCUtIVC nlzed as the oustanding chapter in ~ eel to [till Gilbert of tho `V}-ominS secretary of the fraternity. He chapter representing the chapter ~ , :\.cacia at the climax of the national lrn•ing the best two'>•ear scholastic credited F'.W. Reich, .secretary- frril.ernity's conclave Here '1'uesda)•. ~ lrerc,3e. The 1Vyoming rhaptet• ' Irtaltager Of the Boulder Chant' The aR•ard of the outstanding 1 has had the highest grades ever j bet of Commerce and Forward chapter crop was made to ~~e:terable recorded by ;L fraternity on th© ' h'Ielro Denver with atifacti.~tg Dean Bili Norris by executive sec- S\:~-outing c;antpus. Acacia s interest to this area. relary P,o}~ Clark. Acacia has 35 The conclave officially closed A•Iodern Design chapters. 'I'nesday night ,.°iu, a hnnquet for ~ The headquarters building Urn outer atcard, the outstand- S3 dele~ales aC Estes Parl<. A car- 'was designed by Hobart ll. Wag- in,; chapter publication, •n•as also avan trip over Trail Midge rood R•as ellei' altd ASSOCIateS and COIl- preseuled to the ~C:olaraclo chap- scheduled todn}•. strttcted by the Broadway Cott- ter. Les Poll:, editor of "Colacacia" i Roy' FI. I3e,:';man, of Denver, All ;SLruCtiott Co. of Boulder. It is wns gi;~en the fraternity's cup by aluunu,s of the Colorado chaplet travelin secretaries George Croyle and president of the Rocky ;Noun- Imodern in design utilizing ez- and Edger Kelly. fain _lcacia :\lun,ni association. Ipanses of glass and alt Ittferiol' Lloyd I-I. Ruppet;thal,ltacPher- serverl•as toastmaster. ln]adC entirely from staistetl son, Kns., sax re-elected national Rear Admiral 1;. J. Taylor, Ohlo ~beat'tts and imported Bt'azllian P,•esident of the fraternity for an- university, teas tho guest speaker.' irose wood. In the center Of the other four year term. Other oC[i-~ building, lying directly beneath cers nan,ect were: Christopher 'a large skylight, is an area fot• Gabriel, Pm•lland, Ore., first vice! the raternity's archives .where ~ ~ l,r~sident; .John A. Lnnsforrl, x3ou1-I _ - _ - - _`.,=x:;-~'~~iLlj ~ ;'/3<6~1 ~~~r~~~ ~le~r~~ . Ac~c ~ a ~ r . y ~ ~fi~~5 l~er~ ~~~~~r~~~ Acacia fraternity will move~and is rnte of the 10 oldest chap•~oi chapters of the fraternity and its national headquarters to lets. There also are chapters in~other factors also were consid- Boulder this year, this area at Colorado State Uni-~ered, Marvin Logan, of Floss- Officials of the Masonic, col- versity, Fort Collins; Colorado moor, Ill., first vice president of loge, social fraternity announced Stale College, Greeley, and the the fraternity's council, added today the relocation of the of- University of Wyoming, Lara- that other national fraternities [ices From Evanston, Ill. The mie. wrre polled nit the question of iralernit will build a 5125,000 Harvey L. cc~~ayy,,~~ t~omoted where they would like to relo- center on 281h 5t1•eet. It will from .a<~~lc~ft~l dfie~ctltive di-Icate offices if such a move were move four executives to Boulder rector 5alut•day, heads the fra- possible. Most of them indicated and hire the rest of the staff ternity's paid staff. He is a grad- preference for this part of the Itei•e. uate of Long Beach Slate. nation, lie said. 1'he total present skaEf in CU Graduate Ilxecutive Director Logan, Evanston is seven, but Acacia Barry J. Lyerly,-tlte assistant wltu is not related to the vice officials said that expansion in executive secretary, is a 196{ resident, said that he felt the - the future could mean 15 to ZO graduate o[ the University of Acacia council's actions ap-~ employes here. Colorado. George F. Patterson Jr., Aca- Others who will move here arelproved during the four-day Boul- cia national president from Cin- Tom Bolman and Ron Hill; field der meeting -that ended Satur- cinnati, 'day are most si nificant in the Ohio, announced the representatives. g planned move this morning.) Boulder was chosen, Patterson history of the fraternity. In addi• 1~ormal approval of the action said, over t}te Kansas City, Mo., lion to approving the move to was taken Saturday during the area which also has been under Boulder, Logan said that the! Acacia National Council meet- consideration. The National board adopted a series of new ing held at the Harvest House Council felt that the offices policies for Acacia that recog-I Hotel Here. ~ should be in a progressive, uni- nize the changing role of fratet•- Palterson said that the [rater- versity community and that nities in relation to universihes: fifty, working through Boulderltransportation,_climate, location and colleges in the present day.) Really, h?s purchased a site of J ,:28th Street immediately north of the American National Center _ , _ - 'for Educational Research, for- ~ AcTaciq Auxiliary.Meets inerly the Green Shield building. FOOd DrIV@ Wlth Mrs, eo ovak liobard D. VYagener and Associ- ~ ales have been retained to de-~ Two Boulder Greek houses { ? sign the facility. Bohn A. Luns- will serve as drop-off points for 'the Acad. ~ A •iFF'ar met ford, of Boulder, a former Aca- a food drive to provide canned with i14rs. T,eo• Novak, 45 Uni- cia national vice president; will goods and dry non-perishables versity Ave., at 9:30 a,m. be the fraternity's local consult- to needy rsenlor citizons,.~t Thursday for brunch and a meeting. ;)ant during construction of the Denver. FEB ~ ~ 1~~~ Those attending were hlrs. _Iheadquarters• The drive, sponsore by bV. A. 1Vilson, Mrs. William 1 The building and equipment gl;yIN-Radio. and the Denver Hannah, A4rs. Lorna fling, Mrs. . are expected to cost St25,000, Magazine, will be administered Cora Brown, I41rs. Charles 1Vas- i I Pa tterson said. It is expected through • c h u r c h e s and son, hits. 0. F, Murray, , Dors. t~that the building will be com- synagogues in Denver, who will E. R. Tut•ngttist, Mrs. S. G. f ipleted and the move made by distribute the food to seniors in Manual, and Mrs. Dwight Pet- llecember. their congregations. _ erson. 52 Chapters A note from Acacia- [rater- ' Acacia is a national Fraternity Boulder residents wishing to pity ryas read thanking the aux• l with chapters at 52 colleges and donate may leave food at the liilat;y for the Christmas gift of ;universities. There are some Gamma Phi Beta Sorority, 935 a sweeper for the house. 1 26,000 mrmbers. The national 16th St., or Acacia Fraternity, A "goodie sale" will be hc(d .~organi•tation was formed in ].904.'. 1010 11th St. Drop-off may be at the fraternity on Monday, The University of Colorado] made today through,Salut•day evening, ,Jan. 20. The next ~ Acacia chapter, 955 Broadway,I until 7 p.m. each ,evening, or meeting will be Feb. 20 at. the was chartered nn Jan. 27, 1911, 2 p.m. Sunday:. borne of Mrs. Wasson. ,s-tom[-65uI1. N~vvur k~viovu~ug. - - e • o The Ac:c1a club, a charter"fate'which CHAPTER OFACACIA v. as recently granted by fthe national BEING INSTITUTED TODAY organization to the •\tasdnlc c1Ub of From 3 o'clock this afternoon until the Uc;Ivers x sct~i ~1e rlstalled here ~ ~x midutght tonight :34 University stu- next lnriday atlerdoqu at 5 o'clock by dents are being i}vitiated into the mys- ProP. Cvmstock~; oC~the Universlty of teries of Acacia.{ a fraleruily whose ;litnne~ota. 'Fho Acat;fa cht:b Is a cot- membership is ~tontined to students ~ loge o•ganir,!t,tloa, Cho membership of of selected universities who are also i'~ Rh1ch is confined to \~fasons attending r ` =ai+!J~':i~l'~yit~t,r-J_ l':t(=!- ,iveir free and ._cc let Masons. 't'he iui- t:he S'C11001. `f'ile work R'ilI 110 Fia`r,rv mnrlr~ hnino rnnr9nrlerl by 75-., ~ v~ ~ aaal~ -i-~ ~ r~?((I( ,.iii ~ 4 ' f - 1 L• _ _ w~,f c~':.P +_~C)IISLi~.I('l-t,( u:'~. i.'1~ 111 ti~ ..1.~. -._~~-,~-....+,,~~"~~-rr~~~~~~ ~ _ :.~~.r I _ ti.~~r:~ ~ ~:UIL~T1_IG PL A., 1- r:.i97..~ ED:i _ _I 1 i T P3I,DG. PAiiS <1 L'i,I,t;. ?AItT ~i I GARAGE i~io. CuUic Feet------- ',Cot.al Cost Porches-------------- ,_.-.i:as-------------- --------------I TOTAL ------I~s-------------- Obsolesence -----I-------------- ---------------I------------ Physical Dop. - - i~`c~ ll,2ter L)eductin~ ~ ' ~ Depreciation I Utility Dep. ---IS-------------- 5-------------- ' "iti13SE\T V.r1LT]L--~~--------------I+'--------------•~----------- 3L'SC3?t''FIO~i i ~ - f i,;:: of Pid~ Basement_____ ~ ------------------I, . i:.: a•ution Proof - ~ , nr. a±Const. I3eatin~ rlejah~o[ l3uil~in~,__ ------------------'I _ SLiD1UTAs ~ ' l.NNIJr~L ASSI;9SRSL\T S-i~~r ------I------------------ Plumhin~ - - - I _ II _ LA1CD ~`iSli T.OYL•nliiNT9 i '1'nT: ~ DL•:SCIIIP'*IgN ~ •1~IOU~'i Tla,~tt,l _ ~ 'or t~inich~---------------=--Light--------- f - ~ I L'uildin Permit •~N 195 i;< _ _ ~ \ --------i------------------ Priv. Garage-- - ~ ~ ~ , Ori•;inal Cost. Lmprovcraents Only ~ i~~}~ ;I .r•yriea-------- -------------_____IGarnsor Sheds:--- I r - r;l~ ~ - ~ `I l AddlLiona and F~etterments ~~4• ; ':`,~e Aesleting i, P l 1 ^ - ~ -.gate o~ .tie p•.vner's ]stimate of Present ~ialue 19~;i- _ll r~,, ~~~,1„rlntion---- -----------------•,Loesl Im rs. i---- - - - - ~ t• ~ `i`>'_1.J `}v l i :'_D3~F`zT.«iE1S ai~,D I;'L'?'i" ~%1~N`i'S Insuranc >>ra~sa ~ - II II ---------Cli•.c:: Cl,rc - CLeck CLarl~ - Garr •Single Reaidence_______~___. No. of SCorics_-____':_____-_~.____ COtIiSTRUCI'IOA' I_ Flectricity__________________ _ ROOMS STORIES r ~ I Duplex--•----------- --I---- F'OL`NAr3TION r I .~na------------------------- i---• I vonma•t I i 2 - r Nood Shingle-------------- atc;~ -Liungalo~•, Apt. Crt. i Oil----------------------'--------- - j liricl_ Composition Shingle______ ~ ' -flat or Terrace --------L---- ~ ~ I Cuncrote------------------~ Tar and C ravel-------___-- Living 1~oDZn___'---------~----- -A artment I•Iouse------t---• j---- ~ I _ Dinln l~,oo:a----------------- p Sfonc•------------ Prepared Paper 1; I -klotcl------------•-----I---- Wood---------------------~__-- Sheel• iron----------____-- _ i 1~I1'~1'F GAItA~GE Dinotte______-- - -ctoGe Building 1 ICitch,`n---------I Tiic.---------------------------- CopP~r-------------------- I I I___---------------- Site Conct•ete Tile BrcaL•fast .Nooi:.' = -Office I3uilding _-------_i__-- Construction- - ~ Clay Tile------------------ L'cd Y oom - , _ jl T---- Floor-------- 1-Ios~ital of L alas ~ uildin - Slate----------------------i---- L';.th Room------~- ------7------I----- g ----------T-- - ..nt ar>,u:~i_T--- Asbestos Shingle----____-- _ Toilet Koom.__-- i r Roof - ~ -laeatre___________ B~:SEEdEIdT ~ Feat-------- c ; ~ i i -----i I Tin .,[Dover Room ~ -L1'arehouse------------ ~ - I ~ ~ 1 r--- Insulated Sleepir.I; : o:•ch-_~--------------- - GZuarter-------------------~---- I---- - -factor ' y - Sun l~oorn-------~-------- - ~ Half S'I'T LL ~ -1'uillic Garage----------=---- - ' Three-(quarter ~ BIfFI?S AN1~ B:~ItNS I Den-_-•_-- i - ~ - ( Gable----------------------'---- I Storage]loom------------~------'-----~------ i ,~1; ate haran•P T•li Size-- Const.~ ---l---. Sc.t•vico Station ~ur Gr. k•Iouse Ful1-----------------------;---- I Cement Floor p I G,ucc-----------I ; ~ Flat I-------- 1----- -Ilot house i Size-- Const.l------- I---- (lulls ---------i------` -Po~:utr House Finished VVa!ls and Ceilingt___ I ~ Y I Gambl•el - _ ~ _Lamldry L OG~~I. It1ii'1tOVLi!'ILNTS ------------------r----- i i - F a.ns or Slzec.., i---- :13ansurd ---a------;------------ i Lc:onto------------------------- Streca. Pavin~•---------------- ` FIIt1S}i Girc 1u,,,Le:, I i Alley Paving------------•---- i Sidewahcs-------------- U nlinished ~ P1.UNIBING Is\`i'LI110[t , Curbi:: f Plastered, Plain- i-------- - b-----=---------------- _ Old Style ~ ' 1------------------- , ~ \;:.tcr Mastered, Urnan;_-------------- Cum nton L•'rich Glodern ~ ----T-- ~CONS'TRUCTION i btorm Scwer-----------------,__-- Yapcred_____-------------- - Presscd Briclc ND. 13at11 Tubs Salritar Sewer --------------.1__-- k'aintedorTintcd:-_------------- am e tiVire Cut B ricl: N o. Shower P,aths___--___-~- •y Y Softwood rlDOr-- I ectriut 1---------r----- Glazed L'riclc iVo. 'Toilets ~ Hardwood Floor_~--____-- le------- Wood Siding Ato. Lavatories------------I ~ -----I '1'eicl,hone--------------------~- Suftvrood Fi•tish _ ---;=r------- one Wuod Shin l~s - Ilardr:uod Finish]---------'------ r Cern~nC BtUL'CO N o. Urinals---------------1---- I ~ I ~:crete Plain or ulocl:_______-- b ~ N o. Laundry'1'ubs---------~__-- ~ ! I _ Tile ---------1 _ - Ieelrl ume.nforcca.--==__-- Stontswue--------------------. ND. Sinks-----_-----------:__-. - I ; ' ~ i I4'1I5C1;LiL9NEUUS , c;vc il4arhle or Gnyx_f--=__--- - - - - - - - _ _ Sanitary (,]Deets Ir i 1V alltioard.------ - ~------A------~-----;------------ C@SS PDUI .5'1de~~031'dS__.________________I___- ~ ~1.1itACTI;1t ~~I' (.OIVS'f. Sheetroelt_____--'-------- ~------a------ Ll:cted and S.,-------'-- 1c-rru Cotta ron-----------i---- ---------------------------•I-- 13ultet ------------------------I---- ~ I 1------------ T ' n - CelDtex - Tile .-----------------•----r--- Cabinet---------•------------ Hl;tl'1'ING I 1 Wainscoting ----i---------r----- I Jtore_____________________1____ bletal (,elfin G ___1_________-_____ ~ 1 ydiu m I ]icon] Ceiling----------------- _ ~ - Ilot Air-------- ,Wd---------------------------- Incinerator----------------- T liI:3I - Hot Water.----------- - • - i~e Y esisting Slcy LighC:'.---------------- O~'1'SIDE 'FItIb1 Steaet , . ;in-i•'ire i'eesiytin~;______________ ~ kefrigeratnror Cooler \`;'oud 1 0. D umcny Fireplacca----~---- [Iay \V indo ws----------------~---- 1 I'S'1'A'1'1; OF l3LPe11IlS Tc;rra Cotta air Couditioned_-- De;r:,;er 1Vindows - SCc,ne-------------------------• l~urctte5---------------------- 1~'IJi:L I ai;` Galv.lron.----------------~---- - - :I~N Cunu•cte------------------~--- Coal I I ~ - i 1 j ! 1 1 ,t ' ~ ` F ``w ~ . . - ~ _ _ ter. ~ . X10. . - - , fi { - 5 ~ h 3 .r _ , 1 t ' 1t - r s - ` . . _ _ - ? . `4 A: ~ . . M -'4~. ~ r ? - -'~-.rv --~.aI.G:'~`T"`vt~. ~ `5t.+~lFkr'~~ ~ _ - ~!1' ~ .+:-y _ - - r.w ti it r ! 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