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2 - Draft Minutes - Downtown Management Commission - April 5, 2010 CITY OF BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSION'S MEETING MINUTES FORM NAME OF BOARD/CONLN'IISSION: DOWNTOWN MANAGEMENT COMMISSION NAME/TELEPHONE OF PERSON PREPARING SUMMARY Ruth Weiss-303-413-7318 NAVIES OF MEMBERS, STAFF, AND INVITED GUESTS PRESENT: BOARD MEMBERS: DAHL, KOVAL, MCMULLEN, PA'I" I'ERSON, RUTHERFORD STAFF: "'INTER, JOBERT, "EISS, MA'T'THEWS, CUNNINGH M, LANDRITB, '1'6'EINHEIMER, CUNNINGHAM, EICHEM GUEST: SEAN MAHER TYPE OF MEETING: MINUTES REGULAR: April i, 2010 AGENDA ITEM 1 --Meeting called to order 5:35 pm AGENDA ITEM 2 - Swearing In of New Commissioner: John Koval AGENDA ITEM 3 - Roll Call: All commissioners were present. AGENDA ITEM 4 - Election of Chair and Vice Chair: Patterson nominated McMullen for chair, Rutherford seconded. All commissioners were in favor of McMullen for Chair. Patterson nominated Koval for Vice Chair, Dahl seconded. All commissioners unanimously approved. AGENDA ITEM 5 -Approval of March 1, 2010 Minutes: (See Action Item Below) AGENDA ITEM 6- Public Participation: None AGENDA ITEM 7- Presentation by Bob Eichem, Finance Director - "Upcoming Ballot Initiatives and Impacts on CAGID": Eichem approached the podium and advised the commission on statewide ballot initiatives and amendments. There are three initiatives, two being constitutional amendments that would override the Home Rule Charter for the City of Boulder because they are a statewide concern. All items, if approved in November, would be effective on January 1, 2011. Proposition 101: would eliminate specific ownership taxes and reduce all fees on cars by 97`io and impact the General Fund, the maximum ownership charge on a used car would be $1 and a new car is S2, with a maximum charge of $10 for transfer of ownership and the first $10,000 would not be taxed locally or by state; impact to the city would reduce city revenue by e5.8 million per year and would be effective immediately on 1/11 and, when phased in, the revenue reduction would to come to $7.8 million per year. Telecommunication charges would be eliminated on the state and local level, which is $2 million dollars for the city. It would freeze the 911 fee at the 2009 level and it would not increase. All other state and local taxes except those listed in the proposition must cease and any other charges will be considered taxes and would have to be voted on. Proposition 101 would apply to home rule cities and Boulder needs to be prepared for it. It does not directly impact the city but over time it will lower the state income taxes and if there is less money to the state, there is less money to the cities. Proposed Constitutional Amendments 60 and 61 are added to Tabor restrictions. Proposition 60 deals primarily with property taxes; voids all previous property tax de-Brucings; Future de-Brucings must be re-voted every- four years; it will impact property tax as well as sales tax and all the revenues of the General Fund; new property tax increases would be limited to 10 years and makes it difficult to issue bonds as bonds are typically for 20 years: enterprises and authorities such as the Urban Renewal Authority and the. Wastewater Fund would begin to pay taxes; allows use of petitions to reduce property taxes in all taxing districts: electors may vote on taxes when they mvn property regardless of where they live, and it impacts property and sales tax, ifthere is a de-Brucing on general improvement district, it would void any in place. and would impact bonds since it is only for 4 years, enterprises and funds were exempt in the past as city services and it will require taxes to be paid on them and the reduce property tax, and conflicts with bond covenants. State housing, water and power budgets would he reduced. Utilities would pay taxes and then the rates will need to be raised to pay for the taxes. It impacts schools and cuts the school trill levies in half and the state will backfill the funds, however the state is having trouble making their own budgets so it is unknown where the money will come from and does not speak to it. Anyone can petition the tax rates at any time for reduction of taxes. The first year budget impact would be $4.9 million and close to $8 million dollars when it is fully in place. Proposed Constitutional Amendment 61 would prohibit any type of state government borrowing, not just bonds; CHAFA-state housing authority, Colorado Water and Power Authority, and state universities would not he able to issue any bonds. CAGID pays about $2 million dollars in debt year with parking revenue, not with property tax. Sixty one says "we don't care", if you pay off the debt even though it was parking revenues, it will be considered a tax so you must reduce your tax rate equivalent to ti c anneal t_;x paN tluen[ V.!A1;. PIHU< the ~i niliton d~iiars in property tax re% ennir that CA(Itl) rrc ices will have to be eliminated. Use Tax last year, for the redevelopment, remodeling and building at CU, was $3.5 million and was not exempt for CII contractors but that it would be no more with 61: Local government borrowing (including bonds and leases) or refunding (including enterprise funds) can occur only with voter approval. Except for enterprise funds: after borrowings repayment, tax rates must decline by the equal amount (even not repaid with a tax increase). All bonds must go to ballots. 'T'otal debt issuance is limited to 10% of the assessed valuation of real property and would greatly restrict bonds for remodeling or new construction. The maximum limit on borrowing is ten years with Amendment 61 and there would be no refunding of debt issues without a vote. If it is not a dedicated tax, it must be reduced. The max borrowing would have to be approved by the voters. Revenue bonds stand on their own. It is not clear if utility rates will have to go to the voters. There will be a max limit on borrowing of 10 years from the current 20 years. If all outstanding bonds were reviewed, it would cost $11.1 million to the city. Priority based budget will rank all city services. There is a coalition reviewing it passing. Patterson questioned the source of each of the proposition. Eichem responded it was by initiative of signatures of citizens and approved by the State as citizens initiatives for the ballot this fail. Eichem mentioned it originated in Colorado Springs with those in association with Mr. Bruce. The proposed initiatives would reduce another $10.8 million of revenue for the city and it would be difficult for the city. General fund is $80 million and with library and other funds is $ 100 mil lion. Dahl questioned why this is being proposed. Eichem responded that there are people that think there are too many taxes and the less government. the better government. Rutherford asked the momentum is behind it and Eichem stated that the most traction is for Amendment 61. Sales and use tar is 45% of the city's revenue and would require immediate reduction. It is going to decrease the property tax, long range property tax bonds and will impact CU and the universities around the state. Dahl asked if there were other groups that not want this to happen, f:ichem said not locally as it a little early yet but it is at a state level. Dahl suggested these (Troutps come by and discuss their position. Eichem mentioned an impact to 131D in that if you arc not elected, you cannot set tax rates or fees; council acts as the board. AGENDA ITEM 8 - Police Update: Weinheimer commented that calls on the mall from this year to last year were on par. Weinheimer commented that in 2009 there were 83,175 total calls with the mall accounting for 7,026 calls for service and the lowest of all 5 districts. Winter commented that the mall would be one of the safest places in Boulder and requested the stats. As the weather warms, officers will be spending more time along the creek path and library. McMullen questioned the ACLU case regarding the homeless and Weinheimer has not heard anything. AGENDA ITEM 9 - Parks Update: Matthews mentioned that the tree replacement of 31 trees should be done next week. Matthews reported for Martin that the family gathering area has been put on hold due to some more extensive repairs being warranted. Mall tulips were discussed and the north side of the mall's tulips will come up earlier since they get more sun. AGENDA ITEM 10-11311) Update: Maher began by mentioning the economic vitality front with the kickoff of the free Small business Resource Center having 10 businesses signed up to date for downtown small business consulting and being done in conjunction with the SBA. It is free to anyone within the boundaries of BID. Tomorrow is the kick off of a tenant mix/ retail recruiting effort; for tenants that will add value and working with a group of CU MBA students for a database of retailers to bring value and traffic to downtown and will develop a strategy to get them here. Downtown magazine is going away and being replaced with a visitor guide publication. Free distribution has been offered at DIA, downtown Denver and Cherry Creek for a Boulder publication that fits Denver's required specs. Dahl asked if the publication could be reviewed prior to print. Maher .greed to provide. Patterson questioned the signage to Boulder from Denver. Maher responded that Denver has a good visitor center on their mall and those that ask how to get to Boulder, don't have a car with 80% using, bus transportation. Koval mentioned that the ULI convention is reluctant to send people to Boulder because it seems too far. This publication will be provided at key hotels in Denver. Events: 3!11 Downtown Fashion Show was a success and will be done again next year: Colorado Children's Day and the Tulip Day will happen on April 30 from Noon -4pm and'1'ulip Fairy and Elf Parade at 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., Downtown Exchange will be held at the Rein branch Yards with social media as the focus and how business is -enerating interest. Wednesday is the monthly board lunch at 11:45 am and open to commissioners. Koval mentioned the banners looked good on the mall. Maher commented that 4 have been stolen. Patterson commented on the Daily Camera 2"`r floor article regarding how creative firms have found their Mecca in downtown Boulder. Winter extended an imitation to the commissioners to attend the Business Outreach Meeting at Simple Geo. AGENDA ITEM 11 -Matters from the Commissioners: McMullen began by introducing the Civic Use Concept Paper: Liements of a Vision and the vision and performance criteria. McMullen sought a feel from the board regarding six questions. Question #1: What is your feedback or irnpres.,ions of the vision criteria'? From your perspective. as board members avid ndi~icL:als. Rio the% ,eflzct tLc ciuaractc.j."i .s „f I~ic &uil!fer cultu_V" ]SI'm crite-i:) a1 L, eminence, authei":icity. interactivity, evolutionary. entertaininr:`invig~~iatin~ and edgy. An economic stirnulato~r or economic hencfit, cvcli it' it is not direct, would be part of the vision; and, reflect the Boulder culture. Question #2: Do these vision and performance criteria allow for a successful use of the space? Would you recommend different or additional criteria'? This is for feedback on performance criteria to set up the R1:1. Performance criteria includes financial and management capacity to build and operate the facility: compatibility of place and purpose with the St. Julien Hotel and downtown: include a strategy for local- regional and national partnerships: and, accommodate the carrying capacity of the volumetric space assigned for civic use (right-sizing for infrastructure and parking). Being green for the greatest efficiency: conflict with being green to use cars to get to the site: traffic volume could be a questionnaire issue: and, educational emphasis would be a good focus. Question 43: What do you perceive as the top three opportunities for uses on the civic use site that would embody the vision criteria? Responses included a visitor's ccnter/convention center; a snowboarding museum or hall of fame; a museum of screens in real time in national labs, such as NCAR in the Artie; IMAX that was not Boulder centric with an entertainment focus; interactive visual; interactive ideas of living history. field trip site to learn the history of Boulder; appeal to younger age groups with rotation of ideas and the capability to constantly reinvent; conference center; exchange the land for another piece for a larger conference center.- identify all the limiting criteria that held the previous task forces back; must generate revenue; a great building, thing of beauty, cool; great experiential container, visitor center on steroid: base camp for day visits; housing - mixed use. Question 1+4: 1Xgnat organizations. institutions or individuals do you think may be interested in partnering or, such a vision? Feedback included commercial brokers; science institutions - NCAR, UCAR, NSF and DOE (federal labs). Naraopa: CU; Warren Miller and people who do large productions, Apple, Disney: Goo-le: large corporate sponsors: Conoco Phillips; and, City of Boulder. Question 45: Do you see any coming trends or culture changes in your area of expertise (technology- research. sustainability, ctc.) that we should investigate and pay attention to? Commissioner comments included tech; green building museum; social media: climate change; Extra dimension of tech - not available to general public, Nano technology- gathering spaces - welcoming indoor; serve food/alcohol; field to table localivore: roof top garden; and, aquaponics, Ouestion #6: what experiences or venues in another location do you think might be a good fit for Boulder and applicable to this site? Why? Seattle-hands on science museum: Chicago-Museum of'Science and industry; Portland-Museum of Science; I aroma - Museum of Glass, Monterey Bay Aquarium; and. California Advent ure,'LMAX Committee and Task Forces Assignments: Standing Committees: Finance/Budget - Patterson/Rutherford; Operations-Dahl; Public Safety - \4cMullen: Marketing (with DBI and BID) - Dahl!Patterson: Economic Development - Ko va I /Patterson ; Parking Task Force (with BID & DBi) - Dahl/Koval.. DBI Events - McMullemDahl; Grecn Committee - Rutherford. Task Forces: MYIIMD/PS Master Plan -Koval!Patterson; Civic Use Task Force -McMullen, and. Downtown Improvements - Koval. Council Assignments: Koval - Becker/Wilson: Patterson - Karakehian/Osbourne: Rutherford - Ageton; McMullen (;ray/Morzel; and, Dahl - Cowles/Appelbaum. AGENDA ITEM 12 -flatters from the Staff: Winter discussed the Downtown Boulder Green and Sustainabilit), Inventory report as a way to convey sonic of the gt'een effort,. Winter mentioned the May meeting and scheduling a walking tour of the ;garages before the meeting to shone the work being done; Randolph Center to be closed on April 11'x`, early in the morning to attach new sianage drd other work: meeting with school principals as an outreach meeting; and laterthis week is the Mall Issues meeting. Jobert commented on the January sales tax being down 11% and doesn't expect February to be much better; on street }nuking revenue increased in March. McMullen and Landrith going to the Community Action Summit at NCAR'[ ICAR for tracking of emissions; EPA will be police arm. .N9ceting, adjourned at 7:17 pm - Patterson motioned for adjournment. Dahl seconded. All commissioners were in favor. ACTION ITEMS: MOTION: McMullen motioned to approve the March 1. 2010 meeting minutes. Dahl seconded. Approved unanimously by all commissioners. FUTURE MF.ETINGS: Mai 3.2010 Council Chambers 12e~uiur Meeting 5.30 p.m. APPROVED BY: DOWNTOWN I0ANA_GEMENT COMMISSION Attest: ~ ` ` Ruth Weiss, Secretary John Koval, Vice Chair