Loading...
12.18.23 PRAB PacketAGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (2 minutes) II.JOINT STUDY SESSION AGENDA (6pm – 7:30pm) A.Call to Order B.Staff Presentation C.Board Discussion D.Adjournment - convene with PRAB Agenda III.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (7:30pm - 2 minutes) IV.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (15-30 minutes) A.This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. V.CONSENT AGENDA (5 minutes) A.Approval of Minutes from November 27, 2023 B.Updates from the Director of Parks and Recreation C.Parks and Recreation Planning, Design and Construction Updates D.Parks and Recreation Operations Updates VI.ACTION ITEMS A.None VII.MATTERS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION A.None VIII.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT A.PLAY Boulder Foundation IX.MATTERS FROM THE BOARD A.View of Final PRAB Handbook B.PRAB Matters (Verbal) (5 minutes) X.NEXT PRAB BOARD MEETING: A.6:00 p.m. January 22, 2024 Parks & Recreation Advisory Board and Landmarks Board Joint Study Session Hybrid Meeting 6:00 p.m., December 18, 2023 Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2023 Andrew Bernstein Charles Brock Elliott Hood Anna Segur Anita Speirs Jason Unger Sarah van der Star Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1.Community Health and Wellness 2.Taking Care of What We Have 3.Financial Sustainability 4.Building Community 5.Youth Engagement 6.Organizational Readiness 1 STUDY SESSION MEMORANDUM To: Members of Landmarks Board and Parks & Recreation Advisory Board From: Brad Mueller, Planning & Development Services Director (P&DS) Alison Rhodes, Parks and Recreation Director (BPR) Kristofer Johnson, Comprehensive Planning Manager (P&DS) Mark Davison, Planning Senior Manager (BPR) Marcy Gerwing, Principal Historic Preservation Planner (P&DS) Shihomi Kuriyagawa, Senior Landscape Architect (BPR) Date: December 18, 2023 Subject: Proposed Civic Area Historic District EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of this study session is to provide the Landmarks Board and the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board with an update on the process for the Proposed Civic Area Historic District, to request feedback on the draft design guideline framework, and to review the Cultural Landscape Assessment (CLA) findings for Central Park. The historic district process evaluates an application for a proposed historic district designation of a portion of the Civic Area. The application was submitted by three historic preservation organizations as allowed by Section 9-11-3, B.R.C. 1981, in May 2023. The Landmarks Board voted to initiate the designation process at their meeting on July 12, 2023. Concurrent to the Historic District timeline and as a response to Council’s direction June 14, 2022 meeting (item 4B), BPR staff have developed the CLA process to evaluate Central Park within the proposed historic district boundary. This assessment will determine if the park land has significance and integrity as a cultural landscape per National Park Service Guidelines. The CLA will be considered along with the city’s local historic designation criteria to inform the boundary of the proposed historic district. The CLA is grounded in research, inventory, documentation, analysis, and evaluation of the landscape’s characteristics and associated features and the seven aspects of integrity for the site. The CLA will also be integrated into the Civic Area Phase 2 process and timeline to ensure this work informs this next phase of park design for the Civic Area. This memo describes the historic district process to date, including department and agency coordination, community engagement, racial equity strategies, and development of a draft design guideline framework. This memo also includes the findings from the CLA process described in 2 the City Council Information Packet on May 18, 2023 to evaluate Central Park for historic significance and integrity of the site as a designed landscape. The Landmarks Board, Parks & Recreation Advisory Board and Planning Board will review the proposed designation in early 2024. City Council review is anticipated in April 2024. BOARD DISCUSSION 1.Do board members have questions on the designation process? 2.Do board members have feedback on the draft design guidelines (intent, table of contents, guiding principles)? 3.Do board members have questions on the CLA process or findings? BACKGROUND x On August 27, 2021, the Landmarks Board received a letter from the Friends of the Bandshell (link) requesting Landmarks Board consider an expansion of the landmark boundary of the Glen Huntington Bandshell, an individual local landmark (Ordinance 5751), to include the entirety of Block 13 (1236 Canyon Blvd.). x In November 2021, the Landmarks Board initiated the process to expand the boundary and in April 2022, the Landmarks Board voted to recommend expansion of the boundary. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) requested that the decision be postponed in order to allow time for additional review and coordination with the forthcoming Civic Area Phase 2 planning and design process. x On June 14, 2022, City Council held a public hearing to consider expanding the designation boundary of the Glen Huntington Bandshell. The City Council gave a Nod of Five to “have Landmarks staff investigate and explore the creation of a downtown area historic district that would include this area, saying they would work with the Landmarks Board and Parks Board moving forward.” See City Council 06.14.2022 recording (link). x Following Council’s direction at the June 14, 2022 meeting (item 4B, page 70), Historic Preservation and Parks and Recreation staff jointly established an approach to evaluate a Historic District in the Civic Area that included developing a Cultural Landscape Assessment, which will be integrated into the Civic Area Phase 2 process and timeline, and inform the next phase of park design for the Civic Area. See the April 24, 2023 PRAB Packet (link), the April 12, 2023 Landmarks Board Meeting (link) and the City Council 05.18.2023 information packet item (link). x On May 30, 2023, the Planning & Development Services Department accepted a complete application for a proposed historic district in the Civic Area from Historic Boulder Inc., Friends of the Teahouse and Friends of the Bandshell. x On July 12, 2023 the Landmarks Board voted (3-1, C. Castellano dissenting) to initiate the historic district process with the understanding that the applicants would extend the timeline defined in sections 9-11-4 and 9-11-5, BRC 1981. See Landmarks Board 07.12.23 Minutes (link). 3 x On August 23, 2023, the applicant group and city signed an agreement to extend the public process and hold the designation hearing on February 7, 2024. x This memo describes the progress of this project, including department and agency coordination, community engagement, racial equity strategies and development of draft design guidelines. x The purpose of this December 18 Joint Landmarks Board and Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Study Session is to review the process to date and provide feedback on the draft design guidelines. x The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board will provide feedback on the proposed designation on January 22, 2024, followed by the Landmarks Board designation hearing on February 7, 2024. The application will then be reviewed by the Planning Board for feedback on potential land use implications. x The City Council designation hearing is anticipated to occur in April 2024. BOARD & COUNCIL ROLES Members of the city’s various boards and commission are outlined in the City Charter and Boulder Revised Code. As it relates to historic designation: x The Landmarks Board’s role is to make a recommendation to the City Council on the proposed designation, and to adopt design guidelines. As stated in Section 9-11-5 Landmarks Board Designation Public Hearing, the criteria for the Landmarks Board’s review is to determine whether the proposed designation conforms with the purposes and standards in sections 9-11-1 Legislative Intent and 9-11-2 City Council May Designate Landmarks and Historic Districts. x As provided in Section 9-11-5(e) Planning Board Review, the Planning Board’s role is to review the proposed designation and report to the City Council on its land use implications. x The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board does not have a formal role in the historic district designation process as outlined in Chapter 9-11 Historic Preservation. Per the City Charter, one of the PRAB’s functions is to make recommendations to City Council regarding the protection and maintenance of park lands; the PRAB’s input will inform the design guidelines and be included in materials for reviewing boards and City Council. City Council designates landmarks and historic districts by ordinance. The criteria for City Council’s review is to determine whether the proposed designation meets the purposes and standards in Subsection 9-11-1(a) and Section 9-11-2, "City Council May Designate or Amend Landmarks and Historic Districts," B.R.C. 1981, in balance with the goals and policies of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The City Council may approve by ordinance, modify and approve by ordinance, or disapprove the proposed designation. OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED DISTRICT The proposed boundary of the historic district as submitted in the application includes Central Park, the 13th Street and Sister Cities plazas, five individually designated landmarks, and portions of Broadway, 13th Street, the Boulder Slough and Smith and Goss Ditch, and Boulder 4 Creek. The boundary extends from the west side of the Penfield Tate II Municipal Building (1777 Broadway) to 14th Street, and from Canyon Boulevard to Arapahoe Avenue. The privately owned parcels on the northeast corner of Arapahoe and Broadway (1201 Arapahoe Ave. and 1724 Broadway) are not included in the proposed boundary. On July 12, 2023, the Landmarks Board voted to accept the application and initiate the historic district designation process to further explore the area’s eligibility based on: 1) Its inclusion of five significant buildings and their sites that have been previously designated; 2)Its historic significance in the history of Boulder’s park development and for the role played by the Boulder City Improvement Association, Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., the Lions Club, and consulting city planner S.R. DeBoer and its contribution to the social and cultural life of the city for over a century; 3)Its architectural significance that includes work by notable architects, master builders, and urban planners representing examples of a progression of architectural styles; 4)Its environmental significance for its planned and natural site characteristics that represents an established and visual feature of the community. HISTORIC DISTRICT UPDATES The historic district designation process is outlined in Section 9-11-4 Public Process for Historic Districts, B.R.C. 1981. The following is a summary of efforts between July until November 2023. Department and Agency Coordination In August, Planning & Development Services (P&DS) staff met individually with representatives from Transportation and Mobility, Parks & Recreation (BPR), Planning & Development Services, Public Works - Utilities, Community Vitality, Facilities & Fleet, City Manager’s Office, City Attorney’s Office and Communications and Engagement. The purpose of the meetings was to provide information about the process, discuss the effects of historic designation, answer questions and listen to concerns. P&DS staff also solicited interest from departments to participate in the Technical Advisory Group to develop draft design guidelines (see additional information below). P&DS and BPR staff have been meeting bi-weekly to coordinate efforts on the development of the Cultural Landscape Assessment (CLA) and the overall project management of the historic district application. Public Works – Utilities staff facilitated coordination with the Boulder and White Rock Ditch, North Boulder Farmers Ditch and Boulder Left Hand Ditch companies, as the proposed boundary includes a reach of the Boulder Slough and Smith & Goss Ditch. Staff proposed utilizing the same approach as the landmark designation of the Boulder-Dushanbe Teahouse, which includes language in the designation ordinance that acknowledges that use of the respective ditch easements will not require Landmark Alteration Certificate review. 5 P&DS staff spoke with representatives of the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), as a portion of Broadway (Highway 93) is included in the proposed historic district boundary. Similar to the ditch companies, management of Broadway will not require Landmark Alteration Certificate Review if the area is designated. Racial Equity Instrument This designation process is the first Historic Preservation project to use the Racial Equity Instrument. The process included elevating the voices of historically excluded peoples and amplifying the message that the historic narrative of the area has been dehumanizing and used to perpetuate dominant social structures. Research The designation process provided an opportunity to fill research gaps in the history of the area, in particular the history of residents and businesses that were displaced. Historic Preservation staff were able to access recently digitized information from the Library of Congress and National Park Service, and other state and local sources. Staff focused on primary sources (first-hand accounts, period newspaper articles, maps and photographs) for research, but additionally consulted local experts and contemporary secondary sources. Engagement Strategy The engagement levels for this project are consult for the general public; and involve for the key stakeholders, which include property owners and the applicants. To date, the project team has used different methods to: x share information about the area’s historical significance, x raise awareness and understanding of the designation proposal, x gather feedback from historically excluded communities, x facilitate discussions from key stakeholders on draft design guidelines, and x solicit feedback on whether a portion of the Civic Area should be designated a historic district. 1.Consultation with Community Connectors-in-Residence (CC-in-R): The city’s CC-in-R represent historically excluded communities. The project team met online with four CC- in-Rs representing Black, Latine, Indigenous and people living with a disability to answer questions about the designation process and to discuss the racial equity strategies for the project, including engagement. Following on these consultations, the main opportunity identified by the project team to advance racial equity is to explore and build more comprehensive narratives of our city’s development by researching, elevating and telling the stories of historically excluded populations. The CC-in-R agreed to participate in a ‘dry run’ of the walking tour to provide feedback on the script through a racial equity lens. 2.Walking Tours: The project team and applicants collaborated over the course of six weeks to refine a walking tour script for the public. The project team’s goal was to 6 continue to tell the stories of Central Park and the five landmarked properties within the proposed district – while also telling a more complete and multi-dimensional history of the area. This included researching and telling the stories of people that once lived here. It included amplifying the message that the narrative about the area adjacent to the Boulder Creek, referred to as “The Jungle” from the 1920s, is dehumanizing and used to perpetuate dominant social structures. -The three tours were advertised on the city’s social media, the city calendar and website and by the applicant groups. -Twenty-three people signed up in advance and only eight people attended. The tours were held on Saturday, Oct. 14 at 10 A.M., Wednesday, Oct. 18 at 12 P.M. and 5 P.M. -The project team led a walking tour for city staff on Oct. 12 (about 20 attendees). -The project team also led a walking tour with Community Connectors-in-Residence (CC-in-R) (5) on Sept. 21 to help identify white, privileged bias in the script that could be exclusionary and hurtful. The applicants participated in this walking tour with CC-in-R as observers. CC-in-R feedback was used to update the script. 3.Webpage, StoryMap 1 & online questionnaire: The project team developed a webpage, that has been available online since August 28. The webpage provides an overview of the project, background information, details of upcoming engagement opportunities and latest news, and an explanation of the timeline and process. Additionally, the webpage includes a StoryMap of the area’s history that seeks to tell a more inclusive history of the area. It has been available online since Nov. 28 and viewed by 1,045 people as of Dec. 12. The webpage also includes a questionnaire asking whether people support or do not support the designation. The questionnaire will be available until Jan. 15, 2024. It also provides the opportunity for people to share their own historic photos of the area. 4.Communications and Media Coverage: Media coverage of the project includes an update in the Winter 2023 issue of the Boulder Community Newsletter (p10); a press release announcing the publication of the StoryMap was issued on Nov. 29 and project manager Marcy Gerwing was interviewed for a Channel 8 segment that aired Dec. 1, 2024. Social media posts include Nextdoor on Dec. 5 and Facebook on Dec. 7. 5.What’s Up Boulder: The project team participated in the What’s Up Boulder event at Foothills Community Park on Sept. 10. The project team was available to share information about the project and answer questions. The project team handed out coloring postcards of the landmarked buildings within the proposed district, along with an aerial view of the park and surrounding buildings. 6.Carnegie Library for Local History “Boulder Rewind” event. The project team participated in a celebration of 40 years of local history at the Carnegie Library on Oct. 1, 1 ArcGIS StoryMaps is a story authoring web-based application that allows you to share your maps in the context of narrative text and other multimedia content. 7 2023 with a presentation on some of the research completed on the history of the proposed district. CULTURAL LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENT (CLA) PROCESS AND FINDINGS In April, BPR staff started scoping the CLA, researched the park history in the summer of 2023 and prepared a draft CLA in early fall. This approach was defined by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and the criteria for the National Register of Historic Places as well as the 1998 National Parks Service Guide to Cultural Landscape Reports criteria. The CLA analyzed the site within the historic periods for significance and the major landscape characteristics and features and seven aspects of integrity to understand if there was integrity for the identified historic periods. As described in the City Council Information Packet on May 18, 2023, the CLA follows National Park Service guidelines to identify significance and integrity through a two-step process. The CLA uses the same criteria (seven aspects of integrity) for identifying integrity as the city’s local historic designation integrity criteria to inform the boundary of the proposed historic district. The CLA and city’s local historic code differ on the criteria used to identify significance. The CLA follows National Park Service Guidelines (4 areas of significance), and the city has a code the uses three area of significance. For a landscape to be historic they must have both significance and integrity. For Central Park, the seven aspects of integrity ultimately inform the boundary of the historic landscape, which will contribute to the overall historic district evaluation per the city’s local historic designation criteria. In October, the draft was sent to a nationally recognized historic preservation consultant for a third-party review of the methodology and determinations regarding historic significance and integrity of the park area. This review included evaluation of the site history, existing conditions inventory, and the evaluation of landscape character and features of the entirety of Central Park (boundary in blue in the below diagram), an area of approximately 4 acres and encompasses the current Bandshell landmark boundary (boundary in yellow within the blue boundary in the below diagram). The park is bounded by Canyon Blvd. to the north, 13th Street to the east, Arapahoe Ave. to the south, and Broadway to the west. All other areas and previously historically designated areas are out of scope for the CLA. 8 Figure 1. Study Area of Cultural Landscape Assessment (blue boundary). The site history the CLA provides is an overview of the timeline of the major events that had an impact on the design and development of Central Park area. Four eras of physical development were identified and include the acquisition of the park, its initial development, and major redesigns or alterations. The major historical periods the CLA outlines in its research are: • 1903-1922: Acquiring the Land for Central Park • 1923-1936: Olmsted Jr. Design for Central Park • 1937-1973: Huntington/DeBoer Design for Bandshell and Seating • 1970-2023: Modern Updates Overall landscape characteristics evaluated in the existing conditions as well as the final evaluation of integrity are: x Topography x Vegetation x Circulation x Buildings and Structures x Views and Viewsheds x Land Use x Spatial Organization x Small-Scale Features (for the Huntington/DeBoer Period only) The seven aspects of integrity that were evaluated are: x Location x Design 9 x Setting x Materials x Workmanship x Feeling x Association The draft summary of findings and the evaluation of the site can be found in Attachment A from the historic preservation consultant. The below diagram outlines the summary of findings of significance and integrity in the identified historic periods of significance using the landscape characteristics and seven aspects listed above: Figure 2. Cultural Landscape Assessment, Significance Findings 10 Figure 3. Cultural Landscape Assessment, Integrity Findings The final assessment of the CLA will be completed by the consultant in the coming weeks and the full CLA document will be shared with PRAB, Landmarks Board, and public in January. DRAFT DESIGN GUIDELINES Technical Advisory Group A Technical Advisory Group, comprised of representatives from Community Vitality, Facilities & Fleet, Parks & Recreation, Planning & Development Services and Public Works – Utilities, and representatives from the three applicant groups met over the course of three meetings to create draft design guidelines. Representatives from other city departments, City Manager’s Office, City Attorney’s Office, Community & Engagement, Transportation & Mobility, chose to review the draft design guidelines once complete rather than participate in the Technical Advisory Group. 11 Scope of Draft Design Guidelines The scope of the draft design guidelines includes the intent and scope of the design guidelines, preliminary Table of Contents, and guiding principles. If the City Council designates the historic district, a separate project will commence to develop district-specific design guidelines. Draft Design Guidelines Intent What is the purpose of these design guidelines? How will they be used? (Language from Boulder’s General Design Guidelines and University Place Historic District Design Guidelines) The purpose of the guidelines is to facilitate both the Landmark Alteration Certificate (LAC) application and approval of alterations proposed for design review by assisting owners and designers as they plan maintenance and changes to buildings and public spaces and to provide the Landmarks Board with a framework for evaluation of proposed improvements. The guidelines reflect the Landmarks Board’s philosophy that underlies all its decisions: to encourage the preservation and careful treatment of the city’s historically significant resources, while recognizing the need for continuing adaptation and improvements to these resources. The guidelines have been developed to recognize the unique character of the district and are intended to supplement the General Design Guidelines for Boulder’s Historic Districts and Individual Landmarks (the General Design Guidelines), which apply unless otherwise stated. Where the two guidelines conflict, the district-specific guidelines shall prevail. The design guidelines are intended to be used as an aid to appropriate design and not as a checklist of items for compliance. In some cases, unusual circumstances may allow for projects to deviate from them. Table of Contents What areas will the guidelines address? x Review Process x Roles and Responsibilities o Include review bodies, policies and regulations (i.e. floodplain, Park Plan for the Civic Area, Art Acquisition Policy, Downtown Urban Design Guidelines, plans and policies related to the list in Guiding Principal #2, etc.) x What Requires Review? o Define what does and doesn’t require review in the design guidelines to streamline and clarify the review process (i.e. maintenance, emergency repairs, new work) o Clarify that improvement or maintenance work within the ditch easements and CDOT easement (Broadway) is exempt from LAC review x History of the Area o Summary of area history based on new research to tell more inclusive history of area. x Design Guidelines o Rehabilitation of Historic Structures o Additions to Historic Structures 12 o New Construction o Coordination with Floodplain Development Regulations o Central Park o Boulder Creek o Public Art o East Bookend o 13th Street o Plazas Guiding Principles What values are important to inform the district-specific design guidelines? 1.The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation are the foundation for the historic district design guidelines. Rationale: Adopted by the Landmarks Board in 1985 (revised in 1990), the Standards for Rehabilitation are the foundation of the General Design Guidelines and the eight district- specific design guidelines. As a Certified Local Government, design review is required to be consistent with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards. 2.Preserve maintenance access and align the design guidelines with management practices in adopted city plans and policies for utilities infrastructure, urban trees, park design standards, flood mitigation and transportation networks related to life safety and accessibility. Rationale: The City has established programs and professional staff that manage the many assets within the historic district. The design guidelines should reinforce the importance of life safety and accessibility within the boundaries of the district. Additionally, defining what does and does not require review in the design guidelines will clarify and streamline the review process and ensure that emergency repairs and regular maintenance projects can be swiftly executed. 3.The area has character-defining features that contribute to its historic character and setting. Define these key historic features within the historic district and consider drawing inspiration from them. Key features include but are not limited to: x Boulder Creek as a living entity that is significant to Boulder’s past, present and future and provides critical public safety, health, flood conveyance, water supply, and environmental benefits. x The unique architectural character of the area as defined by five distinct, individually landmarked structures, each representing a forward-looking and progressive city identity. x The area is a place for recreation, gathering and play that contributes to the health and well-being for all and should continue to reflect the variety of community needs and desires for the enjoyment of the site. 13 Rationale: The area has character-defining features that contribute to its historic character. While this is not a complete list, this guiding principle emphasizes the importance of Boulder Creek, the unique architectural character of the structures, and the importance of the area as a place for recreation, gathering and play. 4.The area is significant for its association with Boulder’s municipal, social and political history. As part of Boulder’s Civic Area, this district continues to have a symbolic, geographic, and functional importance and therefore should serve as an inclusive place where all feel welcome. Celebrate the diversity of our community and enrich our collective understanding of different periods of Boulder’s history by acknowledging stories of historically excluded populations. Rationale: The historic district process provided an opportunity to tell a more complete history of the area. While there is additional work to be done, it is evident that the area currently tells only a portion of Boulder’s history. As the civic center of Boulder, it is even more important that it be inclusive and welcoming, and broad representation through art, educational opportunities and programming is encouraged. This principle aligns with the Park Plan for Boulder’s Civic Area, which states “Preserve, reflect and celebrate the area's fully inclusive history (e.g., Indigenous Peoples, mining, the railroad, Olmsted's linear park and landmarked structures).” 5.Align the selection of works of art within the Civic Area Historic District with adopted city plans and policies to encourage creativity, contribute to a sense of place, spark conversation, tell our shared stories and capture our moment in time, foster the enjoyment of diverse works of art, and be thoughtfully designed contributions to the urban environment of our vibrant city. Additionally, select artwork within the Civic Area to attract, inspire, educate and engage the community. Rationale: The Civic Area Park Plan identifies this area as one of the major art centers of Boulder, and new artwork within the proposed historic district is anticipated and encouraged in the future. This guiding principle repeats the mission of the Acquisition Criteria of the Public Art Policy, as well as language from the Park Plan for the Civic Area. Both of these statements are compatible with the intent of historic district designation, which among other things, seeks to promote tourist trade and interest and foster knowledge of the city's living heritage. JOINT BOARD MEETING PURPOSE The purpose of this study session is to provide the Landmarks Board and the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board with an update on the process for the Proposed Civic Area Historic District, to request feedback on the draft design guideline framework, and to review the Cultural Landscape Assessment (CLA) findings for Central Park. No formal vote will be taken. The study session is scheduled for 90 minutes and will take place prior to the regular PRAB meeting and will be guided by the PRAB meeting procedures. The meeting will be facilitated by Comprehensive Planning Manager Kristofer Johnson in an effort to hear from all voices. 14 BOARD DISCUSSION 1.Do board members have questions on the designation process? 2.Do board members have feedback on the draft design guidelines (intent, table of contents, guiding principles)? 3.Do board members have questions on the CLA process or findings? NEXT STEPS The historic district application will be reviewed by Boards and the City Council in early 2024. The anticipated schedule includes: x January 22, 2024 - Parks & Recreation Advisory Board x February 7, 2024 – Landmarks Board Designation Hearing x March 2024 – Planning Board (Land Use) x March 2024 – City Council, 1st Reading x April 2024 – City Council, 2nd Reading and Public Hearing ATTACHMENTS x Attachment A – Peer Review Summary of the CLA Findings 15 toShihomi Kuriyagawa and Mark Davison (City of Boulder)  fromEleanor Cox and Laurie Matthews (MIG)   rePeer review of DRAFT Central Park Cultural Landscape Assessment Report  date12/12/2023 Certification of Peer Review and Summary of Findings Peer Review In September of 2023, Shihomi Kuriyagawa and Mark Davison from the Parks Department at the City of Boulder contracted Laurie Matthews at MIG to provide peer review for a department-authored cultural landscape assessment of Central Park. Eleanor Cox is providing technical guidance on the report content to the City while Laurie Matthews is providing QA/QC on MIG deliverables. Our professional qualifications are attached to this memo. On Oct 27, 2023, MIG received a copy of the DRAFT Boulder Central Park, Cultural Landscape Assessment from the Parks Department. Minor comments regarding missing context and organization of the report were provided in response, and on November 29 MIG received a revised draft for full peer review. After reviewing the revised report, MIG finds that sufficient evidence is presented to support the findings. Further refinement and organization of the content is needed before the report should be considered final, but the chronology is well researched and the integrity analysis presented meets professional standards. MIG concurs with the findings as described below. Summary of Findings The design and development of Central Park in 1923-1924 is historically significant under National Register Criterion C (design) as the work of a recognized master, landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. Additionally, the northern portion of Central Park is already an established historic district that has been determined historically significant under National Register Criteria A (Events) and C (Design) for its role in the social and cultural life of Boulder and the design improvements implemented between 1938 and 1950 by Glen Huntington and Saco Rienk DeBoer, including the band shell, the amphitheater, and the associated vegetation and grading. 16 MIG, Inc. Over the past century the Central Park landscape has experienced changes that include: ƒPhysical changes to the landscape, such as the realignment and redesign of the vegetation and circulation systems, and substantial regrading of the topography. ƒA change in use through the construction of the bandshell and its evolution as an activated space for entertainment and performance. These changes have resulted in a lack of historical integrity of design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association, which are needed for Central Park to convey its 1923-1924 design and association with Olmsted Jr. The character of Central Park relating to the Olmsted Jr.-era has been altered to the point where it is no longer visible in the landscape. Both historic significance and historical integrity are required to meet eligibility thresholds for listing in the National Register. While Central Park has its origins in the 1920s and the Olmsteds’ recommendations and designs for a park system in Boulder, it is no longer able to tell that story through the existing landscape. As such, while the park’s history is significant the lack of integrity in the landscape disqualifies the park as a whole for listing in the National Register as the work of master landscape architect Olmsted Jr. However, the northern portion of park is still able to convey its historic significance and association with the 1938-1950 era of park development associated with Huntington and DeBoer. Therefore, Central Park remains eligible for the National Register under Criteria A and C for the period in which the bandshell and associated amphitheater seating were designed and built (1938- 1950). The area associated with these improvements is roughly outlined in yellow in the graphic on page 3 of this memo; it does not constitute the full park boundary as no evidence exists linking the southern portion of the park to the Huntington-DeBoer improvements. 17 MIG, Inc. Attachments: Professional resumes for Laurie Matthews and Eleanor Cox. Both staff meet the Secretary of the Interiors Professional Qualifications Standards in the areas of history, architectural history, and/or historical landscape architecture. 18 EDUCATION »MLA, University of Oregon »BLA, Landscape Architecture, University of Oregon »BFA, Lewis & Clark College, Portland, Oregon PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS »American Society of Landscape Architects »Alliance for Historic Landscape Preservation »National Trust for Historic AWARDS »Oregon ASLA Distinguished Practitioner Award, 2022 »Oregon Recreation and Parks Association, South Park Blocks Master Plan, 2022 »Oregon ASLA Award of Excellence, Lithia Park Master Plan, 2019 »Oregon ASLA Award of Excellence, Willamette Falls Cultural Landscape Report, 2019 »Historic American Landscape Survey Challenge Award, Gaiety Hollow Documentation, 2014 Laurie Matthews, FASLA DIRECTOR OF PRESERVATION PLANNING AND DESIGN | MIG Laurie Matthews is a nationally recognized expert in preservation planning and cultural landscapes. Her work has helped to maintain and manage some of the most iconic and precious historical sites in the country such as Hearst Castle, Ellis Island, and Yosemite National Park. Laurie is fascinated by the complexities and stories associated with landscapes and the history they reveal. Her expertise and experience are invaluable in assisting clients interpret and apply The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and the National Register of Historic Places guidelines to the cultural properties under their stewardship. Laurie’s analytical and communication skills enable her to readily identify issues and clearly outline potential choices and tradeoffs related to design and management. She is inspired by the passion of her public and private clients and recognizes the impact the planning and design projects she prepares have on cultural landscapes. Laurie has garnered national and regional awards for her work, and she frequently speaks at national conferences on historic preservation and design. SELECTED PROJECT EXPERIENCE »Willamette Falls Cultural Landscape Report, Oregon City, OR »Yosemite Lodge Cultural Landscape Report, Yosemite National Park, CA »South Park Blocks Master Plan, Portland, OR »Dorris Ranch Master Plan, Springfield, OR Preservation Sand Creek Cultural Landscape Inventory, Sand Creek Massacre National Historical Site, CO »Lithia Park Master Plan, Ashland, OR »Point Reyes Light Station Cultural Landscape Report and Rehabilitation, Point Reyes National Seashore, CA »Oliver Kelley Farm Master Plan, Elk River, MN »Bassett Farms Cultural Landscape Report, Kosse, Texas »Denali Park Road Cultural Landscape Report, Denali National Park and Preserve, AK »Scotty’s Castle Cultural Landscape Report, Death Valley National Park, CA »Minidoka National Historical Park Visitor Center, ID »Menlo Community Residential, Menlo, CA »Greasy Grass Battlefield Cultural Landscape Report, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, MT »Curry Village Cabins Rehabilitation, Yosemite National Park, CA »Gaiety Hollow Cultural Landscape Report, Salem, OR »White Pass Cultural Landscape Report, Klondike Gold Rush National 19 EDUCATION »MS, Historic Preservation, Columbia University in the City of New York »BA, History, University of California, Santa Cruz CERTIFICATIONS »Certificate of Cultural Landscape Preservation and Management, University of California, Berkeley PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS »Vice-President, California Garden and Landscape History Society PRESENTATIONS »"Understanding Cultural Landscapes and PlanninH for Change at the National Mall," National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference, 2023 »“Climate Adaptation for Buildings and Landscapes,” National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference, 2022 »“Landscapes Lost or Forgotten: University Mound Nursery in San Francisco,” California Garden and Landscape History Society, 2020 Eleanor Cox, MS PRESERVATION SPECIALIST | MIG Eleanor Cox is a highly accomplished preservation specialist and project manager dedicated to broadening the application of cultural landscapes as a framework for holistically managing and maintaining historic sites and resources. An internship with the National Park Service put Eleanor on the path to graduate school and a 10-year career in historic preservation planning and cultural resources management spanning the United States. Using cultural landscapes as a lens to examine a project, she helps clients consider a place and all its layers and components—historic and archeological, social and spiritual, natural and man-made—as they decide upon its future. Combined with her research, analysis, and writing skills, Eleanor’s expertise and experience enable her to efficiently guide clients through often complex planning processes that require balancing client and stakeholder needs with cultural resources. She is passionate about applying her knowledge to create effective long-term stewardship strategies that allow for change while recognizing and maintaining the significant past. SELECTED PROJECT EXPERIENCE »Bear Lodge Indigenous Cultural Landscape Report, Devils Tower National Monument, WY »Keys Ranch Historic District Cultural Landscape Report, Joshua Tree National Park, CA »Camp Namanu National Register of Historic Places Nomination, Sandy, OR »Ukiah Railroad Depot Historic Resource Evaluation, Ukiah, CA »Bacon Ranch Historic District Cultural Landscape Report, Pinnacles National Park, CA »Bassett Farms Cultural Landscape Report, Limestone County, TX »Thousands Cabins Determination of Eligibility and National Register Update, Yosemite National Park, CA »Merced Manor Reservoir and Pump House Historic Resource Evaluation, San Francisco, CA* »Capitol Annex Replacement Project Landscape Evaluation and Historic Context Statements, Treatment Report, and Environmental Review, Sacramento, CA* »Capitol Extension Group Historic District National Register Update, Sacramento, CA* »Camp Locket Cultural Resources Technical Report, Campos, San Diego County, CA* »Golden Gate Village Maintenance Projects, Section 106 Compliance and Memorandum of Understanding Between the Marin Housing Authority and County of Marin, Marin City, CA* * Completed prior to joining MIG 20 AGENDA SETTING The PRAB Chair, PRAB Vice Chair and BPR staff set the agenda for the next month on Thursday directly following the regular PRAB meeting. PRAB members can submit agenda requests to the Chair and Vice Chair by Wednesday following the PRAB regular meeting for consideration. If time-sensitive matters arise, PRAB Chair and Vice Chair may amend the agenda as needed. LEGEND •Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). •Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. •Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion following the consent agenda. •Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. •Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. •Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-epth analysis. •City Council Item (cc) •Boards and Commissions (obc) •Community Engagement and/or Events (e) •Holiday/Closure (h/c) Italics indicate a tentative date or plan. PRAB Future Board Items Agenda 2024 18-Dec 22-Jan 26-Feb Consent Agenda 1) 2024 Budget - key changes 2) Harbeck House Entry Drive and Blinds 3) ANS overview Summary of Civic Area Study Session with City Council Crestview Maintenance Upgrades Action Items Matters for Discussion/Information Hold for Joint Landmarks Board Meeting - Civic Area Historic District 1) Court System Plan: Planning Analysis (30 min) 2) Civic Area Design Guidelines Follow up? 1) 2023 Year End Financial Review 2) Pleasantview: Schematic Design 3) Park on Violet: Planning Analysis with Vision and Value Matters from the Department •PLAY Boulder Foundation (10 min) 1) 2024 BPR Action Plan (20 minutes) Boulder Creek Safety Update Matters from the Board •View of complete PRAB Handbook Tentative: B&C Report Debrief and Discussion Other Mtgs or Topics •Dec 7: Flatirons Lease Agreement (cc) •Dec 14: Study Session: Historic District Nomination in Civic Area (cc) •Dec 18: B&C Recruitment Begins for 6 weeks • Jan 29: B&C application deadline TBD – PRAB Study Session • BPR Equity Work • Water Safety Access • PRAB Handbook deep dive -PRABs role and authority -PRAB process -Feb 12-Feb23: B&C applicant interviews Dept Event & Items of Interest Dec 22: COB ½ Day Christmas Eve closure Dec 25: COB Christmas Day closure Dec 29: COB ½ Day New Year’s Eve Jan 1: COB New Year’s Day closure Jan 15: COB Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Closure Jan 29: Board Recruitment Closes Feb 19: COB President’s Day closure Feb TBD: Court System Plan Public Meeting Study Session City Council Meeting Date 21 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Bryan Beary, Senior Manager, Community Building and Partnerships Mark Davison, Senior Manager, Planning Regina Elsner, Senior Manager, Natural Resources Jackson Hite, Senior Manager, Business Services Megann Lohman, Senior Manager, Recreation Stephanie Munro, Senior Manager, Regional Facilities Scott Schuttenberg, Deputy Director Dennis Warrington, Senior Manager, Urban Parks SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: December 18, 2023 A. Approval of Minutes November 27, 2023 22 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: November 27, 2023 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Rosa Kougl; 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles (Chuck) Brock, Elliott Hood, Andrew (Bernie) Bernstein, Sunny van der Star, Anna Segur Board Members Absent: Jason Unger, Anita Speirs Staff Present: Ali Rhodes, Rosa Kougl, Scott Schuttenberg, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffmann, Megann Lohman, Mark Davison, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Tina Briggs, Chris Passarelli, Jonathan Thornton, Bryan Beary, Regina Elsner, Stacy Cole Guests Present: Michael Svetz, Pros Consulting Type of Meeting: Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. First motion by Hood, second by Bernstein. The motion passed 5-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items: Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation, reviewed upcoming agenda items and events. No PRAB follow up questions or comments. Agenda Item 3: Public participation: •Patrick O’Brian shared idea of new outdoor Japanese game called Park Golf; a cross between croquet and real golf. It uses only one mallet and one ball to sink in a cup 8” across. The game is extremely popular in Japan, with over 2,000 courses. •Clifford Moss agrees that the results of the survey that Parks and Recreation shared regarding the court study plan are accurately portrayed. He stated that he and the rest of the court community enthusiastically support the Parks and Recreation Department in this project and their thanks go to Tina and Charlotte specifically. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A.Approval of Minutes from October 23, 2023, Business Meeting Motion to approve the minutes from the October 23, 2023, Regular PRAB meeting. First motion by Hood, second by Segur. The motion passed 5-0. B, C, D. Updates from the Director, Project Updates, Operations & Development No PRAB follow up questions or comments 23 Agenda Item 5: Items for Action A.Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve the Fee Schedule Hite presented this item. PRAB had the following questions or comments: •During normal operating hours at the reservoir, is there a fee for large vehicles? •Do tennis courts have to be reserved every time or is it first come first served? •How do you calculate break-even for outside of business hours at the reservoir? •What are other similar sized municipal courses charging for similar passes to our value plan card? $100 increase sounds like a lot. •Does the fee schedule contemplate for dockage fees for boats stored at the reservoir? Public hearing opened. •Larry McKeogh shared that access to the Boulder reservoir should not be universally labeled as an individual benefit when the user groups are operating in alignment to augment the city services at no cost to the city. Meeting or exceeding the 100% cost recovery should be questioned. Motion to adopt Attachment B – Proposed Parks and Recreation Department Fee Schedule for fee setting for 2024 and direct staff to publicly notice the 2024 fee updates pursuant to the Boulder Revised Code Section 8-2-8.: Motion by Hood. Second by Segur. The motion passed 5-0. B.Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to authorize the City Manager to enter into an Agreement with Tanoa Inc, covering a full-service restaurant at Flatirons Golf Course. Munro presented this item. PRAB had the following questions or comments: •What are the terms of the agreement? Public hearing opened. As there was no one who wanted to speak, the public hearing closed. Motion to approve the Agreement between the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department and Tanoa Inc. and to authorize the City Manager to make minor amendments prior to or during the term of this agreement in order to ensure that the Flatirons Golf Course Food and Beverage Restaurant is managed in a manner that is consistent with applicable laws and the policies and regulations of the City of Boulder.: Motion by Brock. Second by Hood. The motion passed 5-0. Agenda Item 6: Matters for Discussion •Facility Evaluation: Updated Annual Process Lohman and Munro presented this item. PRAB had the following questions/comments: •What were key takeaways from the feedback? •How are people prompted to fill out this survey? •It would help if the results showed what benefits these places have for the community. 24 •Do we do intercept surveys, for example for people at the reservoir? •What are some possible strategies to increase participation from financial aid recipients? •Shared that there is a lot more benefit from using texting programs to get people to engage, rather than emails. •Is there anything reasonable to do about goose poop at the reservoir? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Department •Court System Plan: Process and Community Engagement Findings O’Donnell and Svetz presented this item. PRAB had the following questions/comments: •Do we know how many known tennis players there are in Boulder? •Is this survey a statistically valid representation of the community? •There should be a potential for getting some of our low-income communities and immigrant communities engaged in tickle ball. •How do we let people, who are not already engaged in one of these two sports, know the work Boulder is planning here? •What are some strategies for sound reduction and absorption? Agenda Item 8: Matters from the Board Members a.PRAB Recruitment: Prospective Board Member Application Questions PRAB had the following questions or comment: •No changes b. Future meetings coordination and planning PRAB had the following questions or comment: •Doodle Poll in lieu of Google Form for Study Session date Agenda Item 9: Next Board Meeting Next Board meeting. Joint Study Session with Landmarks Board, Monday, December 18, 2023, Hybrid Agenda Item 10: Adjourn The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 p.m. Approved by: Attested: ___________________ _____________________ Chuck Brock Rosa Kougl Board Member BPR Staff Date: ______________ Date: _________________ 25 B. Parks and Recreation Project Update •B. Parks and Recreation Planning, Design and Construction Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. •Overview of Project Status Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved. Project Status Civic Area Reimagining – Phase 2 Contracting Civic Historic District Evaluation Planning Central Park Cultural Landscape Assessment Planning Court System Plan Planning Future of Recreation Centers: Rec Centers as a System Scoping North Boulder Park Contracting Flatirons Golf Course Construction Pleasantview Access Design Park on Violet Planning Coot Lake Bridge Replacement Construction Park Signs for Holiday and Washington School Park Design Pearl Street Place Making Anticipated Start 2024 Boulder Creek Safety Plan Anticipated Start 2024 Boulder Creek Management Plan Anticipated Start 2024 Boulder Junction Pocket Park Anticipated Start 2024 Crestview Play and Discovery Area Replacement Design East Boulder Community Park Anticipated Start 2024 Universal Access Plan Anticipated Start 2024 26 Planning •Facilities development partner search The City of Boulder is seeking a development partner to form a public-private partnership (P3) to help design, construct, finance, operate and maintain several city facilities, including the East Boulder Community Center. Potential partnerships will be considered as part of the Future of Recreation Centers project. Staff is currently working on scoping the Future of Recreation Centers project and will update PRAB in 2024 as more information is available. •Coot Lake Foot Bridge Replacement Construction at Coot Lake is still pending permit approval at this time. The planning team is tracking for a construction start in mid-late December. •Harbeck House Entry Drive and Window Blinds Driveway: In late September, a Landmark Alteration Certificate was issued for the repair of the driveway at the Harbeck-Bergheim House. The proposed work was reviewed and approved by the Landmark Design Review Committee. Over a period of two days, the damaged portion of the driveway was removed by an outside contractor and replaced with fiber-reinforced concrete. The new driveway is in the same footprint as the original driveway, and with the addition of a low-profile swale/pan, drainage at the site is improved as well as the overall appearance of the landmark property. Window Blinds: Window blinds have been installed on both the first and second floor windows of the Harbeck-Bergheim House. Previously, only a few windows had blinds, most of which did not match or function properly. These new blinds will reduce UV damage to the original floors, increase energy efficiency, and provide a greater level of security for the building’s occupants. C. Parks and Recreation Operations Update Boulder Reservoir Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) overview Eurasian Watermilfoil (EWM) was detected in the Boulder Reservoir in August 2022. The invasive plant has spread quickly. Through drone footage and a follow-up survey of the reservoir conducted by Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), staff has found that EWM covers roughly one-quarter to one-third of the reservoir primarily along the western coves. Staff have surveyed Coot Lake, Dry Creek, Lake Valley Estes ponds, and Framers Ditch and have not found EWM therefore, it is still unclear on the origin at the Reservoir. The city is working toward implementing an adaptive management approach, likely using some combination of biological, mechanical, and chemical approaches. To help inform the process and ensure we are implementing productive and cost-effective measures, the city is hiring a consultant to develop an EWM Management Plan. BPR staff are collaborating with the Utilities Department and Northern Water to review proposals, with an expected start date in early January 2024. A completed draft plan is anticipated in March. Depending on the approach implementation of the EWM management would begin in April or May. City staff are also working with the city of Westminster to utilize their expertise and success in habituating and harvesting weevils from 27 their established program. Westminster was not successful in harvesting weevils this fall and will attempt again in the spring or early summer. BPR staff will continue to provide the PRAB with updates as the Management Plan is developed and will keep the PRAB informed regarding any significant recreational operational adjustments. Drone photos: The two photos below illustrate the degree to which the reservoir has changed because of this plant. The top photo is from late 2021; the bottom photo is from September 2023. Flatirons Golf Course – Contractor Lease Agreement update The Tanoa Inc. Contractor lease agreement that PRAB approved at the business meeting in November was approved through the consent agenda at the city council meeting held on December 7. BPR staff will execute the agreement and Tanoa Inc. can begin procurement of the liquor licensure and development operations. The restaurant is scheduled to begin operations with the completion of the building in Summer 2024. 28 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Scott Schuttenberg, Deputy Director Bryan Beary, Senior Manager, Community Building and Partnerships Mark Davison, Senior Manager, Planning Regina Elsner, Senior Manager, Natural Resources Jackson Hite, Senior Manager, Business Services Megann Lohman, Senior Manager, Recreation Stephanie Munro, Senior Manager, Regional Facilities Dennis Warrington, Senior Manager, Urban Parks SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: December 18, 2023 A.PLAY Boulder Foundation Presentation. Angie Jeffords. 29 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: December 18, 2023 A.View of Final PRAB Handbook a.Attachment A B. PRAB Study Session Poll Results C.PRAB Matters (Verbal) 30 Page 1 of 18 City of Boulder Handbook for Members of Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) Adopted: February 2008 Amended: October 2023 Attachment A 31 Page 2 of 18 Welcome to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board! We, your fellow Board Members, look forward to meeting and working with you. We hope this welcome packet will provide a foundation for your five years of service by providing an overview of the role of the PRAB in City government, our responsibilities, and the meeting process. We strongly encourage you to read this packet thoroughly before your first meeting. Being on a board will often require reviewing relatively large volumes of information. Foundational materials for the PRAB include the PRAB Handbook (attached) and the Parks and Recreation Plan. The latter is a large document that is best read over time. The PRAB staff liaison is Rosa Kougl, the Executive Assistant in the Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) Director’s Office. Rosa can be reached at PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov or 303-413- 7223. As you will learn in the Boards and Commissions Orientation, to ensure that public business is conducted publicly and in compliance with the Colorado Open Records Act, we do not communicate using “reply all” or chains of e-mails or other means of group or serial communication. If you wish to share information with other PRAB members (without further group discussion except in a public meeting), the staff liaison can forward the e-mail on to members of the PRAB and appropriate staff, while preserving the e-mail as part of the public record. One-on-one chats with other PRAB members are fine; just please make sure you don't communicate, serially or otherwise, with three or more PRAB members outside of a public meeting. Your fellow board members are: Term Ending 2024 Charles “Chuck” Brock, President Cell: 303-887-2523 charles.a.brock@comcast.net Term Ending 2025 Jason Unger 202-380-7535 junger29@yahoo.com Term Ending 2026 Elliott Hood Vice Chair 312-607-9295 ehood@celaw.com or elliott.hood@gmail.com Term Ending 2027 Anita Speirs 720-987-0195 anitaspeirsboulder@gmail.com Sarah “Sunny” van der Star 303-956-4207 sunny.klaber@gmail.com Term Ending 2028 Andrew Bernstein Cell: (610) 618-6272 boulder.bernstein@gmail.com Anna Segur 720-412-6847 annasegur@yahoo.com Attachment A 32 Page 3 of 18 You will find that we all have different backgrounds and perspectives, and we know that you will bring your own to the PRAB. To help new PRAB members become familiar with the role of the PRAB and our meeting processes, you have the option of accepting an existing PRAB member as a mentor; this process will be discussed at the time of your first meeting. Our regular meetings are generally held on the fourth Monday of each month, with some exceptions for conflicts with holidays, etc. We also have 2-3 additional study sessions or joint meetings with other city boards during the year. Most meetings are in hybrid format (in-person with remote public participation), but we request that you attend in person unless special circumstances apply. Please pay attention to e-mails from PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov, which will include information on the meetings. Most meetings are held in the City Council Chambers in the municipal building, but occasionally we may meet in different public venues or take tours of department facilities. Dinner will be provided; please notify Rosa Kougl about any dietary restrictions you may have. In the week before each meeting, you will receive a link to the "packet", which is a collection of documents that will be discussed at the meeting. The PRAB Handbook describes the different components of this packet (e.g., Matters from the Department, Items for Action, Matters from the Board) and summarizes the work flow of each meeting. The Parks and Recreation department is a large department serving the needs of the people and environment in Boulder. As you learn about all of the services provided, please feel free to ask questions and explore resources like the Parks and Recreation website and the PRAB website. Our community outreach toolkit will help you navigate upcoming meetings and potential communications from community members. Parks and Recreation has excellent social media and email lists. You are invited to sign up for newsletters and follow the accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as BPR’s official non-profit philanthropic partner, the PLAY Boulder Foundation, to learn more about events and the work of Parks and Recreation. We look forward to having you on the PRAB! Sincerely, The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Attachment A 33 Page 4 of 18 I.LAWS RELEVANT TO PRAB’S WORK A.City of Boulder Charter – PRAB’s Creation and Function The City of Boulder and its government is established through its Charter. The Charter establishes a City Council to govern the City, a City Manager to exercise all executive and administrative powers vested in the City, and administrative departments of the City, including the Department of Parks and Recreation (the “Department” or “BPR”). See Charter, Article II (Council), Article V, Secs. 63 (City Manager), Article XI (BPR). The Charter also establishes the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (“PRAB”). See Charter, Article XI, Sec. 157. 1.Basic Requirements of the PRAB Under the Charter, the PRAB shall consist of seven members appointed by City Council who serve presumptive terms of five years. Id. Sec. 158. The Charter further states that the PRAB shall choose a Chair and secretary, who may be the BPR director. Id. Sec. 159. The PRAB shall have regular meetings once a month, though special meetings may be called at any time by three members of the PRAB upon 24 hours’ notice to all members of the PRAB. Id. Four members of the PRAB shall constitute a quorum, id., which is the minimum number of members required to hold a meeting and conduct business for the PRAB. A majority vote is required to authorize action by the PRAB. Id. The PRAB must keep minutes of its meetings and its transactions. Id. Pertinent here, the PRAB “shall have the power to make reasonable rules for the conduct of its business.” Id. 2.PRAB’s Function and Core Responsibilities The Charter also specifies the PRAB’s function. See Article XI, Sec. 160. Under the Charter, “the [PRAB] shall not perform any administrative function unless expressly provided in this charter. The [PRAB]: (a)Shall make recommendations to the council concerning the disposal of parks lands pursuant to Section 162 of [the] charter; (b)Shall make recommendations to the council concerning any expenditure or appropriation from the permanent park and recreation fund pursuant to Section 161 of [the] charter; (c)Shall make recommendations to the council concerning the grant or denial of any license or permit in or on park lands, pursuant to Section 164 of [the] charter; (d)Shall review the city manager’s proposed annual budget as it relates to park and recreation matters and submit its recommendations concerning said budget to the council; (e)May, at the request of the council or the department of parks and recreation, prepare and submit to the council city manager, or the department recommendations on such park and recreation matters as are not provided for by paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (d) above; and Attachment A 34 Page 5 of 18 (f)May request information and recommendations from the department pursuant to the provisions of Section 155(d) above. Further, City Council and BPR “shall not act on any of the matters set forth in paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (d) above without securing a recommendation from the board as above provided; however, the council and department may act on the matters set forth in paragraphs (c) and (d) above without a board recommendation if the board fails to submit its recommendation to the council within thirty days after request therefor is made by the council.” Id. Further, the PRAB’s recommendations pursuant to this section “shall not be binding on the city council unless expressly provided by this charter.” Id. Moreover, the Charter specifies how BPR must function in relation to the PRAB. Article XI, Sec. 155. For instance, Section 155 of the Charter states that the Department: “(c) shall prepare and submit to the [PRAB] written recommendations on those matters where this article requires a recommendation from said board prior to council or department action”; “(d) may, at the request of the [PRAB], prepare and submit to the [PRAB] information and recommendations on such park and recreation matters as are not provided for by (c) above”; and “(e) may request advice on any park and recreation matter from the [PRAB]”. Article XI, Sec. 155. 3.Franchises, Leases, Permits, and Licenses in Parks The Charter also specifies a role for PRAB regarding franchises, leases, permits, and licenses in parks. Under Section 164 of Article XI, City Council “may by motion grant leases, permits, or licenses in or on park lands, but only upon the affirmative vote of at least four members of the [PRAB].” The City Council “may, by ordinance, delegate all or any part of this authority to the [PRAB] to approve such leases, permits, or licenses.” Id. As described below in Section I.B., the City Council, by ordinance, has delegated to the PRAB the authority to approve leases, permits, or licenses on park lands “whose term does not exceed three years.” B.R.C. 8-3-23. Further, “the [PRAB] may, by motion, subdelegate all or any part of its delegated authority to approve such leases, permits, or licenses to the city manager.” Id. The City Manager “may enter into standard commercial licensing agreements for automatic food vending machines on park lands without the approval of the [PRAB] or the council.” Id. 4.Acquisition and Disposal of Park Property Regarding acquisition of park land, Section 163 of Article XI specifies that, while City Council may acquire park land for the city, it “shall not make any expenditure of money for the purpose of acquiring park lands without first securing a recommendation from the planning board and the [PRAB], provided, however, that City Council “can act without such recommendations if said board fail to submit their recommendations to the council within thirty days after request therefor is made by the council.” Id. These recommendations “shall not be binding on the council except that the recommendation of the [PRAB] concerning expenditures from the permanent park and recreation fund shall be binding on the council pursuant to Section 161 of [the] charter.” Id. Similarly, regarding disposal of park property, Section 162 of Article XI states that park lands may be disposed of by City Council, “but only upon the affirmative vote of at least four members of the [PRAB].” Id. City Council may obtain a non-binding “advisory recommendation” from the planning board on land disposal. Id. Lastly, “park land” "park property," and "recreation facilities" are Attachment A 35 Page 6 of 18 defined in Section 154, “…all lands donated to the city for park or recreation purposes, acquired by the city through purchase, dedication, deed, or condemnation for park or recreation purposes, or purchased or improved in whole or in part with funds from the permanent park and recreation fund”. 5.Permanent Park and Recreation Fund The permanent park and recreation fund consists of: “(a) an annual levy of nine-tenths of one mill on each dollar of assessed valuation of all taxable property within the city; (b) gifts and donations to the fund; (c) proceeds of the sale of any part or recreation property or equipment whether real, personal, or mixed; and (d) appropriations made to the fund by the city council.” Charter, Article XI, Sec. 161. Expenditures from this fund “shall be made only upon favorable recommendations of the [PRAB] and appropriation by the council.” Id. the fund “shall not be used for any purpose other than the acquisition of park land or the permanent improvement of park and recreation facilities.” Id. B. City of Boulder Municipal Code While the City Charter establishes the city and its government, the City’s Revised Municipal Code establishes additional laws and rules based on the Charter so that the City can properly function. Think of the City’s Charter as the City’s “constitution” and its municipal code as statutes or laws enacted based on that constitution. All laws in the municipal code flow from the Charter as well as applicable state and federal laws. The Charter can be amended only by voter approval while the municipal code can be amended by majority vote of City Council. The municipal code has laws that apply generally to all city functions, including its boards and commissions, and many of which apply only to the administration of our parks system. For instance, the code generally provides that boards and commissions must: •hold regular meetings open to the public; •keep minutes of those meetings; •appoint a chair, vice chair, and secretary •conduct its meetings under the then-current Robert’s Rules of Order, unless the boards or commissions adopt different rules; and, among other things, •determine whether to hold meetings in person, remotely, or in hybrid format. B.R.C. 2-3-1. The code also has rules that apply specifically to the PRAB. For example, as mentioned above in Section I.A., under B.R.C. 8-3-23, pursuant to Section 164 of Article XI of the City’s Charter, “the [PRAB] is delegated the authority to approve any lease, license, or permit in or on park lands whose term does not exceed three years, as may be recommended to it by the city manager.” Section 2-3-10 of the municipal code codifies the role and responsibility of the PRAB as set forth in the Charter, but also adds additional rules not inconsistent with the Charter: Attachment A 36 Page 7 of 18 (a)The City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Advisory Board consists of seven members, appointed by the city council for five-year terms; (b)The city manager shall serve as secretary of the board; (c)Four members of the board constitute quorum. The board may only act on affirmative vote of at least a majority of all members present at a meeting. Three members of the board may call a special meeting. (d)The Board’s functions are: 1)To approve or disapprove proposals concerning the disposal of park lands and forward such recommendations to the city council; 2)To approve or disapprove expenditures or appropriations from the permanent park and recreation fund and forward such recommendations to the city council; 3)To make recommendations to the council concerning the grant or denial of any license or permit in or on park lands; 4)To make recommendations to the council concerning protection and maintenance of park lands; 5)To review the city manager’s proposed annual budget relating to parks and recreation matters and submit its recommendations concerning that budget to the council; 6)At the request of council, the city manager or the department of parks and recreation matters and submit its recommendations concerning that budget to the council; 7)At the request of council, the city manager[,] or the department of parks and recreation, to prepare and submit to the council, manager[,] or department, recommendations on any additional park and recreation matters; and 8)To request information and recommendations from the department of parks and recreation pursuant to the provisions of Charter Section 155. (e)The board is not authorized to issue subpoenas. C.Colorado Open Meetings Law As a local public body, the PRAB is subject to the requirements of the Colorado Open Meetings Law (COML), which is codified at Colorado Revised Statute (CRS) 24-6-401 and 402. Under COML, “all meetings of a quorum or three or more members of a local public body, whichever is fewer, at which any public business is discussed or at which any formal action may be taken are declared to be open to the public at all times.” C.R.S. § 24-6-402(2)(b) (emphasis Attachment A 37 Page 8 of 18 added). A “meeting” is defined as “any kind of gathering, convened to discuss public business, in person, by telephone, electronically, or by other means of communication.” Id. § 402(1)(b). Further, “any meetings at which the adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, rule, regulation, or formal action occurs or at which a majority or quorum of the body is in attendance, or is expected to be in attendance, shall be held only after full and timely notice to the public.” Id. §402(2)(c)(I). This “notice” can be accomplished by a number of means but must at minimum be “posted in a designated public place within the boundaries of the local public body no less than twenty-four hours prior to the holding of the meeting.” Id. Moreover, “the public place or places for posting such notice shall be designated annually at the local public body’s first regular meeting of each calendar year” and “shall include specific agenda information where possible.” Id. Essentially, our meetings are and should be open to the public. We must notify the public at least 24 hours in advance of any meetings where “public business is discussed or at which any formal action may be taken,” whether those meetings are in person, over the telephone, or electronically. Please note that, under this law, a meeting of three or more PRAB members, or a quorum of the PRAB if less than three people, constitutes a "meeting” under the law—whether that is an in-person meeting, telephone discussion, or email chain—and must therefore be publicly noticed. Failure to follow these requirements could result in a violation of this law and possible legal action against the City, the Department, or the PRAB. You can access and read the entire COML here. D.COLORADO OPEN RECORDS ACT (CORA) Another important law that impacts the PRAB’s work is the Colorado Open Records Act (CORA), codified at C.R.S. § 24-72-201-205.5. CORA declares that “all public records shall be open for inspection by any person, at reasonable times,” unless the records fall into very specific statutory exceptions. C.R.S. § 24-72-203(1)(a). A “public record” is “a writing made, maintained, or kept by the state, any agency, institution, . . ., or political subdivision of the state, . . ., and held by any local-government-financed entity for use in the exercise of functions required or authorized by law or administrative rule or involving the receipt or expenditure of public funds.” C.R.S. § 24-72-202(6)(a)(I). A “political subdivision” includes “every county, city and county, city, town, school district, special district, public highway authority, regional transportation authority, and housing authority within this state.” Id. § 202(5). Our board is subject to the provisions of this statute and, thus, our correspondence and other documents concerning official PRAB business, as well as our correspondence with BPR staff, are subject to CORA. Note that documents created or maintained by BPR staff are also subject to CORA, so their emails and other correspondence with us, subject to certain statutory exceptions, are public records. In other words, subject to specific statutory exceptions, your emails and other documents used in furtherance of this body’s business likely applies as public records and, therefore, may be subject to public disclosure if requested under CORA. Please be mindful of that when you are creating or maintaining documents or sending correspondence on the PRAB. II.PRAB RULES FOR CONDUCTING BUSINESS Attachment A 38 Page 9 of 18 As noted, the PRAB is authorized to create its own rules to conduct its business, so long as those rules are consistent with the Charter and municipal code. Sections II, III, and IV of this Handbook shall constitute the rules of the PRAB and shall be amended only as provided below. A.Basic Principles The following is a non-exhaustive list of the basic principles of fair parliamentary procedure that members of the PRAB shall strive to uphold: 1.Rules should facilitate the transaction of business and promote cooperation and harmony; 2.All members have an equal vote concerning business of the PRAB; 3.The PRAB acts by majority vote, but the rights of minority votes must be respected and protected; 4.PRAB members have a right to full and free discussion of any and all issues presented to the board for action, recommendation, or otherwise, but balanced with the duty to efficiently and timely address all topics set for discussion in a meeting agenda; 5.No member of the PRAB shall be forced to take a vote on any item if that member does not feel he or she fully comprehends the meaning and effect of the vote being taken (but note that abstaining from a vote is considered a vote in the affirmative under the City’s municipal code, see B.R.C. 2-3-1(f)); 6.Meetings should be characterized by fairness and conducted in good faith. B.Officers The PRAB shall have a chair, a vice-chair, and a secretary. Pursuant to the City’s municipal code, the secretary shall be the City Manager or someone designated by the City Manager. The secretary of the PRAB is not a member of the PRAB and therefore has no voting authority. The chair and vice-chair shall be current PRAB members chosen by majority vote of the PRAB at its first business meeting following the annual City Council board appointments. The chair shall run PRAB meetings consistent with these rules and Robert’s Rules of Order. The chair shall, in running meetings, shall: •recognize a quorum; •call meetings to order; •call for motions and for debate on such motions; Attachment A 39 Page 10 of 18 •ensure that public comment, if any, is heard according to these rules and the policies of the City of Boulder and the BPR; •ensure that BPR staff and other non-board participants have the opportunity to report information to and seek action, guidance, or recommendations from the PRAB; •ensure that the board’s business is conducted timely, fairly, and efficiently; •facilitate discussion between among board members; •enforce rules and expectations of decorum; •ensure that each board member who wishes to speak on an issue is heard; •rule on all questions of parliamentary procedure; and •close the meeting. The vice chair shall, without the need for a majority vote or appointment by the chair, run meetings consistent with these rules when the chair is not able to attend a PRAB meeting or is otherwise not able to run the meeting. The chair and vice chair shall work with BPR staff to set the agenda and ensure necessary information and materials are available for PRAB meetings. The PRAB may, by an affirmative vote of a majority of the current members of the PRAB, at a publicly noticed meeting, remove the chair or vice-chair from their position in leadership of the PRAB. Should a vacancy arise in the office of either the chair or vice-chair, the PRAB shall fill the vacancy by majority vote at a publicly noticed meeting of the PRAB. C.Conduct & Rights of PRAB Members PRAB members shall conduct themselves consistent with these rules and consistent with City of Boulder policies concerning service on boards and commissions. Along these lines, each PRAB member must ensure that he, she, or they: •do not purport to act on PRAB’s behalf unless a majority of PRAB members, in a publicly noticed meeting, have delegated authority for that member to so act; •clearly identify in any forum whether they are speaking on behalf of the PRAB or for themselves, including but not limited to city council meetings, newspaper articles or letters, and other public or private engagements; •recuse from matters raising a conflict of interest consistent with Section II.D., below; •act professionally and courteously with each other and with city council, city staff, and the public. Attachment A 40 Page 11 of 18 During meetings, PRAB members have a right to make motions, vote on such motions, speak in debate on motions, call for the retaking of a motion if the result is doubted by that member, make a point of order to insist on the enforcement of the rules, provide comment to other PRAB members or BPR staff on matters under discussion, and make a parliamentary inquiry of the presiding officer if that member is not certain whether there is a breach on which a point of order should be made. Further, while the PRAB chair shall rule on any questions of parliamentary procedure, any two PRAB members can require the chair to submit a ruling to the vote of the PRAB by moving for and seconding an appeal immediately after the presiding officer has made such a ruling. This motion divests final decision of the parliamentary ruling from the chair and vests that final decision with the PRAB. D.Conflicts of Interest/Code of Conduct A PRAB member shall not perform an official act that has a direct benefit to the member or on a business or other undertaking in which such member has a direct or substantial financial interest. If an actual conflict of interest exists, the member shall disclose the basis of the actual conflict of interest in a public meeting to the other members in attendance before discussion of the relevant matter or as soon thereafter as the member identifies or recognizes the actual conflict and shall recuse from further discussion on the matter and disqualify himself, herself, or themself from taking official action on the matter. A PRAB member may also or alternatively have an apparent or perceived conflict of interest, meaning the member does not have an actual conflict of interest but may reasonably be perceived as having an interest in the outcome of a vote which could be viewed by the public as a conflict of interest. A PRAB member who believes, or reasonably should believe, that he, she, or they may have an apparent or perceived conflict of interest: (1) shall disclose the basis of the apparent or perceived conflict of interest in a public meeting to the other members in attendance before the discussion, hearing, or official action related to the matter in question, and (2) may recuse from any discussion on the matter and disqualify himself, herself, or themself from taking any official action on the matter. In other words, PRAB members with an apparent or perceived conflict have discretion to recuse in the exercise of sound judgment. If a PRAB member believes that they may have a conflict of interest or are unsure they should reach out to the City Attorney that supports PRAB for advice. Please note that the definition of “member” for this conflict policy is broad and can be found in the City’s municipal code at Title 2-7-14. Please also familiarize yourself with the City’s Code of Conduct, which can be found at Title 2, Chapter 7, which can be accessed here. E.Speaking on PRAB’s Behalf/Code of Conduct PRAB members may communicate with members of the public, including City Council, individual City Council members, other boards or commissions, press publications, or otherwise, in their personal capacity and noting that he, she, or they are members of the PRAB. Attachment A 41 Page 12 of 18 However, as noted above in Section II.D., PRAB members may not speak on PRAB’s behalf unless a majority of the PRAB members have delegated that member to speak on PRAB’s behalf consistent with these rules. If a PRAB member is delegated to speak on PRAB’s behalf, the delegating PRAB members shall endeavor to direct or instruct the speaking member as clearly as possible on the purpose and scope of the delegation and authority to speak on PRAB’s behalf. Any motion presented to Council by the PRAB shall be in writing. PRAB may designate a PRAB member to present the motion to City Council during the period of public comment or, if requested by City Council, the City Manager, or the Department, during the Council meeting. The PRAB member authorized to present the motion shall provide written copies of the motion to City Council and request to read the complete text of the motion to City Council. This conduct also falls within the City’s Code of Conduct, which can be accessed here. F.Resolutions of the PRAB From time to time, the PRAB may desire to act through a resolution. A resolution is a written document that sets forth a board’s decision or action. A board may adopt resolutions for any purpose the board deems appropriate, including taking formal action on a particular business item or communicating the board’s position on a matter of public concern. A resolution may be proposed by any PRAB member. If a resolution is proposed, the chair shall call for a discussion of the proposal and, after such discussion, shall ask for a motion on proceeding with a resolution for the purposes proposed. If a majority of the PRAB votes to proceed with a resolution, the chair shall designate a PRAB member to draft the resolution with the assistance of BPR or other City staff, including the office of the City Attorney. The PRAB shall consider and vote to adopt the written resolution at a publicly noticed meeting. It is important to note that PRAB may adopt resolutions so long as they are within the PRAB’s scope of legal authority. However, only city council has authority to set policy for the city. G.Making, Debating, and Voting on a Motion Any member of the PRAB may make a motion during a meeting. If a motion is made, the chair shall ask for a second. If no member seconds the motion, the chair shall not recognize the motion and the motion dies. If a member seconds the motion, the chair shall recognize the motion and ask for debate on the motion. In parliamentary procedure, “debating” a motion allows members of an assembly to discuss the merits of a particular question, stating that they “support the motion” or “do not support the motion” and providing specific reasons for that position. Discussion shall focus on the substance and merits of the motion and not on the motive for bringing the motion. Asking a question of clarification on the motion or subject-matter underlying the motion is not considered a statement in the debate. Once it appears that all PRAB members have had an opportunity to “debate,” or discuss, the motion, the chair shall ask whether there is any further discussion on the motion. If not, the chair shall call for a vote on the motion, at which point roll shall be taken to obtain the vote of Attachment A 42 Page 13 of 18 each member of the PRAB, including the members who made and seconded the motion. The board secretary or designee shall tally the votes and announce whether the motion carries or fails. A member may ask that a motion be amended. Amendments must be closely related to the subject of the motion. While amendments may be hostile to or intended to defeat the purpose of the original motion, such amendments are discouraged. Amendments may insert or add words into the motion, strike words from the motion, or substitute words from the motion. If a member desires to amend a motion, the member shall move to amend the motion. If the motion is seconded, the presiding officer shall recognize the amendment and call for debate on the amendment. If no second is obtained, the amendment dies. Once discussion on the amendment is over, the presiding officer shall put the amendment for a vote. The secretary of the PRAB or his or her designee shall tally the vote of any motion and announce whether the motion carries or fails. The chair shall then announce that the motion has carried or failed and proceed with the meeting. Motions are improper if they: conflict with the City Charter, the municipal code, or state or federal law; it is outside the PRAB’s scope of legal authority; it is dilatory, out of order, seeks to thwart the will of PRAB, or is objectively absurd in substance. If an improper motion is made, the presiding officer shall state that the motion is improper and is thus not recognized. Voting shall be by roll call on a rotating basis of the roll for motions concerning: disposal of parks land, expenditures or appropriations from the permanent parks and recreation fund, grant or denial or any license or permit in or on park land, review of the budget, and recommendations on the budget. For all other motions, the vote may be taken by voice, by show of hands, or by roll call on a rotating basis of the roll as determined by the presiding officer, subject to appeal. Unless otherwise provided in the City Charter or municipal code, an affirmative vote of a majority of the members of the PRAB shall be necessary to authorize any action of the PRAB. Any member who doubts the result of a voice vote may require a retake of that voice vote as a show of hands or other means. Any PRAB member may abstain from voting if that member is not adequately informed on the motion or the subject of the motion, but the abstaining member must state a basis for abstaining. Please note that abstaining from voting is, under the City’s municipal code, considered a vote in favor of the motion. See B.R.C. 2-3-1(f). Any PRAB member may recuse from a vote based on a conflict of interest. III.MEETING PROCEDURES AND EXPECTATIONS A.Meeting Time, Place, and Format Meetings are held on the fourth Monday of each month starting at 6:00 p.m. and are publicly noticed on the PRAB’s web page. Attachment A 43 Page 14 of 18 Historically, all meetings were held in City Council chambers. However, the COVID-19 pandemic, which began in March 2020, prompted the PRAB, other boards and commissions, and Council itself, to hold its meetings virtually. Since January 2023, the PRAB has held its meetings in a “hybrid” format, allowing members to attend in person or virtually. Members of the public may be limited to virtual attendance, including during public comment, if there is a public health or safety concern as provided in B.R.C. 2-3-1(b)(7). Within this new hybrid format, the PRAB has established a preference that all members attend meetings in person, though members may attend virtually if they are not able to physically attend a meeting. PRAB members do not need permission or an affirmative vote from the PRAB to attend a meeting virtually, but members attending a meeting virtually are asked to notify the PRAB and BPR staff prior to the meeting of their need to attend virtually so that BPR staff, the agenda committee, or other PRAB members may make appropriate arrangements for that virtual attendance. PRAB members attending virtually are strongly encouraged to have their screens turned on at all times so the public may ensure that the member is present and participating. Meeting locations are determined by the Agenda Committee. Hybrid or virtual meetings present unique challenges, including the ability to recognize whether a member is asking to speak. The presiding officer shall recognize speakers desiring to speak and PRAB members shall attempt to claim the floor by raising their hand (physically or using a virtual hand-raise feature) before speaking. The chair shall recognize speakers in the order in which the speakers raised their hands or otherwise indicated a desire to speak. B.Preparing for Meetings BPR staff shall distribute meeting packets to the PRAB before each meeting. Meeting packets are typically distributed the Wednesday before Monday meetings. PRAB members are expected to review meeting packets and otherwise come prepared to each meeting. Any questions about the meeting packet should be directed to BPR staff or PRAB officers in accordance with the Open Meetings Law discussed above. C.Presiding Officers The chair of the PRAB presides over each meeting. If the chair is absent, the vice chair shall preside. If both the chair and the vice chair are absent, the present PRAB members shall elect a provisional presiding officer by majority vote. Presiding officers shall conduct themselves and recognize the rights of others consistent with the rules set forth in this handbook. The secretary of the board shall be present for each meeting. If the secretary is absent, the PRAB shall appoint a provisional secretary for the meeting by majority vote. Attachment A 44 Page 15 of 18 D.Quorums Four members of the PRAB constitute a quorum as specified in Article XI, Section 159 of the City Charter. The presiding officer of each meeting shall determine whether a quorum is present and shall thereafter call the meeting to order. The only actions that may occur without a quorum are: fixing a time at which to adjourn, adjourning, recessing, and taking measures to obtain a quorum. A non-quorum may proceed with a meeting, but no action may be taken during the meeting without a quorum. E.Consent Agenda A “consent agenda” is an omnibus agenda item that groups routine, non-controversial items together for approval or consideration. The consent agenda is a tool for streamlining the process for meetings and saving time. Consent items are typically not discussed in open session, so it is essential that PRAB members review consent agenda items before the meeting. Consent agendas can include approval of meeting minutes, approval of the agenda for the current meeting, appointment of a PRAB member as provisional member on the agenda committee, or action items that have been discussed at length in a past meeting, among other things. The chair shall ask for a motion to approve the consent agenda, at which point a member may so move. When the motion is seconded, the chair shall call for debate or discussion on the consent agenda. Any PRAB member may ask for debate or discussion on the consent agenda. Because consent agendas are typically routine and non-controversial, PRAB members rarely object to the approval of the consent agenda, though sometimes a member may move that meeting minutes or agenda item be modified. If such an amendment is proposed, the chair shall ask for a motion that the consent agenda be approved as amended. F.Public Comment Public comment allows members of the public to speak to the board on matters that concern BPR or PRAB business not otherwise scheduled for a hearing in the agenda. Instructions for public comment are provided on the PRAB’s web page, which is managed by the City of Boulder. Speakers must sign up to speak to the board by a certain time before the meeting. The PRAB may, by majority vote, allow members of the public to speak to the PRAB at a meeting even if the speaker failed to follow the instructions for public comment. It has been the practice of the PRAB to allow speakers to address the board even if they fail to follow those instructions unless the speaker has repeatedly failed to follow such instructions. Following public comment, the chair shall ask for and allow discussion from the board on any matters raised during public comment. Any member of the PRAB may also ask that BPR staff address a specific issue raised during public comment. The chair may also, at his or her discretion, ask that a representative of the Department, usually the Director, to follow up with a specific speaker or speakers concerning matters raised during public comment. Attachment A 45 Page 16 of 18 G.Action Items Action items are those items upon which the board must act consistent with the City Charter and City municipal code. As noted, the PRAB may act by voting on a motion or through approval of a written resolution. The Agenda Committee shall endeavor to ensure that PRAB members are made aware at a prior meeting that an action item is forthcoming and further ensure that the PRAB has sufficient opportunity to discuss and obtain information and recommendations related to any such action item. BPR staff typically present to the PRAB information and recommendations related to such action items, and PRAB members are given the opportunity to ask for additional information and recommendations from staff. Any PRAB member who feels as if they are not adequately informed on a specific action item may abstain from any vote on that action item. While public hearings on action items are discretionary, in the interests of transparency and accountability to the community, the PRAB shall hold public hearings prior to voting on an action item concerning Sections 160(a), (b), (c), and (d) in the City Charter. Following presentation from staff and public hearing, the chair shall call for a motion on the action item and ask for debate (or discussion) on the motion. The exact language of the motion shall appear in the meeting minutes. Any member of the PRAB may move, preferably at the beginning of the meeting, to add an action item to the agenda. If such a motion is made, the chair shall call for debate on the motion. An action item may only be added to the agenda during a meeting if a majority of the PRAB votes in favor of the motion to add the item. H.Matters from the Department “Matters from the Department” typically includes a summary update from BPR on key priorities for BPR, including a summary of upcoming work, events, and collaborative activities. For expediency, BPR staff prepare a written update for the PRAB that is included in the meeting packet, though staff may elaborate on key items during the meeting if, for instance, that item involves PRAB’s input or guidance. During this segment of the meeting, the PRAB, by majority vote, may move to request additional information or recommendations from BPR on a matter or matters discussed. Individual members may, without a motion, provide comment to BPR on a matter presented by BPR. As noted, under Section 155(d) and 160(f) of Article XI of the Charter, the PRAB may, by majority vote, request information and recommendations from the Department on any park and recreation matter not otherwise specified in the Charter. The Department may, in its discretion, provide such information or recommendations and, if necessary, shall ensure that the Agenda Committee sets an agenda item for such information or recommendations. Attachment A 46 Page 17 of 18 I.Matters from the Board “Matters from the Board" is an opportunity for board members to share their thoughts on issues or matters involving the PRAB or BPR’s work. This could include: feedback for staff on park and recreation facilities, interactions with the public, providing the PRAB with an update on work for a collaborative committee, requests for agenda items at future meetings, and so on. PRAB members are not required to speak during this segment. If, during this segment of the meeting, a PRAB member wishes to add an agenda item for a future meeting, or to be considered for addition by the agenda committee, the member shall request that the Agenda Committee (see Section J, below) add the item to a future agenda. J.Agenda Committee The agenda committee is composed of the chair, vice-chair, BPR Director, and any BPR staff necessary to set future agendas. If the PRAB chair or PRAB vice-chair cannot attend an agenda committee meeting, the absent committee member shall request that another PRAB member be appointed as a provisional agenda committee member, and the accepting board member shall serve as provisional agenda committee member for so long as the absence shall last. The agenda committee usually meets on a weekday following the most recent PRAB meeting to set the agenda for the following meeting or meetings. The agenda committee typically receives a draft agenda from the BPR Director. The agenda committee sets the agenda for the PRAB as a body; thus, PRAB officers, or provisional members, shall endeavor to advocate for the interests of the PRAB as a whole when setting the agenda. In helping to set the agenda, PRAB officers shall prioritize agenda items requiring PRAB action or recommendations consistent with the City Charter and municipal code. The agenda committee shall also set the meeting location if the PRAB is holding physical or hybrid meetings. K.Role of BPR During Meetings The Parks and Recreation Department prepares meeting packets containing the agenda and any materials necessary for the meeting. Meeting packets are typically provided the Wednesday before Monday meetings. Packet materials should clearly articulate the subject on which PRAB’s action or input is sought and why the PRAB’s involvement is necessary or requested. Packet materials should be provided with enough time before a meeting for PRAB members to sufficiently review the materials and prepare for each meeting. Attachment A 47 Page 18 of 18 Packet materials shall endeavor to provide objective information for PRAB’s consideration. When alternatives are proposed, BPR shall present and explain the range of alternatives and, if appropriate, BPR staff’s recommended course of action. Further, BPR provides notice of PRAB meetings as provided in B.R.C. 2-3-1(b)(5). L.Other Meetings The PRAB may hold meetings other than the monthly business meeting. Such meetings, typically referred to as “special meetings,” shall be called by PRAB by a majority vote on a motion, which shall include the time, place, and format of the meeting. Such meetings are subject to the Open Meetings Law discussed above and may be study sessions, working meetings with BPR and PRAB, or other meetings as needed. M.Parliamentary Procedure Except as provided in these rules or in the City Charter or municipal code, all matters of procedure are governed by the current edition of Robert’s Rules of Order. IV.AMENDING AND REVIEWING THESE RULES This Handbook and the rules therein may be amended by a majority vote of PRAB members so long as the City Attorney representing PRAB reviews and approves. Any proposed changes must be provided in writing to the PRAB and to the Office of the City Attorney at least fifteen days before the meeting at which the vote to amend is taken. All PRAB members, now or existing, shall review this Handbook annually to maintain familiarity with the contents of this Handbook, to assess the appropriateness of the rules therein, and to evaluate if any amendments to the Handbook are needed. V.RESOURCES City of Boulder Charter City of Boulder Revised Code (Municipal Code) BPR Web Page PRAB Web Page Colorado Open Meetings Law Colorado Open Records Act Attachment A 48