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04.24.23 PRAB PacketAGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (2 minutes) II.PROCEDURAL ITEMS A.Induct New Members (5 minutes) B.Welcome New members (2 minutes) C.Officer Elections (5 minutes) III.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (2 minutes) IV.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (15-30 minutes) A.This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. V.CONSENT AGENDA (5 minutes) A.Approval of Minutes from March 20, 2023, and April 3, 2023, Study Session B.Updates from the Deputy Director of Parks and Recreation C.Parks and Recreation Planning, Design and Construction Updates D.Parks and Recreation Operations Updates VI.ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION A.Fee Policy and Budget Strategy (45 minutes) VII.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT A.Pleasant View Access and Parking Improvements Feasibility Study VIII.MATTERS FROM THE BOARD A.PRAB handbook revisions (5 min) B.Advancing Racial Equity Training (2 min) C.PRAB Matters (Verbal) (5 minutes) D.New member welcome letter (Attachment) IX.NEXT BOARD MEETING: A.6:00 p.m. May 22, 2023, hybrid X.ADJOURN Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Hybrid Meeting 6:00 p.m., April 24, 2023 Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2023 Andrew Bernstein Charles Brock Elliott Hood Anna Segur Anita Speirs Jason Unger Sarah van der Star Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1.Community Health and Wellness 2.Taking Care of What We Have 3.Financial Sustainability 4.Building Community 5.Youth Engagement 6.Organizational Readiness 1 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Procedural Items DATE: April 24, 2023 A.Oath of Office (2 minutes) B.Welcome New Members (verbal) (10 minutes) C.Officer Election (5 minutes) There are currently two nominations for PRAB Officers for the 2023-2024 term: •Chair: Charles “Chuck” Brock •Vice Chair: Elliott Hood Both candidates have accepted their nomination. Other nominations may be made during the PRAB meeting on April 24 before voting occurs. 2 I, Andrew Bernstein, do solemnly swear (affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States of America and of the State of Colorado and the Charter and ordinances of the City of Boulder, and faithfully perform the duties of the office of a member of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board which I am about to enter. Andrew Bernstein STATE OF COLORADO ) ) COUNTY OF BOULDER ) SS.: ) CITY OF BOULDER ) Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of _______________, 2023. Board Secretary OATH OF OFFICE 3 I, Anna Segur, do solemnly swear (affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States of America and of the State of Colorado and the Charter and ordinances of the City of Boulder, and faithfully perform the duties of the office of a member of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board which I am about to enter. Anna Segur STATE OF COLORADO ) ) COUNTY OF BOULDER ) SS.: ) CITY OF BOULDER ) Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of _______________, 2023. Board Secretary OATH OF OFFICE 4 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Bryan Beary, Senior Manager, Community Building and Partnerships Mark Davison, Senior Manager, Planning Regina Elsner, Senior Manager, Natural Resources Jackson Hite, Senior Manager, Business Services Megann Lohman, Senior Manager, Recreation Stephanie Munro, Senior Manager, Regional Facilities Scott Schuttenberg, Deputy Director Dennis Warrington, Senior Manager, Urban Parks SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: April 24, 2023 A. Approval of Minutes March 20, 2023 and April 3, 2023 Study Session 7 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: March 20, 2023 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Rosa Kougl; 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Pam Yugar, Charles (Chuck) Brock, Mary Scott, Sunny van der Star, Elliott Hood, Jason Unger Board Members Absent: Anita Speirs Staff Present: Ali Rhodes, Rosa Kougl, Scott Schuttenberg, Stephanie Munro, Bryan Beary, Megann Lohman, Christy Spielman, Jackson Hite, Mark Davison, Tina Briggs, Jonathan Thornton, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffmann Guests Present: N/A Type of Meeting: Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:01 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. First motion by Hood, second by van der Star. The motion passed 5-0. (Unger not present for voting). Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items: Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation, reviewed upcoming agenda items and events. No PRAB follow up questions or comments. Agenda Item 3: Public participation: • No public comment. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from February 27, 2023 Business Meeting Motion to approve the minutes from the February 27, 2023, Regular PRAB meeting. First motion by Scott, second by van der Star. The motion passed 6-0 (Unger not present for voting). B, C, D. Updates from the Director, Project Updates, Operations & Development • No PRAB follow up questions or comments. Agenda Item 5: Items for Action • No items 8 Agenda Item 6: Matters for Discussion • 2024 Budget Strategy Roadmap and Fee Policy Hite and Hoffmann presented this item. PRAB had the following questions/comments: • For the lottery fund, does it fluctuate with lottery revenues, or what governs or limits the $428,000 we're getting this year? • Is the General Fund managed by the city's finance department, and then we get a distribution? • Does Boulder charge employers any kind of a head tax on employers? • Do businesses pay equal taxes as to residences? • How do we make sure that smaller businesses are impacted than the larger money makers are? • Are other cities in the country or in our state making the kind of remarkable recovery Boulder is? • There is a big difference between Boulder and many other communities, there are a lot of communities that have much larger General Fund apportionments to parks and recreation. We have much more varied funding sources which makes Boulder unique. • Regarding the golf course, are we counting rounds as 9 holes or 18 holes, because it seems like the trend nationally is that people are stopping playing 18 and they’re playing 9 and that is getting more people out to play. Do we see this trend? Is that reflecting in the data? • If golf revenues exceed projections, where does the revenue go? Is this paying for extra things of the work plan for the golf course? • We are in an era of equity and inclusion, with the new golf building, some people can’t afford to get out to golf, so we just want to make sure that we have an eye towards making sure the money gets spread around. • Do we have any funds held in banks or do we keep it all? • What was the funding for the General Fund Subsidy? • Is the gap that you have in programs something that you’re going to need to cut or programs that you want to reinstate? • In terms of finding alternative sources of revenue, are we generating ideas about that, and identifying if there are potential grants or philanthropic opportunities? • Emphasized the idea of having a Grant Specialist who can pursue federal money with the Inflation Reduction Act as there is a lot of potential money on the table. There is money for tree planting, and money for improvements to increase energy efficiency to move toward more solar power. • When we design graphs, do we as financial experts, look at things like a potential recession, the recovery of the average American financially, if their salaries are going up or not, do you do micro adjusting? • How much would the Parks & Recreation Grants position be integrated with the Governmental Affairs team that the City already has? • There is a lot of opportunity for partnership for some income with restaurants near the proximity of South Boulder park and the rec center and the high school. A community center there could enhance some physical and mental health. • Is BPR’s work evaluated by other departments to identify improvements? • Push for looking at seniors and those with fixed budgets, there is a very aging population. • What budget does clean ups of public spaces fall under? 9 • Have we put a lens of inclusion and equity over everything to look at for decision making? • Is the Recreation Priority Index to cover other types of recreation services, including facility access, folded into the development policy? • There is value to an objective tool and it is encouraged for it to be more than just some words, but some way to quantify as much as possible the community benefit. • When creating the fee policy, look carefully at broader city goals and not just focus on parks and recreation goals. Look at climate initiatives, transportation, and housing and how are these policies going to impact other aspects of the city that are important and livable and broader city goals. • Is there a way to have people that say “fees are high” to reach out so they have input? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Department A. North Boulder Park Briggs presented this item. PRAB had the following questions/comments: • What will be the heat source for the warm water? • Is there a broader plan to re-vision the park with the development of Alpine Balsam which is going to put 300 units of housing directly adjacent to the park. There might need to have some consideration of pathways to the park, and where equipment and amenities are located. It is a good opportunity for some welcoming entrances and pathway connectors to 8th Street. Agenda Item 8: Matters from the Board Members a. Boulder Junction Board Liaison PRAB had the following questions or comment: • Hood will represent. b. PRAB handbook PRAB had the following questions or comment: • First draft has significant improvements, a fantastic job done with inputs. • Keep from making it sound like a legal document. • Revisit content in the handbook every 3-5 years. • Include line numbers on the index version to make comments on specific lines. • Next reading will be at the next meeting and will be shared with the new members as a first order of business for them, ask them if there is anything they would like to see included or if something doesn’t make sense. • The handbook should be online. • Welcome letter should come from the chair, but timing of the current chair and incoming chair is a factor. 10 c. PRAB Recruitment, Orientation and Departing Members PRAB had the following questions or comment: • Two new members announced: Anna Segur and Andrew Bernstein. • Hood and Unger will function as mentors to the two new incoming members. • New members will receive the existing handbook with a link to the March packet that includes the redlined version. • Name plates for staff is encouraged. • It would be nice to order ball caps as swag. d. PRAB Matters PRAB had the following questions or comment: • Hood met with members of the Colorado Crew Team about their fees for using the reservoir. They are very passionate about what they are doing. • What money was made from renting the parks? Agenda Item 9: Next Board Meeting Next Board meeting: Study Session, Monday, April 3, 2023, Hybrid Agenda Item 10: Adjourn The meeting was adjourned at 8:42 p.m. Approved by: Attested: ___________________ _____________________ Chuck Brock Rosa Kougl Board Member BPR Staff Date: ______________ Date: _________________ 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Scott Schuttenberg, Deputy Director Bryan Beary, Senior Manager, Community Building and Partnerships Mark Davison, Senior Manager, Planning Regina Elsner, Senior Manager, Natural Resources Jackson Hite, Senior Manager, Business Services Megann Lohman, Senior Manager, Recreation Stephanie Munro, Senior Manager, Regional Facilities Dennis Warrington, Senior Manager, Urban Parks SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: April 24, 2023 A. Pleasant View Access and Parking Improvements Feasibility Study: The purpose of this item is to update and solicit input from the PRAB on progress and next steps for the Pleasant View Fields Access and Parking Improvements Feasibility Study. Following an in-depth analysis of existing conditions, consultants from Fox Tuttle Transportation Group and the Sanitas Group have prepared draft recommendations for physical improvements and access management strategies to improve multimodal access and parking at the Pleasant View facility. Using input from the PRAB, staff and consultants will update these draft recommendations and conduct additional stakeholder and public engagement before finalizing next steps. Project Purpose Staff from Parks and Recreation have been working collaboratively with Transportation and Mobility staff to assess existing conditions and develop draft recommendations that advance shared goals, such as those included in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, Transportation Master Plan, and the city’s Access Management and Parking Strategy. To that end, the purpose of this project is to explore options for how the city can: • Address safety concerns within the existing parking lot. • Encourage and improve universal, multimodal access to, from, and within the site; and • Provide and enhance overflow parking options. Existing Conditions While the current site configuration for Pleasant View is based off a 1993 master plan, the site has grown in popularity over the years, and the parking facilities have not kept up. This has resulted in safety issues, overflow parking into adjacent neighborhoods, impacts to quality of life for those living nearby, and complaints from event organizers, participants, and spectators. As a first step in this feasibility study process, Fox Tuttle Transportation Group reviewed existing conditions, collected, and studied existing data, analyzed public reviews of the facility on Google Maps, and produced a summary report (shared with the PRAB in November 2022) that identified issues to address, including: • Large pulses of pedestrians and bicycles in the parking lot before and after games lead to safety issues, frustration, and conflicts with drivers maneuvering for a parking space. • Four motor vehicle crashes were reported in the parking lot between 2017 and 2022, including one that resulted in series injuries to a cyclist. 49 • Parking supply is often inadequate on weekends, primarily on Saturdays, and especially during tournaments. • Parking at the nearby Calvary Bible Church was at 30% capacity on Saturday, October 15,2022 and at 50% on Sunday the 16th. The lot can hold 380 vehicles. • Illegal parking occurs along Kalmia and nearby businesses. • While the number of accessible parking spaces meets federal requirements, the current configuration does not allow for rear-loading vehicles, nor does it discourage standard vehicles from parking there when the lot is full. • Having only one access point on the east side for all modes of transportation discourages bicycle and pedestrian access from neighborhoods to the west. • Bicycle circulation through the site requires bikes to go through the existing parking lot, exacerbating safety issues. • The City’s Low Stress Walk and Bike Network Plan calls for bicycle facilities on Kalmia Avenue, but they are not currently funded or scheduled for construction. Draft Recommendations To address these issues and achieve the purpose of this study, consultants have shared a set of options staff can consider and explore. These are described below according to whether they are operational in nature (e.g., management strategies or staffing related) or whether they are capital projects requiring additional engagement, design, permitting, and construction. Operational Improvements to Consider • Pursue shared parking agreement with Calvary Bible Church o Explore options with Calvary Bible Church for formalizing an agreement that allows visitors to park in that lot. This could involve the city and the church entering into a long-term agreement that allows some amount of overflow parking on designated days and times. Alternatively, or in addition, the city could require organizers of events over 1,000 participants to enter into agreements with the church directly. This option would be enhanced by some of the capital improvements described below such as opening and improving the west gate to facilitate pedestrian access between sites. • Consider additional shared parking agreements if necessary o Additional options for off-site parking agreements could include the nearby NCAR/UCAR lot and/or the Friends School lot. To support success, it is recommended that staff pursue this along with or following certain capital improvements described below - such as an improved drop-off circle that would allow large event organizers to transport visitors to and from the site using vans or shuttles. • Continue working with event organizers to reduce parking impacts o To date, BPR staff have been working with tournament directors and other event organizers to reduce peak parking demand. For example, some have agreed to spread out tournaments to include Thursdays and Fridays, while maintaining the same number of games/participants. The results from these pilots will inform next steps. Potential Capital Improvements • Improved west gate/access point o Connects to existing multiuse path into the adjoining neighborhood o Includes additional bike parking and formalized pedestrian access into the park o Should be pursued alongside a shared parking agreement with Calvary Bible Church to minimize neighborhood parking impacts 50 • Improved ADA parking o Improves quality/function of ADA spaces within existing lot o Allows for rear-loading vehicles o Better striping dissuades standard vehicles from parking in accessible space • New pick-up/drop-off circle o Addresses primary safety concerns by improving circulation and reducing conflicts between pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles look for parking spaces o Reduces vehicular congestion by separating pick-up and drop-off traffic from those looking to park, further reducing safety concerns. o Supports future off-site parking options by facilitating easy access and egress for shuttles and vans transporting visitors to/from satellite parking lots o Center island would treat stormwater (i.e., rain garden) and could be considered a space to support visitor activities. • Parking lot expansion o This expansion to the south of the existing lot would result in a net gain of 47 spaces. o No impacts to field layout or existing maintenance facilities o Can be implemented after the creation of a new connection between the parking lot and Kalmia Avenue. • New connections between parking lot and Kalmia Avenue o Provides a new vehicular connection between the BPR parking lot and Kalmia Ave to allow vehicles to reach the church lot for overflow parking when BPR lot is full (pending a successful agreement). o Widens and extends the walk on the west side of the existing lot to support visitor access from the south. • Multiuse path improvements o Pursue in partnership with Transportation & Mobility o Provides a multiuse path bypass around the parking lot, including a raised crossing across the access driveway into the lot o Aligns with Diagonal Highway 119 Bikeway connection o Improves multiuse connections to/from Kalmia o Provides new off-street multiuse path along the north side of Kalmia • On-street parking along Kalmia Avenue o Seek to pursue in partnership with Transportation & Mobility o Benefits from and should be completed in parallel with construction of the multiuse path along Kalmia Additional Considerations As this process moves forward, the operational changes needed to make capital improvements succeed will become clearer. For example, maintenance operations would likely evolve to incorporate new elements like rain gardens that filter stormwater and improve water quality. Additionally, updated signs and pre-event messaging would provide clarity for event organizers, participants and spectators about parking options and requirements. These and other ongoing cost implications will be incorporated into the final feasibility report. Proposed Phasing To advance next steps for this study, BPR has initially programmed $752,000 into the 2024 Capital Improvements Program (CIP), which will be reviewed by the PRAB in May and June and then is expected to be finalized and approved by City Council this fall. To help staff understand what could be accomplished with that amount of funding, the consultant team prepared initial 51 cost estimates for the capital improvements described above. The proposed phasing below demonstrates that Phase 1 and 2 can likely be accomplished within current proposed funding, assuming the capital plan is approved at current levels. Additional stakeholder and public engagement, as well as more detailed design and cost estimating, may refine this approach, as would any changes to available funding. Phase Timeframe Description 1 Spring – Summer 2023 Pursue a shared parking agreement with Calvary Bible Church. If successful, pursue short-term options for opening up existing west side gate for the short-term, until further capital improvements are made. Implement and monitor success. 2 Fall 2023 – Summer 2024 Engagement, design, permitting and construction to include: • Drop-off/pick-up circle • Improvements to west gate/access point • ADA parking improvements Note: Parking lot surfacing will also be improved in accordance with standard asset management practices and funding. Data collection/monitoring to determine whether additional improvements are warranted and can be funded (e.g., on-site parking expansion and connections to Kalmia) 3 TBD Pursue partnership project with Transportation and Mobility regarding multimodal path improvements and the potential for on-street parking along Kalmia. Overall, consultants recommend that staff first pursue a shared parking agreement with the Calvary Bible Church to maximize cost effectiveness and reduce additional resources associated with expanding the parking lot. As compared to the cost of adding 47 spaces to the on-site parking lot at Pleasant View, making use of any portion of the total 380 parking spaces at the church would be substantially more cost effective and reduce resource consumption associated with new construction. As a short-term measure, consultants also recommend pursuing certain capital improvements using available funding. For example, adding a new drop-off and pick-up circle is critical for addressing safety concerns and improving experiences. In addition, improvements to accessible parking at the west gate/access point would be included in this initial design and construction phase. If these improvements substantially advance project goals, then additional improvements such as parking expansion and connections to Kalmia may not be necessary. Additional data collection and monitoring is recommended to gauge progress and determine the need for future improvements. Comprehensive improvements to multiuse paths and the potential for on-street parking along Kalmia would be pursued as a separate project, in partnership with Transportation and Mobility staff and depending on staff capacity and available funding. Staff would seek collaborative grant opportunities as they arise. 52 Next Steps Moving forward, staff will incorporate PRAB input on the above draft recommendations, continue engaging with stakeholders, and host a public meeting in the coming months to refine recommendations. In May and June, the PRAB will review the department’s proposed 2024-2029 CIP, which includes the funding described above. By early fall and with approval of the 2024 budget, staff expect to finalize the feasibility study and pursue additional design, permitting and construction services. As options are implemented, staff will also monitor success and collect additional data as needed. Questions for the PRAB • Does the PRAB have input on the draft recommendations? • Does the PRAB support the proposed phasing as described? 53 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: April 24, 2023 A. PRAB Handbook Revisions – verbal update B. Advancing Racial Equity Training (May and June trainings available) a. Attachment A with sign up link: City of Boulder: Advancing Racial Equity: The Role of Government (signupgenius.com) C. PRAB Matters (Verbal) D. New member welcome letter (Attachment B) 54 Please follow thelinkthrough and select yourpreferred date and time! We will email youdirect information on how toaccess the film prior to the date of your training to watch on your own time. We will also share with you information on attending the training on the day you have selected, whether that will be virtually or in-person.   Sign up Genius Race isoftenthe greatest predictor of access to success in our current system. The creation and perpetuation of racial inequities is embedded into government at all levels. Initially focusing on racial equity provides the opportunity to introduce a framework, tools, and resources that can also be applied to other historically excluded groups based on gender, sexual orientation, ability, class, and age, among others. To read more about the City of Boulder’s Racial Equity Plan, please follow this link. What is the training about? How to sign upfor the training?   Why lead with Racial Equity? If you havedifficulties signing up,haveany questions,or need any accommodations thatwillserveyouin your experience please don’t hesitate to reach out to vasquezi@bouldercolorado.gov or avendano- curiela@bouldercolorado.gov. As part of this training, the city utilizes a documentary called Race: The Power of an Illusion. This is an award-winning documentary series created by California Newsreel discussing the origins, beliefs, and consequences of what this social construct we call race has had in our society. Since its release in 2003, the series has become one of the most widely used documentaries for educational and training purposes. Exploring the concept of race opens the door for individuals to scrutinize their own deep-seated beliefs about race and explore how our social divisions are not natural or inevitable but constructed. Advancing racial equity requires us to look at the origins of race to understand its history, its impacts and how we move beyond to ensure an equitable and just future for all. It is an essential part of your participation to view this film ahead of the actual training. You will be given detailed instructions on how to access the film once you have registered to attend. AdvancingRacial Equity: TheRole of Government A Training Opportunity for the City of Boulder’s Board, Commissions, & Committees Why take this training? The City of Boulder has an important role to play in welcoming, supporting and serving people of diverse backgrounds in our community and in government processes. While we have done valuable equity work in the past, including the creation of a diversity policy two decades ago, a 2017 inclusivity assessment showed us that the impact of traditional diversity and inclusion efforts has been limited. Input from community members of color who bravely shared their perspectives and lived experiences made it clear there is significant work to do. Through shared learning with the Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE), the city developed an understanding to the role institutional racism has played in perpetuating current racial inequities and developed a vision to advance racial equity. In 2021 Council unanimously approved the city’s first ever Racial Equity Plan. The Plan provides strategies to advance equity work across the institution. As a member of a Board, Commission and/or Committee, you are a part of the city organization, and therefore, you serve a vital role in the policy-making process. Your commitment to serve the community and understand all the areas in which we can continue to strengthen is crucial. Attachment A 55 Utilice elenlacede y seleccione lafechay hora que prefiera. Le enviaremos porcorreo electrónico información directa sobre cómo acceder al documental antes de la fecha de su capacitación para que pueda verla en su tiempo libre. También le estaremos compartiendo información sobre los detalles cómo y donde asistir a la capacitación, ya sea  virtualmente o en persona.   Sign up Genius! ¿Dequése trataesta capacitación?    ¿Cómoregistrarse parala capacitación? ¿Porque Dirigir con equidad racial?    Si tiene dificultadespara inscribirse,alguna pregunta o necesita alguna adaptación específica que le ayudeen su experiencia con esta capacitación, no dude en ponerse en contacto con vasquezi@bouldercolorado.gov o avendano-curiela@bouldercolorado.gov.    Hoy en día, la raza deuna persona es el predictor más influyente del acceso al éxito que una persona puede tener en nuestrosistema. La creacióny ámbito de inequidades raciales esta dentro de todos lo niveles del gobierno.El poder enfocarnos en la equidad racial ofrece la oportunidad de esablecer una estructura, herramientas, y recursos que también pueden ser aplicados dentro de otros grupos históricamente excluidos como el género, orientación sexual, habilidad, nivel de clase socioeconómico, edad, entre otros. Para leer más sobre el plan deequidad racial, por favor visite la página en el siguiente enlace. Como parte de esta capacitación, el gobierno municipal utiliza un documental titulado Race: The Power of an Illusion (Raza: El poder de una ilusión). Se trata de una premiada serie documental creada por California Newsreel en la que se debaten los orígenes, creencias, y consecuencias que ha tenido nuestra sociedad sobre esta construcción social que llamamos raza. Desde su estreno en el 2003, la serie se ha convertido en uno de los documentales más utilizados con fines educativos y de capacitación. Explorar el concepto de raza abre la puerta para que las personas examinen a fondo sus propias creencias arraigadas sobre la raza y exploren cómo nuestras divisiones sociales no son naturales ni inevitables, sino construidas. Avanzar en la equidad racial requiere que nos fijemos en los orígenes de la raza para comprender su historia, sus impactos y cómo podemos ir más allá para garantizar un futuro equitativo y justo para todos. Una parte esencial de su participación es ver este documental antes de la fecha de la capacitación. Una vez se halla inscrito, recibirá instrucciones detalladas sobre como acceder al documental. Una oportunidad de capacitación para los miembros de las comisiones, juntas directivas y comités de la Ciudad de Boulder ¿Porquédebe uno tomar esta capacitación? El gobierno de la ciudad de Boulder juega un papel importante a la hora de acoger, apoyar y servir ala diversidad de personas en nuestra comunidad y en los varios procesos de gobierno. Aunquehemos logrado avances en el ámbito de equidad en el pasado, incluyendo la creación de unapolítica de diversidad hace dos décadas, una evaluación llevada a cabo en 2017 indicó que elimpacto de métodos tradicionales paraavanzar la diversidad ha sido limitado. Los aportes por parte de miembros de color de nuestra comunidad, quienes con mucho valor compartieron suspuntos de vista y experiencias de vida, dejaron claro que aún tenemos mucho trabajo por hacer. Gracias al aprendizaje en conjunto con Government Alliance for Racial Equity (Alianza Gubernamental sobre Raza y Equidad o GARE por sus siglas en inglés), logramos entender el papel que ha jugado el racismo institucional en perpetuar las actuales inequidades raciales y desarrollamos una visión para avanzar equidad racial. En 2021, el Concejo aprobó por unanimidad el primer Plan de Equidad Racial en la ciudad, que guía al personal para implementar estrategias concretas que ayudan a avanzarel trabajo de equidad racial en toda de la institución. Como miembro de una comisión, junta directiva o comité, usted forma parte de la organización municipal, y por lo tanto, desempeña un papel vital en el proceso de elaboración de políticas. Su compromiso de servir a la comunidad y comprender todas las áreas en las que podemos seguir fortaleciéndonos es crucial. Avanzando la equidad racial: el papel que juega el gobierno Attachment A 56 \ Welcome to the City of Boulder PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD! We hope this welcome packet will help to start a foundation for your five years of service and ease the transition to your new position. We, your fellow Board Members and City of Boulder Parks & Recreation Staff, are eager to meet and work with you! Your staff liaison is Rosa Kougl, the Executive Assistant in the Director’s Office. Rosa can be reached at: PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov or 303-413-7223. She will be the best point of contact for your questions. As you will learn in the Board & Commission orientation, we do not use “reply all” or group email chains to ensure that public business is conducted publicly; rather, the staff liaison can be a common point of contact. Your fellow board members are: (in order of term end date) Charles Brock Charles.a.brock@comcast.net 303-887-2523 April 2019 - March 2024 Jason Unger junger29@yahoo.com April 2020 - March 2025 Elliott Hood elliott.hood@gmail.com April 2021 - March 2026 Sunny van der Star Sunny.klaber@gmail.com April 2022 - March 2025 Anita Speirs anitaspeirsboulder@gmail.com April 2022 - March 2027 We look forward to connecting with each of you; please reach out at your convenience. As you will find, we all have different approaches to PRAB, and know that you will bring your own. Several guiding questions we might consider to support our first conversation: •What moved us to apply to PRAB? •How would we describe the role of a PRAB member? We also have a PRAB mentor process, which we will discuss at your first PRAB meeting. Attachment B 57 Our meetings are generally held on the fourth Monday of each month. Please pay attention to your calendar appointments from PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov, which will include a information on the meetings. There will be months in which we start early, with a tour of a park or facility, and some months we will meet in various locations. Dinner will be provided; please notify the staff liaison about any dietary restrictions you may have. Parks and Recreation is a large department serving the needs of the people and the environment in our city. As you learn about all of the services provided, please feel free to ask questions and explore resources like the Parks and Recreation website and the PRAB website. Our community outreach toolkit will help you navigate upcoming meetings and potential communications from community members. Being on a board will often require reviewing relatively large volumes of information. Foundational materials for PRAB include the PRAB Handbook and the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. Parks and Recreation has excellent social media and email lists. You are invited to follow the accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as BPR’s official philanthropic partner, the Play Boulder Foundation, to learn more about events and the work of Parks and Recreation. We look forward to collaborating with you, soon! PRAB Attachment B 58 Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Member Bios: Chuck Brock lives in the Newlands neighborhood near North Boulder Park. He grew up in Denton, TX and lived in Seattle and Arvada before moving to Boulder in 1997. He and his family have enjoyed using Boulder's parks and recreation facilities for many years, as well as hiking, skiing, and biking all around the Front Range. Chuck is a scientist at NOAA in Boulder, where he studies air quality and climate change. Elliott Hood lives in the Frasier Meadows neighborhood with his wife and two young children, who are avid users of the City’s parks and recreation system. Elliott grew up in Chicago and originally moved to Boulder in 2000 to attend CU-Boulder. He returned to Boulder in 2012 after graduating from law school. Elliott is an attorney in Boulder and primarily represents public school districts across Colorado. Before becoming a lawyer, Elliott was a public-school teacher in Las Vegas, Nevada and a non-profit development director in Chicago. Jason Unger lives in Lower Chautauqua with his wife and three young kids - all regular users of Boulder's wonderful parks and recreation facilities. He works as a public policy consultant, helping non-profit organizations with policy and advocacy strategies at the federal and state level. Prior to his current role, Jason spent more than a dozen years working on education and health care policy in the US Senate, and served as a public school teacher in Compton, California and a public school administrator in the Boston Public Schools. Jason is originally from southern California and moved to Boulder in 2017. Anita Speirs - Pending Sunny van der Star has called Boulder home since 1996. During that time, she worked as an outdoor educator, climate scientist, travel guide, massage therapist, and yoga teacher. The common thread that weaves through her diverse interests and passions is a desire to understand and promote health and healing on a personal, community, and global scale. As a member of the PRAB, Sunny will continue to explore ways to activate Boulder's parks and community spaces with an eye toward maximizing the healing benefits of nature and engaging activities for all Boulder residents. Sunny currently lives in south Boulder with her husband and 8-year-old twins. Attachment B 59 PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR Date / Time Event / Task Location Details April 15, 2023 Attend Orientation with City Clerk and Attorney Virtual •Meet with City Attorney and various other officials regarding your duties and obligations as a Board Member •Required for your tenure on PRAB Monday, April 24, 2023, 6pm Attend PRAB meeting for your induction In Person •Please review the agenda and meeting packet emailed to you in advance of the meeting. •PRAB meetings typically run from 6-9:00pm (may go later depending on the agenda). Mondays, 6pm Attend PRAB Meetings Details will be emailed in advance and posted online. •For in-person meetings, dinner is provided from 5:30- 5:55pm. •PRAB meetings will run from 6-8:30pm (meetings may go as late as 9pm depending on agenda). •Remaining PRAB meetings for 2023 are as follows. Study Sessions may be scheduled as needed. •April 24 •May 22 •June 26 •July 24 •August 28 •September 25 •October 23 •November 27 •December – to be determined Attachment B 60 PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR (continued) Date / Time Event / Task Location Details Spring 2023 Self- orientation •Meet fellow board members individually. •Meet with your board mentor. •Submit your bio to be distributed to fellow PRAB members and PR staff. •Please familiarize yourself with the resources provided in the letter above. Summer 2023 Meet with City Staff Let the board liaison know if you would like to arrange meetings with the following BPR staff. •Bryan Beary, Community Building & Partnerships Manager •Regina Elsner, Parks & Recreation Senior Manager – Natural Resources •Mark Davison, Senior Planning Manager •Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager •Megan Lohmann, Recreation Manager •Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager •Dennis Warrington, Park Operations and Assets Manager Autumn 2023 PRAB Retreat TBD •Members volunteer to begin annual letter to Council. •Board annual check-in TBD Tour Sites TBD •Please check email and listen for discussion at your meetings for dates for this tour of select locations. •Opportunity for new and sitting board/commission members to take a tour of select sites of interest associated with the work that you will do on this board Ongoing Participate in Additional Opportunities TBD Examples include joint board meetings with other boards and commissions, new committee work and attendance at Parks and Recreation community engagement and masterplan engagement events, email categories for responses to citizen. messages and inquiries. Attachment B 61