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05.04.22 BLC PacketCity of Boulder 2022 Library Commission Agenda Meeting date: Wednesday, May 4, 2022 Location: Zoom Meeting Meeting start time: 6 p.m. 1.Review Online Meeting Guidelines 2.Reminder: Commissioners please submit monthly volunteer hours in the chat or log them in Count Me In Boulder 3.Approval of agenda 4.Election of officers 5.Public comment 6.Consent agenda a.Approval of April 6, 2022 minutes 7.Presentation: Summer of Discovery Program Plan – Anne Ledford, Youth Services Manager 8.Library Director’s report a.Q1 2022 performance measures b.North Boulder branch library project update c.Public services updates d.Community Resource Connector position e.Update on Library Commissioner vacancy f.Summary of patron suspensions 2019 through YTD 2022 g.2022 1st Adjustment to Base budget 9.Library Budget: 2023 library budget requests and assessment of the progress on the master plan goals 10.Update on Library District discussion 11.Items from Library Commission a.Discuss whether to hold a July 2022 Library Commission meeting b.Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues (verbal) c.Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update (Frost/Steinbrecher) d.Update on emails and phone calls to Library Commission i.Email about library district – Heather Ryan 2022 Library Commissioners Jane Sykes Wilson Steven Frost Scott Steinbrecher Benita Duran 1 Library Commission Minutes April 6, 2022 Page 1 of 4 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES Name of Board/ Commission: Library Commission Date of Meeting: April 6, 2022 Contact information preparing summary: Jennifer Phares Commission members present: Jane Sykes Wilson, Steven Frost, Scott Steinbrecher, Benita Duran Commission members not present: Library staff present: David Farnan, Director of Library & Arts Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director Celia Seaton, Administrative Specialist Monnie Nilsson, Branch Library Manager City staff present: Members of the public present: Type of Meeting: Regular | Remote Agenda Item 1: Review of Online Meeting Guidelines [0:00:00 Audio min.] Agenda Item 2: Reminder: Commissioners please log monthly volunteer hours Count Me In Boulder [0:03:06 Audio min.] The Commission logged their service. Agenda Item 3: Approval of agenda [0:03:43 Audio min.] The meeting was called to order and Phares confirmed items in the Director’s Report that did not appear on the agenda. There was a nod of approval from the commission for this amended agenda. Agenda Item 4: Public comment [0:05:02 Audio min.] Michael Smith is opposed to the library district and shared his concern that the tone of discussion the issue may become contentious which he doesn’t want to occur. Smith suggested that few people subscribe to the Daily Camera and the ways of communicating need examination due to misinformation being distributed. He shared concern about the cross over between Boulder Library Commission, Boulder Library Foundation, the Library Champions, and Library District Advisory Committee. His disagreement with the library district proposal is the impact of property tax increase on community members with limited income. Smith asked if active library cards holders are used in the library district information on the Library Champions website. He complimented the library for doing a great job with limited resources. He suggested the library consider offering a property tax protest coaching program. Farnan responded active cardholders are those who have used their library cards within the past three years. The cardholder map referenced was from the library master plan. It shows one dot per street address that has any number of active cardholders residing there. The current percent of the population of Boulder of active library cardholders is 121 percent. Agenda Item 5: Presentation – Meadows Branch Library Update, Monnie Nilsson, Branch Library Manager [0:17:26 Audio min.] Nilsson presented information about the Meadows Branch Library resuming carryout service in July 2020 and hiring new staff in 2021 for the positions restored from the budget reductions. The branch library was to resume full service in January 2022 but was delayed by a damage from a sewer line back up that occurred in December 2021. Repairs were completed Feb. 8, 2022 and the branch library opened for seven days per week service on Feb. 12, 2022. Nilsson introduced the Meadows Branch Library staff members, summarized branch use statistics which are expected to continue to grow and quickly return to pre-pandemic levels, shared information about the branch library’s collection, and staff’s focus on equity, diversity and inclusion in many aspects of their work. She shared information about current storytimes and other programs offered and those planned for the near future. She shared how the branch library staff are supporting victims of the Marshall Fire. Duran asked if there was material damage from the sewer line back up or mold issues. Nilsson responded, no library materials were damaged. The damage was to the carpet and walls and mitigation and clean up was rapid to prevent air contamination. 2 Library Commission Minutes April 6, 2022 Page 2 of 4 Frost thanked the staff for their work rebuilding community relationships. They asked how many Marshall Fire families/victims are being served. Nilsson responded approximately, 1 or 2 persons per day. In addition to library services, the branch staff have sourced schoolbooks for students, lent WiFi hot spots, and been available to listen and chat as needed with the victims. Patrons are also using the internet from the parking lot all hours of the day. Sykes Wilson shared her thanks. She asked how the training of new staff and the building of community relationships is going and if additional resources are needed to move it along. Nilsson said staff is reaching out to teachers by phone and email at the schools nearby Meadows, conducting classroom visits to share information about Summer of Discovery and invite participation, using community partners to get the word out about ways the library can support, scheduling time for staff to do outreach and introducing new staff to community contacts, teachers, etc. Sykes Wilson complimented Nilsson offering bilingual storytimes and asked if the Reading Buddies Program is offered at Meadows. Nilsson responded that Meadows offers STEAM pals. Agenda Item 6: Debrief: April 5, 2022 City Council Public Hearing about Forming a Library District by Resolution [0:41:35 Audio min.] Sykes Wilson briefly recapped the six plus hour City Council meeting/public hearing about the library district. More than 100 community members spoke during public comment with about two to one being in favor of forming a library district. City Council voted six to three to adopt a resolution to form a library district. Council set a ceiling 3.8 mills for the library district property tax, removed Jamestown from the library district service area boundary, and decided that library district trustees should be recruited, selected, and appointed by the City Council and the Boulder County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC). Duran acknowledged Smith’s comments about the overlap of players in the library district discussion and her own request for information (in graphical form) about the advisory role of the library commission and the transition to an appointed board of library district trustees. The board of trustees, being different than other forms of governance in Boulder County and having more authority, needs to be shaped. She recommended providing more clarity and transparency about the board of trustees’ role. Farnan responded the transition is complex and there isn’t a clear answer currently. The role of the Library Commission is defined in the city charter as advisory and has a singular responsibility of policy making. A library district board of trustees is a governing entity that is a subdivision of the state of Colorado with fiduciary responsibility and the ability to levy a tax. The board is held accountable through appointment by the establishing entities. The establishing entities, City Council and the BOCC have options on how to appoint the board of trustees which include appointing the current library commissioners as trustees. This option presents a conflict of interest that would need to be resolved by appointment of a new library commission, or dissolution of the commission until a voter-approved charter change to eliminate the library commission occurs after a successful TABOR election to fund the library district. Duran was looking for clarification and to reflect on the limited role of the Library Commission which has led to some commissioners becoming members of other groups to be activists, advocates, supporters of forming a library district. Sykes Wilson added that a library district board of trustees is required to submit an annual report with a financial information showing how the library budget is being spent to the establishing entities and the public. This type of information is not easily available for the library currently. Regarding the comments about the same persons being involved in the groups supporting the library and forming a library district, a function of the Library Commission is to appoint one or two library commissioners to the Boulder Library Foundation board to facilitate sharing of information and knowledge about library operations. The Library District Advisory Committee was formed to make recommendations to City Council on a library district intergovernmental agreement. It was important to have representation from the Library Commission to share knowledge of the history of library funding needs. The Boulder Library Champions is an advocacy group for forming a library district that members choose to become part of as individuals and not representatives as members of the aforementioned groups. Sykes Wilson invited Smith to speak to members of the Library Champions about his concern regarding the library district mill levy and agreed with his sentiment about this issue staying positive. Stienbrecher commented that the board selection and appointment is complex and the establishing entities will need to strike a balance: appointing persons who are knowledgeable about library issues while not showing favoritism to those who may be seen as insiders. He heard during the public hearing that many who are opposed to the library district are still supporters of the library. He said that listening to and addressing their concerns and explaining why the library district path was chosen is necessary to keep the outcome positive. 3 Library Commission Minutes April 6, 2022 Page 3 of 4 Agenda Item 7: Review and Input on the draft changes to the Collection Development Policy [1:06:07 Audio min.] Phares explained why the policy was reviewed and recommended the updates and the process for incorporating the commission’s feedback. Steinbrecher asked why the word global perspectives was used instead of national and recommended that the policy be translated into other languages in addition to Spanish. Farnan responded that translating policies into Spanish is a city policy. Spanish speaking community members represent between 10 to 15 percent of the population in Boulder. No other group of non-English speakers represents more than one percent of Boulder’s population. Phares said global was likely chosen to be inclusive and in contrast to local perspective. Sykes Wilson asked about the request for reconsideration process and the review committee, its guidelines and if the request and decision are public record. Phares responded that the requests and decisions are public record and may be requested via the Colorado Open Records Act. The information is shared with the Library Commission but not listed on the library website. Farnan said he selects two to three professional library staff members to serve on the review committee. Their recommendation and review is guided by the policy, the library code of ethics and the first amendment to the U.S. constitution. The committee members are asked to read the book in question and any reviews. Farnan said requests for reconsideration are infrequent. A common complaint is that a book doesn’t belong in the children’s library. In those cases, the committee assess who the intended audience is which may be challenging to discern. Sykes Wilson asked how Farnan ensures the committee that reviews the request represents a cross section of the public who might read information with a different view, and if that should that be written into the policy. Farnan responded that members of the committee sometimes disagree, but a basic principle of libraries is not to censor and to allow for representation of all points of view in the collection. The presence of any item in the collections doesn’t mean the library condones the perspective the item represents. Duran requested updates to the library commission’s page. Duran moved to approve the revised Collection Development Policy. Frost seconded. The motion passed unanimously. Agenda Item 8: Items from the Library Commission [1:37:52 Audio min.] Sykes Wilson asked about the timing for appointment for the vacant seat on the commission and on when appointments to the Boulder Library Foundation occur, April or May. Duran asked if the Library Commissioner officer terms would continue or if official action needs to be taken. Seaton confirmed that applications for the Library Commission are still being accepted. Duran asked if it is appropriate to recruit applicants for the commission. Farnan responded that it is not something that is encouraged. Outreach is done by the city to inform potential applicants about the position. Farnan requested of the City Manager’s Office that appointment of a qualified candidate not be prevented due to a technicality of only having one applicant left (as the other was appointed to another city board). Farnan hopes to have an answer by May and said that the timing of election of new officers is at the commission’s discretion. Sykes Wilson prefers to wait until the appointment of a new commissioner is done but with a limit to length of time the election is postponed. Duran requested that new officer appointment be publicly noticed and recommended it be on the May agenda. a.Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues (verbal) b.Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update Steinbrecher reported there was a presentation from Boulder Reads at the last Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) meeting. Several prospective new members attended, and all were appointed as new members. Duran asked for the names of the new members. Farnan responded later in the meeting with names of the new members. Since a new commissioner doesn’t generally serve on the BLF during the first year of their term, the commissioners discussed whom will serve on the BLF board. Frost volunteered to serve and Steinbrecher agreed to continue to serve on the board. c.Update on emails and phone calls to Library Commission i.Staff response to comments from Heather Ryan regarding formation of a library district 4 Library Commission Minutes April 6, 2022 Page 4 of 4 APPROVED BY: ATTESTED: _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Board Chair Board Secretary _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Date Date ii.Response to cancellation of March Library Commission Retreat from Commissioner Duran Agenda Item 9: Library Director’s Report [1:55:00 Audio min.] a.2021 Library Volunteer Survey b.North Boulder Branch Library Project Update b.Library Programs and Services Update c.Income Tax Preparation Help Farnan made brief remarks about the information in the Director’s Report. Duran requested that the Director’s Report be moved earlier on the agenda. Commissioners agreed to trial this for a couple of months. Sykes Wilson requested a report of the security incidents (suspensions) in the May Library Commission meeting packet. Farnan described the challenges staff have had reopening during the pandemic with enforcing the mask mandate, etc. The more active the library becomes the less behavioral incidents typically occur. Frost asked about the reports from patrons during the public hearing about syringes being found on the library grounds. Farnan responded that he won’t deny that a syringe was found on the library grounds but that the story has become apocryphal. The library provides needle disposal receptacles as a best practice and for staff safety. He understands that some people may object to the library providing the receptacles. Farnan responded to Smith’s comment about electioneering confirming that he and library staff are aware of the city’s policy about election rules and there is no such thing as electioneering until there is an item on the ballot. He assured the commission that once a library district item is on the ballot, typically in August, library staff will no longer speak about the library district issue as a city employee. Agenda Item 10: Adjournment [2:12:27 Audio min.] There being no further business to come before the commission at this time, the meeting was adjourned. Date, time, and location of next meeting: The next Library Commission meeting will be at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, May 6, 2022, through a virtual setting. 5 May 2022 LIBRARY DIRECTOR’S REPORT Q1 2022 Performance Measures The first quarter performance measure reports are Attachments A and B. North Boulder Branch Library Project Update The project team is currently wrapping up site review revisions with staff from Planning & Development Services (P&DS). The site review plans were updated in response to new comments from Transportation, and the team expects site review to wrap up by mid-May. In addition, the team re-submitted technical documents on April 15th, and await response from P&DS, but expect that review of those will conclude around the same time. While these documents are in review, the team continues to refine components of the design that have a significant impact on final costs, including: the design of the interior staircase, millwork, the mechanical room, the A/V and controls package, ceilings, lighting and doors. The team anticipates continuing with this level of design and review through June, at which point application for building permit will be submitted. Price escalation in construction continues to be prevalent and, though quotes are collected from contractors along the way to inform our work, the team will not know the full scope of the cost impact until the final budget estimate is made off the construction document set. This final cost estimate is likely to be received in July and will be the basis on which a construction contract is made between the city and the general contractor. Contract negotiations will likely take through the month of August, with construction estimated to begin in September. Public Service Updates Patrons are increasingly using a courtesy phone which was added to the Main library second floor, calls are limited to five minutes. The remaining seating at the Main Library, including the banquet seating and the quiet area seating was re-opened on April 1st. The south building is now fully re-opened! Winners were selected for the 2022 library card art contest and will premier with the kick-off of Summer of Discovery on June 1st. Community Resource Connector Position This position was formerly referred to as a Peer Navigator. Public Services staff are finalizing job description and will be submitting it to Human Resources for classification and compensation review within the next month. An update for the Library Commission is planned for June. Update on Library Commissioner Vacancy Applications for the vacant seat on the Library Commission continue to be accepted. City Council will select applicants and make appointments to vacant seats on boards and commissions on June 7, 2022. Summary of Patron Suspensions 2019 through YTD 2022 A summary of the suspensions issued to patrons for rule violations or illegal behavior during the years 2019 to date is provided here at the request of Commissioner Sykes Wilson. 6 Three firms have provided security service during this time period. The current firm began service in late 2020. The security officers are asked to give warnings upon the instance of a rule violation, unless it is a violation that jeopardizes anyone’s safety. The security officers are provided with guidelines for choosing the length of suspension. The length is determined by severity of the violation and the number of violations per suspension event, if the violation is a repeat offence, or if a minor violation escalates into more severe behavior from the individual being suspended. Total suspensions are in the table below. For this time period, the top rules in order of total violations are: 1.Disrupt others use of the library 2.Threaten or jeopardize the safety of anyone; 3.Lie down, doze or sleep in any library facility 4.Bring into, or possess alcoholic beverages or enter the library while under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol; In general, during this time period, these rules tie for fifth place in total violations: •Leave bags or personal items unattended in any facility. •Use tobacco, marijuana or products containing tobacco or marijuana or their components, including use of any form of electronic smoking or vaping device. •Violate any library policy or terms of use for meeting rooms, the Canyon Gallery and Theater, or Carnegie Library for Local History. 2019 -2022 YTD Report of Patron Suspensions from Library Facilities 2019 2020 2021 2022 Months 12 7 12 4 Total suspensions 93 47 29 22 Average per month 8 7 2 6 Total by length of suspension Less than 30 days 1 8 6 1 30 days 17 3 5 2 60 days 6 4 0 1 90 days 12 4 0 3 120 days 2 0 0 0 180 days 1 3 8 6 365 days 54 25 10 9 7 2022 First Adjustment to the Base Budget (ATB 1) Requests for the first Adjustment to the Base Budget for 2022 are in the table below. City Council will hold first and second readings of the ATB1 requests on May 3, 2022 and May 17, 2022, respectively. Amount Source Description of Request $42,000 Blystat Laesar House Fund Balance Annual cost for Digital Asset Management System, one time migration to new platform, and offsite storage project for archival materials for the Carnegie Library for Local History. $5,000 Blystat Laesar House Fund Balance Colorado Historic Newspaper Digitization Project - The Carnegie Library for Local History contributes to the digital preservation of historical issues of the Boulder Daily Camera. Word searchable digital copies are accessible online, free of charge. $4,000 Blystat Laesar House Fund Balance The historical Boulder Co. assessor card collection has high interest and use and is being digitally preserved so the property information and photographs can be accessed online from the Carnegie Library for Local History website. $16,443 Boulder Library Foundation - George Bragg Fund Carnegie Physical Archivist grant-funded FTE increase - The Boulder Library Foundation is providing ongoing grant funds to reimburse actual costs to increase the Physical Archivist position by .25 FTE. $16,443 Boulder Library Foundation - George Bragg Fund Carnegie Digital Archivist grant-funded FTE increase - The Boulder Library Foundation is providing ongoing grant funds reimburse actual costs to increase the Digital Archivist position by .25 FTE. $16,443 Boulder Library Foundation - BoulderReads Literacy/Outreach Librarian grant-funded FTE increase - The Boulder Library Foundation is providing ongoing grant funds to reimburse actual costs to increase the Outreach Librarian position by .25 FTE. $30,000 Revenue carryover Appropriation of 2022 booksale revenues to fund the volunteer program annual costs, supplement the library collection budget & support the BookRich Environments Literacy Program. $17,088 Revenue carryover 2021 revenues from cost sharing for annual hosting fees for OverDrive downloadable books for the Front Range Downloadable Digital Library Consortium. $29,641 Revenue carryover 2021 Colorado State Library Grant balance - Grant funding for library materials and digital resources for children and Spanish speaking patrons. $58,000 Appropriation correction from ATB1 2021 Appropriate funding from Equipment Replacement Fund for new north Boulder branch library automated materials handling system $5,049 Revenue carryover Donation from Boulder County Area Agency on Aging (via Boulder Library Fund) to continue HotSpot data service for older adults. $240,444 Revenue carryover Carryover of 2021 grant funds for library programs. 8 DIGITAL SERVICES First Quarter Report 2022 April 2022 Goals from Master Plan and Library Communications Plan: Increase community awareness of library programs and services Provide access to high-quality, relevant materials and resources. Detailed reports are available at: ���boulderlibrary.org/stats Team Leads: Lisa Holmberg Annie Elliott Julian Ingram 9 Attachment A. Website & Catalog (boulderlibrary.org & boulder.flatironslibrary.org) Goal: Provide access to high-quality, relevant materials and resources. (2018 Library Master Plan, p. 67) Measure: Sessions returning to previous levels from 2019 Trend: Historically, the first quarter of the year is the high point of the year for website sessions. It is promising to see such strong session numbers, nearly matching those of the mostly pre-covid first quarter 2020. Sessions 1Q 2022 % change prior year 1Q 2021 1Q 2020 1Q 2019 Main site (boulderlibrary.org) 188,333 17% 161,154 189,476 210,755 Catalog (boulder.flatironslibrary.org) 161,843 8% 149,631 165,757 181,298 Total 350,176 13% 310,785 355,233 392,053 10 Page Title Pageviews % Δ Avg. Time on Page % Δ Boulder Public Library 133,285 8.1%04:17 3.9% Search results | Carnegie Library for Local History 38,265 2.1%13 -3.7% Library Events - Library Calendar - Boulder Public Library 20,442 28.7%44 9.2% Your Library Account | Boulder Public Library 11,020 33.8%02:02 -2.0% Carnegie Library for Local History |9,582 -8.6%19 10.0% Home - Staff Links - LibGuides at Boulder Public Library 7,435 19.9%08:12 4.7% Research Home - Research - LibGuides at Boulder Public Li…5,696 20.2%45 0.7% Home - Online Library: Enjoy the library's digital collection…5,094 -4.3%02:26 5.4% Locations | Boulder Public Library 4,672 -41.9%02:22 -7.1% Main Library | Boulder Public Library 4,102 50.5%02:26 9.6% … 1 - 10 / 14782 <> Sessions 188,333 16.9% Pageviews 458,783 19.1% Number of Sessions per User 2.16 -2.1% Users 87,043 33.6% Pages / Session 2.44 -0.4% Sessions Sessions (previous year) Jan 2022 Feb 2022 Mar 2022 0 20K 40K 60K 80K Web Sessions Boulder Public Library boulderlibrary.org Avg. Session Duration 00:02:13 3.0% desktop mobile tablet 37.6% 59.6% Jan 1, 2022 - Mar 31, 2022 ▼Return to Dashboard Sessions by Device User Page Visits 11 Sessions 161,843 7.9% Number of Sessions per User 2.77 -21.2% Pageviews 666,366 -3.1% Users 58,477 37.1% Pages / Session 4.12 -10.3% Sessions Sessions (previous quarter) Jan 2022 Feb 2022 Mar 2022 0 20K 40K 60K Web Sessions Library Catalog boulder.atironslibrary.org Avg. Session Duration 00:03:56 4.5% desktop mobile tablet 33.1% 63.8% Search Term Total Unique Searc…% Δ % Search Renemen…% Δ 1.harry potter 107 5.9%24.75%0.8% 2.the lincoln highway 100 -27.5%28.23%-4.3% 3.wings of re 87 1.2%53.85%31.0% 4.cloud cuckoo land 84 -38.7%39.8%0.8% 5.the midnight library 75 10.3%41.05%8.6% 6.dune 69 -54.6%35%33.1% 7.midnight library 69 97.1%43.04%-21.4% 8.lincoln highway 67 -16.3%41.86%-17.2% 9.braiding sweetgrass 67 -23.9%38.04%-1.9% 10.Maus 64 6,300.0%13.64%-86.4% 1 - 10 / 113316 <> Jan 1, 2022 - Mar 31, 2022 ▼ Sessions by Device Searches 12 Newsletter Goal: Increase community awareness of library and citywide programs and services. (2018 Library Master Plan, p.45 and 2022 Library Communications Plan) Measure: Increase newsletter opens and views of news articles on our website. Trend: We now have just over fifty thousand subscribers to our bi-weekly newsletter. Newsletter opens have jumped up significantly this quarter to an average of 34.61%. With the most opens on the February newsletter titled, Library District Update. 1Q 2022 % change prior year 1Q 2021 1Q 2020 Newsletter Opens 34.61% 82% 18.97% 22.26% 13 Sent Date Subject Opens %Link Clicks Shares 1.Mar 30, 2022, 10:00:00 AM Library News:Spring into creativity! ☀32.17%2.84%8 2.Mar 16, 2022, 9:53:00 AM Library News: ☀ Growing Programs ☀34.58%4.37%5 3.Mar 2, 2022, 9:23:00 AM Library News: 🎨 Design your next library card!35.03%2.86%3 4.Feb 16, 2022, 3:00:00 PM Library News: Library District Update 37.05%3.12%2 5.Feb 2, 2022, 10:15:00 AM Library News: ⌨ Get hooked on technology! 💻34.06%4.19%0 6.Jan 19, 2022, 11:29:00 AM Library News: Choose the next OBOB topic!33.48%4%4 7.Jan 5, 2022, 4:00:00 PM Library News: New year, new changes!!35.87%5.67%3 ▼ 1 - 7 / 7 <> Jan 1, 2022 - Mar 31, 2022 ▼ Subscribers 50,182 Clicks %Opens % Jan 5, 2022, 4:00:00 PM Jan 19, 2022, 11:29:00 AM Feb 2, 2022, 10:15:00 AM Feb 16, 2022, 3:00:00 PM Mar 2, 2022, 9:23:00 AM Mar 16, 2022, 9:53:00 AM Mar 30, 2022, 10:00:00 AM 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Newsletters Sent 7 Avg. Open % 34.61% 28.4% Newsletter Report Recent Mailings Clicks % 3.86% 8.6% Account Insights Return to Dashboard 14 Social Media Goal: Increase community awareness of library programs and services. (2018 Library Master Plan, p.45) Measure: Post daily on all social media platforms. Trend: The Social Media team meet their goal of posting on average once a day on all social media platforms this year. This goal is important to maintain our social media presence. Per post engagement is down slightly, due to our increased number of posts per day this quarter. Impressions are strongly up. 15 16 1 2022 Q1 BPL Quarterly Performance IN PERSON VISITS & NEW PATRONS Quarter 1 saw upward trends on several performance metrics: Door Counts and New Patrons in Q1 showed increased activity as we extended our hours in January and Reynolds had its first full month of re-opening in January. However, Meadows had an unfortunate event requiring closure from Dec 28 to Feb 11, so we lost the gain of their patron visits to these stats. Fig. 1. New patron accounts show Q1 2022 new accounts closing in on 2019 Q1, shy by just around 100 Fig. 2. Door Counts 2019 – 2022 Q1 Jan – Mar Patron visits in 2022 for Q1 are climbing, increasing 42 % over last year and March gained over 50% of 2019 levels with Q1 overall at about 46% of 2019 levels. Fig.3 Circulation Q1 performance by month. Performance Metric Qtr1 Percent change 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021 to 2022 Door Counts 240538 190861 53570 110967 107.14% New Patrons 2439 2281 1548 2199 42.05% 17 Attachment B. 2 Figures 4,5, 6 Q1 Circulation Physical circulation is growing with a 40% gain over Q1 2021 and achieving 67% of 2019 Q1 levels. eCollections saw an enormous spike in Q1 during 2020 and 2021 Database usage also saw gains in usage for 2022 (not pictured) Recall Meadows was closed until Feb 11, so their collections were not filling holds or borrowed. PROGRAMS Performance Metric Qtr1 Percent change 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021 to 2022 Circulation (Patron Activity)391703 326720 187850 264677 40.90% Database Use 81179 83220 50297 62757 24.77% Door Counts 240538 190861 53570 110967 107.14% eCollection Use 59316 78194 103151 98988 -4.04% FLC Borrows incoming 28497 30001 28387 23087 -18.67% FLC Loans outgoing 21641 23493 18384 17280 -6.01% Prospector Borrows 6306 5584 3077 n/a Prospector Loans 3314 2387 1576 n/a Holds Filled (Collections)52409 45398 52712 42558 -19.26% Tot. Holds filled 87212 80983 62786 68722 9.45% 18 3 Staff continue to meet program needs of the community and host innovative events during what we hope is the tail end of the pandemic. Fig 7 excludes the External Events by discussion groups happening offsite in 2021/22 Fig 7 SELECTED HIGHLIGHTS OF Q1 •Prospector returned to the overwhelming delight of patrons and staff! Huzzah! •Seed to Table events included a Seed Swap at Main and Meadows, BeeChicas Make a Valentine and Bee House. •Winter Reading Challenge ran end of Dec through Feb 28 and had 594 participants •Teen programming continued diverse programming with Book Queeries, Traditional Mexican Lottery games and author visit from Alison Ames. •Outreach conducted at Temple Grandin and Boulder H.S. •The library hosted the Marshall Fire Toy, Book and Games giveaway for those impacted by the fire. •First annual Tolkien Reading Day 2022 •Library Card Art Contest resumed, a favorite time of year for staff! •Tax Help Preparation offered through volunteer programming. •NoBo continued their Holiday Park story and craft times, delivering adventures in all weathers. •Meadows endured through a facility closure for many weeks but rebounded with stellar performance with their Storytime attendance in late Feb and March. •George Reynolds Branch opened their newly renovated space in December much to the delight of South Boulder community and began offering new programs, such as DIY Tea Towels and Pokémon Engineering. •Research Rendezvous held research help for teens participating in National History Day competition. •Building 61 introduced M.I.G welding and Screen Printing technology to their offerings. •BoulderReads continued to serve their studnets in outstanding ways with Free GED, TOEFL and tutoring. •Drop in Tech help, our popular service for digital literacy, began Saturday service at the Meadows branch. Summary: As Winter turned to Spring in the first quarter of 2022, the library continued to make strides toward resuming pre-pandemic performance with increased patron usage, visits, and borrowing. One bright spot of the past two years is that staff have found new and innovative ways to engage patrons, combining the very best of in person and virtual programming Performance Metric Qtr1 Percent change 2019 2020 2021 2022 2021 to 2022 Programs Attendance-Adult 7628 4235 2016 3703 83.68% Programs Attendance-All Ages 2552 448 1156 158.04% Programs Attendance-Children 4587 1695 736 496 -32.61% Programs Attendance-Teen 3059 2287 369 278 -24.66% Programs Offered-Adult 482 349 303 665 119.47% Programs Offered-All Ages 42 72 44 -38.89% Programs Offered-Children 205 101 75 30 -60.00% Programs Offered-Teen 71 77 56 36 -35.71% Total Programs Offered 758 569 506 775 53.16% Total Program Attendance 15274 10769 3569 5633 57.83% Storytime Attendance 8903 6513 1158 3634 213.82% Storytime Events 319 270 107 170 58.88% 19 DATE: April 29, 2022 TO: Boulder Library Commission FROM: David Farnan, Library Director Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director SUBJECT: 2023 Library Budget Requests and Assessment of Progress of the Master Plan Goals BACKGROUND September 2022 marks the fourth year of the current library master plan. Most of the goals were intentionally created to be broad, rather than discrete action items so investment can be adjusted to respond to evolving community needs and priorities for library programs and services. The goals are categorized into four themes: •Programs and Services •Facilities and Technology •Building Community and Partnerships •Organizational Readiness Objectives identified for each goal were prioritized into three investment levels: Maintain Service Levels Continue to make the most of existing resources with the primary goal of the department to maintain service level and quality. The objectives associated with maintaining service levels are essential operational changes that require limited funding to accomplish. Address Community Demand Service, program or capital improvements undertaken when additional funding is available. This includes strategically enhancing existing programs, beginning new alternative programs, addressing the 2007 Library Master Plan goals that were not accomplished, or making other strategic changes that require additional operational or capital funding. Service Expansion These objectives represent new programs, services and facilities identified through community input that were not included in the previous master plan. Since 2018, the Library Commission has advised that long term financial sustainability of the library system is an overall priority and essential to the library fulfilling its potential for the community as an engine of social and economic mobility, a platform for civic education and dialogue, and a place to create hands-on, collaborative learning environments which address the needs of 21st century learners. At the direction of City Council, staff from the library, City Manager’s Office, City Attorney’s Office, and Finance have coordinated to fulfill the Library Commission’s recommendations to complete a thorough evaluation of future library funding options and hold a broad-based community discussion around the 20 library’s long-term financial sustainability. To date, City Council has examined several options for long- term and more stable funding for the library and a library district form of governance. While the City Council and the Boulder County Board of County Commissioners discussion of forming a library district by resolution has ended, the community discussion about library funding is ongoing. ANALYSIS During the past four years, library staff has invested the funding received from the annual city budget allocation and several grants and staff effort to meet the objectives in the Maintain Service Levels investment level. As described in the background section of this memo, these objectives were essential operational changes that required limited new funding to maintain the level and quality of the core programs and services. The economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in reductions to core library services and contraction or suspension of many programs integral to a Healthy and Socially Thriving Community 1. Funding and staff effort for many objectives in the Address Community Demand investment level were curtailed, also. The 2022 library budget requests were strategically designed and prioritized to meet community needs and address master plan goals rather than simply replace the funds to where they were cut. Staff will take this same approach in designing and prioritizing the 2023 library budget requests. An assessment of progress for the 2018 Boulder Public Library Master Plan Goals is Attachment A. New City of Boulder Budget Process The City Finance Department implemented a new program-based budget development process with two phases, 1. Base budget development and 2. Program proposals that are categorized as new programs, enhancements, realignment, or reductions. The base budget for the upcoming year is built upon the approved department budget for the current year with adjustments proposed for (a) contractual obligations resulting in budget increases, (b) inflationary increases beyond city control and (c) other budget obligations with prior approval. Base budget proposals were submitted in early April, and are reviewed by the city executive budget team with decisions shared with departments by the end of April. Program proposals (phase 2) are submitted by departments mid-May, reviewed by the city executive budget team with decisions for the program proposals accepted for the city recommended budget shared with departments in July. The proposals are finalized in the city recommended budget and presented to City Council in September. Council holds two readings of the city recommended budget in October. The 2023 city budget is scheduled for adoption Oct. 18, 2022. Library Budget Program Areas In past years, the library budget was presented by the organizational divisions: Administration, eServices, Public Services, and Community Engagement and Enrichment and further broken out by sub programs 2. For the new program-based budget approach beginning in 2023, the library budget will be presented in five programs: 1 Boulder Sustainability + Resilience Framework, City of Boulder. 2 Fiscal Year 2022 Approved Budget, City of Boulder, page 130. 21 •Administration •Collections •Programs and Events •Public Services •Community Literacy and Outreach The Administration Program includes eServices and the Carnegie Library for Local History. 2023 Library Base Budget The library submitted $93,636 of base budget adjustments for the following: •Increase to annual maintenance contract for three automated materials handling systems •Background check fees required for volunteer program support •Increases for the annual courier contracts for library materials and to resume U.S. mail delivery •Fee increases for the Common Area Maintenance for the Meadows Branch Library and for collection agency placement of past due patron accounts •Increase to the security contract to resume coverage to the pre-pandemic level These adjustments were approved in the 2023 base budget. 2023 Library Budget Requests The 2023 library budget requests focus on four key areas that fall under the enhancement category and align with the City’s goals for budget development: 1.Define and embed intended outcomes that advance organizational racial equity goals within programs and projects. 2.Determine and collect data to inform and monitor progress related to the intended outcomes of budget choices. 3.Engage with residents, especially with traditionally underserved groups, to develop shared strategies to improve outcomes. 4.Establish shared accountability for making improvements to programs and projects where measured progress falls short of expectations. These budget development goals compliment the staff’s strategy to design budget proposals that address the library’s master plan goals. Staff Compensation Adjustments The library is requesting approximately $50,000 for adjustments anticipated from a pending update to the city’s classification and compensation project that was implemented in October 2021. The adjustments address issues with pay equity and market competitive classification and wages. The library is planning a staff reporting structure reorganization which includes separating the former Community Engagement and Enrichment Division into two new divisions: the Programs and Events Division and the Community Literacy and Outreach Division. Funding for reclassification of positions that will assume an increased level of responsibility resulting from the reorganization is included. Restoration of Core Services and to Resume Programs 22 Approximately $800,000 The library will seek restoration of ongoing funding to address capacity issues with providing core library services and to resume the programs that remain contracted or suspended due to the budget reductions in 2020 and 2021. •Library materials (collection) budget •George Reynolds Branch Library personnel •Makerspace personnel and materials •Library Collection Development and Resource Services personnel •Boulder Reads Literacy Program personnel •Carnegie Library for Local History personnel •Program and Events personnel •Patron Services personnel North Boulder Branch Library Construction and Operations Partial year operating costs, approximately $360,000 One-time non-capital costs, estimate is pending Cost escalation of construction materials and labor to complete the construction of the branch library is still impacting the project budget. Since the branch library is expected to open mid to late 2023, the library and the Facilities Department will request a commensurate portion of operating funds for personnel and non-personnel costs such as: •Public Services personnel •Branch Librarian •Facilities Support, Technology Support and Makerspace personnel •Contract security services •Building maintenance and utilities costs Some of the remaining annual operating funds planned for the branch library will be requested as one-time funds to purchase non-capital items for the branch library such as: •Computers and other technology equipment •Furniture •Directional signs •New library materials One-time use of operating funds for these items may somewhat reduce the extent of the impact of the construction cost escalation. Addressing Disparities of Access to Information and Library Services Approximately $ 180,000 The COVID-19 pandemic emphasized many critical social and economic disparities experienced by some Boulder community members. During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and despite budget 23 reductions and facility closures, library staff coordinated with Housing and Human Services Department staff to conduct outreach and provide technology resources and internet access to many children, families and older adult community members in need. These resources were essential to support education for children, facilitate access to unemployment benefits, critical health and social services, etc. Funding for the equipment and services was provided by the Boulder Library Foundation and other grants. This experience caused the library staff to assess master plan goals and prioritize investment of new funding, if available, toward objectives that increase capacity in literacy programs and service areas, and for community outreach to under-served members of the Boulder community. A few of the master plan goals were created to specifically address the disparities experienced by immigrants, minority groups, persons experiencing homelessness, and persons or families with fixed and/or low incomes. Funding for the following will be requested for programs and services that reduce disparities: •Outreach Librarian •Literacy Librarian •Specialized and focused marketing support and other non-personnel expenses to support these program enhancements Questions for the Library Commission 1.Does the Library Commission have questions or input for staff regarding the 2023 budget requests? 2.Does the Library Commission support staff approach for the 2023 budget requests? 3.Does the Library Commission have questions or input regarding the assessment of the 2018 Boulder Public Library Master Plan goals? 24 ATTACHMENT A. 2018 Boulder Public Library Master Plan Goals Assessment of Progress For the sake of brevity, progress is noted under each goal theme by investment level. Goals not appearing in the tables below are those with objectives that have been addressed to the extent possible, work may be ongoing related to them but no additional new implementation activities are planned unless it becomes warranted by community use or demand. Those completed goals and objectives are listed at the end of this document. PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Maintain Service Levels Objectives addressed for all goals. Meet Community Demand Uniform service levels Some progress has been made regarding staffing level at the branch libraries with the addition of branch librarians. Restoration of funding from the 2020 and 2021 budget reductions and additional personnel resources are necessary to provide consistent open hours and program offerings. Collections and maintenance The collection budget is currently funded at $9.89 per capita. The goal is $14 per capita within in ten years. The collection budget has not been increased since 2019. Increased community awareness of programs and services Personnel and non-personnel resources are needed to support expansion of programs with the opening of the north Boulder branch library and for specialized and focused communications to reach under-served community members. Activate the outside public spaces A strategy and funding plan for maintenance and programs has not been completed and is unfunded. Activate the Canyon Theater and Gallery Personnel resources are funded at a minimum level. Ongoing non-personnel costs are not funded. Maker program expansion Not funded. Expand makerspace facilities at the Main Library and branch libraries Completion of the makerspace in the north Boulder Branch Library is unfunded. Expand the variety of programs Grant funding is available for program materials, presenters, etc. Personnel resources to support the expansion of programs is not funded. Service Expansion All objectives for these Programs and Services goals are unfunded at this investment level: •Provide resources and facilities to encourage civil civic dialogue 25 •Activate the Canyon Theater and Gallery •Increased community awareness of programs and services •Activate the Canyon Theater and Gallery •Expand makerspace facilities at the Main Library and branch libraries FACILITIES AND TECHNOLOGY Maintain Service Levels Cleanliness of libraries facilities Additional day porter personnel is unfunded. Facilities Sustainability Plan Facilities analyses identified are unfunded for all investment levels. Safety and security Restoration of security contract funding to provide coverage at pre-pandemic levels is unfunded. Meet Community Demand North Boulder Branch Library Construction budget is not adequate to address cost escalation. Technology Strategic Plan Implementation of recommendations is unfunded. Carnegie Library Restoration Plan The plan is unfunded. Archival storage Ongoing funding needed. Facilities Sustainability Plan Facilities analyses identified are unfunded for all investment levels. Safety and security Analysis and resources to directly employ security personnel at adequate coverage level is unfunded. Service Expansion All objectives for these Facilities and Technology goals are unfunded at this investment level: •Open a corner library in Gunbarrel •Carnegie Library Restoration Plan (implementation funding) •Facilities Sustainability Plan (Facilities analyses identified are unfunded for all investment levels.) BUILDING COMMUNITY AND PARTNERSHIPS Maintain Service Levels Partnership Strategic Plan Plan is unfunded. 26 Library teen advisory groups Objectives were revised by staff based on teen patron input. Teen volunteer engagement has increased and Annual Teen Summit was implemented. Expand outreach to reach underserved communities Development of an outreach plan is on the library workplan in the next two years. Meet Community Demand Expand outreach to reach underserved communities Increased personnel resources are needed to accomplish the objectives at this investment level. Service Expansion Expand volunteer services program The objective is dependent on the activation of the Canyon Theater and Gallery goal (See Programs and Services section). ORGANIZATIONAL READINESS Maintain Service Levels Review policies and planning documents Work on objectives reduced to accommodate staff support of community discussion of long- term stable funding. Staff communication and teambuilding Staff communication taskforce has not been pursued. Equity, Diversity, Inclusion committee was formed to advise on improving recruitment and retention practices, and a staff survey was conducted. Meet Community Demand Gather staff and community input Patron satisfaction survey is unfunded. Service Expansion No objectives. Master Plan Goals with Objectives Fully Addressed The objectives for the goals below have been addressed to the extent possible, work may be ongoing related to them, but no additional new implementation activities are planned unless it becomes warranted by community use or demand. •Provide resources and facilities to encourage civil civic dialogue and create a forum of ideas to address local, regional and national issues. •Expand the library materials holds service for patrons. •Provide sufficient devices and network bandwidth to accommodate user demand in current and new facilities and to manage technology resources to maximize purchasing power and quality. •Cultivate community awareness about how the library is a welcoming and inclusive public place for all and protects all patrons’ first amendment rights and privacy. 27 •Cultivate and engage the Library’s teen advisory groups. •Cultivate relationship with patrons who are experiencing homelessness. •Host an annual literacy-focused festival. 28 From:No Reply To:BPL-COM Subject:Commission Contact Form Date:Monday, April 11, 2022 4:59:10 PM Formstack Submission For: Commission Contact Form - Celia Submitted at 04/11/22 4:59 PM Your Name:Heather Ryan Email:h10ryan@yahoo.com Message: City Council is undermining Library District by insisting on an excessive tax increase and "pocketing" the excess. The only way the tax for the district has a chance of passing in my view is if it is kept as low as possible and that it does not result in over $10 million increased funding for the City. My letter to the City Council: City Council Library District Vote Discouraging I write as a supporter of increased and stable funding for the library. The flaw in the current proposal for the Library District is that it results in an unnecessarily large tax increase (total taxes include $20 million in new taxes on top of well over $10 million in current tax revenues) to fund a relative modestly increased library budget. This is not responsible financial stewardship by the City Council. I was disappointed when watching the recent City Council/County Commissioner meeting that no City Council representative even raised the option of minimizing the proposed tax increase by continuing to devote the current library funding to the Library District (or otherwise rebated these taxes). It was unsettling to see 29 Council Member Benjamin gleefully talking of the fun he would have spending the “saved” funds of well over $10 million. There was zero recognition that the council was seeking to impose a large tax increase when a small one would serve the purpose of providing the necessary additional funding for the library. I respect that the County Commissioners refused to be rushed into a decision on this matter and seems more concerned than the City Council about minimizing the tax increase and burden on their constituents. There is a way to have a properly funded Library District without imposing a tax burden that is far greater than needed. It is a mystery to me why the City Council refuses to support a financially responsible proposal that minimizes the needed tax increase (is it the “price” the council exacted to support the Library District?). This refusal undermines the library rather than supports it, and it disrespects Boulder citizens. 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