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10.25.21 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m.,October 25, 2021 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2021 Raj Seymour (Chair) Pamela Yugar (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Elliott Hood Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate /͘ APPROVAL OF AGENDA (2 minutes) //͘ FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (2 minutes) ///͘ PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (15 - 30 minutes) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. A.PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (10 minutes)B.Guidance for Annual Input to CouncilC.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) (10 minutes) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. VIII͘ NEXT BOARD MEETING Retreat 6:00 p.m., November 15, 2021 Regular Meeting 6:00 p.m., November 22, 2021 IX.ADJOURN sI. MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT A͘ Court Allocation Update (15 minutes)B. Restuarants in Regional Parks (10 minutes) VII͘ MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS IV.CONSENT AGENDA (5 minutes) A.Approval of Minutes from September 27, 2021 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.ITEMS FROM DISCUSSION/INFORMATION A͘ 2022 Reservoir Operations Plan (30 minutes) B. Master Plan Update - Key Themes and Policies (60 minutes) 1 PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS UPDATED: October 20, 2021 OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY PRAB October 25: •Reservoir Operations Plan (d/i) •MP Update- Key Themes and Policies (d/i) •Court Allocation Update (md) •PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) •Guidance for Annual Input to Council (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) November 22: •Reservoir Operations Plan (d/i) 60m •BCFM & Creek Festival Contract Renewals (d/i) 20m •PRAB Retreat Follow Up –Letter to Council (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •PRAB Recruitment (mb) •Approved 2022 Budget, ARPA overview (c) December 13: •BCFM & Creek Festival Contract Renewals (a) 10m •MP Update- Implementation Plan (d/i) (60-90 minutes) •Historic Preservation Plan HiPP (d/i) •PRAB Retreat Follow Up (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) January 24: •Galls Golf Software (c) •Public Art Update (md) •Park Names: Next Steps (md) •BPR 2021 Annual Report and BPR 2022 Workplan (md) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •Boulder Creek Management Plan Kick –Off (md)Department Events and Items of Interest •Master Plan Engagement: Details online •October 1: Scott Carpenter Closed for Season •November 11: Veteran’s Day (City Administrative Offices Closed) •November 15: PRAB Retreat •November 25: Thanksgiving Holiday – City Administrative Offices Closed •Afternoon of December 23, Full day December 24: Christmas Eve and Day Holiday Observed– City Administrative Offices Closed •Afternoon of December 30, Full day December 31: New Years Eve and Day Holiday Observed – City Administrative Offices Closed AGENDA SETTING The PRAB Chair, PRAB Vice Chair and BPR staff set the agenda for the next month on the Thursday directly following the regular PRAB meeting. PRAB members can submit agenda requests to the Chair and Vice Chair by Wednesday following the PRAB regular meeting for consideration. If time-sensitive matters arise, PRAB Chair and Vice Chair may amend the agenda as needed. LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion following the consent agenda. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in- depth analysis. City Council Item (cc) Other Boards and Commissions (obc) Community Engagement and/or Events (e) Holiday/Closure (h/c) Italics indicate a tentative date or plan. 2 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: October 25, 2021 A. Approval of Minutes September 27, 2021 3 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: September 27, 2021 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, Phone: 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Elliott Hood, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Pamela Yugar, Tara Winer Board Members Absent: Jason Unger Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Tina Briggs, Stacy Cole, Tim Duda, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Chris Passarelli, Ali Rhodes Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:00 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve minutes. Motion by Brock. Second by Scott. The motion passed 5-0. Elliot Hood abstained as he was absent from the August 23, 2021 meeting. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Brock. Second by Scott. The motion passed 6-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation •Bev Nelson: Suggested stripping more tennis courts and other ways to allow for pickleball use outdoors. (See talking points provided to PRAB in Attachment A) •Ceal Barry: Suggested stripping more tennis courts and other ways to increase pickleball space outdoors. •Lou Ingalls: Suggested stripping more tennis courts and other ways to increase pickleball space outdoors. (See talking points provided to PRAB in Attachment B) •Barb Miller: Suggested stripping more tennis courts and other ways to allow for pickleball use outdoors. (See talking points provided to PRAB in Attachment C) •Marti Hopper: Suggested stripping more tennis courts and other ways to allow for pickleball use outdoors in the short-term and building more pickleball courts long-term. •Larry McKeough: Shared disappointment about the annual after-action Reservoir survey. He felt that overall aquatic usage was low this summer and spoke against the reduction in 4 hours. He would like to see more public private partnerships to address the lifeguard shortage. •Mike Chiropolos: Suggested that BPR consider an exchange of land from the planning reserve elsewhere in the city (Area III land) for part of the recently annexed CU South property. The board had the following comments or questions: •Will court space be part of the October PRAB agenda? Does staff have any brief notes to share tonight? •What is the process for making sure each sport is considered and the changes that are made are prioritized fairly? •Suggested that staff look at creative ways to address emerging needs as part of the master plan. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda B.Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •Impressed by the high visitation at pools this summer. •Will vaccines be required for city staff? If not, why not? •Looks like programming is up from last year but the number of attendees is lower than last year. Is that correct? If so, is there an explanation of why there is a discrepancy? •The new features at Valmont are great and already seeing a lot of use. •Its great that BPR continues to focus on the Requity and financial aid programs. •The increase in Golf participation is terrific. •Congratulations to the staff members who responded to a medical emergency and saved a life. Agenda Item 5: Matters from the Department A.Reservoir Annual After-Action Review Process Overview This item was presented by Munro. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •When there are issues that arise, does the city ever hire third party mediation to help? •Would it be possible to have a newspaper article about this questionnaire to get more respondents that are not part of special groups? •Request consideration of rate adjustments based on transportation mode as part of the discussion at the next PRAB meeting. B.Restaurants in Regional Parks This item was presented by Rhodes. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •What are the three regional parks? •How does BPR and PRAB work with other departments on these planning efforts and 15- minute neighborhood planning? •Given concerns that this would apply to all parks, the specificity of focusing on the three regional parks is appreciated. •PRAB members offered support for this project. 5 C.Historical Places Plan This item was presented by Haley. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •Which of the historic sites need the most care or updating? Why is that? Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Board A.Information on CU South and Area III Haley provided a verbal reminder of previous information shared with PRAB. The board had the following comments/questions: •Is all of Area III going to be parks and recreation development? •Would the city pay for the development and maintenance of the public parks and recreation amenities at CU South? •To maintain the current Level of Service in terms of park acreage per resident, is the city short 200 or more acres, not including the Area III acreage? •Community members want to be involved in development and how uses will be decided. •Council discussed Area III in depth on February 25, 2020. Could that memo be forwarded to PRAB? B.PRAB Retreat Committee and Agenda Discussion •Pamela and Chuck volunteered to serve as the retreat committee. •Elliot Hood volunteered to be the PRAB liaison to the Master Plan Process, replacing Tara Winer in that post. C.PRAB Community Engagement Updates •Brock talked to North Boulder Park users to gather the following feedback: Slackliners like big trees in south end of the park, users of exercise equipment like the pull up bars, and would like a place to use TRX straps, families like the playground and want slides fixed, many users wanted more bathrooms. •Several PRAB members expressed support for adult playground equipment. •Winer went to a fundraising event at the Reservoir and thought it was an incredible event. •Seymour talked to several North Boulder Park users and received requests for removal of the pea gravel due to kids eating it. •What did BPR decide with regards to bird-safe windows for the new golf course building? •Hood talked to users at several different playgrounds in south Boulder. Users liked many of the features but suggested that the slide at Tantra park be replaced as it is too small and not steep enough. • Agenda Item 7: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, October 25, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 8: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, Seymour adjourned the meeting at 7:57 p.m. 6 Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 7 From:Bev Nelson To:PRAB Subject:NBRC pickleball courts Date:Monday, September 27, 2021 1:53:03 PM External Sender I am speaking tonight to encourage you to restripe three of the North Boulder Rec Center tennis courts for pickleball and add rolling nets to each new court. This creates dual purpose courts without reducing any usage away from the tennis players as the pickleball players roll the nets onto the court and the tennis players roll them off, depending on who’s scheduled. There is huge competition for the two existing pickleball courts which will get worse with less daylight and the closing of the local Impact private pickleball courts which has unleashed over 100 players competing for local courts. The data collected earlier this year shows 8 times as many pickleball players as tennis players, and the tennis courts are often empty while we play pickleball. Thanks for listening Attachment A: Speaking Points from Bev Nelson 8 Speaking points by Lou Ingalls Intro •84 yr old mother in law introduced me to PB •First to organize outdoor PB games during pandemic •Participation in large as well as small groups of players History of requests: •Began asking for more outdoor courts last fall •Participated in QR code survey for 6 months •Verified strong interest and need for more facilities •Personal experience of rare tennis court usage Frustration: •Empty tennis courts right next to us on a regular basis •Pandemic concerns with indoor vs outdoor play Resistance? •Where is resistance to meeting community need? •Told it’s not expense •Told rec centers focus on multi use facilities •Why are tennis courts solo-use and prioritized? •Not interested in displacing tennis players – want to foster community •Good camaraderie among all court players •Disconnect between top priority stated as responsive to community when no response to report in June by PB liaison committee Please: •Add lines to current tennis courts at NRBC in October 2021 •Waiting is antithetical and counterproductive to community cohesiveness •Don’t fall further behind our surrounding communitites Thank you. Attachment B: Speaking Points from Lou Ingalls 9 From:PRAB Admin Cc:Barb Miller Subject:FW: 9/27/21 Speaking Points Barb Miller Date:Monday, September 27, 2021 3:26:33 PM Attachments:image001.png Dear members of the PRAB, I am forwarding the below from community member Barb Miller. Her speaking points are also pasted below, instead of attached. She is copied on this email. Best, Charlotte O’Donnell Administrative Specialist III (pronouns: She/Her/Hers) What's This? odonnellc@bouldercolorado.gov Phone: 303-413-7223 -----Original Message----- From: Barb Miller bmiller6lake@gmail.com Sent: Monday, September 27, 2021 2:50 PM To: PRAB Admin PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov Subject: 9/27/21 Speaking Points Barb Miller External Sender Dear PRAB members, Thanks in advance for allowing our group to speak at PRAB tonight. I thought you might appreciate my speaking points so they are attached here. Best, Barb Miller Speaking Points by Barb Miller Intro •Bringing it down to the personal level •Frustration of scheduling online reservations •This is what being part of the 88% means Pandemic - moving from the inside to the outside to play •Winter shoveling •Playing ALL winter long •60+ PB players at NBRC •Same skill levels play together (aka, “Would you ask this of tennis players?”) Attachment C: Speaking Points from Barb Miller 10 “Why don’t you just play inside at NBRC drop-in?” •Reasons for playing & reserving outside •JUST LINES. JUST NETS. 11 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Master Plan Update (see discussion item) o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Project (see action item) o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP) o Skate Park Improvements and Pump Track Project Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Boulder Reservoir Capital Projects In 2021, $200K was allocated in capital funding to continue implementation of the recent Boulder Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan. The key improvements identified for this funding includes parking lot repairs near the boat parking and ramp on the east side of the park as well as a complete renovation to the restrooms at the marina. Weather permitting, repairs to the parking lot near the boat parking and ramp are scheduled to begin and end in late October. These repairs will cover approximately 50,000 square feet of asphalt. Restroom renovations are expected to occur throughout the fall and winter. Signage is expected to be installed spring of 2022. All improvements will be complete for the summer 2022 season. Improvements were prioritized through the development of the capital strategy that provide necessary upgrades to existing facilities while also supporting the visitor experience. 12 East Boulder Community Park Restroom: A new, year-round restroom facility has been installed at East Boulder Community Park. The new restroom was included in the park’s master plan and will provide much needed services for athletic field users and users of the tennis and handball courts, dog park, and playground. Other improvements will include a new shade shelter with tables, a drinking fountain with bottle filling station, and installation of water hydrants in the small and large dog park. The restroom remains closed to the public while irrigation and landscape repairs are made, final building permits are closed out and the facility is brought on to a regular cleaning cycle. The restroom is expected to be fully open by the end of October. • Skate Park and Pump Track –Valmont City Park and Howard Heuston Park: The addition of the new skate features and the pump track at the parks are supported by community members and stakeholder groups and have increased the amount of skateable space in the city for users of all abilities. They provide much needed outdoor, soci ally distant recreation opportunities and beginner skate features for those starting to learn. Each of the locations are accessible to all community members. Valmont City Park: While construction activities continue at Valmont City Park, the skate park, bike pump track, and dog parks remain open to the public. On-going and upcoming construction activities at the park include: - Storm-water quality garden installation - Irrigation installation - Tree installation - Installation of site features (bike racks, picnic tables, etc.) Paving of the new parking lot was completed in early October, and the majority of the lot remains closed while on-going construction activities continue. Several spaces, south of the green-block pavilion, are open to the public, but use of alternate parking at the disc 13 golf course and Airport Rd. lot is still encouraged. The lot will be fully opened when activities in the lot are complete. Construction is expected to last through November. Some landscaping items will occur in the spring with warmer weather. Howard Heuston: The skate spot at Howard Heuston Park is a 3,500 square foot, low- impact, transition-oriented skate area designed for all skill levels. With completion of irrigation and landscape repairs, the skate spot at Howard Heuston will open to the public in mid-October. Permanent fencing around the skate spot will be installed as soon as materials are available. •GOCO Grant Project Updates The contractor has completed the trail work on the North Shore of the Boulder Reservoir, supported by funding from GOCO. Two trails formalize previously undesignated social trails to create access to the Reservoir shoreline east of the Boulder Feeder Canal. The contractor also constructed timber stairs just west of the Boulder Feeder Canal on the existing designated trail. These stairs are intended to mitigate steep, muddy and sometimes icy trail conditions on that section of trail. 14 Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. •Wildlife Management Amphibians and Reptiles: The Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) has disappeared from many areas where it was once abundant and is listed as a Tier 1 Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) by Colorado Parks and Wildlife. In partnership with OSMP, improvements for Northern leopard frog habitat were made at East Boulder Community Park. Approximately 6 tons of cattail material were removed allowing for increased water surface and vegetative diversity. Supported by a Great Outdoors Colorado Conservation Service Corps grant, the Mile High Youth Corps performed habitat restoration work along the North Shore of the Reservoir and at Coot Lake. Just under 5 tons of cattails and 320 Russian olive trees of varying sizes were removed from the wetlands at Coot Lake. This work supports multiple species of concern including the Northern leopard frog and the American bittern. Bats: During a program at Thunderbird Lake in 2020, local bat expert and professor at the University of Northern Colorado, Rick Adams, noted the presence of tricolored bats. Typically found in the eastern United States, this species has been petitioned to be listed as an endangered or threatened species under the Endangered Species Act due to impacts from white nose syndrome. White nose syndrome is a fungal disease that decimates bat populations. In 2021, Professor Adams surveyed multiple sites across the BPR system to collect data on bat species diversity and relative abundance in urban areas of Boulder. The noted tricolored bats were found at three of the six sites surveyed. Maxwell Lake had the highest bat activity levels, as well as the most species diversity of the six sites surveyed. The management recommendations presented in Professor Adams’s report are being evaluated for potential implementation to improve conservation of these urban bat populations. 15 •Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration Aquatic Nuisance Species: The annual survey of BPR aquatic ways (creeks and ditches) for Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) was recently completed. Evidence of a new population of New Zealand Mud Snails was found in Farmer’s Ditch at Elk’s Park. This joins previous populations at Elmer’s Two Mile Park and Pleasant View Fields Sports Complex. With these expanding populations of invasive species, efforts are underway to create city-wide mapping of known locations to minimize the continued spread of New Zealand Mud Snails. This city-wide effort will help inform other department’s projects and the steps necessary to minimize risk of spread when impacting waterways. Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Visitor Management; o Volunteer Programs; o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination; and o Natural Lands Maintenance. C. Operations Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific BPR services in the parks or facilities. This section is not all inclusive of all current operations and intends to provide awareness on key accomplishments, new happenings, service level adjustments or other information impacting operations.    COVID-19     The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus.        •Facility Masking Requirements: On September 3, Boulder County Public Health issued a public health order requiring facial coverings indoors for all individuals two-years-and-older regardless of vaccination status. In line with this order, the department is currently requiring all staff and patrons to mask when indoors. •Staff Vaccine Mandate: To promote a safe and healthy workplace for staff and the community it serves, the city has implemented a requirement for all employees be fully vaccinated by December 8, 2021. The city will comply with all legal requirements related to medical and religious accommodations. Halloween Drive-in Movie To support COVID-safe Halloween activities for the entire community, BPR will again host a Drive-In Movie at Flatirons Golf Course. Building on the success of last year’s event, the 2021 program will grow to feature two nights of Halloween double features. Registrants will enjoy pre-made treat bags and watch one (or both) spooky movies under the stars as part of two movie screenings per day: an early screening at 6 p.m. (suggested for families with children ages 12 and under), and a late screening at 8 p.m. (suggested for adults and children 13+). A community poll hosted via social media selected: 16 •Oct. 28 – “Musical Thursday” with The Nightmare Before Christmas (6 p.m.) and Little Shop of Horrors (8 p.m.) •Oct. 29 – “Monster Friday” with Monsters, Inc. (6 p.m.) and Gremlins (8 p.m.). Those who participated in the online movie choice poll and put in their email will have the first opportunity to buy tickets. The remaining tickets will be made available via BPREvents.org. Restaurants in Regional Parks As shared with the PRAB in September, City Council is reviewing a code change to clarify how restaurant uses are permitted and managed within city facilities from the zoning perspective. The proposed code change would make it more clear how the uses are permitted on Publicly zoned properties, more specifically within the city’s larger regional parks. The proposed changes to the Land Use Code would make restaurants allowed by right if within a regional park managed government facility and no closer than 500 feet from any residential zone. Restaurants closer than 500 feet would require Use Review. This code change would only apply to the Flatirons Golf Course, Boulder Reservoir and Valmont Park, which fit the definition of a regional park. City Council approved the change on first reading 8-1 on October 5, 2021. Planning Board reviewed the proposed ordinance on October 7, 2021 and unanimously recommended that City Council not adopt the ordinance. The board cited concerns that restaurants in public parks should be considered through a Use Review rather than as by-right uses and that application of the same standard to the three regional parks may not be appropriate. The board found that the regional parks have different characteristics and their differences may merit different approaches. Some also felt that perhaps restaurants should not be established as principal uses in all of the regional parks. The board was concerned about how a restaurant at the reservoir, either as currently permitted or expanded in the future, may present impacts to wildlife and nearby residential properties with respect to noise, light and traffic. The board felt that an alternative ordinance should be developed and brought back to the board for consideration. The Planning Board motion is below: On a motion by L. Smith seconded by J. Gerstle the Planning Board voted 7-0 to recommend that City Council reject the Ordinance 8510, which proposes to amend Title 9, “Land Use Code,” to allow restaurants as limited uses in regional parks within the public (P) zoning district, as written due to the following concerns: •Desire for individual Use Review; •That the three parks are sufficiently different to merit different approaches; and •While Planning Board agrees with staff and the community that restaurants may be appropriate in regional parks, further exploration of “accessory” vs. “principal” use is warranted. The October 26 City Council meeting includes the second reading and a Public Hearing on this topic. The memo for the item includes staff analysis and recommendations based upon the Planning Board’s review. (This link to be provided when the packet is posted Thursday, October 21). 17 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: October 25, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: 2022 Boulder Reservoir Operations Plan PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Stephanie Munro, Regional Recreation Facilities Manager Stacy Cole, Boulder Reservoir Facility Supervisor Chris Passarelli, Data Analyst EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) continues to align business practices with the guidance outlined in the 2014 Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan. At the Boulder Reservoir, operations are also informed by the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan. This item is part of a two- step approach to develop the 2022 Operations Plan for the Boulder Reservoir. First, and with this item, staff share an overview of 2021 Reservoir performance and introduce opportunities for improvement in 2022. Next, and at the November business meeting, staff will share proposed operation and access shifts for 2022 based upon the department’s approach where solutions are based upon the triangulation of data, community input, and policy. The PRAB’s role in these items is to advise the department, providing input to guide the final 2022 Boulder Reservoir Operation Plan. BACKGROUND: The Boulder Reservoir Constructed in the 1950s, the Boulder Reservoir collects and retains water for municipal, domestic, agricultural and industrial uses for members of the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District (Northern Water). The Reservoir is, first and foremost, a valuable drinking water supply for the City of Boulder. The recreational activities at the Reservoir are supported by the Parks and Recreation Department in a manner that is compatible with the protection and management of the water supply. The Boulder Reservoir (Reservoir) is one of the city’s premier recreation destinations and one of only eight reservoirs and lakes offering significant water -based recreation and boating opportunities along the Front Range corridor. Over the years, the Boulder Reservoir has increased in popularity as a local and regional venue for small and large-scale group and organized events. The management of and investments in the Reservoir are guided by the 2014 Parks and Recreation Master Plan (master plan) and Boulder Reservoir Master Plan (BRMP), approved by City Council in January 2012. The BRMP integrates the principles of economic, social, and environmental sustainability and includes recommendations addressing 18 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 2__ water quality, natural habitat, and recreational uses at the Boulder Reservoir. Finally, investments and operations at the reservoir are also guided by the 2020 South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan, approved by the PRAB in April 2020. The BRMP guides long-term goals, and the plan also calls for annual reviews and refinements to help achieve those goals in an ever-changing environment. As part of the adaptive management principles outlined in the BRMP, the reservoir management team complete an After -Action Review of the peak season and boating program each year to evaluate and improve services. Reservoir Services The 1190 acres of land surrounding the reservoir are divided into four management areas (see Figure 1). The South Shore Management Area (“South Shore”) consists of roughly 76 acres and is the location of the most intensive active recreational uses at the reservoir. Facilities on the South Shore include gate house buildings, Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) inspection building, a new Visitor Services Center, lifeguard station, boat house maintenance building. Popular amenities are the swim beach, boat parking, boat moorings, boat ramps, a variety of docks, reservable picnic site locations and numerous vehicle parking areas. Figure 1 Boulder Reservoir Management Areas Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) are invasive, non-native animals and plants that can be introduced to waterbodies primarily via boating, angling, and dogs. Key ANS of concern in Colorado include zebra and quagga mussels, New Zealand mudsnails, and Eurasian milfoil. If these ANS were introduced to a body of water, including the Reservoir, they would establish and 19 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 3__ spread rapidly, and eradication would likely not be possible. Since 2008, the reservoir has operated a leading ANS program, which is also reviewed and updated annually. Since acceptance of the BRMP and as part of the ANS protective measures, reservoir operations require staffing the gate any time the facility is open to the public for recreational uses and all boating requires a permit to ensure operators are informed of ANS protocol and to manage use. The height of recreational use occurs from Memorial Day to Labor Day when the reservoir is fully staffed, and services include the swim beach. The spring and fall months see reduced staffing and the closure of the swim beach, however, other services are still available in this flank season. The winter months see the least visitations and offer the least amount of services (Lake Patrol does not operate November – February). See Table 1 for a summary of reservoir seasons and services available. Table 1: Boulder Reservoir Operating Seasons Jan 1- April 15th April 15th- Memorial Day Memorial Day - Labor Day Labor Day to - October 15th October 15th- December 31st Season Low Season Flank Season High Season Flank Season Low Season Gate Staffed All Open Hours Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Gate Fee No Yes Yes Yes No Swimming area Water Safety No No Yes No No Lake Patrol Begins in March Yes Yes Yes Ends in November Boating Access- (permit and ANS protocol required) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Reservoir Funding and Access Recreation operations at the Boulder Reservoir, which include boating and the activity in the managed South Shore recreation area, are funded from the BPR managed Recreation Activity Fund (RAF). The RAF is characterized as a quasi-enterprise fund where the department manages all expenses, receives revenues from user and participation fees, and relies on a subsidy from the General Fund to support community benefit programming. In May 2019, the department presented an update to the PRAB on the Recreation Activity Fund (RAF) and the related revenue management strategies developed to align with the master plan and additional guiding documents. The department uses this guidance, including the Recreation 20 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 4__ Priority Index and the Service Delivery Model, to classify services based on their exclusivity and degree of community benefit. Exclusive activities should achieve at least full cost recovery while community benefit programming is subsidized through the General Fund and other program revenue because of its importance to the department and the city. More details can be found in the May 2019 PRAB memo (starting on page 15). At the Reservoir, and at current cost recovery, access fees supports age-based discounts for youth and seniors and financial aid to support participation by community members with lower resources. All other programming and operations are expected to achieve full cost -recovery. Capital efforts at the Reservoir are funded from the department’s dedicated .25 Cent Sales Tax and Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Since 2020, the entrance fee has matched the entrance fee at other BPR facilities based upon feedback from users indicating this was preferred to ensure annual and other multi-visit passes included the reservoir and seasonal outdoor pools. Starting this year, boat permits are priced to include one annual pass (with additional access available via the access fees available to all), while small watercraft users pay for access separately in addition to paying the smallcraft permit fee. Reservoir Visitation The South Shore is visited by approximately 300,000 visitors in the typical year, a large majority of which occurs during the high season from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The Reservoir charges full entrance fees during the peak season between Memorial Day and Labor Day and visitation numbers are carefully recorded. Starting in 2021, users also paid a reduced flank season fee for access during those times. Outside of the high and flank seasons, visitors can use the South Shore without paying a gate fee. As demonstrated in Figure 2, the majority of visitation takes place during the peak season. Figure 2: Monthly visitation with Flank seasons marked in boxes. Peak season takes place between them. 21 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 5__ Boating is one of the most popular activities, with boating representing approximately 40% of all annual revenues. To manage the popularity of water activities, and starting in 2021, the lake is scheduled in two ways: •Shared Lake: The lake is open to all watercraft. Smallcraft are limited to the No- Wake Zone to limit potential for conflict with fast-moving power boats. •No-Wake Lake: The lake is open to all watercraft, however, no wake is allowed. This limits activities by power boats (no water skiing or wake boarding), allowing smallcraft to visit all areas of the lake safely and without significant waves. A survey of nearby lakes and reservoirs shows that Boulder Reservoir is unique in this respect: while many other bodies of water have specific “no-wake” areas, none ensure wake- free water at designated times (note that Standley Lake and Union Reservoir do not ever allow power boats and thus all access is wake-free). This no-wake time is offered as a safety recommendation from the BRMP and makes Boulder Reservoir an excellent facility for rowing and other activities that require still water. In 2021, the schedule included 16 hours of No-Wake Time each week. These varying types of management have been offered to balance the interests of varying users. Interest in smallcraft activities, such as Stand Up Paddling (SUP) and kayaking have grown significantly in the past several years (see Figure 3) In 2020, after selling out of the initial 1,500 small craft permits, BPR offered another 300 for sale. A similar quantity was offered and purchased in 2021, however, 500 of the passes were weekday only passes. Figure 3: Reservoir Boat Permit sales 2018-2021 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2018 2019 2020 2021 263 284 244 236 810 1110 1792 1700 Permits Sold by Year Large Boat (incl. power and sail boats)Small Craft 22 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 6__ ANALYSIS: Since the beginning of the ANS program in 2009 and with guidance from the BRMP, each year staff evaluate the data, gather input from users, and review policy guiding the operations to respond to changing conditions and address opportunities for improvement. In the following pages, staff share initial performance data for the 2021 high season, an overview of adjustments made in 2021, and outline next steps for developing the 2022 Operation Plan. 2021 Operations While Reservoir operations continued to experience some pandemic-related impacts, recovery exceeded expectations and projections. The full suite of services typically available largely resumed after public health orders, resource reductions, and the drainage project limited operations in 2020. The swim beach opened to swimmers of all ages seven days per week in the high season, special events returned to the iconic location for Boulder 5ks and triathlons, camps were offered by both BPR and partners like Avid for Adventure, and groups utilized reserved picnic sites along the South Shore to gather and celebrate. While Special Events have not returned to 2019 levels, organized athletic events did return to the Reservoir in 2021 with the Ironman 70.3 and Boulderthon being the largest events. Improved event management practices implemented since the BRMP, including more robust application processes, a public event calendar for awareness of traffic impacts, and sound monitoring have responded to concerns about the impacts of large events on neighbors and continued to manage sound, traffic, and impacts to other users. Community members and visitors expressed appreciation for the return of the popular Dine and Dash and Stroke and Stride Race series (medium events). Staff received some emails from neighbors expressing appreciation for events that were well-managed, such as the Colorado Triathlon, the Boulder Peak, and the Ironman 70.3. Staff will continue to improve traffic management related to medium and large events and manage impacts to the community (see Table 2 for event numbers). Table 2: Medium and Large Events at the Reservoir Event Class 2018 2019 2020 2021 Medium (200-800 participants) 22 20 0 12 Large (800+ participants) 2 2 0 2 The hospitality partnership with the Dine and Dash group, operating Driftwind Restaurant at the Reservoir, made incremental advancements towards full operations as outlined in the 2017 Visitor Services Center Concept Plan. The operator put plans for a liquor -license on hold after hearing concerns from neighbors and attempted to operate a modified business plan to demonstrate the ability to fulfill the 2017 concept plan. Conversations are ongoing to develop a 2022 business plan that is viable for the operator and city while balanced with feedback received throughout 2021. 23 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 7__ Gate revenue at the reservoir recovered significantly in 2021 over 2020 ($477,000 vs. $292,204) illustrating the community desire for outdoor activity and appreciation for the unique services available at the Reservoir while special events, picnics, and gatherings have been slower to recover. As visitation did not reach 2019 numbers, the increase in revenue can be credited to increased gate admission fees. As noted above, these were initially been planned for implementation in 2020 but were delayed due to COVID and the limited services available in 2020. Across the department, the Reservoir is one of the few services in BPR that is on-track to achieve revenue goals for 2021 that were developed early in 2020 in the most uncertain period of the pandemic. With most of the revenue for the year collected, the group has under 1% to collect to meet budget (see Table 2); $30,000 expected to come from events will achieve this target. Table 3: Reservoir Revenue 2021 2021 Original Revenue Projection YTD ACTUAL Oct 2021 Reservoir Revenue $1,137,000 $1,129,783 Meanwhile, the Reservoir team has continued to control costs through the recovery. Expenses are projected to finish right around the budgeted total of $1,090,000, achieving full cost recovery and a net benefit of $70,000 to support other operations in the Recreation Activity Fund, including our community benefit services. This performance also supports expanded operating hours in 2022. 2021 Operational Adjustments Review Flank Season Gate Fee As noted above, in 2021 the reservoir included a flank season fee for the period of high visitation from mid-May to Memorial Day weekend and from Labor Day through mid-October, which is also when all services are offered except for the swim beach. The introductory flank season gate fee was $5.00 per visitor, aligning a reduced fee with the reduced level of service while still having visitors pay for the expenses of front gate supervision and Lake Patrol. The $5.00 gate fee was projected to generate approximately $13,000 in revenue in 2021. The estimated staffing costs during these periods is approximately $15,000. Preliminary analysis of 2021 Flank revenue shows $11,380 in income, just below initial projections. One reason for the revenue coming in below projections is that BPR piloted a “Stay, Play, Pay” structure, waiving the flank fee for users passing through the reservoir on foot or by bicycle, thereby reducing the flank revenue from original projections. Peak Season Twilight Fee 2021 also included a reduced “twilight fee” of $5.00 per person or $10.00 per car to visitors entering the reservoir after 6:00pm in the peak season. This reduced fee recognizes that services 24 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 8__ are reduced after 6:00p.m. with the closure of the beach and to incent off-peak usage as recommended in the BRMP. This fee intends to incent off-peak hour visitation while a per car fee Twilight fee was introduced to incent carpooling. Usage data shows that drop-in attendance strongly recovered in the evening hours in 2021, nearly returning to 2019 levels (see Figure 4). In 2021, data collection did not include people per car and so analysis on the effectiveness of the carload fee is incomplete and will be addressed in 2022. Figure 4: Visitors to the Reservoir during twilight hours in peak season *2021 total is calculated from individual entrances and two “visitors” per carload fee paid. Actual visitor numbers are assumed to be higher for cars that contained three or more people. Together, the Flank Season Fees and Peak Season Twilight Fee earned $15,505,offseting the $15,000 in janitorial costs required to keep the restrooms open during the flank season, which otherwise would be closed during the spring and fall, and directly benefiting the users. The staffing costs through the flank seasons were an additional $22,500 8,000 people with access to the facility during this period, whether for boating, jogging, biking, or general outdoor recreation. 6-Month Unlimited Pass Staff implemented a new six-month unlimited pass to make the most of the peak season at both the reservoir and the new Scott Carpenter Pool while providing systemwide access to users in alignment with user feedback in 2019. A total of 184 passes were sold in 2021. This pass was designed to replace the previous “Summer Fun” pass which offered only reservoir and pool access during peak season. 25 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 9__ Figure 5: 6-Month Pass Scans by Facility Much like the Summer Fun pass before it, this membership option was primarily used to access the Reservoir and outdoor pools. Just over 20% of the scans were at recreation centers while the remaining 80% were for those outdoor experiences. Watercraft Permit Fees and Access Fees separated Prior to 2021, small watercraft permits were purchased separately from entrance fees while large boat permits (power and sailboats) included entrance passes and punches as part of their purchase price. As power boating is categorized as Exclusive in the Recreation Priority Index, the price of each pass has been aligned with the costs related to reservoir operations and the Aquatic Nuisance Species program. Feedback on the 2020 questionnaire indicated a desire for easier comparison and consistency in pass structure. By separating large watercraft permits from access fees, like the current structure for smallcraft, users were able to easily determine the access option (e.g., monthly pass, punch card or daily entry) that were appropriate for them. Selling watercraft permits independently from admissions also more clearly aligns fees with the benefit being received and associated expenses. A permit holder can purchase the right to a boat on the reservoir and contribute to those associated expenses, while they can also determine the appropriate number and type of passes to meet their needs and offset the associated staffing and facility costs. This structural change was not anticipated to increase or decrease total revenue; however, some permit holders might have experienced adjustments depending upon the type of access option they select (see Attachment B). After initially introducing this separation in 2021, staff are exploring ways to address concerns about equity and access – solutions to fully align permit and access options are presented later in this memo and will be explored further in November. 47% 32% 10% 9% 2% 6-month Pass Usage by Facility Rez Scotty EBCC NBRC SBRC 26 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 10__ 2021 Service Adjustments BPR implemented three changes to reservoir service levels in 2021 as a result of the 2020 post- season review and feedback from the PRAB. The changes, influenced by community feedback, were designed to maintain sustainable operations while providing flexible, multi-use access pursuant to foster well-being in line with policy direction of the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan and the Parks & Recreation Master Plan. 2021 Operating Hours Based upon projected revenues and service levels, BPR offered a modest increase in peak season operating hours in 2021. In addition, operating hours were consistent throughout the week to simplify planning for all user groups. The 2021 peak season operating hours focused on serving the broadest mix of users and are based upon visitation levels (see Table 3 and Figure 6). Specialized user groups activating the reservoir outside of the operating hours were able to do so through lake rental options. Table 4: Peak Season operating hours 2019 Peak Season: Mon-Sun: 5 am - 9 pm 2020 Peak Season: Mon-Thurs: 8 am – 7 pm Fri-Sun: 7 am - 8 pm 2021 Peak Season: Mon-Sun: 7 am - 9 pm Figure 66: 2019-2021 Peak Season Operating Hours per Week 2021 Flank Season hours (see Table 4) were also based upon 2021 budget projections. By reducing flank season hours, more services were offered during the peak season when more visit and benefit from the services. A quick post-high season financial analysis indicated that the end of the summer flank season hours could be adjusted slightly. Like peak season hours, the operating hours were consistent every day of the week to simplify the planning process for patrons. 27 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 11__ Table 5: Flank Season operating hours 2019 Flank Season: Mon-Sun: 7 am – 7 pm (total of 84 hours per week) 2020 Fall Flank Season*: Mon-Sun: 10 am - 6 pm (total of 56 hours per week) 2021 Flank Season: Approved in 2020: Mon-Sun: 10 am - 6 pm (total of 56 hours per week) Expanded in September: Mon-Sun: 10am – 7 pm *Because of COVID impacts and closures as well as the dredging project, 2020 flank hours were significantly reduced. Lake Access Lake access is based on a desire to provide a balanced recreational experience that is safe for all visitors, including the approximately 1,700 smallcraft and 270 large watercraft permitholders in a typical year this season. As reviewed above, starting in 2021, the lake no longer included times when smallcraft were allowed in the middle of the lake when larger boats were moving fast. Uses were safely separated by the No Wake Zone, except for the times when the whole lake was designated a No Wake Zone: Tuesday: 7:00a.m.-11:00a.m. Thursday: 7:00a.m.-11:00a.m. and 4:00p.m.-8:00p.m. Sunday: 7:00a.m.-11:00a.m. This schedule was driven by feedback from users and a desire for a consistent, easy to remember schedule. Previously, no-wake hours were scheduled at different time frames on different days, causing confusion and difficulty with enforcement (see Attachment C for visual summary of historical and 2021 lake schedule). This new schedule provides no-wake time on weekends for the first time and overall provides 16 hours of no-wake time in the peak season, or nearly 20% of operating hours. This doubles what was provided in 2020, and means that 1/5 of the time, other recreation activities will be limited. Initial findings indicate that these changes enhanced safety by avoiding conflicts presented by the prior shared use arrangement while meeting the burgeoning smallcraft interest for more dedicated no-wake time. Return to One Off, One On After trialing a reservation system to manage increased weekend demand in 2020, in 2021 lake access returned to a “one-off, one-on” system for power boats when capacity is reached. While this could result in long waits at peak entrance times, such as what was experienced in the early summer of 2020, however, many power boat permit holders expressed frustration with the reservation system. The return to one-off, one-on has saved time and effort for staff and boaters alike. Weekday Smallcraft Permit In 2021, a total of 1700 smallcraft permits were sold (500 weekday only, 1200 season-7-day access). Smallcraft permits continue to be in very high demand and sold out by the end of April. 28 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 12__ Staff are exploring options to address the continued high demand, including a forfeit option for permits that are never claimed (approximately 350 permits in 2021), and other options to optimize lake access during off-peak times. Aquatic Nuisance Species City Watercraft Inspection Program All watercraft entering Boulder Reservoir are inspected for ANS by state trained and certified seasonal Parks and Recreation staff. As conditions require, the watercraft may also be decontaminated and/or quarantined. Since the watercraft inspection program was first implemented in 2009, staff has made continuous improvements to the user-funded program. Since the program’s inception, Parks and Recreation staff have intercepted two mussel -impacted boats – one in 2018 and one in 2019. In 2020 and 2021, there were no interceptions at the Boulder Reservoir. The Boulder Reservoir watercraft inspection program is funded by user fees, with watercraft permits funding overhead and inspections; decontamination fees fund direct costs for that service. A program overview for the most recent three-year period is presented in Table 3. Annual costs vary for several reasons including the number of watercrafts stored onsite and the number of visitors. Table 5: Quantities for ANS operations and permits Item 2019 2020 2021 Powerboat permits sold 272 217 236 Smallcraft permits sold 1110 1792 1700 Motorboat inspections 6920 3298 1023 Non-motorized watercraft inspections 6466 7426 4607 Decontaminations ~43 58 35 There was a significant reduction in inspections and decontaminations as more users stored dedicated boats at the Boulder Reservoir and reduced travel to other bodies of water that had exceptionally low water levels, avoiding the need for additional inspections and/or decontaminations. North Shore Management Improvements To address vulnerabilities with illegal launching on the North Shore, and to support increased visitation of this popular passive recreation area with the pandemic, staff made significant improvements to the management of the North Shore in 2021. Through generous support from Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), in 2021 the comprehensive approach included: 1) staffing/enforcement dedicated to the North Shore, 2) additional visitor management improvements, and 3) continued educational outreach. In May 2021, the department hired a seasonal, limited commission ranger for 20 weeks to provide a physical presence and enforcement capacity in the North Shore and Coot Lake areas. Table 4 below summarizes the data collected by the ranger from 6/17/2021 through 10/3/2021. While no summons were issued for violations of the no watercraft rule, the ranger did intercept 29 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 13__ 49 people throughout the summer before they were ever able to leave the trailhead area with their watercraft. Many of these individuals shared similar stories that either they had not been able to receive a small craft permit from the gate so came to the north side or they were from outside the area and did not realize that they needed a permit. Table 6. Ranger data, 6/17/2021 through 10/3/2021 Total Visitor Contacts 6965 Craft Intercepted 49 Warnings 1675 % from outside Boulder area* 63% Most common violation Dogs: Voice and Sight (1049) Summons 174 % from outside Boulder area* 72% Most common violation Dogs: Voice and Sight (133) *“outside Boulder area” data collected from 7/15/2021 through 10/3/2021 The most impactful outcome of this ranger presence in the North Shore and Coot Lake areas was the relationships that was built with the community that exists in that space. Some visitors come daily, and sometimes more than once a day to this natural area. Those “regulars” frequently expressed appreciation for the additional presence in the area. These visitors know each other, look out for each other, and have a true appreciation of the area. The team looks forward to continuing the relationship started this year and building upon that in future years with the seasonal ranger position. In coordination with the Volunteer Services team, the Natural Lands Outreach Volunteer program continued on from 2020. Six volunteers gave approximately 60 hours of their time over the summer season to provide education and outreach to visitors at the North Shore and Coot Lake. Topics included information about Aquatic Nuisance Species, wildlife and blue-green algae. Visitor management improvements are currently on-going throughout the North Shore and Coot Lake area. The primary improvements visible to visitors are the trail improvements throughout the area. Earlier in the summer, with the help of the Mile High Youth Corps, the trail immediately out of the 55th Street Trailhead was slightly realigned and a crusher fine trail tread added to manage for muddy trail conditions. A contractor is currently finishing work on several trail connections between the main trail and the Reservoir shoreline to provide designated access points to the shoreline throughout the area. Those trail improvements will be complete by the end of October. To accompany the trail improvements, wayfinding signage and a new kiosk at the 55th Street Trailhead will help visitors orient themselves to the site and ensure they are aware of the rules and regulations. New educational signage is also planned for the two trailhead kiosks at 55th Street and Coot Lake. These improvements have not been evaluated for their effectiveness yet, but the team will monitor them in 2022 to make additional improvements and continue to make positive impacts on the management of the area. NEXT STEPS Staff are completing analysis of the 2021 User Questionnaire, an informal (not statistically valid) tool to gather feedback from the various Reservoir stakeholders, including visitors, user groups, 30 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 14__ neighbors, event producers, and camp participants, on their experience. The questionnaire was sent directly to user groups, neighbors, permit holders and participants. It was also shared widely in BPR social media and via the department’s e-newsletter, which is sent to over 30,000 subscribers by email. Findings from the questionnaire will be synthesized with performance data and reviewed against policy direction to develop areas for improvement to discuss with the PRAB at the November meeting. Initial opportunities for improvement identified include: •Aquatic Nuisance Species Risk Reduction: Data and input from the State Division of Wildlife indicates that the threat of ANS contamination continues to increase. The ANS program is being analyzed for vulnerabilities, and strategies to mitigate them will be shared in November. •Small Watercraft Permit: Based upon overwhelming demand in 2020 and 2021, staff are analyzing options to expand the number of permits sold while still managing safety, ANS risk, and user experience. •Storage and Permit Pricing: Staff will review overall watercraft permit and storage pricing. Storage fees in particular have not been updated in more than five (5) years. •Sustainability: Staff is gathering research on incentives to support multi-modal transportation to the Reservoir, as well as ways to reduce single-occupancy vehicle visits. To sustain cost recovery, any adjustments must have a feasibility plan to ensure discounts are funded. •Appropriate pricing and packaging of facility access with watercraft permits: As discussed in the section on separating watercraft permits and entrances, there is still work to be done to ensure fairness across the permit types. Staff hopes to complete the separation of permits and access in 2022. There are options for this and each has impacts. For example, including an access pass with all watercraft permits (as is the current process for powerboats), including SWCs, forces users to purchase an access pass in addition to any BPR passes they may already hold. On the other hand, no access could be offered to boaters with their permits, leaving the option of daily entries, punches, or other systemwide passes. By removing any bundled access options from the boat permits, which directly fund ANS services, customers could select the passes or entrances that work best for them. Staff has considered bundling an entrance pass with all boat permits, but that would force existing patrons of BPR’s facilities and services to purchase a redundant pass. However, a significant portion of Reservoir users, particularly the non- residents, do not patronize other BPR facilities and have shared concerns about the “all or nothing” structure in 2021. 31 AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 15__ A “reservoir-only” add-on pass, which could only be purchased with a boat permit, could be an option considered by the PRAB in November. The PRAB’s input in November will inform adjustments to 2022 reservoir operations. These proposals will also be shared with stakeholders, and their feedback will be considered for final 2022 operation. Upon finalizing the 2022 reservoir program, updates will be communicated to users and community members. This communication will include website updates, direct e-mails to users as well as education (virtually or in-person) during permit sales. BPR will continue to monitor and evaluate these changes and adjust as needed. QUESTIONS FOR THE PRAB 1.Does the PRAB have questions on reservoir operations in 2021? 2.In addition to questionnaire results, is there any other inputs or data you would like to be considered in the analysis of 2022 operations? 3.Does the PRAB have any questions or initial thoughts on the improvement opportunities identified for 2022? ATTACHMENTS Attachment A Front Range Lake/Reservoir Comparisons Attachment B Boulder Reservoir Entrance Fees Attachment C Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours 32 Attachment A: Front Range Lake/Reservoir Comparisions- 2021 Body of Water State or Municipal Fee Season Annual Pass option Powerboats Allowed Non-Vehicle Entry Fee Vehicle Fee Add'l Boat Fee Per person fee Wake Information Additional Information Aurora Reservoir Municipal Year-round $65NR/$55R No gas powered No $10 Watercraft Access Pass - $10 for trailered or compartmented boats, no fee for kayak or SUP N/A Wakeless boating only Day Pass $10, Valid at both Aurora and Quincy Reservoirs Barr Lake State Year-round $80 or $120 <10HP not listed $9 No $4 Wakeless boating only Only low powered fishing vessels, sailboats, and SWC allowed Bear Creek Lake Park Municipal Year-round $80/$50senior <10HP, or non-motorized depending on lake No $10 Daily No N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Bear Creek Reservoir is <10HP, Big Soda Lake for non-motorized only, Little Sodal Lake is rentals only Boulder Reservoir Municipal Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, Flank Seasons mid April through mid October Summer Unlimited Fun Passes: $297R/$366NR Household; $186R/232NR Adult Yes Regular per-person cost during high season.Pass- through runners and cyclists free in flank season, regular fee for "stay, play, pay".N/A, household rate applies to specific groups of 4 Yes. Annual Only $50 Season SWC, $30 Weekday SWC, 50+HP $530R/$633NR; storage extra $9R/$11NR; Other fees apply Tues, Thurs, Sun 7am- 11am, Thursday 4pm- 8pm Boyd Lake State Year-round $80 or $120 Yes not listed $10 No N/A Designated areas of the lake for wakeless and for skiing. (I.E. South end for skiing) No specific wakeless days/times Carter Lake County Year-round $90/VehicleR $120/VehicleNR $180/Vehicle+BoatR $240/Vehicle+BoatNR Yes not listed $9 vehicle only $9 for trailered vessel, so $18 total for vehicle plus trailer N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Managed by Larimer County. Simillar fees to Horsetooth Reservoir. No additional permit requires for SWC carried on or in vehicle. Chatfield State Year-round $80 or $120 Yes, only on main reservoir not listed $10 No N/A Divided into zones for each type of activity. No other days/times specifiec. SWC allowed on any water inside of park, powerboats only allowed on main reservoir. Full service Marina Cherry Creek State Year-round $83 or $123 Yes not listed $11 No N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Durango/Nighthorse Municipal early April-mid Nov, closed in winter for wildlife $80 Household/$70 Senior/$25 Walk-in Yes $4 Walk $10 Daily No N/A No Wake Zone around whole lake. Mon/Wed/Fri Wakeless from Opening to 10am (No longer has whole days wakeless) No additional fee for anything boating related included decontaminations. Gross Reservoir County None None No None None No N/A All wakeless Carry-on, nonmotorized boats only (canoes, kayaks, row boats). Bellyboats, sail boats, and all trailer hitched boats are NOT allowed. Horsetooth Reservoir County Year-round $90/VehicleR $120/VehicleNR $180/Vehicle+BoatR $240/Vehicle+BoatNR Yes not listed $9 vehicle only $9 for trailered vessel, so $18 total for vehicle plus trailer N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Managed by Larimer County. Simillar fees to Carter Reservoir. No additional permit requires for SWC carried on or in vehicle. Lagerman Reservoir County None, Open Sunrise to Sunset Year- round None Under 7.5HP or propeller must be out of the water at all times.None None None None All wakeless Sailboats and sailboards not allowed. SWC allowed. Motorized boats must have electric motors or be less than 7.5 HP. Standley Lake Municipal Year-round $65 (Does not inlclude paddle pass), Valid Jan 1- Dec 31, $35 for Seniors/Persons with Disabilities/Military No Free Walk/Bike In, Website lists free parking areas nearby.$7 $10 Daily Paddle Pass, $200 Annual Paddle Pass, Valid May 1-Sept 30, $165 for Seniors/Persons with Disabilities/Military N/A No powerboats allowed Union Reservoir Municipal Year-round $65R/$150NR Yes but wakeless $2 for Bike/Walk-in $10 Weekdays/$12 Weekends Daily Watercraft Fee - $5 SWC/$8 trailered boat N/A All wakeless Storage $490R/$1074NR, extra fees for full moon paddles and open water swims 33 Craft type Status Package Price Includes:Permit Price Includes:A la carte purchases to match existing Price of entries Total Price Variance from 2020 4 x 10 Adult punches $324 $854 2% Household $297 $827 -1% 4 x 10 Adult punches $396 $1,059 1% Household $366 $1,029 -2% 2 x 10 Adult punches $162 $442 -8% Household $297 $577 20% 2 x 10 Adult punches $198 $548 -9% Household $366 $716 19% 2 x 10 Adult punches $162 $342 -18% Household $297 $477 15% 2 x 10 Adult punches $198 $423 -19% Household $366 $591 14% Resident $50 $50 $50 0% Non-Resident $55 $55 $55 0% Resident N/A $30 $30 0% Non-Resident N/A $35 $35 0% Total Revenue $285,622 Total Revenue $285,622 Notes and assumptions: Boat storage/mooring fees remain unchanged. 2019 permit sales used for consistency. Revenue estimates are based on a 50-50 split between the current entrance options offered. Additional entry purchases, including those for small craft, are not included. 50-499hp Weekday Resident $480 1 Adult Summer + 20 OR Household $280 $520 Resident Smallcraft Smallcraft Weekday (no entry included)(no entry included) (no entry included) Non-Resident $416 1 Adult Summer Attachment B: Boulder Reservoir 2021 Proposed Fees 1 Adult Summer + 20 OR Household $663 50-499hp 1-49hp & Sail Proposed 2021 Structure 1 Adult Summer + 40 OR Household 1 Adult SummerNon-Resident $600 $350 Resident Non-Resident $837 $1,050 1 Adult Summer (no entry included) $225 $180 $530 2020 Structure 34 Attachment C: Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Note: Closed hours shown in light red, “no-wake” time is shown in green, and shared time is in blue. For 2019-2020, white areas represent times when the whole lake was open to all watercraft. 2019 Schedule: 112 weekly operating hours, 15 hours no-wake 35 Attachment C: Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Note: Closed hours shown in light red, “no-wake” time is shown in green, and shared time is in blue. For 2019-2020, white areas represent times when the whole lake was open to all watercraft. 2020 Schedule: 83 weekly operating hours, 8 hours no-wake 36 Attachment C: Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Note: Closed hours shown in light red, “no-wake” time is shown in green, and shared time is in blue. For 2019-2020, white areas represent times when the whole lake was open to all watercraft. 2021 Proposed: 98 weekly operating hours,16 hours no-wake: 37 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: October 25, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: Master Plan Update: Implementation Plan, Key Theme Overviews and Policy Statements PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Regina Elsner, Parks Planner Tina Briggs, Parks Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Parks and Recreation master plan is the key policy guidance for the department that will inform policy direction, capital investments, budgets and operations for the next 5-7 years. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB) role in this process is to provide input on the plan development to ensure that the community’s needs for its parks and recreation system are being delivered in alignment with its values. Success will be measured by the board’s recommendation of the plan f or acceptance by City Council. Figure 1 provides an overview of the planning process; a more comprehensive timeline and approach can be viewed here. Since the project kick-off in September 2020 and subsequent discussions with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB), staff and the consultant team have been hard at work on the Master Plan Update. The Research and Trends wrapped up in April and the Needs Assessment phase wrapped up in August. The purpose of this item is to introduce the Implementation Plan approach to the PRAB by reviewing the Key Theme Overview Statements and Policies related to each Key Theme. Upon review of the memo and presentation, the PRAB’s input will inform next steps, specifically staff and stakeholder engagement to identify the long-range goals and initiatives that will be the foundation of the Implementation Plan for the Master Plan Update. 38 2 Figure 1: BPR Master Plan Update Process as of October 2021 BACKGROUND: PRAB has been engaged multiple times throughout the Master Plan Update. At the December 2019 meeting, PRAB provided input on the overall approach for the update to ensure alignment between staff and PRAB. In April 2020, staff shared an update with the PRAB given COVID-19 impacts on timing and budget. Following successful contract negotiation, PRAB participated in the project kick-off during the September 2020 meeting. At the November 2020 meeting, PRAB reviewed the public engagement plan and helped staff prepare for a study session with City Council in December 2020. An update from that council study session was provided at the December 2020 PRAB meeting. In March, staff shared the outcomes of the first window of community engagement and findings from research and trends. At the May 2021 meeting, PRAB heard the key results from targeted engagement with youth, including presentations from Growing Up Boulder and the Youth Opportunities Advisory Board. In July, PRAB provided input that shaped the final Needs Assessment Report and helped staff prepare for a study session with City Council in July 2021. An update from that council study session was provided at the August 2021 PRAB meeting. Some of the counsel from PRAB at previous meetings that have shaped the process and approach include: 1. Confirming the continued relevance of the 2014 master plan’s six key themes, as well as the need to ensure equity and resilience are addressed throughout the planning process. 2. Ensuring the impacts and lessons learned from COVID impact this process and the outcomes, including but not limited to changes in how the community accesses and uses our programs, facilities and services – while keeping a long-term and forward- looking view to serving the community into the future. 3. Understanding the impacts of climate change and how that will influence all aspects of our work. 4. Effectively engaging community members specifically in a time of isolation and distancing, including in-person alternatives as appropriate. 39 3 5.Working to reach unengaged and non-users of BPR’s system and programs and focusing on a robust and well-rounded approach to engagement that hears and balances input from many members of our community. 6.Seeking to understand the benefits of Parks and Recreation economically, socially, and mentally. Project Approach As a reminder from previous PRAB engagement with the project, the Master Plan Update is broken into five phases. The list below provides a high-level description of the milestones, deliverables or meetings for each phase that will result in a final Master Plan and provides an update as to what has been completed to date: Project Initiation and Kick-off Kick-off Meetings to confirm project critical success factors, schedule and risk management Draft Public Engagement Plan outlining the four engagement windows Formation and meetings with BPR staff Management Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) and Working Technical Advisory Group (WTAG) November 23 PRAB Meeting December 8 City Council Study Session Development of master plan graphic themes, templates, and table of contents Informational video to support community engagement Research and Trends Update of 2012-14 White Papers that provide information, research and best practices to inform the update – In Progress throughout the project until final drafts are complete. Past Planning Efforts Review to pull out key takeaways and cross-reference planning efforts since the 2014 master plan to white paper topics. December 15 White Paper Charette with BPR staff and consultant team to identify research gaps and prioritize content to inform the current state snapshot Four stakeholder focus groups in 2021 to uncover on-the-ground trends, challenges and opportunities System overview snapshot to provide graphic, high-level overview of the current state of BPR parks and recreation facilities. April 12 PRAB Meeting Needs Assessment Review and update of BPR facilities inventory and assessment Gap analysis updates to the per capita level of service tables for 2020 and future population projection point New gap analysis map or analysis around equity Supply and demand trends memo and maps 40 4 Statistically valid survey with Spanish version as well as open participation link Benchmark update of 2014 study Scenario planning and draft strategy matrix May 24 PRAB Meeting- Youth Voice presentation July 12 PRAB Meeting July 27 City Council Study Session Implementation Plan Draft implementation plan– In Progress Draft plan on a page that highlights big moves of master plan– In Progress Financial overview and funding strategies memo– In Progress Master Plan Acceptance Master Plan Draft #1 (word document) Master Plan Draft #2 (graphic, PDF document) Master Plan Draft #3 (PDF) Master Plan Final Document ANALYSIS: Needs Assessment Wrap-up In July, both the PRAB and City Council provided policy guidance and input on key questions related to the findings from the Needs Assessment phase of the project. This input helped finalize the Needs Assessment Report and formally capture all the needs discovered throughout the process to date that allows the team to now go to work on seeking solutions. PRAB and the community can now view the final reports that were developed throughout the needs assessment including the Facilities Assessment, Community Survey, Financial Analysis and Engagement Window #2 Summary on the project webpage. Implementation Plan The current phase of the project is the Implementation Plan, which is critical to ensure the long-term success of the department in meeting the needs and desires of the community determined through the needs assessment. This phase will result in a balanced approach of themes, policies, goals and initiatives that align with the vision and mission of BPR and carefully draw the road map to how staff and the community will prioritize actions to meet the needs of Boulder. The relationship of the themes, policies, goals and initiatives is carefully informed by each other to ensure focus and consistency to stay targeted to the needs. This relationship is demonstrated below: 41 5 KEY THEMES The master plan contains several key themes that were developed during the 2013 master planning process and are still relevant today. These key themes help lay the foundation for all aspects of the master plan are the building blocks for the policies, goals and initiatives. These themes are clearly defined by overview statements that give the overall intent and background information of what the theme is conveying to the audience. POLICY Provides clear direction for how BPR should meet its vision and mission Policies are driven by decision-makers representing the Boulder community, including the Boulder City Council and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. They provide direction and help set the framework within which BPR operates. These policies help support consistent and transparent decision-making and operations and must be followed. GOAL Result that requires time and planning Goals, which are influenced by the master planning process, are the long-term results BPR would like to achieve to meet its mission and implement policy. INITIATIVE Action taken to accomplish goal Initiatives are specific activities and/or projects BPR staff work on to meet the Master Plan goals. They are implementable and based on research, community and staff engagement and policy direction. Over the course of the next several months, the project team will work through the development of policies, long range goals and initiatives, as well as prioritizing with available funding levels for implementation through scenario planning within the city’s budgeting framework of Fiscally Constrained, Action, and Vision. This engagement with PRAB is the first step in implementation planning, confirming the overview statements and draft policies that will be approved with the acceptance of the 42 6 final Master Plan and guide the work of the department for the next 5-7 years. This will be followed by engagement with staff and stakeholders to identify goals and initiatives within the themes and associated policies. In December, a discussion of draft goals and initiatives with the PRAB will help the team prepare for a broader outreach to the community in early 2022. A final engagement with PRAB in March 2022 will finalize the Implementation Plan as the project moves into the final phase, Master Plan Acceptance. PRAB’s Role PRAB will be providing input on the revised Key Theme Overview Statements and Policy Statements to ensure the project team is accurately reflecting a foundation of policy guidance as engagement with staff and stakeholders begins to shape goals and initiatives. Key Theme Overview Statements The Key Theme Overview Statements lay a foundation of understanding what the department intends when referring to Community Health and Wellness or Taking Care of What We Have, for example. These are not policy statements, but rather general descriptions to promote common understanding. Based on previous direction from both the PRAB and City Council, the project team has worked to revise the 2014 Master Plan Key Theme Overview Statements to include both equity and resilience. This is intended to ensure that both those important city-wide focus areas are explicitly called out in all the work of the department. Master Plan Policies The Policy Statements under each Key Theme are intended to provide clear direction for BPR staff on how to meet the department vision and mission. Policies are driven by decision-makers representing the Boulder community, including City Council and the PRAB. These statements provide direction and set the framework within which BPR operates, supporting consistent and transparent decision-making and operations. The intention is that through the Master Plan Acceptance process, these policy statements become adopted as guidance that must be followed. Questions for PRAB 1.For each Key Theme Overview Statement: a.Does this overview statement fully capture the intent of the Key Theme based upon the community feedback, research and PRAB direction provided through the needs assessment? b.Without wordsmithing, does the PRAB see any key language that should be added or deleted to reinforce the key theme or provide better clarity of the theme for staff and the community? c.Recognizing the overarching importance of equity and resilience on all aspects of BPR, does the overview statement demonstrate an equitable focus and approach to all members of our community as well as providing a resilient approach in how the theme will be achieved? 43 7 2.For policies supporting key themes: a.Staff doesn’t intend to go through the various policies one by one and line by line but ask that PRAB members provide a general review of the overall intent of the policies within each key theme. b.PRAB should consider if the policies clearly identify an intended outcome and expectation. c.Does the policy clearly align with the key theme overview statement and support the intention of the theme through a call to action? d.Do the policies have clear guidance that can support the development of a goal and initiative to achieve the policy? e.Are there any actions or direction that might be missing from the policies that PRAB believes is important or critical to include? In other words, has the project team missed anything? Next Steps In November, the project team will engage staff and stakeholders to start developing the goals and initiatives that will help BPR address the needs of the community. In December, PRAB will review the outcomes before the project team requests community input after January 1, 2022. Attachments Attachment A: Theme Overviews and Policy Statements 44 8 Attachment A: Theme Overviews and Policy Statements BOULDER PARKS & RECREATION MASTER PLAN UPDATE VISION & GOALS CHAPTER UPDATE Definitions POLICY Provides clear direction for how BPR will achieve the intention of the key themes Policies are driven by decision-makers representing the Boulder community, including the Boulder City Council and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. They provide direction and help set the framework within which BPR operates. These policies help support consistent and transparent decision-making and operations. They lay the groundwork for the development of BPR goals and initiatives and must be followed. GOAL Result that requires time and planning Goals, which are influenced by the master planning process, are the long-term results BPR would like to achieve to meet the key themes through implementing the policies. INITIATIVE Action taken to accomplish goal Initiatives are specific activities and/or projects BPR staff works on to meet the Master Plan goals. They are specific and measurable based on research, community and staff engagement and policy direction. 45 9 Theme Overviews & Policy Statements Nationally, regionally and within Boulder, people recognize that the benefit of parks, recreation programs, trails and natural areas are amenities that improve quality of life. They provide many measurable personal and Community Health & Wellness benefits, including increased physical and mental health, direct contact with nature, increased opportunities for social interactions, and an understanding of environmental stewardship. Community feedback indicates that BPR is doing a good job of providing accessible and safe parks, facilities and programming, and encouraging physical activity. Recently, BPR has seen high levels of increased use of parks and recreation resources. This, coupled with the city’s popularity as an outdoor activity mecca for tourists from around the world, adds complexity to how BPR maintains its properties, offers recreation activities, health and wellness programs and community services. Equitable access to parks, programming and facilities, and building a resilient system in the face of population growth and climate change are essential to keeping Boulder a healthy, vibrant and inclusive community. Policy Statements • BPR shall continue to recognize the role the department plays in supporting the overall health and wellness of Boulder through services that emphasize the important and unique mission of the department to enhance the public health and wellness of the community and shall be available, accessible and equitable to all. • BPR shall provide for Boulder community members’ health and wellness through deliberate and thoughtful design and delivery of programs, facilities, parks and services, ensuring their resilience over time. • BPR shall serve as a facilitator, collaborator and leader with local organizations in efforts to improve the community’s health and wellness , helping to increase positive outcomes in public health trends. • BPR shall partner with other city departments, local and regional partners and other groups to ensure specific health disparities are strategically addressed and overcome. • BPR staff shall refer to the Health Equity Fund Theory of Change model to strategically consider cause and effect – to support the idea keep track of activities, measure short and long-term outcomes, and make logical assertions that the activities of the department relate to these outcomes. • Given the increasing health challenges facing children, youth and aging adults, BPR shall prioritize parks and facility upgrades, programs and services that support positive health outcomes for these specific populations within the community. • Recognizing the importance of accessible outdoor public spaces and ecosystems linked to many positive health outcomes, BPR shall prioritize thoughtful planning, implementation and management of outdoor spaces to achieve overall community health goals. • Understanding the link between the community health impacts resulting from a changing climate, BPR shall prioritize ecosystem services and meeting climate goals as w ell as sustainability in all aspects of the department. 46 10 Boulder currently manages over 100 parks and facilities and must carefully manage these amenities to ensure residents have access to enjoy recreation and wellness opportunities. In fact, a recent trend of parks and natural areas being “loved to death” is evident at both national and local levels due to the increasing demand for parks and recreation services and is expected to continue for many years. Boulder residents feel that existing assets are sufficiently maintained and BPR staff is doing a good job of continuing to maintain its parks and facilities given constrained resource and aging infrastructure and community members want BPR to continue to prioritize maintaining and enhancing existing assets before building new facilities. Taking Care of What We Have now requires a more strategic approach to prioritizing maintenance needs and developing more flexibility around programming and services. BPR will continue to synthesize data, policy direction, and staff and community input to ensure decisions are equitable, address the specific needs of all users and help maintain a resilient parks and recreation system. Policy Statements • BPR shall prioritize financial resources to manage all assets within industry standards to ensure safe, clean and accessible parks and facilities by implementing a life cycle approach for preventative, regular and capital maintenance that includes metrics for equity and resilience. • BPR shall regularly prioritize management of assets based on criticality of the asset informed by a variety of criteria supported by the community including equity and resilience. • BPR shall recognize living systems as infrastructure and strategically focus on an integrated ecosystem approach to operations and management related to the urban forest, natural lands and parks that supports city-wide climate goals through implementing new technology, best practices and innovative strategies. • With increasing climate stressors, BPR shall prioritize ecosystem services to achieve immediate results specified in relevant plans such as the Urban Forest Strategic Plan, Natural Lands Management Plans and the Capital Investment Strategic Plan among others. • BPR shall fully implement the Asset Management Program to guide investments, operations, maintenance and capital projects through annual work planning guided by all relevant plans and reports. • To ensure a strategic process for prioritizing capital investments, BPR shall complete an annual Capital Improvement Program that engages the community, PRAB and staff in determining key projects informed by relevant plans and strategies for renovating existing assets and that considers the total cost of facility ownership before building new assets. • While planning and implementing capital maintenance and enhancements to existing assets, BPR shall recognize the importance of providing relevant and meaningful parks and facilities that inspire the community to continue active lifestyles and respond to latest trends in recreation. 47 11 Boulder’s parks, facilities and programs provide many positive community benefits. They support healthy lifestyles, recreation and tourism, increase municipal revenue, enhance social capital, and draw people to Boulder. Parks, recreation, and open spaces are also some of the main drivers of tourism for the region. Boulder’s parks system offers community members and visitors the opportunity to enjoy Colorado’s great outdoors and participate in memorable programming and events. BPR has continued to provide high levels of service while revenues have remained mostly flat, and expenditures have continued to rise. At the current pace, BPR must consider prioritizing services as the funding doesn’t meet the demand and expenses to achieve the community’s goals. Staff must determine the highest and best use of services and facilities, setting maintenance priorities, and working to provide the right financial support for those who need it most are necessary for the long-term financial viability of the department. Balancing multiple and increasing demands with limited resources is difficult, but BPR is committed to finding creative ways to achieve Financial Sustainability and deliver high quality programming and facilities along with equitable access to these resources . Policy Statements •BPR shall continue to categorize services using the PRAB-approved Recreation Priority index (RPI), which objectively determines community benefit of a service to inform appropriate subsidy level and cost recovery target. •BPR shall determine the actual cost of an activity or service using a standardized method that emphasizes consistency of data inputs and analysis methods and consistently and uniformly track and monitor track financial performance of services . •To manage existing parks and facilities to industry standards, and in the face of increasing capital and maintenance costs, BPR shall explore all feasible funding strategies to manage existing assets. •Recognizing the increasing gap in funding related to expenses outpacing revenues, BPR shall develop strategies to increase funding through a variety of means to meet the community goals and expectations outlined within the master plan. •BPR shall use the Asset Management Program to ensure limited funding is prioritized annually to manage the most critical assets while considering retirement of assets if feasible to reduce expenses. •To demonstrate the critical importance and ensure sustainability of BPR’s dedicated funds to implementing the mission of the department, staff shall complete an annual budget process founded on transparency and clarity of the key funding priorities and results achieved. •BPR shall continue to foster key partnerships and strategies to leverage funding with other means such as donations, sponsorships, foundational support and philanthropy to support BPR provision of community goals and expectations in all aspects of operations, programs and capital investment. 48 12 Parks and recreation facilities, programs and services promote community and environmental health, and can help address social and cultural inequities. They also help build social capital, which is the backbone of a strong, connected and engaged community. BPR offers a variety of programs, spaces, events and services that foster socializing and help people learn from, understand and support each other. Relationships improve and expand access, creating a more equitable and resilient parks system. Partnerships with volunteers, community organizations, non-profits and private entities are necessary for long-term success, especially when considering constrained budgets, staffing challenges, climate change impacts and increasing usage. Building Community & Relationships encourages a stronger, more diverse, and more unified community, benefitting from a variety of viewpoints and life experiences. Working together, the Boulder community can collectively propose and implement workable solutions that continue to make Boulder’s parks and recreation system resilient in the face of environmental, economic and social change. Policy Statements • BPR shall build community through partnerships that foster equity, are mutually beneficial, mission focused and grounded in BPR guiding principles as demonstrated in parks, facilities, and programs. • BPR shall work to ensure partnerships help foster the resilience of the community’s parks and recreation system. • BPR shall pursue public-private partnerships to share resources, adapt to future challenges, better meet changing community member demands, innovate and take advantage of the expertise provided by each partner to achieve specific outcomes. • BPR shall ensure all community members feel welcome by providing safe, accessible and meaningful parks and recreation services and experiences available to all. • BPR shall seek and develop partnerships and opportunities to leverage operations, maintenance and capital asset/infrastructure funds that not only support basic services but allow BPR to meet action level or vision level investment goals . • BPR staff shall use inclusive, equitable, transparent and consistent communication and engagement practices, encouraging participation of all community members. 49 13 BPR plays a vital role in enhancing the mental and physical health of younger members of the Boulder community through Youth Engagement & Activity. In 2014, staff began developing programming that better connects children to the parks and recreation system, offering opportunities for direct experiences with nature and peers, physical exercise, experiential learning through play, and providing outlets for stress. A growing body of research suggests that increasing children’s interactions with nature can have positive physical, mental and spiritual benefits throughout life. The power of these benefits increases exponentially when started at a young age. While Colorado is considered one of the healthiest states in the country and is a national leader in appreciating nature and active lifestyles, serious physical and mental health issues are impacting youth. According to the 2018 Children’s Hospital Colorado Community Health Needs Assessment, nearly one quarter of Colorado children are overweight or obese, and less than half get the recommended 60 minutes of daily physical activity. Between 2013 and 2019, the number of high school students reporting sadness or hopelessness that increased by more than 40% and in 2019 alone, 18% of teens participating in the Healthy Kids Colorado Survey reported seriously considering suicide . BPR can help reverse these trends by offering programming and services targeted to children’s and teens’ specific needs−supporting physical and mental health, civic pride, community belonging, environmental stewardship and healthy living for life. Policy Statements • BPR shall enhance the health, safety, resilience and overall development of Boulder’s youth through parks, facilities and services. • BPR shall support family activities that benefit youth and build a strong sense of community and place, encourage a culture of stewardship, and promote resilience. • BPR staff shall determine the appropriate role to play within the community to address the physical and mental health challenges of Boulder youth. • When considering capital improvements, BPR staff should prioritize amenities and features that encourage youth activity, participation and healthy lifestyles such as providing nature- based play spaces, innovative teen areas and engagement opportunities for children and youth within the parks and public spaces managed by BPR. • BPR shall use all data and metrics available to prioritize investments in capital, operations and programs that best meet the needs of the most vulnerable youth in the community. 50 14 BPR’s employees are resilient and by ensuring its ability as a department to pivot in the face of economic, social and environmental uncertainties. A variety of initiatives have been planned and implemented to make sure staff are ready to meet changing user, operations, maintenance and programming needs. New software, service delivery models and asset management tools and training are helping with this effort. BPR has also made progress in effectively managing maintenance and operations to help meet the City o f Boulder’s collective climate goals. While the department is making strides in these areas, there have been challenges including reductions in staffing levels, capacity and funding. Keeping an engaged and motivated workforce remains a top priority for the department. Continuing education, team building exercises, skills development and streamlining internal processes are opportunities to support staff morale and foster deeper connections with each other. Looking to the department’s readiness to meet the needs of the public, staff will focus on the community experience, improving the current registration system, offering more flexible programming and spaces, and continuing to adapt public engagement techniques to equitably meet the needs of everyone. Organizational Readiness is paramount to BPR’s continued success in serving the Boulder community. Policy Statements •BPR shall ensure that the department workforce, structure and culture are designed and prepared to respond to community needs. •BPR shall develop a highly effective workforce that will positively impact the community’s health and quality of life. BPR shall partner with other departments and follow citywide goals related to both equity and resilience to serve the Boulder community and proactively prepare for the future. •BPR staff shall continue to use and implement accepted plans and reports to guide all aspects of the department and allow informed decision making. •BPR shall develop Key Performance Indicators to measure successful delivery of services, facilities and programs to meet the community goals outlined in this master plan. 51 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: October 25, 2021 A.Court Allocation and Planning: Tennis and Pickleball Pickleball was invented in 1965 on Bainbridge Island, a short ferry ride from Seattle, Washington. Three dads – Joel Pritchard, Bill Bell, and Barney McCallum — whose kids were bored with their usual summertime activities — are credited for creating the game. Pickleball has evolved from original handmade equipment and simple rules into a popular sport throughout the US and Canada. The game is growing internationally as well, with many European and Asian countries adding courts (USA Pickleball.org). Pickleball is a “fun sport that combines many elements of tennis, badminton and ping-pong, and can be played both indoors or outdoors on a badminton-sized court and a slightly modified tennis net (USAPickleball.org). Some of its popularity can be attributed to its accessibility, as it can be played by all ages and skill levels. Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) is excited to support its growth here in Boulder, which is significant – especially among older adults. Teammates in BPR have been working on addressing that growth, and the work has been slowed because of pandemic-related workplan and resource shifts. There are several organized community groups providing input and recommendations to staff, and their outreach and partnership is helpful. Supporting pickleball must be carefully balanced with impacts to tennis, which is also experiencing significant pandemic-related growth. The United States Tennis Association will not allow matches to be played on courts with pickleball lines; thus, while BPR desires multi-use and flexible facilities, recognizing that supporting one sport can negatively 52 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 impact another requires balance. Coordinating with the Boulder Valley School District, whose courts support high school competition, BPR is working to ensure the growth of both sports is supported. City-sponsored Drop-in Hours Through drop-in play, many players can share a court – rotating in and out after abbreviated games. Additional city-sponsored drop-in pickleball hours now facilitate drop-in play seven days/week. The below schedule was effective October 11 and reflects a balance between indoor/outdoor drop-in play on each side of town. Amidst the pandemic, there are many who still prefer outdoor to indoor, and this schedule provides an opportunity for outdoor drop-in at both ends of town at the North and South Boulder Recreation Centers. With the addition of two courts at North, the introduction of city-sponsored drop-in outdoors at North will provide a balance of outdoor access for all while relieving the pressure for reservation on weekday mornings. Some who have successfully been able to reserve courts every day through their groups may find this as a negative impact, and we believe it will be alleviated by the additional two courts added on Court #2. There are others who have been negatively impacted by the current reservation only system and we believe this schedule strikes a balance between reserved/drop-in play, and indoor/outdoor options for all. Indoor Drop-in: (3 courts each) NBRC: M/W/F from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. (current); Sun 12-2 p.m. (week of 10/11) SBRC: M/F from 1:30-3:30 p.m. (added week of 10/4) Outdoor Drop-in: NBRC: T/Th from 8:30-10:30 a.m. (starting week of 10/11; 4 courts) SBRC: M-F from 8 to 11 a.m. (starting week of 10/11; 4 courts) EBCC: 2 courts available by reservation only Additional Multi-Use Courts Pickle ball lines for two courts were painted on Tennis court #2 at the exterior courts behind the North Boulder Recreation Center the week of October 4, with two new roll-out nets added the courts have doubled at this location. All four of the courts behind NBRC are also scheduled for a complete renovation next year due to the extensive cracking that has occurred. The courts will be renovated to eliminate all existing cracks and return to a like-new condition. Approximately five pickleball court lines will be painted on the existing inline hockey rink at Foothills Community Park next spring (weather dependent and with roll-out nets). This winter, staff will engage with other park stakeholders (e.g., neighbors and other users) to solicit feedback and ensure everyone is aware of creating this multi-use change. This use will introduce even greater flexibility and use to an underutilized space in the system. Inline hockey and other uses will still be available, with reservations for pickleball at designated times. This outreach will occur throughout the winter and painting will happen as soon as weather allows next spring in 2022. 53 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Dedicated Pickleball Courts Staff also recognizes the popularity and increase in demand for pickleball that requires dedicated courts. New, dedicated pickleball courts will provide additional space to pickleball players without impacts to other user groups during peak usage. In 2022: -The Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program (CIP) includes the construction of four dedicated pickleball courts. They are tentatively sited at East Boulder Community Park and could potentially include lighting, depending upon the budget and costs. This location was chosen in collaboration with the Pickleball committee and the consideration that lighting, parking, restrooms and other amenities are readily available. Master Plan Integration and Analysis Throughout the current master plan process, stakeholders from both tennis and pickleball have participated in meetings, reviewing materials and providing input to ensure the process includes research and information related to both sports. A summary of the outcomes and information are included below and representatives from both tennis and pickleball will continue to be engaged in the master plan process moving forward into the draft plan phase of the project. The current update to the Parks and Recreation Master Plan will include longer-term capital strategies and recommendations which will inform investments for 2023 and beyond. Pickleball •Provided self-reported, observational data that indicated an 87%/13% split in usage between pickleball/tennis players. •Pickleball committee members have made requests for additional reservations, drop-in times, and striped courts o Several of these requests are being met by short-term action as mentioned above. •Made request for dedicated pickleball courts o Included in 2022 CIP as indicated above. Tennis •Provided an overview of BPR public-facing reservation data that indicated a 50%/50% split between the two sports in terms of court usage. •Requested better information and transparency related to how and when courts will be maintained, renovated and repaired within the CIP or annual operations. •Desire for maintaining access to USTA compliant courts for league play (i.e., no pickleball lines or shared use with BVSD). Master Plan Research Outcomes •Level of Service Analysis o Tennis Courts: BPR = 3.33 per 10,000; TPL Median = 1.70; Colorado Median = 2.44 54 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Pickleball Courts: BPR = 0.56 per 20,000; TPL Median = 0.60; Colorado Median = N/A •Benchmark Analysis o Tennis Courts: Tied for 4th with 36 (High = 51 Tempe, AZ; Low = 12 Broomfield) o Outdoor Pickleball Courts: 8th with 7 (High = 12 Naperville PRD, IL; Low = 3 Westminster) •Statistically Valid Survey (of respondents with an opinion) o Tennis Courts: 84% Satisfied or Very Satisfied; 67% Boulder has enough o Pickleball Courts: 80% Satisfied or Very Satisfied; 83% Boulder has enough •Open Community Survey (of respondents with an opinion) o Tennis Courts: 89% Satisfied or Very Satisfied; 81% Boulder has enough o Pickleball Courts: 83% Satisfied or Very Satisfied; 83% Boulder has enough Issues and Observations •Tennis and pickleball have had to share resources throughout the past few years to both enjoy their respective sports, whether that is physical courts or funding. Has created a tension between the two sports as participation has increased and demand for courts continues to rise. •Reservation data available doesn’t always correlate directly with actual usage, especially as 2 pickleball courts fit in 1 tennis court and there are many courts within the system that are not reservable. •Ideally, BPR could support both sports in such a way as they both grow and expand the community living healthy and active lifestyles. B.Restaurants in Regional Parks As shared with the PRAB in September, City Council is reviewing a code change to clarify how restaurant uses are permitted and managed within city facilities from the zoning perspective. The proposed code change would make it more clear how the uses are permitted on Publicly zoned properties, more specifically within the city’s larger regional parks. The proposed changes to the Land Use Code would make restaurants allowed by right if within a regional park managed government facility and no closer than 500 feet from any residential zone. Restaurants closer than 500 feet would require Use Review. This code change would only apply to the Flatirons Golf Course, Boulder Reservoir and Valmont Park, which fit the definition of a regional park. City Council approved the change on first reading 8-1 on October 5, 2021. Planning Board reviewed the proposed ordinance on October 7, 2021 and unanimously recommended that City Council not adopt the ordinance. The board cited concerns that restaurants in public parks should be considered through a Use Review rather than as by-right uses and that application of the same standard to the three regional parks may not be appropriate. The board found that the regional parks have different characteristics and their differences may merit different approaches. Some also felt that perhaps restaurants should not be established as principal uses in all of the regional parks. The board was concerned about how a restaurant at the reservoir, either as currently permitted or expanded in the future, may present impacts to wildlife and nearby residential properties with respect to noise, light and traffic. The board felt that an alternative ordinance should be developed and brought back to the board for consideration. The Planning Board motion is below: 55 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 On a motion by L. Smith seconded by J. Gerstle the Planning Board voted 7-0 to recommend that City Council reject the Ordinance 8510, which proposes to amend Title 9, “Land Use Code,” to allow restaurants as limited uses in regional parks within the public (P) zoning district, as written due to the following concerns: •Desire for individual Use Review; •That the three parks are sufficiently different to merit different approaches; and •While Planning Board agrees with staff and the community that restaurants may be appropriate in regional parks, further exploration of “accessory” vs. “principal” use is warranted. The October 26 City Council meeting includes the second reading and a Public Hearing on this topic. The memo for the item includes staff analysis and recommendations based upon the Planning Board’s review. 56 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: October 25, 2021 A.PRAB Retreat Agenda Review From the Retreat Committee: PRAB Members Pamela Yugar and Chuck Brock Planning for the 2021 Parks and Recreation advisory Board Retreat/Study Session We would like for PRAB members to consider the following possible topics for discussion at the Study Session on November 15th. Experience has shown that about three major topics can be addressed in the approximately 2-3 hours of the meeting, so please prioritize among the possible topics below so that we may select a subset for the retreat . And feel free to bring up any additional topic areas we have not covered. Possible Topics: 1) PRAB Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines. Since we have several members who have been added to PRAB since this was last discussed in 2019, it might be useful to review how the City Charter defines PRAB's roles, the rules for public meetings and PRAB communications, the Code of Conduct, and other relevant guidelines. 2) Discussion of 2020 departmental milestones, review of Master Plan steps, and PRAB Action Plan for the coming year. Our values and thoughts. For example, are there any ideas from PRAB for new initiatives, including outreach, improving public input, equity/inclusion issues, climate mitigation and adaptation, or other topics? 3) Letter to Council in response to their request. They would like input from all Boards to add potential items to the Council's 2022-2023, two-year workplan. Are there any items we would like added to Council's plan, what are the specific details, and what would metrics be for success/failure? How would the workplan relate to work the the PRAB (and PnR Department) is doing? 4) "Onboarding" of new members (this was discussed last year, but input from new members of PRAB would be valuable). Do the newer members feel that this process has been relatively smooth? What changes could improve it? How can we connect once COVID restrictions are lifted? Would it be possible to get name tags, business cards, or other ways to indicate our membership on PRAB (and build a sense of pride and inclusion) when we begin attending public forums again? 57 5) Changes to procedures and agenda setting. Are we happy with the way the vi rtual PRAB meetings are conducted? Do PRAB members feel that their voices are heard? Is the apportionment of speaking time equitable? Is there an opportunity for PRAB members to bring up new topics? As an example, some other boards have a period in Matters from the Board where Board members can bring up topics they wish to have addressed either directly, with quick answers from staff, or more formally, with a request for an agenda item in a subsequent meeting. Is this something we would like to consider? 6)Are there any fun ideas to relax during the retreat? Raj, stretching? Mary, get us biking? Have every member describe their favorite song or quote? Any other ideas? B.Guidance for Annual Input to Council Council requests feedback from Boards and Commissions every year. PRAB submitted the following letter to council in 2020. This year council requested the following: “Boards, Commissions and those who support them, The Council Retreat Committee is in the process of planning the annual city council retreat, January 21-22, with some pre-retreat work by council earlier in January. Historically, council has engaged boards and commissions prior to the retreat for feedback on the city’s performance and workplan. However, at last January’s retreat, you may recall there was significant discussion around boards and commissions – how council engages them, how they engage each other, how to align workplans, how to empower these groups, how to remove barriers for service, and more. To that end, this year the Retreat Committee has decided to use a new approach to soliciting your feedback, which will be achieved in two steps– once before the retreat and one after. 1.Prior to the retreat, we invite each and board or commission to determine whether they want to suggest an item to be added to council’s 2022-23, two-year workplan. We anticipate that workplan will be relatively full, with carry-over work from this year and ideas offered by new council members. So, it is perfectly fine for a board or commission to indicate that they have no suggestions for possible additions to the work plan. But if a board or commission wishes to suggest an additional item (one only, please), you can send your suggestion to Taylor Reimann at reimannt@bouldercolorado.gov no later than Wednesday, December 15 by noon. We recognize it may be difficult to choose only one item, but this will ensure council clearly understands your highest priority given resource constraints. If you decide to offer a suggestion, we encourage your board or commission to use specificity when describing your proposal, and outline what success on your item would look like. We will not be asking boards and commissions to present their letters during a council meeting. 2.In addition to soliciting your assistance with creating the council 2022-23 workplan, we would welcome the opportunity to discuss with you how that workplan relates to the work that your board or commission is doing, and vice versa. After the January retreat, we will communicate out about those interactions, as well as soliciting your feedback. 58 There will be dedicated time in the near future to continue discussing board and commission work with council members. We hope you can appreciate the different and iterative approach we are taking to engage with boards and commissions this year. It is our sincere intention to rethink, co-create, and improve the experience for you as our dedicated volunteer experts, as well as for the community. Thank you for your effort to support city council and the city staff as we continue planning for 2022 and 2023. Respectfully, Council Retreat Committee: Bob Yates, Adam Swetlik (outgoing member), and Rachel Friend (incoming member)” C.PRAB Community Engagement (verbal) 59