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08.18.21 BAC MinutesCITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES Name of Board/ Commission: Boulder Arts Commission Date of Meeting: August 18, 2021 Contact information preparing summary: Celia Seaton Commission members present: Kathleen McCormick, Devin Hughes, Bruce Borowsky, Georgia Schmid (arrived during Item 4), Eboni Freeman, Maria Cole, Caroline Kert Commission members absent: none Library staff present: Matt Chasansky, Office of Arts & Culture Manager Lauren Click, Coordinator, Grants Mandy Vink, Coordinator, Public Art David Farnan, Director Celia Seaton, Administrative Specialist City staff present: Aimee Kane, Equity Program Manager, City Manager’s Office Members of the public present: Jessie Friedman, Ann Moss, Lisa Nesmith, Kari Palazzari, Jennifer Sandoval, Sarah Shirazi Type of Meeting: Regular|Remote Agenda Item 1: Call to order and approval of agenda [0:00:18 Audio min.] The meeting was called to order. McCormick provided an introductory orientation around the virtual procedure, as this meeting was held through Zoom videoconference. She asked the group for any addendums to the agenda. There was a nod of approval for the agenda as presented. Agenda Item 2: Review of Minutes [0:03:01 Audio min.] Item 2A, Approval/Review of July 2021 Meeting Minutes McCormick asked the commission for changes or addendums regarding these minutes. McCormick had minor changes to the minutes, sent along beforehand. Kert moved to approve the minutes as amended, Freeman seconded, and the motion was approved by all who were present at the meeting. Borowski abstained as he was absent at the previous meeting. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation [0:04:25 Audio min.] Moss spoke as a representative of Create Boulder, Arts Alliance of Boulder County, and Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. She invited commission to visit two current exhibits at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art – one, situated outside on 13th St., is a sculpture commemorating Los Seis de Boulder. The other work acts as an interactive exhibition, The Journey Continues Toward Justice, El Movimiento Sigue. She also alerted the group to an upcoming event at eTown, date TBD, in which Boulder County Arts Alliance and Create Boulder will feature a forum for the City Council candidates to discuss issues of arts and culture in the community. Moss will dispatch event updates and invited input on the planned inquiries. Sandoval, director of the North Boulder Sunset Market, announced the success of this past summer’s inaugural event within the NoBo Art District. The event provided vendor space, food trucks, and live music to the artist studio space warehouses in north Boulder and was well received by the public. Sandoval hopes for more funding to create a similar event next year. Nesmith, president of the NoBo Arts District, advocated for a streamlined permitting process in the city, and reduction in fees for events. Small organizations have difficulty navigating the city’s “onerous” permitting process and coming up with the necessary monies. Agenda Item 4: Matters from Guests - Racial Equity Declaration and Plan [0.15.35 Audio min.] Kane spoke on goals and strategies for the adopted Racial Equity Plan in the City of Boulder (see plan.) She discussed disparities, as well as individual, institutional, and structural racism. Kane provided background on the Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE) model for change. Steps include normalizing the concepts and organizing the movement to enact change, and then implementing a racial equity tool to “operationalize” equity. This instrument involves the framework of a six-step process to evaluate policy through community engagement. Community involvement provided heavy input on this project. A 2017 inclusivity community perceptions report informed the outline, presented to community members who created a robust public engagement plan. One stated goal provides opportunity for commissioners to train in racial equity at workshop offerings. Chasansky and staff will work to align the Cultural Equity Plan with the city’s principles. He expects a facilitated workshop for commission likely in October 2021. Freeman was excited to see the diversity of communities whose input was requested during the public engagement. She inquired about efforts to connect with the disability community, or whether there were other challenges in the outreach. Kane acknowledged that staff has experienced difficulty engaging the disability community. Freeman wondered about connecting with black community through church culture. Kane agreed that there is a lot of opportunity through that arena – staff has so far engaged with the Sacred Heart Church and the Second Baptist Church. Freeman would appreciate any update on the disability outreach in coming months. Chasansky acknowledged how forward-thinking the commission has been in its pursuit of racial equity; he noted past consultant work, the collaboration with the Human Relations Commission in providing equity grants, and the ongoing outreach to the indigenous tribal leadership. Cole agreed with Kane re: “casting a wider net around what encompasses ‘art.’” McCormick favors the idea of engaging a consultant again to further this work. Freeman suggested tracking several vectors of diversity to obtain metrics that measure change and trend data for the grants and applications. Kane also recommended collecting qualitative data (anecdotes). The group thanked Kane for her presentation – Kane welcomed any further feedback or inquiry and provided her contact information to commission. Agenda Item 5: Budget Update [1.16.11 Audio min.] 2022 Division Budget and Proposed Restorations for 2021 – Staff put in a request for increased funding to grants and public art. This increase would restore funding to 2019 levels. The full request will be published August 31st. Some upcoming dates covering the budget approval process: on September 9th, there will be a first reading and public hearing concerning a special adjustment to base for the monies granted by American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (“ARPA”). A second reading will occur on September 28th. At the September 28th session, the first reading of the city’s 2022 budget is also planned. Staff will seek commission recommendations in September and October. Agenda Item 6: Grant Program [1.23.22 Audio min.] A. ACTION: Grant Report Approvals 1. Colorado Conservatory for the Jazz Arts, SheBop Weekend Workshop, $3,000 2. Boulder International Film Festival, BIFF 2021 Youth Pavilion/Cinema to Schools/Youth Advisory Council, $3,000 3. EcoArts Connections, OASIS: A Gathering Place for Opportunities, Arts, Science, Inspiration, and Sustainability, $10,000 4. Follow up: Boulder Community Media, Beyond Wind River: Fort Chambers Virtual Reality (WRVR), $3,000 Kert made a motion to accept the grant reports for Colorado Conservatory for the Jazz Arts (with a question regarding the division of monies for scholarships and for catering), Boulder International Film Festival, EcoArts Connections, and Boulder Community Media. Cole and Freeman seconded the motion, simultaneously. The motion passed unanimously. B. 2022 Cultural Grants Cycle Blueprint, Step One – Click reviewed staff, community, and commission feedback on the program. The Community Cultural Plan informs the grant program’s financial structure. The group discussed funding priorities for 2022. If funding is restored towards an equity grant, the group was favorable toward a fellowship built in collaboration with the Tribal Nations. McCormick hoped to retain latitude on funding program directions if COVID restrictions prohibited certain activities (e.g., field trips, professional development grants requiring travel outside Colorado, venue grants). When funds were previously cut due to the pandemic, commission recommended consolidating money to support general operating support grants, community project grants, and arts education grants that could still be done virtually. In discussion of process improvements regarding eligibility criteria, Freeman suggested lowering the eligibility age to increase accessibility. Staff responded with the concern that state law parameters will only permit contracting with those of legal age. Kert mentioned that she would like to review the city boundary criteria, as location has been cited as a concern in trying to focus benefit to the local community. Freeman suggested requiring vendor contract language to also support the local businesses. Schmid spoke to her observation that the same large art organizations in Boulder tend to win the grant awards year after year; now that she is a commissioner, she realized that this is a result of the predictable applicant pool. She suggested striving to attract new organizations. She personally has contacts in the dance world who never applied for a grant (one large barrier is the restriction of timing and application deadlines that sometimes occur long before the realized project). In order to “raise the bar,” she advocated diversity of style. Boulder Ballet performs the same version of The Nutcracker annually, though a dancer she knows reimagined the story with a jazz style set in a Colorado winter. This alternative version would be great to bring to Boulder, though this artist would need grant support to rehearse and present the show. She wants to see a larger scope of style offered to the community. McCormick agreed and suggested incorporating smaller grants that are given out more frequently. Borowsky referenced the Spark grants which were awarded on a rapid cycle with smaller amounts in order to help artists on a more spontaneous basis. The group discussed whether a panel of four community volunteers should still be involved in the grant scoring; can this panel process be enhanced? Palazzari, a recent panelist, recommended maintaining the addition of panelists even with the newly enlarged body of commission – a greater diversity of viewpoint can still be consolidated by way of the scoring rubric’s numerical sieve. Palazzari also spoke about spreading the money around as much as possible. When distributing this taxpayer money, she places a heavy weight on the scale toward equity and feels that a single organization should not be winning multiple grants. Changing the rubric parameters could avoid this possibility. More input will be gathered at the September meeting, with options to be presented and finalized at the October retreat. Agenda Item 7: Public Art [3.08.31 Audio min.] A. Public 2022 Public Art Implementation Plan Updates, Chapter 1 i. Questions about the Public Art Policy, Public Art Implementation Plan Ch. 1 (see packet.) Cole wondered about parameters in the policy around the deaccession of a piece of public art which may no longer be culturally relevant or sensitive to current society. Vink referenced language in Section 12, which provides opportunity to remove an artwork if new information causes it to be no longer deemed culturally appropriate. ii. Programming, Experiments in Public Art – In response to Schmid’s inquiry, Vink noted that many of these events are publicized through the Office of Arts and Culture robust social media channels. Agenda Item 8: Matters from Commissioners [3.57.40 Audio min.] A. CCS Tax Discussion by Council – for September meeting B. GOS Liaison Appointments Agenda Item 9: Matters from Staff [3.58.45 Audio min.] A. Manager’s Memo: see packet. Chasansky welcomed questions. APPROVED BY: ATTESTED: _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Board Chair Board Secretary _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Date Date Agenda Item 10: Adjournment [3.59.01 Audio min.] There being no further business to come before the commission at this time, the meeting was adjourned. Date, time, and location of next meeting: The next Boulder Arts Commission meeting will be at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, on Zoom. 9.15.21