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08.18.21 BAC HandoutsWhy Race? What’s Racial Equity? Why work on racial equity? Disparities exist today •In 2015 the median family income for Latino city residents was $33,810. For white families, the median income was $113,920. •8.7%of city residents are Latino, but more than 16% of city affordable housing residents identify as Latino. •Latino community members are less likely to have access to quality health services. People of color experience higher rates of diabetes, obesity and other health problems. •The high-school graduation rate for white city students is 93.8%, but for Latino students the rate is 77.2%. Types of Racism Structural Institutional IndividualInstitutional Racism •Policies, practices and procedures that work better for white people that for people of color, often unintentionally or inadvertently. Structural racism •A history and current reality of institutional racism across all institutions, combining to create a system that negatively impacts communities of color. Individual racism •Pre -judgement, bias, or discrimination by an individual based on race. Model for Change Development of the Plan Shaped by community input: •2017 Inclusivity Community Perceptions Assessment •Courageous personal stories shared more recently by community members of color in sessions hosted by the Human Relations Commission and City Council •Frequent conversations with organizations that work with less connected communities •Participation in Diversity & Inclusion Summits at the University of Colorado Boulder Racial Equity Engagement Working Group Community Engagement Feedback Sessions •Community organization partners •In-person or via Zoom –90 minutes in length •20-30 minutes –context and overview •60-70 minutes –sharing feedback, questions, discussion Be Heard Boulder •Online engagement •Outreach •City of Boulder Racial Equity Work list-serv, City of Boulder biweekly e-newsletter, and NextDoor citywide post Draft Racial Equity Plan Outcome The City of Boulder will advance racial equity by ensuring that its policies,programs and practices are free from institutional and systemic racism. We pledge to work collaboratively to support a high quality of life and access to opportunity for community members of all races and ethnicities. Goal 1: Everybody gets it. The city will normalize and operationalize understanding of institutional and structural racism among people who work for or represent the City of Boulder, including city staff, City Council, Boards and Commissions, and ongoing program volunteers. Strategy 1.1: Develop equity- focused leadership at all levels 1 Strategy 1.2: Develop workplace-based equity teams 2 Strategy 1.3:Provide Racial Equity Training 3 Goal 2: Justly do it. The city will take action to end racial disparities in city services. •Strategy 2.1:Achieve commitment at the department level •Strategy 2.2:Operationalize the Racial Equity Instrument •Strategy 2.3:Integrate racial equity into master and strategic Plans •Strategy 2.4:Focus on racial equity in stewarding public funds and city financial processes Goal 3: Community commitment. The city will strengthen partnerships and collaborate with community members and organizations that d emonstrate a commitment to ending racism. •Strategy 3.1:Partner with community •Strategy 3.2:Build community organizational capacity •Strategy 3.3:Seek opportunities to support and promote the value of diversity and multiculturalism •Strategy 3.4: Recognize history of institutional racism within the City of Boulder Goal 4: Power to all the people. The city will build and maintain trust, expanding the influence of community members of color through inclusive and responsive engagement. Strategy 4.1:Improve access to decision-makersImprove Strategy 4.2:Support city-community relationships through staffingSupport Strategy 4.3:Focus on high-quality community engagementFocus on Strategy 4.5:Value lived experienceValue Strategy 4.6:Address language, cultural and engagement access barriersAddress Goal 5: Representation matters. The city will eliminate barriers and create opportunities to build a diverse workforce across the depth and breadth of local government including elected officials, boards, commissions and working groups. •Strategy 5.1:Address boards,commissions and working groups •Strategy 5.2:Develop City of Boulder’s workforce Thank you Aimee Kane, Equity Program Manager City of Boulder kanea@bouldercolorado.gov Boulder Arts Commission Meeting August 18, 2021 Grant Program Matters Boulder Arts Commission meeting August 18, 2021 ACTION: Grant Reports •Colorado Conservatory for the Jazz Arts, SheBop Weekend Workshop, $3,000 •Boulder International Film Festival, BIFF 2021 Youth Pavilion/Cinema to Schools/Youth Advisory Council, $3,000 •EcoArts Connections, OASIS: A Gathering Place for Opportunities, Arts, Science, Inspiration, and Sustainability, $10,000 •Follow up: Boulder Community Media, Beyond Wind River: Fort Chambers Virtual Reality (WRVR), $3,000 2022 Cultural Grants Cycle Blueprint, Step One BRAVO! Positive Feedback •“Longer term funding (multi-year grants) are really helpful because they allow for more comprehensive long-term planning.” •“Even if I hadn't received a grant, it was well worth the time just to have both supportive AND constructive feedback.” •“Generally, I think your process is clear, thorough and fair. The information you are requesting fits well with the objectives of the grant we applied for (general operating grant).” •“Creo que el proceso para postular a las subvenciones es bastante ágil y adecuado.” I think the grant application process is quite streamlined and suitable. •“I liked the online system for submission. I thought that was well done.” •“…I will say I appreciated how you all adjusted to make the Zoom experience even more professional and thoughtful as COVID -19 went on. I definitely missed being in -person but I thought you all did a wonderful job.” Agenda •Review the staff, community and Commission feedback to the grants program •Panel and Commission comment and discuss •Public comment •Arts Commission asks clarifying questions •Final discussion and guidance for staff Topics for Discussion •Grant Program Financial Structure •Process Improvements •2022 Grant Program Schedule Grant Program Financial Structure •Based on the Community Cultural Plan, what are your funding priorities for 2022? •Grants budget restored to 2019 levels •Possibility that ARPA will add funding with certain parameters •If funding is restored towards an Equity Grant, is a fellowship built in collaboration with the Tribal Nations still a priority? Process Improvements: Eligibility •Do you agree with the eligibility criteria? •Are you interested in changing how the City boundaries are defined in the Grants Program? •Are there issues of fairness regarding receiving multiple grants? Is it a priority to diversify grant recipients year over year? General Operating Support Refresher To bolster the sustainability of the community’s cultural organizations, a series of operating grants is a priority for the cultural grants program. This system of institutional funding supports the Community Priorities and goals in the Community Cultural Plan, including the “Support for Cultural Organizations” strategy. Awards: In 2019 there will were four levels of GOS grants, based on the size of the organization’s budget: •Extra Large Orgs (1M or more) with grants of $50K each •Large Orgs (250k –999k) with grants of $20K each •Mid-sized Orgs (100k –249k) with grants of $10K each •Small Orgs (99k or less) with grants of $8K each •The number of General Operating Support Grants in each category varies depending on the number of applicants in order to ensure that levels of competition are similar in each category. •Cycle: Triannual (Every year for three years), then we added biannual recipients in 2020 Process Improvements: General Operating Support •Is this program serving the community’s needs? •Are the tiers correct? •For the 2022 GOS application, what impacts of COVID -19 should be considered in elements of criteria and selection? •How to improve the reporting process? Process Improvements: Application •Do we need to improve the clarity of the Encouragement Points section? •Small organizations and first-time applicants are at a disadvantage without a grant writing staff •Improving accessibility •Character limits Process Improvements •How do we learn from the pandemic? •Carry on second and third extension request practices? •Should the scoring be adjusted (e.g., from 8 points to 80)? •Recusals should be sent to staff via email with justification •Is there interest allowing organizations to say that they’d accept less funding than their full request? Process Improvements: Panel •Do you still want a panel? •Can the panel process be improved? •Commission and panel comments Improvements: Grant Schedule •You’ll review approximately 8 grant categories •You should expect to read from 100 to 130 individual applications •Reviewing will last from February through August •There will be six commission meetings with decisions What concerns you? How can staff make the process manageable? Clarifying questions? Public Comment Discussion: Overall priorities Specific issues Unanswered questions from staff 2019 Cultural Grants Funding Structure 2021 Cultural Grants Funding Structure Liaison Positions Bruce 3rd Law Dance/Theater Block 1750 Circle of Care Open Studios, Inc. Boulder International Fringe Festival Caroline Band of Toughs KGNU Community Radio Boulder Samba School EcoArts Connections The Catamounts, NFP Devin Boulder MUSE eTown Greater Boulder Youth Orchestras Mmmwhah! // Creativity Alive Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema Eboni Butterfly Effect Theater of Colorado (BETC) Boulder Metalsmithing Association Boulder Symphony Frequent Flyers Productions, Inc. JLF Colorado Georgia Boulder Bach Festival Cantabile Singers Boulder Ballet Local Theater Company Parlando School of Musical Arts Kathleen Art Parts Creative Reuse Center Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra Boulder International Film Festival Colorado Music Festival & Center for Musical Arts Dairy Arts Center Motus Theater Maria Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art Colorado Chautauqua Association Colorado MahlerFest Museum of Boulder NoBo Art District Studio Arts Boulder Next Steps •Review texts with the city’s legal department •Panel applications and interviews Wednesday, October 16, 2019 during the Retreat Time TBD •Grant Info Sessions o Thursday, November 14 at 4pm (location TBD) o Wednesday, December 11 at 11:30am at the Nomad Playhouse Public Art Implementation Plan Updates: Chapter 1 Boulder Arts Commission meeting August 18, 2021 Discussion •Public Art Policy and Implementation Plan •Race Equity, Access, and Climate Justice goals of Boulder Arts Commission and Office of Arts + Culture •Community Engagement opportunities •Budget updates and opportunities. Public Art Policy, Process, Implementation Plan •Questions, comments to Policy? •Questions, comments to Process? •Overall questions, comments to Public Art Implementation Plan? •Pulse check: goals, outcomes to work towards? Race Equity, Access, and Climate Justice •Discussion during Arts Commission through Nov* (ongoing) •Incorporated into public art process, Public Art Implementation Plan Updates •Questions, comments •Pulse check: goals, outcomes to work towards? Community Engagement •Commission-sponsored or Commission-endorsed activities: Public Art Town Halls, Public Art Socials, Experiments in Public Art, tours, artist talks, 5x5 community share, etc. •Public Events and the pandemic •Questions, comments •Pulse check: goals, outcomes to work towards? Budget Considerations •Goals of the Cultural Plan ($300,000 projects; $100,000 strategies) •Program Areas: new projects, maintenance and interpretation, community engagement •Questions, comments •Pulse check: goals, outcomes to work towards? Budget Considerations •Goals of the Cultural Plan ($300,000 projects; $100,000 strategies) •Program Areas: new projects, maintenance and interpretation, community engagement •Questions, comments •Pulse check: goals, outcomes to work towards? Next Steps •September Arts Commission : Chapter 2: Project Snapshot, proposed updates •Incorporate feedback to Public Art Implementation Plan •Budget Approval –finalize edits to Plan •October Arts Commission : Public Art Implementation Plan Action Item EXPERIMENTS IN PUBLIC ART Introduction A city-wide laboratory expanding the potential of public art Why Experiments in Public Art? > Most diverse program > Temporary = Take risks, open conversation > Tailored to community themes, issues, desires > For Artists Emerging to seasoned artists participate Explore new practices Medium unconventional to public art Build portfolio/experience > For Community Unexpected, serendipitous encounters Collaborations and partnerships Brings folks together, bridges divides > For The City Uniquely-Boulder program, travels Event-based, catalyst to come together Exercise in expectations and “how to” 2022 →→→ > Equity and Resiliency (overarching theme) > Program designed with layers of outcomes Questions? Year CCS Tax Non-Profits Public Art 2014 (3 yr) ~$28 million $7.85 million or 28% $600 thousand or ~2.25% ($200K annually) 2017 (4 yr) ~$41.5 million $7.9 million or 19% $400 thousand or ~1% ($100K annually) 2021 (15 yr) ~$200 million $20 million or 10% < $1.8 million or ~1% of qual. CIP (<$120K annually) *2021 = Projected amounts for ballot measure, based on current revenue projections. Nothing committed /guaranteed.