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05.24.2021 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., May 24, 2021 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2021 Raj Seymour (Chair) Pamela Yugar (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Elliott Hood Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate /͘APPROVAL OF AGENDA (2 minutes) //͘FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (2 minutes) ///͘PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (15 - 30 minutes) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. /s͘CONSENT AGENDA (5 minutes) ͘ Approval of Minutes from Ɖƌŝů26, 2021 B. Approval of Minutes from May 10, 2021 Study Session C.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update s͘MATTERS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION A͘ 2022 Budget StrategLJŽŶƚŝŶƵĞĚ(90 minutes) i.2022 Proposed Operating and Fees ŝŝ͘ ϮϬϮϮͲϮϬϮϳ/W2nd ƚŽƵĐŚ s/͘ MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT ͘ BPR Master Plan - Sharing Youth Voices (30 minutes) s//͘MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS ͘ Elect Greenways Advisory Committee (GAC) Representative(5 minutes) ͘ Remote Meeting Update ͘ PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. s///͘ NEXT BOARD MEETING: 6:00 p.m., June 28, 2021 /y͘ADJOURN B.Studio Arts Boulder Lease (25 minutes) 1 PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS UPDATED: May 19, 2021 MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST PRAB May 24: • Financial Strategy (d/i) (90min) o 2022 proposed operating and fees o 2022-27 CIP 2nd touch • Studio Arts Boulder Lease (d/i) (25 min) • Master Plan – Sharing Youth Voices (md) (30 min) • Elect GAC Representative (mb) (5min) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) (10 min) June 28: • 2022-27 CIP (a) • Pottery Lab Lease (a) • 2022 Operating Budget (md) • Park Naming (d/I) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) July 12: • PRAB Preparation for Council Study Session on Master Plan Needs Assessment (d/i) • Greenways Advisory Review (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Historic Places Plan Update (md) August 23: • Park Names (md) • PRAB Retreat Planning (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Boulder Creek Management Plan Update (md) • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Update (md) Department Events and Items of Interest • May 4: Severe Weather Shelter, Coordinated Entry, and Health & Safety Regulations in Public Spaces (cc) • May 10: PRAB Study Session on Budget • May 11: 2021 Ballot Items (cc) • Memorial Day Weekend: Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool, Spruce Pool. Reservoir Swim Beach Open for season. • June TBD: Chautauqua Playground Opening Celebration • June 11: Reservoir Opening Celebration • June 12: Scott Carpenter Pool Opening Celebration July 27: Council Study Session on Master Plan (cc) AGENDA SETTING The PRAB Chair, PRAB Vice Chair and BPR staff set the agenda for the next month on the Thursday directly following the regular PRAB meeting. PRAB members can submit agenda requests to the Chair and Vice Chair by Wednesday following the PRAB regular meeting for consideration. If time-sensitive matters arise, PRAB Chair and Vice Chair may amend the agenda as needed. LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion following the consent agenda. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in- depth analysis. City Council Item (cc) Other Boards and Commissions (obc) Community Engagement and/or Events (e) Holiday/Closure (h/c) Italics indicate a tentative date or plan. 2 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: April 26, 2021 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Mora Carrillo, Phone Number: 303-413-7253 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Elliott Hood, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Ali Rhodes, Dennis Warrington, Jeff Haley, Bryan Beary, Stephanie Munro, Jackson Hite, Megann Lohman, Stacy Cole, Stacie Hoffman, Chris Passarelli, Tim Duda, Jonathan Thornton, Lena Dow, Kim Moore, Jamie Pocock, Mora Carrillo Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:10 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. Passed 7-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Mark McIntyre spoke about the Reservoir fee entry structure memo and recommended that the fees disincentivize driving. Lisa Spalding shared concerns about upcoming changes to the city’s rules on public consumption of alcohol. Shannon Callahan, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the restaurant and events Sharon Anderson, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA). Roger Pioszak, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA). Eric Tussey, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA) and events. He requested that the GNA be renamed and smaller events be listed on the special event calendar. Neil Anderson, Reservoir neighbor, spoke about the importance of protecting open space in Boulder. Kimberly Bixel, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the restaurant and change in operations at the Reservoir, especially with regards to alcohol and safety. 3 Shirley Schaller, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the restaurant, especially with regards to sound. He expressed disappointment about charges to the Reservoir fees which will impact residents who might walk their dogs around the Reservoir during off season. Bernee Strom, Reservoir neighbor, shared concerns about the restaurant and events especially with regards to sound. She suggested testing of sound be done by a certified engineer and checked from the neighborhoods. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A.Approval of Minutes from February 22, 2021 Motion to approve the minutes from April 12, 2021 as presented. Motion by Unger. Second by Brock. The motion passed 7-0. B.Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. •Asked for an update on the Howard Houston and Scott Carpenter park improvements. •Scott Carpenter pool is one of the few Olympic pools in the area. Does staff plan to make the Olympic distance available this summer? •The Scott Carpenter Pool and the entire project looks amazing. Was extremely excited when visited the facility two days ago. Agenda Item 5: Matters for Discussion/Information A.Boulder Reservoir Update This item was presented by Ali Rhodes. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •Understand that the department has taken extreme measures to work with the neighbors on this, and it is in full support. Looking forward to the summer, and for a great partnership. •The extension of hours seems to be the most significant concern. Would like a discussion on operations hours and closing of operations. •Understands neighbors’ concerns but thinks there is a good neighbor policy in place, and the process for monitoring the sound. Knows that the department will be on top of this and making sure nothing bad happens. Is in full support of changes in operation and is looking forward to a good partnership. •Thankful for the detailed presentation and appreciated all the residents that provided their comments. •How does the number of events scheduled for this summer compare to previous years? •Are there other agreements like the GNA for other facilities? •Are we charging for dog walkers? •Appreciated the work that staff has done to come up with this agreement, understands that has been very difficult, and is in full support of the GNA. 4 •Commented about the concerns heard tonight. Feels very sensitive about these concerns and knows that the department will work to find solutions and address them properly. Proposes a name change for GNA, agrees it is a commitment that the department is going to make to the neighborhood, thinks it is a great document. •Commented about one of the resident’s concerns about consequences. If certain behavior happens, is there any documentation that would describe a course of action for certain things happening? •Are private events also ending between 9:30 pm and 10 pm? B.2022 Budget Strategy Continued i.Scenario Planning and Fees This item was presented by Stacie Hoffman and Jackson Hite. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •What does end users mean in this context? •Does usage patterns mean national trends? •What are the details of the recovery met target goals and what are those goals based on? •Recognized the time that the city will take to come back to a full recovery and suggest a slow opening of all services. •Feels that there will be a lot more demand for outdoor activities and suggests increasing fees for outdoor facilities. •Has there been investigation for the peak hours during of the recreation centers? •Is it feasible to close during slower peak times? •Are these fees for 2022 or 2023 as well? •Rather than increasing the fees, would a reduction of hours would be a better option? •Feels that raising the fees after a pandemic would not be a preferable idea. •Does staff track if non-residents are city workers or other details? •How much of the non-resident fees subsidize operations? •Concerns about residents that have lost their jobs and fee increases. •Would like to see a multiyear source of support for the financial aid program. •Any funding support for health equity is a great option. •Appreciate the comments from Mark McIntyre, and based on this has the following question: Why does BPR not have a more progressive transportation-based fee structure at the Reservoir? •Would like to address the city’s concerns regarding climate and overall sustainability goals. •Is BPR considering eliminating fees for residents running through the Reservoir? ii.2022-2027 CIP 1st touch This item was presented by Jeff Haley. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •Feels that the department should be very conservative in the next five years, and just take care of what BPR has. 5 •Grateful to see that the Flatirons Golf Course plan is moving forward with a focus on accessibility and quality. •What will happen to the current service pro shop/club house building at the Golf Course? •Some parts of the packet mention capital improvements for Scott Carpenter park and North Boulder park, but other areas just list the North Boulder renovation. Will Scott Carpenter park improvements be included or is the focus North Boulder park? •The city made a climate commitment of 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by every city organization. It is surprising that the CIP does not mentioned any changes on these. Would like to discuss more about this in next moth meeting. •Really appreciates all CIP presentations, they are very clear. Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department A.WasteLess Parks Pilot Evaluation This item was presented by Dennis Warrington. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •Before COVID, would see random bags full of dog waste on the side when going on a hike, now they seemed be everywhere. Can something be done about that? •Residents are just letting their dogs’ poop in city property, and not picking after them during their hike on Open Space. •Has there been a talk about fines for littering? B.Summer 2021 Service Levels This item was presented by Ali Rhodes. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •When looking at the schedules it seems that the South Boulder Rec Center is the most impacted facility. What is the reason this facility has been impacted more than the other two? •Would it be possible to include statistics about services and usage and make these available to the public? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A.New Board Member Introduction B.July Meeting Date Changes – Suggest moving July business meeting to July 12th so PRAB input can inform City Council July Study Session on the master plan. C.PRAB Community Engagement Updates Yugar gave a PLAY Boulder Foundation update: $50K will be donated to kids in the community in need, and BPR will be receiving part of these funds for families in need of financial aid. Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting is a study session, to be held Monday, May 10, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). The next regular meeting will be Monday, May 24. 6 Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 9:20 p.m. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Mora Carrillo Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 7 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: May 10, 2021 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Elliott Hood, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger (arrived 6:02 p.m.), Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Ali Rhodes, Bryan Beary, Tim Duda, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffman, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Chris Passarelli Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Study Session Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:00 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Agenda Item 2: Matters for Discussion/Information A. 2022 Budget Strategy This item was introduced by Rhodes. Hoffman and Hite presented this item. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Has there been a significant impact on any certain demographic group due to the shift in hours? • What if sales tax continues to decline? Is there a way to change how BPR is funded? • Is there a summary of why our budget looks different from the average parks and recreation seen in the national trends? • Do Boulder families need subsides for recreation entry fees potentially more than Boulder’s senior population? • How does the Silver Sneakers program work? • What is the plan if BPR does not receive the rescue funds? • If needed, would it be an option to close different facilities a few days each week rather than one facility for an extended period? • If needed, how much would BPR save if a facility closes for an extended period of time? • Regarding closure of a facility for an extended period, board members understood the need to take this action to protect ability to deliver services long term and believed that that users could drive to other facilities. They shared concerns that kids would suffer most if a facility does close for an extended period of time. • Is there an option to provide camp or other youth programming during a closure? • Would it be possible to provide transportation to other facilities during a facility closure? 8 • How much money does BPR expect to make from the current sources identified? If a deficit continues, how would BPR close that gap? • Will a deficit continue in 2023 and future years? Has BPR considered long term strategies to avoid a continued gap? • Has BPR considered additional marketing to draw users back to the facilities? • Did the youth at the master plan session have any suggested innovations at the program earlier this month? • The board shared appreciation for the great new playground at Chautauqua. • Are people signing their children up for programming? • Regarding the potential to increase marketing, board members shared that they are not personally comfortably exercising inside gyms yet and therefore wouldn’t recommend marketing to adults or seniors. If vaccination rates are higher this fall, marketing might pay dividends at that time. • If BPR waits for Master Plan to change Reservoir fees, would that be in time for the 2022 season? Or would this be for the 2023 season? • If there was a closure at one facility, would it be possible to offer users a discount at other facilities? • Has there been analysis of a sliding scale fee structure? Does data on potential financial impacts exist? • When might staff look investigate the potential for a sliding scale fee structure? • Would it be possible to reduce hours or increase fees rather than close one facility like South Boulder? • When will BPR find out the rescue funding received? • Regarding closing the budget deficit, board members shared that they appreciated BPR making sure not to negatively impact any one group and understood that there may be ambiguous solutions. • Is it possible to cut certain more expensive programs if needed? Is it possible to look at other savings through a combination of cuts? • Is it possible to collaborate with philanthropic partners to subsidize programs and help balance the budget? • Has BPR looked at volunteer capacity for revenue or for providing program services? • Board members shared comments that they are not looking to increase Reservoir fees at this time. • Based on comments seen on social media, there seems to be misunderstanding of where BPR’s funding comes from. • Does BPR include time to brainstorm bigger ideas when budgeting or planning for the future years? Agenda Item 3: The next PRAB meeting will be held virtually (via video conference) 6:00 p.m. Monday, May 24. Agenda Item 4: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 7:37 p.m. 9 Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 10 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: May 24, 2021 A. Approval of Minutes April 26, 2021 B. Approval of Minutes May 10, 2021 Study Session C. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Project: The Flatirons Golf Course Facility Concept Planning wrapped up at the end of 2020. Staff continues to work with the local architect, ZDesign Group, on the next phase: Design Development. The previous phase (Concept Planning) documentation, including community engagement summaries, will remain on the project web page throughout the duration of the project. Construction is anticipated in 2022; however, staff has committed to keeping PRAB and the community informed about the project as it develops through Design Development and Construction Documents, to ensure the continued excitement and support of the project. Project Process Diagram 11 Based on the community engagement throughout 2020, staff is excited to share the next level of design as submitted for a land use review (City of Boulder Planning and Development Services required process). Details and features may change based on comments from the land use review staff. Highlights of the project can be found below while the detailed full land use review documentation is also available to the public. This month, staff is highlighting the building materials, elevations, and the floor plan. The Design Development phase heavily relies on the community engagement from the previous phase and the expertise of the consultants as we move into more technical details. Staff is excited about the progress and hopes to keep the community excited as well. Project banners will be placed on the fence around the golf course to share the elevation and point them to the web page for the latest information. The web page will be updated regularly with email notifications for those who have requested it. The golf community will also be kept informed in the newsletter provided to users. Our main goal is to keep the community informed as we develop the level of detailed plans required for construction. In addition to the physical building, staff is in the process of developing a business plan that will help guide the search for a food and beverage (F&B) partner for this site. The F&B partner will likely also manage the special event lawn including scheduling, onsite catering, and related services. It is important that guidelines are set to provide a high level of service to the golf course, ensure a rich community experience, and support a mutually beneficial long-term partnership. Right click on the images below for a larger view. 12 The next steps will include more detail about parking, sidewalk access, and circulation between the buildings. Examples of what the engineers are currently working on include flood requirements, tree protection, energy needs, and electric vehicle (EV) station locations. Consideration for the future is being considered in features like additional conduit (or sleeves) that would allow for future expansion of EV stations. •Howard Heuston Skate Park: Construction of skate features at Howard Heuston Park have been paused pending a follow-up community meeting to share information, hear feedback, and answer any questions the neighbors might have. Construction at Howard Heuston was anticipated to begin in mid-May, following the skate park construction at Scott Carpenter Park. The skate park contractor will instead begin work at Valmont City Park. Please visit the Howard Heuston Park page for upcoming meeting details as soon as they are available. The community can submit their email address to be notified about the upcoming meeting in mid-June and leave comments. We want to honor the public process and the voices that were heard from the Howard Heuston Park neighborhood in 2017 and the community-wide Skate Park Improvement process in 2019-2020, but also understand that current neighbors may not have been involved in those opportunities. The neighborhood outreach for Howard Heuston Park renovations occurred in 2017, resulting in the new playground, picnic area, fencing, etc. It is a common planning practice to develop a concept plan for park improvements, including potential future phases of work that might fall outside of the original project budget. Once funding is available, staff relies on the previously approved plan for those future improvements. Skate features were identified as a future phase in the approved concept plan. There was subsequent outreach regarding Skate Park Improvements in 2019 and early 2020. The outreach for the Skate Park Improvements project was targeted community- wide, as it involved improvements and additions at multiple parks. The second meeting in Elevations Floor Plan Materials 13 2020 was hosted completely online at the early onset of COVID. Staff made their best effort to align the outreach with the new safety guidelines, but we also realize it was a stressful time for all, creating a less than ideal time to discuss skate features. At the upcoming community meeting in June, staff will provide the background of the project to begin discussion with a factual base of information, requested demographics, and the process of how staff arrived at the current location and size of the skate features at Howard Heuston. This meeting will be an opportunity to share dialogue between the neighbors and the skate community to collaborate on a solution for all. •Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP) o BPR Master Plan (See Matters from the Department item) Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. •Chautauqua Playground Renovation: The Chautauqua Playground opened to the public on Mother’s Day weekend. The playground was renovated as part of the department’s ongoing Capital Improvement Program (CIP). The design for the playground was unanimously approved by PRAB in December of 2019. The Landmarks Design Review Committee (LDRC) approved staff’s application for a Landmarks Alteration Certificate in March of 2020. Construction began in September of 2020 and progressed through the winter, as weather permitted. The renovation project included: -Replacement of playground equipment and surfacing to meet ADA accessibility standards and safety guidelines and requirements -A custom rock climbing structure -New sand play -Addition of natural play features such as log steppers and boulders -Site amenities such as bike racks, picnic tables, trash, recycling, and compost receptacles. The May playground opening was a ‘soft’ opening. A grand opening is currently planned and will take place in June. More information will be provided as details are finalized. Please visit the project website for more information and pictures. •Skate Park and Pump Track - Scott Carpenter Park and Valmont City Park: After over a year and a half of community input, design, and permitting, the construction of two new skate parks at Scott Carpenter and Valmont City Park and a bike pump track at 14 Valmont are underway. A third, planned skate park at Howard Heuston is currently on hold pending a follow-up meeting with the community. More information on the plans for Howard Heuston, previous community engagement, and an upcoming meeting can be found here. The addition of the new skate features and the pump track at the parks are supported by community members and stakeholder groups and will greatly increase the amount of skateable space in the city for users of all abilities. It will also provide much needed outdoor, socially distant recreation opportunities and beginner skate features for those starting to learn. Each of the locations will be accessible to all community members. General information on the skate park improvements and pump track project can be found here. Scott Carpenter Park: The new skate park at Scott Carpenter will add approximately 5,300 square feet of skateable area to the existing park. Catering more to beginners to intermediates, the Scott Carpenter skate park is designed with flat terrain for slower speeds and smaller, low-impact street features. Construction is anticipated to last through the end of May or early June. 15 Valmont City Park – Skate and Pump Track: Valmont City Park will soon be home to a new 10,000 square foot skate park and bike pump track. In addition to the skate and bike elements, the existing parking lot will be renovated to improve pedestrian and vehicular connections and provide a new storm water garden for water quality. These improvements represent part of a larger concept plan. Other improvements may be implemented at a later point when funding is available. The new skate park will include a bowl, transition elements, and street features and has been designed for users of all skill levels. The new bike park pump track will be a beginner level, 10,000 square foot track. The track will be comprised of asphalt trails, a beginner slant wall, and a hammock. 16 Construction Impacts at the Park Sites: Construction impacts will be specific to each park. The public is encouraged to visit websites for each of the individual park sites for impacts and general construction information. Generally, the public can expect the following at each site during construction: •Closures around the construction area. •Detours of adjacent walks or paths. Detours will be posted at the specific park site. •Intermittent increase in construction traffic as materials are delivered or removed from the site. •Construction hours are Monday through Friday, 7.30 a.m. to 5 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Below are links to the websites for each of the individual parks: Scott Carpenter Park: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/scott-carpenter-park Valmont City Park: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/valmont-city-park Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. •Volunteer Programs: Natural Lands Outreach Volunteers and Prairie Dog Count Volunteers: Recruitment for both programs is currently ongoing. Natural Lands Outreach Volunteers shifts have already begun. The first prairie dog counts will occur in mid-June, with additional counts in July and August. More information on these programs can be found on the volunteer page. •Natural Lands Operations: The Natural Lands Team is excited to welcome two new standard staff starting in early June, along with two seasonal staff to help with the busy season. One of those seasonal staff is a full-time naturalist/ranger position funded by the GOCO Resilient Communities grant and focused at the Boulder Reservoir. •Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Urban Wildlife Management. o Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration. o Visitor Management; and o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination. C.Operations Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific BPR services in the parks or facilities. This section is not all inclusive of all current operations and intends to provide awareness on key accomplishments, new happenings, service level 17 adjustments, or other information impacting operations. COVID-19  The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus. •City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery: Boulder County Public Health continues to support a dial framework for COVID-19 guidance where Boulder County will be in Level Clear through August 16. Under level Clear, local capacity restrictions and mitigation are no longer required but may be encouraged. As of May 31, 2021, reservations will no longer be required at recreation centers and pools as detailed in this email sent to community members this week. Staff will continue to provide regular updates to the PRAB on opportunities to restore department services. •Communications on Reduced Summer Services Levels In several engagement and feedback opportunities this spring, department staff shared that the most helpful thing leadership could do to support them through pandemic recovery and in managing workloads and stress is to clarify and manage community expectations. Subsequent to the April 26 Matter from the Department on Summer 2021 Service Levels which identified services facing reductions due to financial impacts or limited capacity, the department issued a press release on May 7th sharing that summer service levels will be reduced so that resources can be focused on services that safely deliver the broadest community benefit possible. To help address concerns around burnout, staff were provided a ‘support toolkit’ that provides suggestions to resolve common causes of burnout including time/work management, meeting management, and self-care/connection among other topics. Templates for email and voicemail were created to make community members aware of current service levels and how requests will be prioritized to make workloads manageable. Feedback will be gathered and shared during the summer season to help monitor burnout and determine efficacy of these tools. •Boulder Valley School District Joint Use Agreement In 2004, the department and the Boulder Valley School District entered into a ten-year joint use agreement (JUA) for the mutually beneficial use of recreation facilities within the city which are owned and operated by both entities to promote the health and general welfare of the community and contribute to the enhancement of the recreational opportunities afforded to the children in the community. In January 2016, the parties entered an updated five-year JUA set to expire this year. Staff have worked with representatives from the district to create an updated JUA that iterates on previous agreements and was intended to serve for another five-year term. The agreement was ultimately limited to one year to allow the findings from the following two undertakings to inform a more long-term partnership between the District and the City that will best serve the community: 18 a.The tennis courts at Centennial Middle School are in fair to poor condition, and the extent of refurbishment required to bring them to acceptable conditions is unknown at this time. The District and the City have issued a joint Request for Proposals (RFP) that will inform both the work required and the funding strategy to enable this work. b. The City is updating its Parks and Recreation Master Plan, which includes a community Needs Assessment to understand community needs for recreation facilities and analyze current Levels of Service. The District is updating its Capital Strategy to inform future capital funding efforts. While the outcomes from these initiatives are awaited, the one-year agreement which will begin on July 1, 2021 primarily updates both city use and district use of facilities to better align with current operational needs and clarifies maintenance, irrigation and management responsibilities for facilities with shared property lines. •Scott Carpenter Concessions In 2020 staff submitted a Request for Proposal to obtain a concessions vendor for Scott Carpenter Pool, at that time no bids were received. In March 2021, two potential concessions vendors contacted staff to express interest. An informal bid process was developed to aid staff in determining the most appropriate vendor. One bidder subsequently withdrew their bid. Staff have selected Landloch LLC as the concessions vendor for Scott Carpenter Pool for the 2021 summer season, who will operate the concession area under the name the Belly Flop Cafe. The menu will initially include prepackaged items as the Belly Flop ramps up to full service and will ultimately include sandwiches and salads and other traditional pool-side offerings. Operations of the concession are currently scheduled to begin by June 12. •Boulder Reservoir Good Neighbor Commitment Following the PRAB April 26, 2021 business meeting, and per the timeline established in February, staff incorporated board member’s feedback into a final document. The final document has been shared with neighbors who have signed up to the Reservoir mailing lists and via liaisons on the Waterstone and Valhalla neighborhoods. Building on adjustments made with input from neighbors for the second draft, the final document reflects these changes based upon input from the PRAB: •Name Change: To reflect input that this document does not reflect bilateral agreements between the city and neighbors, and based upon requests to rename it, we now refer the Good Neighbor Agreement to as our Good Neighbor Commitment. •Neighbor’s Role in Reservoir Decisions: To ensure role clarity, and how Neighbor input will be considered, we have clarified our commitment to seek neighbors’ input and added language to explain how that feedback will inform operations. •Request for consequences: Based upon a request for consequences, a new section explains how violations of policies, sound restrictions or other will be addressed with any business partners or event producers. BPR staff are now focused on operating the Reservoir as outlined in the 2021 operations plans and ensuring that all commitments are honored. Staff are hopeful that success implementation will build trust with neighbors and support a great summer at the Reservoir for the community. 19 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Regina Elsner, Planner and Master Plan Project Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: May 24, 2021 A. Master Plan – Sharing Youth Voices The Master Plan project team is pleased to share with the PRAB outcomes from the youth targeted outreach from this Spring 2021 semester. The project team worked closely with Growing Up Boulder (GUB) and an action team led by high school students from the Youth Opportunities Advisory Board (YOAB). This engagement focused on learning what is important to youth in the community and hearing their hopes and concerns for the future. The project team will use this feedback and input to shape the strategies and recommendations in future phases of the project. No additional targeted youth engagement with GUB or YOAB is anticipated, although YOAB has expressed a desire to continue their work in the fall if timing and student capacity allows. In future engagement windows, the project team will continue to ensure general engagement opportunities include youth and their families through other tactics, such as meeting them where they are at classes and events throughout the community. Youth Engagement with Growing Up Boulder: In January 2021, GUB began conducting youth master plan engagements with ten different groups, including six school groups and four non-school groups representing 114 students, 6 teachers, and 20 parents. Although engagement details varied, each student group was asked to learn and think about Parks and Recreation facilities, parks, and programs, consider how they currently use them and identify what recommendations and priorities they had for the master plan update. GUB staff utilized a “Values, Hopes, and Concerns” engagement framework, and students presented their recommendations in share out events throughout spring 2021. The Growing Up Boulder’s Summary of Findings originates from elementary, middle, and high school student engagements and share-out event recommendations, posters, watercolor paintings, in-person surveys and discussions, student-researched and created digital presentations, and student videos. It also includes engagement data from an EXPAND parent focus group. Some student work samples are embedded throughout the summary. Other work samples and project materials are housed in the appendix at the 20 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 end of the report. Please note that some of the appendices are password protected because they contain videos of the kids. Permission can be given to those who request it, such as PRAB members. The specialty service of GUB, beyond their ability to create curriculum and effective youth dialogue, is the ability to interpret the variety of tools used to engage with youth and translate it into a language that can be used on a long-range planning document like the master plan. GUB staff and a few brave students have offered to present the summary of findings to PRAB in May. Youth Opportunities Advisory Board: The YOAB for the City of Boulder has developed a three-step approach to engage their peers on the forthcoming Parks and Rec Master Plan. At Boulder High and Fairview High, YOAB members surveyed their peers on what areas of the plan were most important to youth. Results from the survey concluded that Youth Engagement and Activities, Taking Care of What We Have, and Community Health and Wellness were the top priorities for youth. YOAB members then created a short video to disseminate to their peers reflecting these results. For the final step, they created a post survey that contained questions focused on those three focus areas. The process and tabulated results will be presented at the May meeting. 21 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: May 24, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: 2022 Budget Strategy: Recreation Activity Fund Facility Access Fees PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Tim Duda, Business Analyst Stacie Hoffmann, Administrative Supervisor Chris Passarelli, Business Analyst EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item continues the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) discussion related to the Parks and Recreation Department (the department) 2022 Budget Strategy. As staff develop operating and capital budgets, the PRAB’s input is critical to ensuring spending aligns with community priorities and values. The intent of this item is to confirm the priorities and approach that will be taken in finalizing 2022 operating budget submission for the Recreation Activity Fund (RAF). BACKGROUND: At the February 22, 2021 PRAB meeting, staff introduced the 2022 Budget Strategy conversation. The memo summarized the PRAB engagement that informed 2020 recreation access fees, impacts of COVID on revenue in 2020 and 2021, and the opportunities, challenges, and recommendations for the 2022 Budget Development Strategy. Staff also shared the plan to consult and engage the PRAB on 2022 budget development monthly, March through June. Finally, to inform the next stages of budget development, staff sought PRAB’s input on the proposed opportunities, challenges, and recommendations. At the April 12, 2021 PRAB meeting (rescheduled from March 29), staff provided an update on the 2019 and 2020 actual revenues and expenses, the 2021 approved budget, and a five-year financial look-ahead. The item summarized the department’s funding sources, including their uses and financial outlooks, and reviewed the current fee structure and levels of services. The item was intended to provide foundational information to ensure the PRAB members have a strong understanding of the 22 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 2 department’s financial outlook, potential challenges, and budget approach as the 2022 budget is developed. At the April 26, 2021 PRAB meeting, staff presented various options for the PRAB’s consideration to prepare for the May study session informing the 2022 budget, fee structure, and levels of service. Following the meeting, staff modeled the magnitude of the proposed options and their impact on the 2022 draft budget. At the May 10, 2021 PRAB study session, the PRAB provided input on staff-proposed options to align the revenues and expenses in the Recreation Activity Fund for the 2022 operating budget. The PRAB’s input is critical to ensuring the department’s budget aligns with community priorities and values. This discussion will be an opportunity to confirm staff’s final approach to submitting the 2022 budget considering the PRAB’s input throughout these meetings. Recreation Fund Management Strategies The RAF is a quasi-enterprise fund where the department manages all expenses, receives revenues from user and participation fees, and also relies on a subsidy from the General Fund to support community-benefit services. In alignment with city guidance, the RAF maintains a 10% reserve, intended to mitigate current and future risks (e.g. revenue shortfalls and unanticipated expenses). Management of recreation funding is guided by several strategies, all developed in alignment with the master plan and the PRAB’s input (see Figure 1, on page 5). General Fund Subsidy Annually during the budget development process Central Finance, in coordination with the department, determines what subsidy level the Recreation Activity Fund will receive from the General Fund. As a proportion of total operations spending, the department receives just over one third the General Fund support compared with the average Parks & Recreation department (National Recreation and Parks Association, 2020). The calculation for General Fund transfer to the RAF has historically been based on projected personnel costs (including benefits) during the next budget year, non-personnel costs from the previous year, anticipated growth in these costs, and any significant increases or decreases in service. This has recently changed to a calculation based on subsidy received in the prior year, which potentially disconnects subsidy from actual expenses incurred and community benefit provided by the tax support. The General Fund subsidy supports community benefit programming based on community input and values expressed in the department’s master plan, which is then prioritized using the Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index (see below). Programs that most benefit the community receive the greatest share of subsidy, while programs that most benefit individuals receive little to no subsidy and are funded via user fees. The General Fund subsidy also provides access for the whole community through age-based discounts to recreation facilities and financial aid support for under-resourced residents with low incomes. Through its provision of programming and access, the General Fund subsidy helps ensure equitable access to all recreation facilities, services, 23 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 3 and programs. This support is what has allowed the RAF to be a sustainable quasi- enterprise fund while offering crucial programming that may not achieve full cost recovery. Service Delivery Model (Item VI.A – p. 15-47): Clarity of the department’s role in the community is a key outcome of the 2014 master planning process. The policy direction of the master plan indicates that: All services should emphasize the important and unique mission of the department to enhance the public health and wellness of the community, services will be deliberately and thoughtfully designed and delivered to enhance and impact health and wellness, and the department will use a life-cycle management approach to ensure services remain aligned with community interests. The department will do this through implementing standardized measurement and evaluation processes based on measurable program objectives. The Service Delivery Model serves as a framework to consistently assess these programs and processes to achieve these goals. The department has adopted procedures and trained staff in the use of the Service Delivery Model to integrate best practices in program design, delivery and evaluation. Since 2015, staff regularly evaluate programs according to the specifications outlined in the Service Delivery Model to ensure alignment with the master plan. Adjustments to services are made on an on-going basis and any major changes to service delivery are discussed with the PRAB. Recreation Priority Index (Item VI.A – p. 15 – 47): The Recreation Priority Index (RPI) provides an objective methodology to categorize services based upon the degree of benefit they provide to the community. By categorizing services and understanding their cost, the department can ensure that general fund subsidies are focused on community priorities as expressed in the master plan. For example, by reducing subsidies to exclusive services, funding becomes available to enable financial aid programs to remove participation barriers for our under-resourced and low-income community members, thereby fulfilling several master plan initiatives. Facility Access Fees The department’s master plan provides policy direction defining the use of community resources, and staff has identified a standard methodology for calculating the total cost of providing services which includes identifying direct and indirect costs. In setting facility access fees for the recreation centers, outdoor pools and Boulder Reservoir, the department uses the following categories to calculate and analyze costs: • Operating costs include expenses to provide community services. There are indirect and direct operating costs: o Direct facility costs include the personnel and non-personnel expenses including department R&R (restoration and refurbishment) associated with the operation and maintenance of recreation facilities. These costs are incurred daily and include staff; materials and supplies, utilities, and custodial services. These costs are included in the operating budget. 24 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 4 o Indirect costs are those that department incurs regardless of whether or not it provides a specific service to the community. They are also included in the operating budget. Overhead personnel and non-personnel expenses associated with the day-to-day operation of the department may include contributions towards Administration, Business Services, Internal Support Services (Human Resources, Information Technology, City Attorney, Risk Management, Finance), and Service Coordination/Supervision. • Capital costs include expenses over $50,000 for major maintenance and enhancement of public infrastructure by correcting current facility deficiencies and constructing new service-delivery infrastructure. These expenses are not included in calculating operating costs. This is due to research and leading practices which acknowledge there is community benefit in the existence of recreation facilities, and thus community resources pay for the capital development and enhancement of these amenities. 25 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 5 Figure 1: Sources of funding and the documents and plans that guide them ANALYSIS: Based on input from the PRAB so far in 2021 and the framework of the Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index, staff have greater clarity with how to move ahead on the 2022 recreation operating budget. After synthesizing original budget submissions, the RAF is projected to take in $9.1 million in revenues and expend $10.4 million in 2022, which creates a delta of $1.3 million. This delta is partially due to general cost escalations such as projected increases to salary and benefits for standard and non-standard employees (including minimum wage), janitorial costs, and increased utility expenses. On the other side of the equation, revenues continue to remain uncertain as the pandemic has caused center utilization to Recreation Centers $2,897,229 Boulder Reservoir $1,135,000 Aquatics $972,481 Recreation Programs & Contracted Programs $1,215,707 Sports $972,481 Flatirons Golf Course $1,321,950 Fund Transfers $1,545,954 $10,126,789 Master Plan & Service Delivery (General Fund Subsidy) Pending Capital Enhancement & Business Plan Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index Facility Access Fees 26 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 6 drop over 65% from 2019 levels. In developing the 2022 budget, staff assume that center utilization will grow but will remain 40% less than 2019 levels based on fewer people working full time in Boulder, increased adoption of home exercise equipment, and decreased comfort with exercising around other people, especially indoors. To close the $1.3 million delta, staff proposed options at the PRAB study session to reduce the distance between revenue and expenses. The three options introduced were: 1. Pursuit of possible alternate funding alternatives 2. Reduction in Recreation Center Levels of Service 3. Adjustment of entry fees Alternate Funding Alternatives: The greatest opportunity for additional funding is through the American Rescue Plan. The department has submitted proposals to the city’s Finance Department to request portions of the approximately $20 million allotted to the City of Boulder, and staff hope to have more information on the outcome later this summer. Another option is to request an increase in General Fund Subsidy based on the historic impact the pandemic has had on recreation as an industry, as seen through dramatically decreased usage and the sustained capacity restrictions. A final option is to use a portion of the department’s RAF reserves to help fund operations in 2022, since they are intended to mitigate current and future risks (e.g. revenue shortfalls and unanticipated expenses). None of these options would close the delta on their own, nor can any be counted on with certainty, but staff intends to pursue all three to minimize the remaining delta between revenues and expenses. Reduction in Recreation Center Levels of Service: Second, the PRAB was supportive of aligning recreation center hours with usage, consistent with the work already done throughout 2020 and continuing into 2021. In 2021, Recreation Centers hours are operating at 60% of those provided pre-pandemic. In any further reduction to operating hours, the PRAB emphasized a focus on equity for those who receive the free recreation center passes to ensure they are not unfairly impacted by closures. To that end, center utilization data from the past three years shows that a reduction of hours early in the morning and later in the evening would impact the fewest number of users and does not unduly impact any group relative to others. Additionally, there was mixed conversation regarding any closure of a recreation facility for a portion of the year; staff promised to return to the PRAB for additional input if alternative funding does not materialize and the department is faced with that decision. Adjustment of Entry Fees: Finally, the PRAB discussed adjusting entry fees at the recreation facilities. Because the department’s fees are already the highest among benchmark communities on the Front Range and due to concerns about middle-income family affordability, the PRAB was not supportive of increasing user fees to close the delta between revenue and expenses. In addition, due to the parallel Master Plan Update, staff will return in 2022 to discuss the 2023 levels of service and fee structure based on input received through that process. 27 AGENDA ITEM V.A.i PAGE 7 NEXT STEPS: Staff recognizes the valuable role Boulder’s parks and recreation system plays in the lives of community members and agrees with PRAB’s recommendation to not adjust user fees during a pandemic to allow for an adequate recovery. As a result, no fee increase is recommended for 2022, and the department will pursue alternative funding opportunities first and if not feasible, adjust recreation center operations to align expenses with revenues. If these two measures do not successfully align revenues with expenses, staff will return for further PRAB input on further reducing recreation center hours or increasing fees to mitigate rising expenses and decreased usage. The department remains committed to being fiscal stewards of limited community resources and to maintain accessibility to all community members. The direction provided by the PRAB will be included in the 2022 operating budget submission which will be reviewed at the June meeting. City Council is scheduled to review the budget in August and September and approval is anticipated in October 2021. Also, through the 2022 Budget Strategy conversations PRAB has provided input on aligning access fees with citywide climate change goals (such as support for multi-modal transportation to the Boulder Reservoir) and annual golf fees. These topics require further evaluation and community engagement that will occur with the Master Plan Update. The PRAB can expect these items to be discussed in greater depth as part of Master Plan strategy development. The department will continue to regularly monitor revenues, expenses, and performance metrics on recreation usage. Staff will strive to align revenues and expenses, along with facility operating hours, throughout this continued recovery period. Staff will return to the PRAB in September to provide an “end of summer” update on 2021 revenues, expenses and performance metrics. Finally, as we move towards colder weather, the Recreation Division and marketing team will promote the benefit of Boulder Parks and Recreation activities and centers, growing marketing efforts through the third and fourth quarters of 2021. 28 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: May 24, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: 2022-2027 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB)’s input is essential throughout the capital budget process, as PRAB’s role is to provide a formal recommendation of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP), including the appropriation of the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund (Fund 230). All capital projects are included for information, regardless of funding source, to ensure the PRAB understands the department’s comprehensive capital investment plan. The April CIP “First Touch” memo included a variety of information related to the background, process, methodology and guiding principles associated with the annual CIP development and specifically PRAB’s role in reviewing and approving the CIP. The memo also outlined the current year’s approved CIP projects that are in progress. The purpose of this agenda item is the “Second Touch” to provide a formal discussion item for the Parks and Recreation Department (department) to communicate the proposed 2022-2027 CIP projects and consider questions and feedback from the PRAB to inform the final projects that will be proposed in June for consideration for PRAB approval. This memo outlines the project types, funding amounts and current funding status to achieve the goals of the CIP. At this time, the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) will have an opportunity to ask questions and provide comments on the draft CIP. As with previous years, Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) continues to be in a transitional year related to capital planning and long-term investments. First, staff are still understanding the impacts of the pandemic on our various funds and the projections for the recovery. This continues to lead to prioritization and uncertainty. In addition, staff are continuing the Master Plan Update that will guide and inform the funding priorities into the future based upon all the research and engagement. Finally, staff are currently participating in the city-wide discussion of renewing the Community, Culture and Safety Tax that has been in place since 2014 with a current renewal in 2017. This additional 29 2 funding has allowed BPR to complete the Civic Park Redevelopment and the recent Scott Carpenter Pool Renovation. There are three projects in consideration for this tax renewal. This will be discussed with City Council at a study session on May 25th and the agenda item and memo can be viewed here. Finally, staff have also submitted projects for the American Rescue Act funding that is anticipated for the City of Boulder. Pending the outcome of these various initiatives and possibilities, the department’s CIP might change. IMPACTS Fiscal: $4.4 million recommended for 2022 with the 2022-2027 CIP projecting an investment of $26M throughout the six-year program. This equates to average annual CIP funding of $4.3M and reflects the total uses of funds projected for 2022 in the Lottery (Fund 2100), .25 Cent Sales Tax (Fund 2180), Capital Development Fund and Permanent Parks and Recreation (Fund 3300). PUBLIC FEEDBACK Since City Council acceptance of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan in 2014, the department has completed considerable public involvement over the past few years to complete multiple plans and studies outlining capital needs. These needs have directly informed the department’s CIP and continue to be discussed with the community as projects are developed. Additionally, a formal public hearing for the CIP is scheduled June 28, 2022. At that time, the public will have the opportunity to comment on the proposed CIP and any specific projects before final approval. The public will also have an opportunity to comment during the Planning Board’s CIP review in August and during future public hearings with City Council’s discussions and review of the 2022 recommended budget. BACKGROUND Capital Projects: As outlined in the April memo (page 77), CIP projects are defined as any major project with a cost greater than $50,000 for purchase or construction, or major replacement of physical assets. Once approved for funding, CIP projects are potentially subject to a public planning and review process or Community and Environmental Assessment Process (CEAP) review that evaluates consistency with applicable policies and any potential impacts to a variety of review criteria. This process includes review and approval by PRAB. The April memo outlined all the CIP project categories as well as the specific criteria that was developed to inform the project prioritization related to COVID-19. Capital Funding: Also outlined in the April memo, the department’s CIP is funded primarily from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund (Fund 3300), .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (Fund 2180) and Lottery Fund (Fund 2110). Additional sources of funding that have limitations on the type of capital investment that funding can be spent on and are not managed exclusively by the department include the Capital Development Fund (Fund 2100), Boulder Junction Improvement Fund (Fund 3500) and past Capital Improvement Bond or Tax Funding. 30 3 The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund (Perm Parks Fund) is funded specifically from property and development excise taxes. By city charter, this fund is dedicated to the purposes of acquiring land and renovating or improving existing park and recreation assets. It may not be used to fund daily operations or routine maintenance. Due to increasing assessed property values, the outlook on this fund is currently positive (while still sensitive to economic conditions). Operating and Maintenance Impacts: The department prioritizes capital projects based upon maintaining existing assets and decreasing the maintenance backlog of the department’s portfolio of parks and facilities. Therefore, most projects included in the department’s CIP will not have an impact on maintenance costs due to replacement of aging infrastructure and efficiencies associated with new and improved facilities and systems. However, as the department fulfills commitments relative to long-term planning needs such as the future phases of Valmont City Park, Boulder Junction Park or Violet Neighborhood Park in the future, the department will need to carefully design enhancements in sensitivity to the department’s O&M funding and not overburden funds with maintenance of these new facilities. Equitable Distribution: In planning and developing the CIP, the department strives to provide equitable distribution of improvements throughout the city, both geographically and socio-economically. In planning projects and identifying needs, the department reviews all asset management information to prioritize the critical deficiencies and engages staff as well as the PRAB to understand the capital priorities that exist throughout the community. The planned six-year CIP includes a variety of projects throughout Boulder’s many subcommunities and even emphasizes development of assets within areas not currently serviced as park amenities. ANALYSIS The current budget, and the department’s planning, reflect a conservative economic reality regarded as the “fiscally constrained” budget not predicted to shift anytime soon especially regarding the impacts of COVID-19. The department faces difficult trade-off decisions in managing and operating its facilities and in the provision of its programs. City guidelines regarding capital improvement prioritize the maintenance of current assets over the development of new facilities, and through the Master Planning process, the community has indicated strong support for this concept. The department must focus on maintaining and improving all deteriorating assets. Simultaneously the department must respond to the community’s shifting values related to new facilities by providing adequate facilities to meet those needs and by making them accessible to the entire community. To mitigate the impacts of limited funding, staff is: • Evaluating service levels to identify opportunities for efficiencies and/or targeted service reductions based upon resilience categories. • Working collaboratively with Facilities Department to prioritize funding for deferred, major and ongoing facility maintenance. 31 4 • Deferring low priority improvements and new capital projects that cannot be sustainably maintained by the operation. • Completing projects to achieve energy and operational efficiencies at recreation facilities and in park infrastructure. • Developing long-term partnerships and non-traditional funding sources to support desired new facilities and enhancements to existing facilities. In alignment with the master plan and Capital Investment Strategy, (Attachment A – Capital Investment Strategy) and considering the fiscally constrained scenario, the department’s CIP is primarily focused on “Taking Care of What We Have” and prioritizes most of the funding within the capital maintenance category. Staff have identified options for reducing spending strategically as a standard practice for this fiscal environment and especially as it applies to the CIP. For both 2022 as well as the full 6-year CIP, staff have performed careful analysis and projections for all funds that make up the department CIP and adjusted the spending accordingly to remain within funding projections while still maintaining a healthy fund balance for reserves. Staff will continue to monitor and adjust spending as necessary with new fund projections and revenue information are available related to COVID-19. 2022-2027 CIP Development The department’s draft 2022 capital projects and projected future year projects are outlined in (Attachment B - 2022-2027 Draft CIP). In the six-year plan, the department continues to focus primarily on taking care of existing assets that provide core services to the community, while partnering as possible to leverage capital funding, to achieve master plan goals including: • Community Health and Wellness: Parks and facilities are being improved with capital maintenance and enhancements to the three recreation centers and many outdoor facilities such as courts, playgrounds and ballfields. The amenities are critical to the department’s core services and investments are outlined in recent plans and studies. • Taking Care of Existing Facilities: through implementation of the Asset Management Software, improvements to East Boulder Community Park, Boulder Reservoir South Shore along with smaller renovation and refurbishment projects across the system will extend the useful life of priority facilities and improve the condition of many assets. • Building Community Relationships: The department continues to address the Emerald Ash Borer epidemic in Boulder and maintain as much tree canopy as possible. With help from the Tree Trust, developed by the PLAY Boulder Foundation, staff are making progress in fighting the pest and planting replacement trees through capital funding. 32 5 • Youth Activity and Engagement: Many youth facilities such as sports fields and play areas will be enhanced and renovated through the 2022 projects that will continue to allow the department to focus on youth and provide opportunities for children in the community. Projects identified for 2022 include: Aquatics Facility Capital Enhancements Based on recommendations of the 2015 Boulder Aquatics Feasibility Plan, this project provides implementation of priority indoor and outdoor pool enhancements for Boulder's aquatics programs. In 2021, the East Boulder Community Center leisure pool will be redesigned with community input to determine a new and improved family aquatics experience. This work will include a new multi- use leisure pool for warm water classes and instruction, a new waterplay structure and an outdoor splash pad will be completed in 2022 in partnership with Facilities Department funding necessary facility repairs. $1,638,000 Natural Lands Management The department's natural lands team manages over 1,000 acres of wildlife and vegetation conservation areas to support the region’s vulnerable ecosystems within urban areas. Capital funding helps support planning and implementation of critical conservation measures and management strategies on the properties. In 2021, funding will provide an opportunity to partner with other departments in developing a comprehensive restoration and management plan for Boulder Creek to balance recreation and public use with maintaining the streams ecosystem which is critical to Boulder. In 2022, funding will allow for the replacement of a trail bridge at Coot Lake Natural Area that is in disrepair and in danger of failure if not replaced within the next year $50,000 Parks and Recreation Strategic Planning Initiatives As illustrated in the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan, the department must consistently review the many programs, services and facilities to ensure alignment with the community expectations, best practices in the industry and strategic focus to meet the many goals of the master plan. This is achieved through ongoing planning and studies that are funded through the CIP. The specific projects planned for each year include: 2022 – Reservoir Strategic Plan Update and regional multi- modal feasibility study $150,000 33 6 2023 – General Maintenance and Management Plan Update / Ops Maintenance Facility Assessment 2024 - Natural Lands Strategic Plan 2025 - Water Assets Strategic Plan 2026 - Facilities and Aquatics Plan update Urban Forest Management This project provides annual funding to continue the EAB response by allowing critical safety measures of removing identified trees throughout the city and replacing with new tree species to slow the spread of the pest and ensure safety of the public as well as expanded urban forest management practices. This project also provides treatment of trees designated for preservation and associated infrastructure improvements such as irrigation to ensure sustainability of the new trees. $300,000 Columbia Cemetery Capital Maintenance The cemetery is a designated landmark and requires ongoing maintenance to meet the preservation requirements associated with all the infrastructure ranging from headstones, markers, ornamental fencing and grounds maintenance. This project will provide necessary funding to complete projects as well as local match for leveraging state grant funds. $40,000 Flatirons Golf Course Capital Enhancements The Flatirons Golf Course is the only public course in Boulder and provides a highly desired recreation amenity while also contributing to funding sources through revenue generation. The golf course has many planned enhancements to ensure playability and provide necessary visitor amenities. This project will provide design and construction of a new clubhouse to replace the former events center that was demolished because of the 2013 flood. The design of the replacement facility will occur in 2021 and construction to begin in 2022. Funding in 2022 restores the contingency funds that were removed last year due to budget constraints and reductions. $ 700,000 34 7 Neighborhood and Community Park Capital Maintenance This project provides funding for asset maintenance throughout the system as well as a complete renovation of one neighborhood park annually to meet the goals outlined within the BPR Master Plan and Capital Investment Strategy. The renovations typically include playground replacement, irrigation renovation, forestry maintenance, ADA compliance and shelter repairs. In 2022, renovations will be focused at East Boulder Community Park. $900,000 Capital Infrastructure Enhancements and Partnership Opportunities This project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. In 2022, funding is provided to finalize the design of the undeveloped portions of Violet Park and Eaton Park that have been a priority for several years to extend the service areas of parks to adjacent neighborhoods. $100,000 Recreation Facility Capital Maintenance Based on recommendations of the 2016 Facility Strategic Plan and upcoming Recreation Needs Assessment, this program will provide annual capital funding for implementation of key facility repairs and renovations at the city's three recreation centers to ensure acceptable facility conditions and continue cost-effectively meeting the needs of health and wellness opportunities within Boulder. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities Department. In 2022, funding will be provided to support the East Boulder Community Center by addressing maintenance backlog items combined with opportunities for energy conservation to reach climate goals. $ 500,000 Unfunded Projects and Emerging Needs In the long-term, regardless of the COVID-19 impacts, additional funding will need to be secured to develop any new major facilities as well as improve service standards for maintenance operations and to fund deferred maintenance. The current master plan includes a list of priority items to complete based on various funding levels and will be updated as the new plan is developed this year and next. As mentioned in the executive summary, the department is in another transition year related to capital planning and addressing our backlog of projects due to many variables. With the update of the Master Plan and determination of projects included in special funding opportunities, this will likely shift the capital plans in terms of priorities of investments. 35 8 In the meantime, staff continues to evaluate deferred maintenance needs, including park sites and recreation facility needs and have implemented an Asset Management Plan (AMP) to assist in capital planning and day-to-day operations. The current maintenance and facility improvements backlog, including major repairs and replacements, is significant. The department anticipates that this backlog will continue until funding levels reach appropriate amounts to accommodate life-cycle projections for the department’s assets. A list of unfunded projects within the department can be viewed in (Attachment C – BPR Unfunded Projects). This list will be comprehensively updated in the upcoming master plan process based upon the research, community input and leadership from PRAB and City Council. Key Unfunded Projects Include: • Boulder Reservoir South Shore enhancements to accommodate increased use and visitation as well as basic amenities to support the regional destination as outlined in the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan and currently evaluated through the Concept Plan and Capital Strategy. • The Recreation Facility Strategic Plan projected a total of $4.5 million in deferred maintenance and an additional $3 million over the next ten years in the three recreation centers. This funding need will also be refined and updated with the upcoming master plan related to the Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment. • Meeting energy compliance required by the Building Performance Ordinance. • Increased capacity and additional facilities for youth and adult sports fields. • Expansion and enhancement of recreation centers and aquatics facilities that accommodate increased demand for lap swimming, fitness equipment and multi-use classroom space that could be expanded. QUESTIONS FOR THE BOARD • Does the PRAB have questions about the variety of projects and initiatives underway that will continue to inform the BPR capital planning such as the master plan, special tax opportunities, etc.? • Does the PRAB have questions or comments related to the current unfunded list of projects? • Does the PRAB have questions regarding the selection and determination of projects for the draft CIP project list? NEXT STEPS Important milestones for the CIP process are included below. 2022-2027 CIP Process Timeline (Projected) PRAB – 3rd touch Approval (Action) June 28 CIP PB/Council Tour TBD Planning Board Hearing August Council Study Session September 36 9 Attachments: A.Capital Investment Strategy B.2022-2027 Draft CIP C.BPR Unfunded Projects 37 43 a b c d e f g h i j k Jay Rd tS ht82tS ht03tS ht74tS ht91US H w y 3 6 Monarch Rd Canyon Blvd Iris Ave Pine St Baseline Rd Lee H i l l D r tS mosloFdR enipStS ht9Valmont Rd Arapahoe Av Pearl St Pearl Pkw ydR egatS edlOWalnut St tS ht67tS ts16Linden Dr South Boulder Rd Colorado Ave tS ht75Violet Ave Mineral Rd tS ht71Gil l a s p i e D rFlagstaff RdtS ht55Independence Rd dR elavyrrehCF o o t h i l l s P k w y Balsam Ave Mapleton Ave Yarmouth Ave Lookout Rd Sunshine Ca n y o n D r Edgewood Dr College Ave Spruce St tS ts17State Hwy 119 Marshall Rd Kalmia Ave University Ave tS dr36tS ht55tS ht57tS ht55Foothills PkwyyawdaorBtS ht03Diagonal Hwy28t h S t Baseline RdBaseline Rd Table Mesa DrtS ht9Valmont Rd GreenbriartS ht82tS dr36B r o a dw a y South Boulder CreekSkunk CreekBoulder Creek Goose Creek W o n d e r l a n d C r e e k 4-Mile Creek Bear Cre e k Viele Channel Capital Investment Strategy Map February 2016 A B C D E A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Legend Major Capital Investments Park Assets (over 20 years) Nature Areas within 10 minute walk of Parks (1/2 mile) Bike and Ped Trails Designated Bike Route On Street Bike Lane Paved Shoulder Parks Community Areas Maintained by Parks Natural Lands Schools Open Space and Mountain Parks County Open Space Main Creeks YSI /Housing Partner Sites City Limit 1 a Map ID L O CA T IO N 1 Boulder Reser v oir 2 F latir ons G olf Cour se 3 V almont City P ar k 4 P ear l Str eet Mall 5 Civ ic Ar ea P ar k 6 Staz io Ath letic F ields 7 P leasant V iew F ileds 8 Satelitte Ath letic F ields 9 Map leton Sp or ts P ar k 10 Tom W atson P ar k 11 Sc ott Car p enter P ool 12 Sp r uc e P ool 13 Nor th Boulder Rec Center 14 South Boulder Rec Center 15 East Boulder Rec Center 16 Coot L ak e 17 Columb ia Cemeter y 18 Andr ew s Ar b or etum 19 Har b ec k House 20 Haw th or n Com G ar dens 21 Haer ting Sc ulp tur e G ar den 22 Hic k or y Community G ar den 23 Ar ea I I I 24 V iolet P ar k 25 Boulder J unc tion Rail P laz a 25 Boulder J unc tion P ar k 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 3 7 9 2 15 14 11 5 4 17 21 19 22 18 13 12 25 6 10 16 20 24 23 BPR CAPI T A L I N V E S T M E N T STRATEGI C P L A N 2 0 1 6- 2 0 2 6 Prepared f o r t h e C a pi t al I n v e s t m e n t T e a m January 2 0 1 6 BPR CAPITAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2026 Prepared by the Capital Investment Team March 2016 Capital Investment Strategy Boulder P&R 100+ Years of Excellence CIS Three Top Projects Scott Carpenter Pool $8M Boulder Reservoir $3M Valmont City Park South $4M In 2014 the City Council adopted the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan and guiding principles. This plan reected over two years of public input as to the future of the urban park system. The master plan identied a clear vision, mission and six core themes to implement the community vision. In addition to the BPRD Master Plan the department has undertaken a number of site plan studies that were identied in the master planning process required to meet future park and recreation needs or address current deciencies. These plans have been summarized in the Capital Investment Strategic Plan. The Capital Investment Strategy provides a development framework plan with specic, implementable urban park design and development recommendations for the enhancement of Boulder’s urban park system. The strategy addresses the need to invest up to $40 million in existing assets as well as $24 million in backlog or enhancements and the desire to invest an additional $60 million in new facilities as identied in the department’s Master Plan over the next ten years. This strategy includes three areas of focus that builds on the vision and values set by the master plan desired to be achieved over the next 10 years through strategic investments in the CIP process. The plan includes a long-term investment strategy as well as an action-oriented implementation strategy that includes both public and private sector investment and partnership opportunities. The project calls for a new 50-meter 10-lane pool would be built for $8 million and an outdoor water park to the site for $5.3 million. The project calls for a new bathhouse and administration building, upgrades to south shore amenities and repairs to boat house and maintenance building. Phase one includes completion of disc golf course, nature playground, picnic area and shelters. Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D rddRReeggggaattSSeeddllOOA 1 2 8 The 1910 Plan for Boulder by the Olmsted Brothers above established parks and open space as community priority. The 2016 Capital Strategy Map to the right builds on this 100 year legacy to invest capital in close to home parks, greenways and major attraction sites for future generations. The department has $75 million to invest over the next 10 years in capital projects. This includes $8.9 million for the Civic Area, $3.3 million for Boulder Junction that is committed. In addition the department is projecting an addition of $50 million from dedicated park funding and approximately $3-5 million from DET funding. . Attachment A BPR Planning Process & Results 38 Asset Management Systems (AMS) Financial Background Major Facility CRV FCI 90% Standard 80% Standard Savings Backlog EBRC $18,907,343 0.10 $3,079,892 $3,146,599 $66,707 $1,962,118 NBRC $21,337,047 0.06 $5,166,970 $5,428,246 $261,276 $1,377,900 SBRC $9,376,617 0.13 $1,642,329 $1,876,919 $234,590 $1,181,104 Res-Admin $1,500,000 0.31 $837,779 $1,062,297 $224,518 $471,729 Res-Boat House $800,000 0.14 $129,476 $135,551 $6,075 $109,738 Res-Maint $750,000 0.19 $258,080 $305,886 $47,806 $144,623 Totals $52,671,007 0.10 $11,114,526 $11,955,498 $840,972 $5,247,212 Dierence between maintaining facility at 90% over 80% condition saves $840,972 and provides higher quality facilities with higher customer satisfaction. Farnsworth 10-Year Investment Strategy Current Replacement Value = $215 Million Facility Condition Index = .11 Operation & Maintenance - 4% annually of CRV estimated at $8.9 Million Preventative Maintenance (PM) plus Regular & Recurring Maintenance (RR) –2% per year of CRV estimated at $4.4 Million Deferred Maintenance (DM) - items that have not been repaired or replaced based on industry standards estimated at $24 Million. Work Completed Next Steps Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well-being of the entire Boulder communi- ty by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, facilities and programs. Community Health & Wellness Taking Care of What We Have Financial Sustainability Building Community Youth Engagement Organizational Readiness Goals In 2011 the community voted to extend the .25 Sales Tax that funded urban park and recreation facilities and programs. This extension provides an additional $2.2 million in funding available in 2016. In 2011 the community also passed a 3-year bond that provided approximately $9 million in urban park upgrades to existing facilities. In 2014 citizens approved ballot proposition 2-A that included $8.7 million for the Civic Area improvements, $5 million for Boulder Creek Path improvements and $1 for Chautauqua Park improvements. The department’s 6-year Capital Investment Plan (2017-2022 CIP) proposes a total of $40 million in investment in assets. In addition Facility and Asset Management (FAM) proposes to invest $2.7 million in major recreation facilities repairs during the same time period. This represents an annual investment in assets of approximately $7.1 million or $2 million more than outlined in the scally constrained budget of the master plan. This level of investment will maintain existing facilities as well as begin to make the level of investments in key aging facilities required to maintain public service levels. It does not address the full action or vision strategies desired by the community. The facilities portfolio is typically the most valuable asset that public park and recreation organizations manage and often are considered critical to the execution of the organization’s mission. Updating facilities management practices to reect sustainability and asset management principles for these facilities requires the application of complex, interconnected, and comprehensive facility management practices to the asset portfolio. This includes ; 1. Determining the total cost of ownership for the asset portfolio. 2. Developing systems and sta knowledge to support agency implementation of life cycle management. 3. Approval of a capital investment strategy for the agency that focuses on the organization’s mission and is nancially sustainable. This eort will take time and resources; it will require the department to prioritize asset management initiatives as a primary responsibility of our sta, park board, and community. This commitment to the asset management practices uses the simple process below, combined with long range capital investment planning. The department has already begun to address the rst three questions above. It has inventoried all major assets department wide, calculated a portfolio and established a baseline Facility Condition Index (FCI) from which to measure the condition of our portfolio: While the majority of Boulder Park and Recreation assets are in good to excellent condition approximatively 10 percent of existing assets have a poor or worse rating greater with an FCI of .30 or greater. Many of these assets have not been upgraded for a number of years with some aging infrastructure over 60 years old. Investments in these aging assets is a high priority of the department and includes renovations of the Civic Area with 2-A funding that will be constructed in 2016-2018. In addition the department has prioritized Scott Carpenter Pool and the Boulder Reservoir for complete renovations in the next few years. While these improvements and enhancements will dramatically lower our overall FCI there still remains a number of historic assets in need of ongoing repair or replacement. Taking Care of Aging Assets One of the principles of asset management is establishing benchmark standards for each asset to achieve community desired conditions. The city has hired Farnsworth Ltd. to evaluate current condition of major buldings including the three recreation centers and to develop a 10-year preventative maintenance work plan for each building. The chart at the right illustrates the life cycle curve on building maintenance to extend the overall life of a facility. The table above illustrates the investment required over 10-years to maintain facilities at 80 percent versus 90 percent condition. By maintaining facilities at a higher standard the city can increase customer satisfaction while spending less over time. Why Have High Standards? 39 ATT B: BPR Draft 2022-2027 CIP 6-Year PlanProjectsDescription/Comments2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected2026 Projected2027 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025) Project TypeAquatics Facility Capital EnhancementsBased on recommendations of the 2015 Boulder Aquatics Feasibility Plan, this project provides implementation of priority indoor and outdoor pool enhancements for Boulder's aquatics programs. In 2021, the East Boulder Community Center leisure pool will be redesigned with community input to determine a new and improved family aquatics experience. This work will include a new multi-use leisure pool for warm water classes and instruction, a new kids play structure and an outdoor splash pad will be completed in 2022 in partnership with Facilities and Asset Management funding necessary facility repairs. In 2025, funding is provided to partner with City Transportation to begin the design of the 30th street improvements along Scott Carpenter park to remain in compliance with necessary infrastructure required through the city's regulatory planning and development review process for Scott Carpenter Pool enhancements. The construction of the 30th street improvements is anticipated to be approximately $1M and is required to be complete by 2026. In 2027, new leisure activities for children will be improved by adding spray amenities and splashpad as identified within the Aquatics Feasibility Plan at Spruce Pool.1,638,000$ 100,000$ 1,000,000$ 450,000$ 3,188,000$ Capital Enhancement Athletic Field Capital EnhancementsBased on key recommendations of the Athletic Field Study, this program will allow implementation of field repairs and enhancements including turf, field renovations and expansion to accommodate additional capacity for sports uses. Average cost for a complete renovation of an irrigation system is $63K and which is necessary to ensure preventative maintenance of the systems. System failures can lead to field closures and loss of revenue from field use. 63,000$ 63,000$ 63,000$ 189,000$ Capital Maintenance Natural Lands Management The department's natural lands team manages over 1,000 acres of wildlife and vegetation conservation areas to support the regions vulnerable ecosystems within urban areas. Capital funding helps support planning and implementation of critical conservation measures and management strategies on the properties. In 2022, funding will allow for the replacement of a trail bridge at Coot Lake Natural Area that is in disrepair and in danger of failure if not replaced within the next year. In 2023, funding will allow the department to complete and inventory and prioritization of the department's populations of prairie dogs across the system to better manage the colonies aligned with the department's goals. In 2024, funding will allow the department to begin relocation of the prairie dogs at Valmont Park to allow for the next phase of planned improvements.50,000$ 75,000$ 500,000$ 625,000$ Capital Maintenance 40 ProjectsDescription/Comments2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected2026 Projected2027 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025) Project TypeParks and Recreation Strategic Planning InitiativesAs illustrated in the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan, the department must consistently review the many programs, services and facilities to ensure alignment with the community expectations, best practices in the industry and strategic focus to meet the many goals of the master plan. This is achieved through ongoing planning and studies that areis funded through the CIP. The specific projects planned for each year include:2022 – Reservoir Strategic Pplan Update and regional multi-modal feasibility study2023 – General Maintenance and Management Plan Update / Ops Maintenance Facility Assessment2024 - Natural Lands Strategic Plan2025 - Water Assets Strategic Plan 2026 - Facilities and Aquatics Plan update150,000$ 100,000$ 60,000$ 120,000$ 60,000$ 490,000$ Boulder Reservoir South Shore Capital EnhancementsContinuing to implement the 2012 Master Plan and recent Concept Plan and Capital Strategy, this project will provide key improvements to the south shore recreation area and various visitor amenities to serve the region. Funding is planned through 2026 to continue key enhancement priorities that are outlined each year in the recently approved Concept Plan and Capital Strategy. Projects include a variety of amenities including but not limited to signage, dock repairs, trail connections, pavilions, facility maintenance, road repair, landscaping, and parking lot repair. In 2022, a initial feasibility study and concept plan will be developed for the proposed multi-use path along 51st street to prepare for future funding and grant opportunities.1,300,000$ 355,000$ 721,500$ 100,000$ 500,000$ 2,976,500$ Capital Enhancement Columbia Cemetery Capital MaintenanceThe cemetery is a designated landmark and requires ongoing maintenance to meet the preservation requirements associated with all the infrastructure ranging from headstones, markers, ornamental fencing and grounds maintenance. This project will provide necessary funding to complete projects as well as local match for leveraging state grant funds.40,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 200,000$ Capital Maintenance Urban Forest ManagementThis project provides annual funding to continue the EAB response by allowing critical safety measures of removing identified trees throughout the city and replacing with new tree species to slow the spread of the pest and ensure safety of the public as well as expanded urban forest management practices. This project also provides treatment of trees designated for preservation and associated infrastructure improvements such as irrigation to ensure sustainability of the new trees.300,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 2,800,000$ Capital Maintenance Flatirons Golf Course Capital EnhancementsThe Flatirons Golf Course is the only public course in Boulder and provides a highly desired recreation amenity while also contributing to funding sources through revenue generation. The golf course has many planned enhancements to ensure playability and provide necessary visitor amenities. This project will provide design and construction of a new clubhouse to replace the former events center that was demolished because of the 2013 flood. The design of the replacement facility will occur in 2021 and construction to begin in 2022. Funding in 2022 restores the contingency funds that were removed last year due to budget constraints and reductions.700,000$ 200,000$ 200,000$ 1,100,000$ Capital Enhancement 41 ProjectsDescription/Comments2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected2026 Projected2027 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025) Project TypeNeighborhood and Community Park Capital MaintenanceThis project provides funding for asset maintenance throughout the system as well as a complete renovation of one neighborhood park annually to meet the goals outlined within the BPR Master Plan and Capital Investment Strategy. The renovations typically include playground replacement, irrigation renovation, forestry maintenance, ADA compliance and shelter repairs. The current list of parks within the CIP include:2021 -North Boulder Park2022 - East Boulder Community Park Playground Reno & Pickleball Courts 2023 - Martin Park Playground + Restroom/Shelter Reno2024 - Parkside Park2025 - Shanahan Ridge Park2026 - Elmer's Two-Mile Park2027 - Beach Park900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 5,400,000$ Capital Maintenance Capital Infrastructure Enhancements and Partnership OpportunitiesThis project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. Currently undeveloped park sites such as Violet Park in north Boulder and Eaton Park in Gunbarrel have planned amenities that need to be implemented to meet service levels of surrounding neighborhoods. Other properties have seen a dramatic shift in land use adjacent to the park and warranting a redevelopment option to serve more residents such as Mapleton Ballfields. Additionally, this project will provide implementation of planned amenities at developed park sites that haven't been constructed such as restrooms, ballfields, additional sport courts and play areas. The Recreation Facility Needs Assessment completed in 2021 will also outline future priorities that will be funded through this project that will enhance the existing recreation facilities. In 2022, funding is provided to finalize the design of the undeveloped portions of Violet Park and Eaton Park that have been a priority for several years to extend the service areas of parks to adjacent neighborhoods.100,000$ 1,000,000$ 500,000$ 1,600,000$ Capital Enhancement Recreation Facility Capital MaintenanceBased on recommendations of the 2016 Facility Strategic Plan and upcoming Recreation Needs Assessment, this program will provide annual capital funding for implementation of key facility repairs and renovations at the city's three recreation centers to ensure acceptable facility conditions and continue cost-effectively meeting the needs of health and wellness opportunities within Boulder. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Division of Public Works. In 2022, facility maintenance will be focused on the East Boulder Community Center in conjunction with the planned improvements to the leisure pool. In 2026, maintenance will be focused on the South Boulder Recreation Center.500,000$ 500,000$ 1,000,000$ 2,000,000$ Capital Maintenance 42 ProjectsDescription/Comments2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected2026 Projected2027 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025) Project TypeEast Mapleton Ballfield EnhancementsAs a result of the implementation of the Boulder Junction area along 30th street near Mapleton, the area has increased in residential units resulting in more demand for community park and recreation amenities such as playgrounds, dog parks, open lawn areas and other multi-use amenities. The original area plan indicated a goal of providing park and recreation amenities to this new residential area as development occurs. This project will result in the addition of new amenities at the existing East Mapleton Ballfield site that is in close proximity to Boulder Junction connected by the underpass along Goose Creek. A community planning project will be completed to determine the final design and priorities for construction. Any reduction in ballfields will be replaced at other sports complexes as indicated in the department's Athletic Field Study completed in 2015.210,000$ 1,890,000$ 2,100,000$ Capital Enhancement Valmont City Park Phase 2 DevelopmentThis project provides for the development of the next major phase of Valmont City Park, south of Valmont Road. Potential amenities to be built include adventure playground elements, community garden space, a splash pad, skate elements, an event pavilion and additional parking. Final plans will be completed in 2023 to determine amenities for development as well as available funding. Final design and permitting will occur in 2024 with construction to commence in 2026. This project also allows for increased park service to the surrounding areas of east Boulder as well as the entire Boulder community.240,000$ 3,000,000$ 3,240,000$ New CapitalTotal Budget4,378,000$ 4,180,000$ 5,177,000$ 2,436,500$ 6,092,000$ 3,645,000$ 25,908,500$ 43 PROJECT CAPITAL COST O&M COST (Annually)DESCRIPTION Master Plan Funding Plan NOTES Maintenance Facility Enhancements $ 139,500 $ 2,790.00 The GMMP study has indicated that the lack of indoor storage for machinery and equipment is a significant shortfall in the building designs and capacity on the golf course property. Given the location of the buildings in a flood plain it is recommended to commission a complete recommendation that will include facility(s) size recommendations, feasibility study and funds needed to complete the structural additions or adjustments. The study shall further give cost construction estimates and location feasibility information for the addition of a permanent shade structure located adjacent to the current grill area and the feasibility and design for enhancements to the grill area structure to increase seating capacity and access. Fiscally Constrained Parking Lot Renovation $ 500,000 $ 10,000.00 The golf course parking lot is in poor condition and needs repair. As the lot is currently not designed to existing City standards, the repair of the lot should include redesigning the lot to include appropriate size stalls, accessible spaces, drainage, landscape elements and walkways among other required features. It is also recommended that the design of the lot include the consideration of expanding the width of the practice range to the west. This work will try to be achieved wtih the upcoming facility improvements in 2021. Fiscally Constrained Included in new facility devleopment Golf Course Irrigation Pond Dredging $ 225,000 The main irrigation pond located on hole #17 has lost approximately 40% of its original storage capacity. In 2008 when the pumphouse was rebuilt it was recommended that the pond be dredged in the near future as the amount of silting observed was projected to threaten the viability of the intake and wet well systems. The original capacity was also observable during that project. Golf course industry standards recommend the main irrigation ponds be dredged every 20 years. This pond has not been dredged in at least 35 years. Water storage on hole #9, two ponds on the west side of the hole would also be included in this project. $75K each pond. Fiscally Constrained Various Course Improvements $ 288,500 $ 5,770.00 An assessment has been completed on each hole of the course with recommended improvements for playability and maintenance. The enhancements include cart path extensions, tree removals and bridge repairs. Fiscally Constrained Historic Roney House Restoration $ 400,000 $ 8,000.00 Complete the restoration of the landmarked property south of Valmont Road per the recommedations to come with the proposed preservation plan.Action New Restroom at Dog Park $ 300,000 $ 6,000.00 Design and develop a new, year-round restroom on the east side of the park near the dog park. Action Disc Golf Site Plan $ 15,000 The Valmont Disc Golf course was built in 2013 as a temporary course until a more permanent course will be built. Disc golf has increased in popularity and the Valmont course reflects that increase. The course enjoys a strong volunteer presence and has a nice partnership with the Boulder Disc Golf Club. The 2015 Valmont City Park Master Plan update called for 16.5 acres designated for a new disc golf course. The area is designed to have mounds trees and other hazards for enhancing the playing experience not currently offered at the temporary course. By funding the course design portion, we can more accurately project total costs and can utilize the disc golf community and PLAY Foundation to fundraise now towards aiding the City’s construction efforts. Action Maintenance Facility Enhancements $ 15,000 $ 300.00 Enhancements to the current maintenance building to provide additioanl covered storage of equipment, vehicels and materials. Fiscally Constrained Skills Loop Shelter $ 40,000 $ 800.00 Design and construct a new shade shelter in the skills loop area of the park to serve children and families.Action New playground near dog park and skills loop $ 250,000 $ 5,000.00 Design and construct a new childrens play area near the dog park on the east side of the park. Action South park development $ 45,000,000 $ 900,000.00 Implementation of the 2015 Concept Plan for the development of various amenities south of Valmont Road.Vision Maintenance Building Repair, Paint and  Elect. $ 30,000 $ 600.00 Fiscally Constrained Picnic Shelters add 2 $ 50,000 $ 1,000.00 Fiscally Constrained Covered Parking for maint. vehicles $ 40,000 $ 800.00 Fiscally Constrained Primary Road Asphalt Repair and maint. $ 1,275,000 $ 25,500.00 Fiscally Constrained Secondary Road Asphalt Repair and maint. $ 25,000 $ 500.00 Fiscally Constrained Unpaved Road Grade to overflow lot  $20,000  $ 400.00 Fiscally Constrained Paved Parking Maint. and repair  existing $ 50,000 $ 1,000.00 Fiscally Constrained Flatirons Golf Course Valmont City Park Boulder Reservoir Roads, Parking and Trails Structures and Facilities Attachment C: BPR Unfunded Projects 44 Paved Parking Porous asphalt for  new boat parking $ 1,008,000 $ 20,160.00 There are critical repairs needed to the asphalt in the Coot trailer parking lot. This lot is at the top of the priority list for repair of parking lots at the Boulder reservoir. The large cracks and the dip in the lot where the new sewer line was installed pose safety hazards for thousands of patrons and risk of damage to patron boats and trailers. The Coot parking lot is a highly used year round by boaters, as well as special events. This lot is a highly sought after space for boat storage due to its close proximity to the boat ramp and easy accessible spots for boat parking. In addition to yearly boat storage this space is used as daily parking of vehicles and boat trailers by 60-100 patrons. The coot lot is also the location of the bike transition area for the full Ironman. During this event the lot is the location for 3000 bicycles and their athletes to transition from the swim to their bike. Given the current condition of the lot an assessment would need to be done to determine the most cost effective solution to address the current status of the lot. Fiscally Constrained Unpaved Parking Repair and maint.  exisiting $ 25,000 $ 500.00 Fiscally Constrained Paved Walkway and Plaza at Central drop-off $ 43,800 $ 876.00 Fiscally Constrained Soft Surface Trail 1 Regional trail $ 169,000 $ 3,380.00 Fiscally Constrained Soft Surface Trail 2 New connectintrails $ 29,000 $ 580.00 Fiscally Constrained Promenade Walkway concrete, asphalt or  soft‐surface at  shoreline $ 180,000 $ 3,600.00 Fiscally Constrained Landscape Improvements Native revegetation  on west boundary 57,000$ $ 1,140.00 Fiscally Constrained Landscape Improvements Screen  Planting/groupred trees 140,400$ $ 2,808.00 Fiscally Constrained Landscape Improvements Parking area trees  and srubs 184,950$ $ 3,699.00 Fiscally Constrained Picnic Tables Replace existing 15,000$ $ 300.00 Fiscally Constrained Shaded Bench Area 7,500$ $ 150.00 Fiscally Constrained Boat Storage Racks small craft 20,000$ $ 400.00 Currently the reservoir sells over 1000 Small watercraft permits per year. This number has steadily increased over the past 3 years. The demand to store those watercraft on site has also increased. Currently we have 8 spots that are specifically dedicated to smallcraft storage. Many patrons purchase a shore mooring spot and build their own racks to store multiple craft in one spot. This practice leads to a loss of revenue and an inconsistency in structures on site. The storage racks would allow 6-10 craft per structure and could potentially generate 30K-50K in revenue per year. The ability for more on site smallcraft storage address goal #4 in the Reservoir master plan to implement strategies to reduce and manage the risks of ANS infestation by decreasing the number of times a craft exits and reenters the park. This would also would decrease the amount of boat traffic through the front gate area and the number of smallcraft inspections that need to be performed Fiscally Constrained Signage for South Shore wayfinding, rules,  coutesy, interior  needs 160,000$ $ 3,200.00 Fiscally Constrained Signage for North Shore minimal additions  while north shore  plan is developed 5,000$ $ 100.00 Fiscally Constrained Water Entertainment System $ 240,000 $ 4,800.00 Fiscally Constrained Irrigation Upgrades to more  efficient systems and  support additional  trees, shrubs and  lanscaped areas.  Prepare for future  needs. $ 50,000 $ 1,000.00 Fiscally Constrained Fuel Station new shell $ 18,000 $ 360.00 Fiscally Constrained Rip Rap overflow from 6‐mile $ 50,000 $ 1,000.00 Fiscally Constrained Ped Crossings Paint, bump, mark at  10 locations $ 27,000 $ 540.00 Fiscally Constrained Regional Trail Access Gates 4,000$ $ 80.00 Fiscally Constrained Accessible Dock new in 3 locations $ 225,000 $ 4,500.00 Fiscally Constrained Existing Docks Repair and maint. $ 15,000 $ 300.00 Fiscally Constrained Boat Ramp Rip rap 60,000$ $ 1,200.00 Fiscally Constrained Site Amenities Infrastructure and Utilities Security, Safety and Access 45 Boat Ramp Repair and  replacement 50,000$ $ 1,000.00 Fiscally Constrained Boat Launching Areas Rip rap 63,000$ $ 1,260.00 Fiscally Constrained Maintenance Area Compound Fence $ 15,000 $ 300.00 Fiscally Constrained West zone Notification signage 2,500$ $ 50.00 Fiscally Constrained Erosion Control along existing  Shoreline 20,000$ $ 400.00 Fiscally Constrained Goose Manure Collector 8,000$ $ 160.00 Fiscally Constrained Prairie Dog Fence $ 10,000 $ 200.00 Fiscally Constrained Goose Beacons $ 15,000 $ 300.00 Fiscally Constrained Coot Lake Restoration and Enhancement 1,500,000$ $ 30,000.00 Plans for south & east shoreline stabilization (north shore is already in progress) at Coot Lake. Wetland permitting would be needed even for floating islands to be installed. The banks are experiencing erosion issues due to users accessing the lake wherever they want so fencing would be installed to create designated access points. Trail repairs will be included over to 55th and to provide better ADA access around the lake. Signage would be updated. Parking, amenities and facilities would be updated as they are in a major state of disrepair and are potential liabilities. Work must be coordinated with nesting birds and other wildlife in mind. Fiscally Constrained ARA Thunderbird Lake Dredging 75,000$ $ 1,500.00 Given potential drought conditions and our commitment to keep the water at a certain level, this project is a priority. The low lake levels, poor water quality and lack of water views and access would finally be addressed by dredging the lake and installing a pier. Consultants and wetland permits would be required. Educational signage that was not completed in the last round would be added to address the value of urban natural lands, nature play, “Bee Friendly” areas, the history of Burke Park and significance to local farming, the ecology of the current pond and wetlands as well as the geological formations that are influencing water in the region. Fiscally Constrained ARA Boulder Reservoir North Shore Resource Management 450,000$ $ 9,000.00 Implement recommendations such as wildlife and vegetation surveys, prescribed burns, erosion control, habitat improvement, invasive removal/vegetative restoration, closures, etc. Fiscally Constrained Community Park Enhancements 11,600,000$ $ 232,000.00 Includes the design and development of enhancements to community parks including: Foothills Community Park, Harlow Platts Community Park, and East Boulder Community Park. Each of these Community Parks has planned future phases that include additional amenities and recreation areas not including athletic fields: Action Boulder Civic Area Phase 2 Development 8,000,000$ $ 160,000.00 This project would provide a key next step in the momentum of the Civic Area transformation by implementing key amenities that support the guiding principles and vision of the Civic Area based on a wealth of support from the community and City Council. This next phase of Civic Area implementation would develop the community-supported, public market by renovating the existing Atrium building at 13th and Canyon. To compliment this phase, the adjacent Central Park would be renovated and improved to better support an active market, events and programs within the East Bookend. Additionally, this phase would provide a public restroom, enhancements to 13th Street and opportunities for a variety of public/private partnerships. Action Historic and Cultural Facility Improvements 2,758,000$ $ 55,160.00 The city's historic assets must be maintained appropriately to preserve them over time and for future generations. Additionally, some assets are governed by various grants that require certain maintenance efforts and upgrades to meet requirements of grant funding. Conservation and preservation of important historical and cultural assets in the community that are managed by the Parks and Recreation Department including the Columbia Cemetery, Chautauqua Park, Pottery Lab, Harbeck House, Boulder Bandshell, Boyd Smelter Site, Roney House at Valmont Park and the historic locomotive assets housed at the CO Railroad Museum. Action Rec Centers and Indoor Pool Renovations 8,640,000$ $ 172,800.00 The rec centers are foundational to the city's delivery of programs and services that enhance the social capital including the health and wellness of the community. The centers serve a broad range of residents with multi-generational facilities and inclusive to all income levels. This funding would allow uninterrupted service to the community and enhance the centers to provide quality facilities and equipment. This will address the existing backlog of maintenance items within the recreation centers including pools while also providing key upgrades and enhancements to better serve the community 's focus on health and wellness. This would restore the facilities to "like-new" condition by allowing BPR to catch up on maintenance and provide some new planned amenities to improve the facilities. Action Area III Concept Planning 200,000$ Develop long-term plan for the development of the Area II park planning reserve to support the department needs within the community.Vision Sports Complexes and Athletic Field Improvements 5,240,000$ $ 104,800.00 Provision of ballfields continues to be a priority for the community and growth continues in sports leagues and programs. This funding would allow the city to provide critical upgrades and new fields to support the growing demand as evidenced in the Athletic Field Study. Address backlog of maintenance needs to keep fields open and up to standards while also enhancing parking and other amenities. Design and development of new or improved diamond and rectangular athletic fields at existing Parks and Recreation facilities in support of various team sports leagues and multi-use practice field needs. Action Natural Lands General Parks and Recreation Needs Water Quality and Environment 46 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: May 24, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: Studio Arts Boulder Three-Year Lease and Service Agreement for the City of Boulder Pottery Lab PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Bryan Beary, Recreation Manager, Community Building + Partnerships EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The purpose of this item is for the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) to review and consider a three-year Lease and Service Agreement for the City of Boulder’s Pottery Lab. In September 2019, Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) solicited competitive proposals from organizations that had interest in leasing and offering programs at the Pottery Lab. Studio Arts Boulder (SAB), a Colorado nonprofit organization, was the only responsive proposal and staff entered negotiations to update the relationship between the two parties. These discussions were subsequently delayed by impacts of the pandemic. Capacity to reengage with SAB this spring has allowed for staff to move forward with the completion of the agreement being presented to the PRAB for consideration. Key elements of the agreement are: • Three-year term, through June 30, 2024. • $1 per year lease payment, in consideration for use of the Pottery Lab facility. • Clarification on cleaning, maintenance, and repair responsibilities. • Allowance for SAB to pursue provision of alcoholic beverage sale or consumption. • Provision for the operation of two wood-fired kilns located at 63rd street location. • Updates to performance benchmarks. Staff believe this agreement continues to foster the delivery and growth of cultural arts by SAB while also establishing appropriate maintenance and operating responsibilities related to the Pottery Lab as an important historic asset for the department and community. 47 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___2____ BACKGROUND: The Pottery Lab was established in 1954 and moved to its current location at 1010 Aurora Avenue, Boulder, Colorado in 1956 (a former Fire Department station, to be managed by BPR). Since its inception, the Lab has provided art classes and pottery instruction to children, teens, adults, seniors, and people with disabilities as highly subsidized community programs. In an effort to increase the exposure of the program to a broader community segment and address cost-recovery issues, in 2010 the department contracted with Museum Management Consultants, Inc. to complete a Pottery Program Management Assessment. In February 2012, participants of a department-initiated community roundtable reviewed recommendations from the Management Assessment and established the Pottery Lab Working Group (PLWG). Comprised of twelve members of the community, PRAB and department staff, the PLWG was established in February 2012 to make consensus recommendations to the city on ways to ensure the sustainability of the city’s pottery program. The working group recommended the city explore a nonprofit or public-private partnership for the management and operation of the Pottery Lab. Eight of the twelve working class members recommended that the city move forward with the partnership option, for the following reasons: • A partner would have more flexibility in hiring, programming, and fundraising for the Pottery Lab program; and • Ongoing city management of the pottery program appeared unlikely to result in long-term programmatic sustainability. Based on the recommendation of the PLWG, the city issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) in July 2013. One responsive proposal was submitted by SAB. The city accepted the SAB proposal and negotiated in good faith with representatives from SAB to develop an agreement modeled on previous agreements between the city and other nonprofit organizations. Studio Arts Boulder has acted as the nonprofit partner leasing and operating the Pottery Lab since 2014. Previously mentioned amendments and renewals have extended the current lease agreement with SAB through June 30, 2021. In September 2019, Boulder Parks and Recreation solicited competitive proposals from organizations that had interest in offering programming and leasing the Pottery Lab. One responsive proposal was submitted by Studio Arts Boulder and staff entered negotiations to update the relationship between the two parties. 48 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___3____ ANALYSIS: Contractor Performance Since taking over management of the Pottery Lab program in 2014, SAB has been able to transition the Pottery Lab from running at a nearly $100,000 deficit, serving around 630 people each year, to a sustainable nonprofit business. SAB now serves over 3,000 unique individuals annually across 32,000 program hours through the Pottery Lab and is not receiving any direct financial subsidy from the City of Boulder. SAB is now responsible for all operating expenses for programming at the Pottery Lab, and nearly all routine maintenance expenses less than $3,000 for the building and its surrounding property. Students of SAB vary in age from 3 to 85 years old, coming from a wide range of the Boulder community. All aspects of programming are designed to support artistic learning, social connection, and personal creativity. Performance evaluations show 95% of students are very or totally satisfied with current operations and management, with 85% of students returning to take additional classes. Between 2017-2020, SAB has provided over 100 youth and adult scholarships, to families with incomes at or below 200% of federal poverty levels. Adult scholarships allow registration at a 50% discount while scholarships for youth allow for 100% discounted classes and camps. Additionally, SAB provides free and reduced-rate outreach programs to underserved populations through partnerships, including, the City of Boulder Youth and Families programming, Attention Homes, I Have a Dream Foundation, Safehouse Progressive Alliance for Nonviolence, Boulder Housing Partners, Transgender Youth Education & Support, Rocky Mountain Pathfinders, Imagine!, and Colorado Residential Solutions. 2019 RFP Process In alignment with the department’s commitment to program life cycle management through the Service Delivery Model, an RFP was issued to ensure the selected operator of the Pottery Lab is providing services that address and impact the current needs and interests of the community and customers after last being issued in 2014. In preparation for the Pottery Lab RFP posting in 2019, staff procured an independent Property Inspection and Market Analysis with Insurable Value to understand the current state and value of the property and then calculated average annual costs of ownership and management. Staff then applied industry standard calculations to identify the total costs of ownership for the Pottery Lab. 49 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___4____ Chart 1: 2019 Property Inspection and Market Analysis with Insurable Value excerpt Estimated Value Insurable Value (IV) $ 830,000 Annual Cost Calculation Operations and Maintenance (O&M) (industry standard is 2% of IV) $ 16,600 Repair and Replacement (R&R) (industry standard is 2.5% of IV) $ 20,750 Total Annual Cost of Ownership* $ 37,350 * Total annual cost of ownership covers all estimated O&M and R&R expenses for the facility As demonstrated in Chart 1, shifting management of the Pottery Lab to a lessee relieves the city of potential operations and maintenance responsibilities and lifecycle expenses estimated at $37K per year. While those costs could alternatively be recovered or exceeded through rental fees with limited community benefit, the ability to additionally provide cultural arts programming with a wide, accessible service reach and high customer satisfaction directly supports Master Plan policy in Theme 4 – Building Community and Relationships as: “BPRD shall build community through partnerships that are mutually beneficial, mission focused and grounded in BPRD guiding principles as demonstrated in parks, facilities and programs.” Accordingly, a $1.00 per year lease payment is accepted for the operations and management of the Pottery Lab programming for the duration of the lease. The term of the lease is limited to three years both to provide program stability for SAB, and to allow flexibility to adjust for outcomes of the Master Plan Update in future years. Maintenance Responsibilities To ensure the Pottery Lab is adequately maintained and repaired, responsibilities are shared between SAB, BPR, and the city’s Facilities department: • SAB will bear the cost of cleaning, maintenance, and repairs less than $3,000, as well as the sole responsibility for the trash enclosure. • BPR will bear the cost of maintenance, repair, or replacement above $3,000, as well as sole responsibility for site fences, signage, and roof expenses. • The Facilities department will regularly inspect the Pottery Lab to ensure appropriate compliance with maintenance obligations and industry standards. • As a historic landmarked structure, any improvements and alterations are subject to prior city approval. 50 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___5____ Liquor License SAB has expressed interest in pursuing an application for the provision of alcoholic beverage consumption on site at its sole expense and liability. Should SAB pursue this potential, consideration of and approval for the related liquor license would be determined by the Beverage Licensing Authority. This agreement supports the request in principle - so long as the association management plan ensures that any alcohol is provided with strict compliance to liquor license requirements, including TIPS-Certified personnel and necessary security, and the consumption operates within a maximum ‘redline’ area that encompasses the Pottery Lab building and rear fenced kiln yard only. 63rd Street Kilns Operating Agreement In order to provide clear communication between SAB and BPR staff at the 63rd Street location, which hosts both wood kilns for pottery and a maintenance shop for the parks and planning divisions, a simple operating agreement was included to maintain a safe and effective operation of the site. Performance Benchmark Updates Minor clarifications were made to the Performance Benchmarks to more accurately represent subsidized access based on the number of spaces in a class, rather than classes as-a-whole. The change will support SAB’s desire to more broadly implement a ‘pay as you are able’ model across a wider selection of classes. Staff Recommendation The department supports the lease agreement with SAB as during the term of the original lease and subsequent amendments or extensions, SAB has met or exceeded all established performance measures while complying with all city reporting requirements. For example, growth of participation has reached a maximum capacity and over 90 percent of evaluated respondents have shown they are fully or partially satisfied with pottery program offerings. Given the success of the initial seven-year programmatic partnership and continued responsiveness to a refreshed RFP, the department agrees that a three-year lease agreement is appropriate. Throughout the lease agreement period, the department will continue to work with SAB staff to ensure ongoing public access to the Pottery Lab and programs, fulfilling all lease requirements. As with the current lease and as part of the partnership, the department will continue to provide one full page in the department guide at no cost. Finally, the renewal has adjusted the performance benchmarks to reflect current status and growth opportunities. Staff are confident that with these updates, SAB staff are poised to continue to deliver high quality services to community members and further department and community goals. NEXT STEPS: Staff will incorporate the PRAB’s feedback in the negotiations and lease agreement with 51 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___6____ SAB. The lease is anticipated to be completed and included for approval at the June PRAB meeting. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A: Studio Arts Boulder Lease and Services Agreement for the City of Boulder Pottery Lab (2021) 52 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___7____ Attachment A LEASE AND SERVICES AGREEMENT FOR THE CITY OF BOULDER POTTERY LAB THIS LEASE AND SEVICES AGREEMENT, (the “Agreement”) is made to be effective this ________ day of ___________, 2021, by and between the City of Boulder, Colorado, a Colorado home-rule city (the "City”), and Studio Arts Boulder, a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation (the "Contractor") (collectively, the “Parties”). RECITALS A. The City’s Pottery Lab (the "Lab") was established in 1954 and moved to its current location at 1010 Aurora Avenue, Boulder, Colorado in 1956. Since its inception, the Lab has provided art classes and pottery instruction to children, teens, adults, seniors, and people with disabilities. B. The City wishes to provide high quality pottery resources to the community in the most cost-effective manner. Through a Request for Proposal (RFP) process, the City sought a contractor to operate and manage the Lab as well as to provide pottery, ceramics and other arts classes to the community. C. The Contractor submitted the most responsive proposal for the operation and management of the Lab, and the City is desirous of contracting with the Contractor. D. In compliance with City Charter Sec. 164, and Section 8-3-2, “Applicability,” B.R.C. 1981, the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board shall approve any lease in or on park lands whose term does not exceed three years, as may be recommended to it by the city manager. Longer lease term periods require city council approval. E. This Agreement is for Contractor services as well as lease of park property, the Lab. The lease term shall be three years commencing on July 1, 2021 (the “Commencement Date”) and unless terminated sooner, terminating on June 30, 2024. COVENANTS NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the promises and obligations set forth below, the Parties agree as follows: 1. AGREEMENT DOCUMENTS. It is agreed that the request for bids, the specifications, and the Contractor's proposal (copies of which are hereto attached) are 53 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___8____ made a part of this Agreement, and each of the parties agrees to carry out and perform all of the provisions of said documents. In the event of conflicts or inconsistencies between this Agreement and its exhibits or attachments, such conflicts or inconsistencies shall be resolved by reference to the documents in the following order of priority: (a) The Agreement and its attachments; (b) The request for bids and specifications; and (c) The Contractor's proposal. 2. GRANT AND TERM. A. Lab Facility & Equipment Lease. The City agrees to lease the Lab to the Contractor, together with the existing lab equipment (the “Lab Equipment”), and the Contractor shall provide for the operation and management of the Lab on the Commencement Date of July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2024. See Attachment 1, Lab Equipment Inventory. At the expiration of the Agreement, the Contractor shall surrender the remaining City-owned Lab Equipment to the City by delivering the Lab Equipment to the City in good condition and working order, ordinary wear and tear excepted, as it was on the Commencement Date. The parties agree to perform a walk-through on the Commencement Date to document the condition of the Lab and the Lab Equipment. Additionally, the Contractor agrees as follows: i. The Contractor shall only use the Lab Equipment in a careful and proper manner and shall comply with all laws, rules, ordinances, statutes and orders regarding the use, maintenance of storage of the Lab Equipment. ii. The Contractor shall, at the Contractor's sole expense, keep and maintain the Lab Equipment clean and in good working order and repair during the term of this Agreement. In the event the Lab Equipment is lost or damaged beyond repair by the Contractor, the Contractor shall pay the City the replacement cost of the Lab Equipment, and the City shall replace the lost or damaged Lab Equipment. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Contractor shall not be required to replace, or pay to the City, the replacement cost of Lab Equipment lost or damaged beyond repair due to natural catastrophes, including but not limited to fire and flood. iii. Any equipment purchased by the Contractor, including equipment purchased to replace worn out Lab Equipment shall be and remain the property of the Contractor throughout the term of this Agreement and at the expiration of this Agreement. The Contractor is responsible for maintaining any documentation to verify its purchase of any equipment. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Contractor is not required to replace 54 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___9____ worn out Lab Equipment. iv. The Contractor shall use and maintain two wood-fire kilns located at the 63rd Street location subject to operating agreements outlined in Attachment 4, Wood Kiln Operating Agreements. The parties agree to maintain a mutually-beneficial approach to optimize space at the 63rd Street location for all relevant stakeholders. v. The Contractor agrees to an annual shutdown of the Lab, not to exceed seven days, as agreed by the parties, to allow the parties to perform annual cleaning, repair and maintenance responsibilities. vi. The City represents and warrants that as of the execution of this Agreement, the Lab is, and on July 1, 2021 the Lab will be, in compliance with all ordinances, rules and regulations of the City so that the operation of the Lab, as currently conducted, will not violate any City ordinance, rule or regulation. vii. The Parties agree that in accordance with its own uses and at its sole expense and liability, Contractor may pursue an application affording the provision of alcoholic beverage sale or consumption on site in accordance with applicable laws, ordinances, or regulations. Contractor shall provide TIPS-Certified personnel and necessary security in compliance with the liquor license. Attachment 5, Pottery Lab Diagram and Redline, indicates the maximum extent of the Contractor’s liquor license “redline”, which may be adjusted pending input. B. Consideration. In consideration for use of the Pottery Lab facility, Contractor agrees to pay the City the sum of $1.00 on or before the first day of each lease year beginning July 1, 2021. 3. SUPPORT SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE CITY. A. ADA Inclusionary Training Services. The City shall provide the Contractor and its staff with accommodation training up to three times per year, to assist the Contractor in providing inclusionary services to their program participants. Additionally, the Contractor may contact the City's EXPAND program at 303-441-4933, for additional information regarding accommodations and the inclusion process. B. Program Manager. The Contractor shall consult with and advise the City as it reasonably requires during the term of this Agreement. As a general matter, it shall communicate about this Agreement through the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation 55 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___10____ Manager of Community Building and Partnerships, currently Bryan Beary or his designee. 4. PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS. A. Intellectual Property. The Lab will continue to be identified as the "City of Boulder Pottery Lab" (the "Lab Name"). The Contractor shall have the right to reference and use "City of Boulder Pottery Lab,” "City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department," or common abbreviations of these names in connection with providing promotional materials about the Lab. Contractor agrees to include the Parks and Recreation Department logo in promotional materials to publicly credit City support for the Pottery Lab. The Contractor acknowledges that the City owns and retains exclusive intellectual property rights now existing, or which may in the future exist, associated with the Lab and the City. No part thereof may be used by or under the authority of the City in any manner other than as expressly provided in this Agreement. B. The City’s Approval. The Contractor will submit all promotional materials to the Program Manager that are to be included within the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide or on the City’s website or digital newsletter. The Contractor shall provide such materials and information on or before the deadline as communicated by the Program Manager. These marketing and promotional materials are subject to the City’s approval. C. The Contractor's Identification. For any promotional materials or references to the Lab, including but not limited to, building signage, program names, communications, websites (the City’s and the Contractor’s), and phone, the Contractor may include its name, logo, and other reference as may accurately reflect the Contractor's role in the operation and management of the Lab. D. Advertising of Classes. The City agrees to co-promote the Contractor including advertise the Contractor's classes in the seasonal City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Guide in the amount of one page per guide published for the length of this Agreement. The City shall also publish promotional information on the City’s website and digital newsletter in the amount of 10 eBlasts per year. 5. CONTRACTOR'S OBLIGATIONS AND REPORTING RESPONSIBILITIES. A. The Contractor's Duties. In accordance with the Contractor's proposal, the Contractor is responsible for the operation and management of the Lab, including the provision of pottery, ceramics and other arts related classes and programs, and as more specifically set forth in Attachment 2, Contractor's Duties. Any fundamental change in the operation of the Lab or the Contractor's duties as contained in Attachment 2 will be subject to prior approval of the City. 56 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___11____ B. Reports. The Contractor shall submit the following reports, to the Program Manager annually (minimally), no later than 30 days past December 31st each year of the Agreement: i. Financial ledger; ii. Proof of utilities payments; iii. Documentation of conformance with the performance benchmarks as set forth in section 6 of this Agreement; iv. Participant information, on a form provided by the City, in Microsoft Word or Excel, or compatible software, as follows: i) participant name; ii) parent name (if applicable); iii) street, city, zip code; iv) phone number; and v) email address; and v. Expenditures and proof of such expenditures associated with the provision of inclusions services, as set forth on Attachment 2, Contractor's Duties, paragraph 4. 6. PERFORMANCE BENCHMARKS. In order for the City to guarantee consistent levels of service at the Lab, the City has established the performance benchmarks as goals for the Contractor as forth in Attachment 3. Failure by the Contractor to meet these benchmarks may be considered a material breach and the City may exercise its right to terminate this Agreement in accordance with section 9 of this Agreement, except in the event of a natural catastrophe and, in such event, the benchmarks shall be waived with such time as the Contractor is able to resume normal operations of the Lab. 7. MAINTENANCE, UTILITIES, ALTERATIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. A. Cleaning, Maintenance, and Repairs. The Contractor shall be responsible for and bear the sole cost and expense of all cleaning, maintenance, and repairs of the Lab for which the cost is less than $3,000, except Contractor shall have sole responsibility for the trash enclosure and the City shall have sole responsibility for site fences, signage, and roof expenses. i. The Contractor shall keep the sidewalks in front of and around the Lab, as well as the grounds of the Lab, free from all snow, ice, litter, dirt, debris and obstructions, and it shall neither permit nor suffer any disorderly conduct, noise or nuisance whatsoever on or about the Lab having a tendency to annoy or disturb any persons occupying property adjacent to the Lab. ii. The maintenance performed by the Contractor shall, at a minimum, comply with industry standards for the maintenance of buildings and facilities and shall be performed by appropriately qualified individuals to ensure quality products and workmanship. The Contractor shall allow the 57 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___12____ City to conduct regular inspections of the Lab to ensure compliance all maintenance obligations. iii. The Contractor shall annually submit a maintenance log to the City on or before February 1st detailing: (i) maintenance performed on the Lab; (ii) the date corresponding maintenance was completed; and (iii) a list of items which will require maintenance and repair to be performed by the City, unless immediate maintenance is required for the safe and efficient operation of the Lab. The parties agree to meet prior to the annual shutdown to review maintenance issues. The maintenance log will be made available to the City upon request at any time for its review. iv. The Contractor acknowledges that the Lab is a historic landmarked structure and will maintain the Lab with the proper care due a historic building. The Contractor agrees to contact the City if it has any questions regarding any materials or equipment located within the Lab. B. Improvements. The Contractor may make improvements and alterations to the Lab subject to prior City approval and provided that such improvements and alterations are in conformity with all applicable codes and provisions of law. If the Contractor is approved to make any exterior changes to the Lab, such exterior changes shall be subject to the standards set out in Section 9-11-18 "Historic Preservation, B.R.C. 1981". Additionally, the Contractor agrees to the following for any improvements associated with the Lab: i. Any work done by the Contractor as provided by this Agreement shall conform to all applicable building and fire codes, and regulations. ii. The Contractor is responsible for all costs associated with any modification that is based on program changes and changes to the physical layout of the Lab implemented by the Contractor. iii. The City shall not be liable for the payment of any expense incurred by the Contractor, or the value of any work done or material furnished to the Lab by virtue of any construction, change, addition or alteration undertaken by the Contractor. All such work shall be at the Contractor's sole cost and expense. The Contractor shall be wholly responsible to all contractors, laborers and material men for any such work. iv. With regard to improvements, the Contractor shall indemnify and hold the City harmless from any and all liabilities, damages or penalties, and any costs, expenses or claims of any kind or nature arising out of any 58 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___13____ construction, change, alteration or addition undertaken by the Contractor, including the City's reasonable attorney's fees. Such indemnification shall apply to any damages or injuries to person or property. v. All additions, alterations and leasehold improvements made by the Contractor shall become part of the real estate and permanent structure thereon and shall remain upon and be surrendered with said Lab as a part thereof upon the termination of this Agreement. vi. Trade fixtures, furniture and equipment which may be installed in the Lab by the Contractor during the term of this Agreement shall not become a part of the Lab and may be removed by the Contractor at any time prior to the end of the term. However, the Contractor shall, at its own cost and expense, repair any and all damage to the Lab resulting from or caused by the removal thereof. C. Payment of Utilities. The Contractor shall be responsible for the payment of the following utilities: i. Trash and recycling services; ii. Telephone services; iii. Internet connection; iv. Gas; and v. Electric. The Contractor agrees that all bills and services which it incurs in connection with the Lab shall be listed in the Contractor's name alone. The Contractor shall hold the City harmless for any and all bills, charges and services which may accrue with respect to the Lab during the term of this Agreement. D. The Contractor's Personal Property. All personal property of any kind or description whatsoever of the Contractor's in the Lab shall be kept there at the Contractor's sole risk, and the City shall not be held liable for any damage done to, or loss of such personal property; nor for any damage to or loss of personal property which may be suffered by individuals using or attending activities at the Lab. E. Liens Caused by the Contractor. If, because of any act or omission of the Contractor, any mechanic's or other lien or order for the payment of money shall be filed against the Lab or against the City (whether or not such lien or order is valid or enforceable as such), the Contractor shall, at the Contractor's own cost and expense, within 10 days after notice, either cause the same to be canceled and discharged of record or deliver to the City a bond containing provisions satisfactory to the City, issued by a 59 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___14____ surety company reasonably acceptable to the City from and against all costs, expenses, claims, losses, damages and liabilities, including reasonable counsel fees. F. Contractor’s Failure to Maintain. If the Contractor shall fail, refuse or neglect to provide routine maintenance or fulfill its repair obligations stated in this Agreement and in Attachment 5, Maintenance Schedule, or if the City is required to make any repairs or alterations to the Lab as a result of such neglect, the City shall have the right, but not the duty, after the City has given to the Contractor ten days' notice (except in case of any emergency), to perform such maintenance or make such repairs on behalf of and for the account of the Contractor and to enter upon the Lab for such purposes, and charge the cost and expense thereof to the Contractor, and the Contractor agrees to pay such amount. Any cost or expense incurred by the City and chargeable to the Contractor as herein provided shall be reduced to the extent that the City is reimbursed therefor under any policy of insurance. 8. MAINTENANCE OBLIGATIONS OF THE CITY. A. Maintenance, Repairs, and Replacement. Subject to and limited by available appropriations of funds by the City Council for the purpose, the City shall be responsible for and shall bear the sole cost and expense of any maintenance, repair, and replacement at the Lab for which the cost is $3,000 or more, except the City have sole responsibility for site fences, signage, and roof expenses and Contractor shall have sole responsibility for the trash enclosure. B. Damage or Destruction. The City shall be responsible for major damage expenses caused by natural forces and covered by its insurance carrier. If the Lab is damaged by fire or other casualty the City will, promptly after learning of such damage, notify the Contractor in writing of the time necessary to repair or restore such damage, as estimated by the City's architect, engineer or contractor. If such estimate states that repair or restoration of all of such damage that was caused to the Lab or to any other portion of the Lab necessary for the Contractor's occupancy cannot be completed within 90 days from the date of such damage (or within 30 days from the date of such damage if such damage occurred within the last 12 months of this Agreement), then either party will have the option to terminate this Lease. Nothing in this section shall remove the City's discretion not to repair or restore the Lab. Any option to terminate as described in this section must be exercised by written notice to the other party given within 10 days after the City delivers to the Contractor the notice of estimated repair time. If either party exercises its option to terminate this Lease, the Term will expire and this Lease will terminate 10 days after notice of termination is delivered. 60 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___15____ If the Lab is damaged by fire or other casualty and neither party terminates this Agreement, as stated above, the City will repair and restore such damage with reasonable promptness, subject to delays for insurance adjustments and delays caused by matters beyond the City's control. However, the City will not be required to spend more for such repair and restoration than the insurance proceeds available to the City as a result of the fire or other casualty. The City will have no liability to the Contractor and the Contractor will not be entitled to terminate this Agreement if such repairs and restoration are not in fact completed within the estimated time period, provided that the City promptly commences and diligently pursues such repairs and restoration to completion. In no event will the City be obligated to repair, restore or replace any of the property required to be insured by the Contractor according to section 10 of this Agreement. C. Condition of the Lab. Subject to and limited by available appropriations of funds by the City Council for the purpose, the City shall keep the structure of the Lab repaired so as to comply with all applicable zoning, building and fire codes, regulations, and laws but in so doing it shall receive the cooperation of the Contractor to the degree that responsibilities assigned to, or rights allowed the Contractor by this Agreement, are affected. Nothing in this section shall limit the Contractor's obligation to perform non- structural maintenance as set forth in section 7 of this Agreement. 9. TERMINATION. A. For Cause. This Agreement may be terminated by either party if it has been materially breached by the other party, 30 days written notification is tendered, and if during such 30-day period following receipt of such notice, the breaching Party fails to cure such breach. Notice must include a description of the breach. The parties shall cooperate with respect to the termination date in order to provide sufficient time to allow for the orderly withdrawal of the Contractor without creating additional harm or inconvenience to the Lab program and participants. The City will make the final determination as to the amount of time, and shall provide the date of termination in a written termination notice to the Contractor. B. For Convenience. The parties may, at any time, terminate this Agreement, in whole or in part, for its own convenience and without cause of any nature by giving the other party written notice at least 180 days in advance of the termination date. C. Additional Termination Terms. In the event of any termination under this section: i. The Contractor shall continue to be liable to the City for the expense of removing all persons and property from the Lab. The City may re-enter the Lab using such force for that purpose as may be necessary without being liable to any prosecution for such re-entry or the use of such force. 61 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___16____ ii. In the event of any vacation or abandonment of the Lab, the Contractor shall nevertheless continue to be liable to the City for all sums for which the Contractor would have been liable had it not vacated or abandoned the Lab. The City may re-enter the Lab, using such force for that purpose as may be necessary, without being liable to any prosecution for such re- entry or the use of such force. The City may repair or alter the Lab in such manner as it may deem necessary, and the Contractor shall repay the costs of such retaking, repossessing, repairing and altering of the Lab and the expense of removing all the Contractor’s property from the Lab. iii. The City may, but shall not be required to relet the Lab or any part thereof for the whole or any part of the remainder of the original term or for a longer period in the City's name, or as the agent of the Contractor. No entry or re-entry by the City, whether had or taken under summary proceedings or otherwise, shall absolve or discharge the Contractor from liability hereunder. The Contractor hereby expressly waives any defense that might be predicated upon the issuance of a dispossess warrant or their termination or cancellation of the term hereof. iv. In the event of any termination under this section, the City shall be free to obtain said services from other sources without incurring liability or damages to the Contractor. v. Upon termination of the Agreement by the City, with or without cause, the Contractor will not have any claim against the City by reason of, or arising out of, incidental or relating to termination. The City will not have any claim against the Contractor by reason of, or arising out of, incidental or relating to termination, once possession of the Lab is returned to the City and the City has found that the Lab and its equipment are in good working order, as set forth in Section 2.1 of the Agreement. 10. INSURANCE. The Contractor agrees to procure and maintain in force during the term of this Agreement, at its own cost, the following minimum coverages: A. Workers’ Compensation and Employers’ Liability i. State of Colorado: Statutory B. General Liability i. General Aggregate Limit: $2,000,000 ii. Per Occurrence: $1,000,000 62 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___17____ Coverage provided should be at least as broad as found in Insurance Services Office (ISO) form CG0001 and should include both ongoing and completed operations coverages up to the policy limits. C. Automobile Liability Limits i. Bodily Injury & Property Damage Combined Single Limit: $1,000,000 D. In the event Contractor secures a liquor license, Contractor shall carry Liquor Liability Coverage of $2,000,000 Coverage provided should be at least as broad as found in ISO form CA0001 (BAP) including coverage for owned, non-owned, and hired autos. E. Insurance shall: i. Provide primary coverage; ii. Include the City of Boulder and its officials and employees as additional insureds as their interest may appear (except for Worker’s Compensation and Professional Liability). Additional insured endorsement should be at least as broad as ISO form CG2010 for General Liability coverage and similar forms for auto liability; iii. Include a waiver of subrogation for General Liability coverage; iv. Issue from a company licensed to do business in Colorado having an AM Best rating of at least A-VI; and v. Be procured and maintained in full force and effect for duration of the agreement. F. Certificates of Insurance evidencing the coverages described herein, shall be forwarded to Purchasing for each year of the agreement. Certificate Holder shall be: City of Boulder, 1777 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80306. G. Within seven days after receiving insurer’s notice of cancellation or reduction in coverage, the Contractor, or its insurance broker, shall notify the City. In either such case, the Contractor shall promptly obtain and submit proof of substitute insurance complying with the City’s insurance requirements. 11. INDEMNIFICATION. 63 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___18____ A. The Contractor’s Indemnification. The Contractor shall indemnify and hold harmless the City, its directors, officers, employees, and agents and their heirs, executor, successors, and permitted assigns of any of the foregoing from and against all losses, claims, obligations, demands, assessments, fines and penalties (whether civil or criminal), liabilities, expenses and costs (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs of defense), bodily and other personal injuries, damage to tangible property, and other damages, of any kind or nature suffered or incurred by the City directly or indirectly arising from or related to: (i) any negligent or intentional act or omission by the Contractor or its representatives in the performance of the Contractor’s obligations under this Agreement, or (ii) any material breach in a representation, warranty, covenant or obligation of the Contractor contained in this Agreement. The Contractor is not obligated to indemnify the City in any manner whatsoever for the City’s own negligence. The Contractor’s obligation to indemnify the City as set forth in this Agreement shall survive the termination or expiration of the Agreement. B. Infringement. The Contractor shall hold and save harmless the City from any and all claims for infringement, by reason of the use of any patented design, device, material, process, or trademark or copyright and shall indemnify the City for any costs, expenses, and damages, including court costs and attorney fees, which it might be obligated to pay by reason of infringement at any time during the prosecution or after completion of the Contractor’s services under this Agreement. C. Immunity. The City, its officers, and its employees, are relying on, and do not waive or intend to waive by any provision of this Agreement, the monetary limitations or any other rights, immunities, and protections provide by the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act, C.R.S. 24-10-101 et. seq., as from time to time amended, or otherwise available to the City, its officers, or its employees. 12. NOTICES. All notices hereunder and communications with respect to this Agreement shall be effective upon the mailing thereof by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, and postage prepaid to the persons named below: If to the Contractor: Studio Arts Boulder 1010 Aurora Avenue Boulder, CO 80302 If to the City: City of Boulder P.O. Box 791 Boulder, CO 80301 With a copy to: City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department Attn: Community Building & Partnerships Manager 3198 Broadway 64 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___19____ Boulder, CO 80304 Either party may change designated recipients by written notice to the other party. 13. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS. A. Independent Contractor. The relationship between the Contractor and the City is that of an independent contractor. The Contractor shall supply all personnel, equipment, materials and supplies at its own expense, except as specifically set forth herein. The Contractor shall not be deemed to be, nor shall it represent itself as, an employee, partner, or joint venturer of the City. No employee or officer of the City shall supervise the Contractor. The Contractor is not entitled to worker’s compensation benefits and is obligated to directly pay federal and state income tax on money earned under this Agreement. B. The City’s Parks and Recreation Department Not to Compete. The Parks and Recreation Department shall not directly or indirectly compete with the business of the Contractor. The term "business" here means the operation of any pottery or ceramic programs except those programs that may be offered collaboratively through the City of Boulder's EXPAND program. C. The City’s Attendance at Board Meetings. A representative of the City may attend regularly scheduled Contractor Board of Directors meetings pertaining to the Lab, provided however, that, in the discretion of the Board, sensitive or confidential matters may be discussed at closed meetings. The City will provide at least 24 hours advance notice to the Contractor if a City representative wants to attend a regularly scheduled Board of Directors meeting. The Contractor may waive such advance notice at its discretion. D. No Assignment. The Contractor shall not assign this Agreement without the written consent of the City, which it may withhold at its sole discretion. E. Boulder Revised Code. This Agreement shall be subject to the provisions of the Charter, Municipal Code and ordinances of the City. F. No Third-Party Beneficiaries. It is expressly understood and agreed that the enforcement of the terms and conditions of this Agreement and all rights of action relating to such enforcement, shall be strictly reserved to the City and the Contractor. Nothing contained in this Agreement shall give or allow any claim or right of action whatsoever by any other third person. It is the express intention of the City and the Contractor that any such party or entity, other than the City or the Contractor, receiving services or benefits under this Agreement shall be deemed an incidental beneficiary only. 65 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___20____ G. Waiver. The waiver of any breach of a term, provision or requirement of this Agreement shall not be construed or deemed as waiver of any subsequent breach of such term, provision or requirement, or of any other term, provision or requirement. H. Amendments in Writing. This Agreement is intended as the complete integration of all understandings between the parties. No prior or contemporaneous addition, deletion or other amendment hereto shall have any force or effect whatsoever, unless embodied herein in writing. No subsequent notation, renewal, addition, deletion or other amendment hereto shall have any force or effect unless embodied in a writing executed and approved by the City pursuant to the City’s rules. I. Prohibitions on Public Contracts for Services. The Contractor certifies that the Contractor shall comply with the provisions of section 8-17.5-101 et seq., C.R.S. The Contractor shall not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien to perform work under this Agreement or enter into a contract with a subcontractor that fails to certify to the Contractor that the subcontractor shall not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien to perform work under this Agreement. The Contractor represents, warrants, and agrees (i) that it has confirmed the employment eligibility of all employees who are newly hired for employment to perform work under this Agreement through participation in either the E-Verify or the Department Program; (ii) that the Contractor is prohibited from using either the E-Verify Program or the Department Program procedures to undertake preemployment screening of job applicants while the Agreement for services is being performed; and (iii) if the Contractor obtains actual knowledge that a subcontractor performing work under this Agreement for services knowingly employs or contracts with an illegal alien, the Contractor shall be required to: i. Notify the subcontractor and the contracting state agency or political subdivision within three days that the Contractor has actual knowledge that the subcontractor is employing or contracting with an illegal alien; and ii. Terminate the subcontract with the subcontractor if within three days of receiving the notice required pursuant to 8-17.5-102(2)(b)(III)(A) the subcontractor does not stop employing or contracting with the illegal alien; except that the Contractor shall not terminate the contract with the subcontractor if during such three days the subcontractor provides information to establish that the subcontractor has not knowingly employed or contracted with an illegal alien. The Contractor further agrees that it shall comply with all reasonable requests made in the course of an investigation under section 8-17.5-102(5), C.R.S. by the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. If the Contractor fails to comply with any 66 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___21____ requirement of this provision or section 8-17.5-101 et seq., C.R.S. the City may terminate this Agreement for breach and the Contractor shall be liable for actual and consequential damages to the City. J. Authority. The Contractor warrants that the individual executing this Agreement is properly authorized to bind the Contractor to this Agreement. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties hereto have signed this Contract effective as of the day and year first written. (signature page follows) 67 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___22____ STUDIO ARTS BOULDER By: __________________________________ Title: _________________________________ STATE OF COLORADO ) ) ss. COUNTY OF BOULDER ) SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me, a notary public, this ______ day of ______________, 20__, by ___________________ (contractor name) as ________________________________ (contractor title). Witness my hand and official seal. _________________________________ (SEAL) Notary Public CITY OF BOULDER ____________________________________ _ City Manager ATTEST: _____________________________ City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: ______________________________ City Attorney’s Office Date: 68 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___23____ ATTACHMENTS 1. Lab Equipment Inventory 2. Contractor's Duties 3. Performance Benchmarks 4. Wood Kiln Operating Agreements 5. Pottery Lab Diagram and Redline 69 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___24____ ATTACHMENT 1 - LAB EQUIPMENT INVENTORY City-owned Equipment at the Pottery Lab as of July 1, 2021: Description Qty Approximate Acquisition Approximate Lifespan Location Shimpo Wheels 2 2006 10 Lab downstairs Shimpo Wheels 3 2014 10 Lab downstairs Brent Wheels 5 before 2006 10 Lab downstairs Brent Wheels 2 2010 10 Lab downstairs Kick Wheels 3 before 2000 na Lab downstairs Kick Wheels w/ motor 2 before 2000 10 Lab downstairs Slab roller 1 2011 25 Lab downstairs Extruder - round 1 before 2000 na Lab downstairs Extruder - square 1 before 2006 na Lab downstairs Pug Mill 1 2010 10 Lab downstairs Raku Kiln 1 2011 8 Lab kiln yard Baby Blue Gas Kiln 1 2008 10 Lab kiln yard Electric kiln 1027 round 3 2008 10 Lab upstairs Electric kiln 1627 oval 1 2012 10 Lab upstairs Spray booth 1 2005 20 Lab upstairs Bourry Box wood kiln 1 2005 15 63rd Street Anagama wood kiln 1 2006 15 63rd Street Treadle wheel 1 before 2006 na Offsite storage 70 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___25____ ATTACHMENT 2 - CONTRACTOR'S DUTIES 1. Contractor will schedule and supervise all Pottery Lab ("Lab") classes, programs, camps, workshops, events and activities ("Program") as well as supervise the Programs' participants. 2. Contractor is responsible for paying all operating costs of the Lab, including but not limited to: staff salaries, insurance, rent and utilities, materials and supplies, routine maintenance of the Pottery Lab (drain clogs, kiln cleaning, custodial services, interior painting, etc.); routine maintenance of Pottery Lab equipment; legal, human resources, payroll, marketing and other administrative functions. 3. Contractor will supply all materials including clay, tools, glaze materials, other pottery or administrative supplies necessary to operate the Lab. 4. Contractor is responsible for providing inclusion services. If a participant in the Contractor’s programming requests an accommodation, Contractor is responsible for providing any such accommodation in accordance with ADA requirements. By way of example accommodations may include: hands-on teaching techniques in addition to verbal instructions, one-on-one staffing assistance, two-on-one staffing assistance, interpreter etc. Contractor is responsible for all costs associated with providing the accommodation. Contractor shall contact the City’s EXPAND program at 303-441-4933, for additional information or training regarding accommodations and the inclusion process. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the City will pay all costs associated with the provision of inclusion services for any participant in a City program specifically designed for persons with disabilities, such as EXPAND. 5. Contractor will provide a scholarship program for participants who are eligible for financial assistance. Contractor is responsible for all costs associated with providing the assistance. 6. In conjunction with a scholarship program, Contractor will conduct community outreach to underserved populations of the community. 7. Contractor will hire, supervise and pay all Program staff. Unless previously conducted by the City, Contractor will conduct background checks on all its employees who will be staffing youth programs, classes or camps (16 and younger) and programs specific for people with disabilities (FAC for example) at its own cost; obtain a NCIC background check on each employee prior to working with any of the program participants. 8. Contractor shall be responsible for establishing all programs, camps, fees, course schedules, number of class participants and in general, all day to day operations of the Lab. 71 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___26____ 9. Contractor will conduct participation satisfaction surveys approved by Program Manager, following all program sessions. Forms or results of administered surveys will be provided to the Program Manager. 10. Contractor will provide training for Contractor's staff in Program operation, first aid, AED and CPR. 11. For children's classes and camps, Contractor will (i) maintain class appropriate student to teacher ratio as required by the State of Colorado and (ii) will keep accurate records and provide complete and timely information for required reports on camp activities including "check-in and check-out" procedures, incident and accident reports and injury log. 12. Contractor will notify the Program Manager and prepare and maintain incident or accident forms within 24 hours of any incident or accident. The forms will document participant's and Contractor's employees and agent's injuries associated with the Lab and will be provided to the Program Manager within 72 hours of the incident or accident. 13. Contractor will implement recycling and sustainability programs or other efforts that support the City’s Climate Initiatives and abide by the City’s Zero Waste ordinances. 72 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___27____ ATTACHMENT 3 - PERFORMANCE BENCHMARKS In order for the City to guarantee consistent levels of service at the Lab, the City has established the following performance benchmarks as goals for the Contractor. A pattern of continued failure by the Contractor to meet these benchmarks may be considered a material breach and the City may exercise its right to terminate this Contract in accordance with Section 10. The performance benchmarks are as follows: A. At least 85% of respondents should indicate they are fully or partially satisfied with pottery program offerings and/or instruction on program participation surveys. B. Contractor shall provide consistent levels of service at the Lab, which shall not fall below an average of 100 adult spaces and 60 youth spaces each session. C. Offer a minimum of 10% of program spaces at reduced or subsidized rates in accordance with Attachment 2 – Contractor’s Duties, paragraph 5. D. Conduct a minimum of 100 classes each year for underserved populations of the community in accordance with Attachment 2 – Contractor’s Duties, paragraph 6. D. Hold at least one fundraising event each year. E. Apply for at least one grant per year. 73 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___28____ ATTACHMENT 4 - WOOD KILN OPERATING AGREEMENTS In order to provide clear communication between the parties and maintain safe and effective operation of the kilns, the parties agree to the following: A. Contractor shall provide all codes, keys, or other methods needed to access the wood kiln site to the Program Manager to ensure the City has access to all areas of the property. B. Contractor shall give notice to necessary city work groups on site as well as the Program Manager at least one week in advance before any programs or on-site activity by patrons who are not Contractor’s employees. C. At least annually Contractor shall provide a list of scheduled activities at the wood kilns, including estimated dates, times, description, and number of people on site. D. City shall provide identified space for parking in advance of any scheduled program activities on site. E. Contractor shall have a designated point of contact at all times during programs on site and provide the Program Manager with all necessary contact information to communicate directly with this contact. F. Contractor shall ensure the designated point of contact is aware of all rules, regulations, and protocols to ensure safe and effective operation of the kilns and use of the site. G. If any safety issues arise, the point of contact shall directly inform Contractor and all necessary City staff including on site work groups and the Program Manager. H. Contractor shall meet all relevant legal requirements to fire the kilns and shall have a fire mitigation plan that includes extinguishers and/or appropriate on-site water to extinguish any fires outside the kilns. I. All of Contractor’s tangible personal property shall remain within the fenced area enclosing the kilns. Contactor shall promptly remove any items left outside the fence. J. Contractor shall maintain all equipment and components of equipment in good working order to prevent unnecessary risks. K. City and Contractor shall equally share any expenses associated with repair or replacement of the existing fence around the kiln area. 74 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___29____ L. Contractor shall not permit any person, whether employee or patron, to enter City workspace, which includes the interior of the building as well as the fenced area around City equipment. M. Contractor shall maintain the cleanliness of the entire fenced kiln area and shall dispose of all trash, recycling, and compost generated by patrons and employees. N. Contractor shall carry general liability insurance as outlined in the lease agreement. O. City and Contractor agree to work in collaboration to maintain long-term space optimization at the 63rd Street property to support both city work groups and wood kiln programming into the future. 75 AGENDA ITEM # _V.B__PAGE___30____ ATTACHMENT 5 - Pottery Lab Diagram and Redline The redlines indicate the maximum extent of the Contractor’s liquor license “redline”, which may be adjusted pending input. Sidewalk Aurora Avenue Fence Fence Kiln Yard Driveway Fire Escape Studio Alley 76 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: May 24, 2021 A. Elect Greenways Advisory Committee (GAC) Representative The intent of this item is for PRAB to elect a new representative to GAC from among its members. Alli Fronzaglia previously served as the PRAB representative to GAC until she completed her term on PRAB in March 2021. The GAC oversees the greenways program for the City of Boulder. It is made up of one representative from each of the boards listed below: • Water Resources Advisory Board (WRAB); • Transportation Advisory Board (TAB) ; • Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB); • Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT); • Environmental Advisory Board (EAB); and • Planning Board. The GAC meets as warranted, rather than on a regular basis. The next meeting will be scheduled for August 2021. Past meeting materials and more information can be found on the GAC webpage. B. Remote Meeting Update The intent of this item is to provide an update about the meeting format for council, boards and commissions. No action is needed by PRAB tonight as board and commission meetings will continue to be remote until at least September 2021. At their May 11 meeting, City council decided to move to hybrid meetings starting in July 2021, after their summer recess. Members of Council and critical city staff will attend meetings in- person, and they are piloting a hybrid approach where other staff and members of the public can participate remotely. Study Sessions will remain remote until further notice. Council is currently recommending that boards and commissions meetings stay remote until at least September 7, 2021. This will allow city staff to pilot the hybrid meeting approach, which is resource intensive, and apply lessons learned to board and commission meetings in the fall. Then each board or commission will be able to choose whether to stay remote or go to in-person 77 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 meetings. Since PRAB is not currently live streamed, a full hybrid set-up similar to council may not be an option in 2021. C. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) 78