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04.26.21 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., April 26, 2021 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2021 Raj Seymour (Chair) Pamela Yugar (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Elliott Hood Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate /͘APPROVAL OF AGENDA (2 minutes) //͘FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (2 minutes) ///͘PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (15 - 30 minutes) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. /s͘CONSENT AGENDA (5 minutes) ͘Approval of Minutes from ƉƌŝůϭϮ, 2021 ͘Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update s͘MATTERS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION ͘ ŽƵůĚĞƌZĞƐĞƌǀŽŝƌhƉĚĂƚĞ;ϯϬŵŝŶƵƚĞƐͿ ͘ 2022 Budget StrategLJŽŶƚŝŶƵĞĚ(60 minutes) ŝ͘ ^ĐĞŶĂƌŝŽWůĂŶŶŝŶŐĂŶĚ&ĞĞƐ ŝŝ͘ ϮϬϮϮͲϮϬϮϳ/WϭƐƚƚŽƵĐŚ s/͘MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT ͘ tĂƐƚĞ>ĞƐƐWĂƌŬƐWŝůŽƚǀĂůƵĂƚŝŽŶ(ϭϱ minutes) ͘ ^ƵŵŵĞƌϮϬϮϭ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞ>ĞǀĞůƐ;ϭϱŵŝŶƵƚĞƐͿ s//͘MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS ͘ EĞǁŽĂƌĚDĞŵďĞƌ/ŶƚƌŽĚƵĐƚŝŽŶ(5 minutes) ͘ :ƵůLJDĞĞƚŝŶŐĂƚĞŚĂŶŐĞ (5 minutes) ͘PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. s///͘NEXT BOARD MEETING: ^ƚƵĚLJ^ĞƐƐŝŽŶϲ͗ϬϬƉ͘ŵ͕͘DĂLJϭϬ͕ϮϬϮϭ ZĞŐƵůĂƌƵƐŝŶĞƐƐDĞĞƚŝŶŐϲ͗ϬϬƉ͘ŵ͕͘DĂLJϮϰ͕ϮϬϮϭ /y͘ADJOURN 1 PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS UPDATED: April 21, 2021 APRIL MAY JUNE JULY PRAB April 26: • Boulder Reservoir Update (d/i) (30 min) • 2022 Budget Strategy Continued (d/i) (60 min) o Scenario Planning and Fees o 2022-2027 CIP 1st touch • WasteLess Parks Pilot Review (md) (15 min) • Summer Service Levels (md) (15 min) • New Board Member Introduction (mb) (5 min) • July Meeting Date Change (mb) (5 min) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) (10 min) May 24: • Financial Strategy (d/i) o 2022 proposed operating and fees o 2022-27 CIP 2nd touch • Pottery Lab Lease (d/i) • BVSD Joint Use Agreement (d/i) • Master Plan – Sharing Youth Voices (md) (30 min) • COVID Recovery (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 28: • 2022-27 CIP (a) • Pottery Lab Lease (a) • BVSD Joint Use Agreement (a) • 2022 Operating Budget (md) • Racial Equity Plan (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) July 26: July 12 • PRAB Preparation for Council Study Session on Master Plan Needs Assessment (d/i) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) Department Events and Items of Interest • April 20: CU South Direction on Key Issues (cc) • April 27: Update on Encampment Resourcing and Safe Camping (cc) • Master Plan Engagements will be posted here (e) • May 4: Severe Weather Shelter, Coordinated Entry, and Health & Safety Regulations in Public Spaces (cc) • May 10: PRAB Study Session on Budget • May 11: 2021 Ballot Items (cc) • Memorial Day Weekend: Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool, Spruce Pool. Reservoir Swim Beach Open for season. • July 27: Council Study Session on Master Plan (cc) AGENDA SETTING The PRAB Chair, PRAB Vice Chair and BPR staff set the agenda for the next month on the Thursday directly following the regular PRAB meeting. PRAB members can submit agenda requests to the Chair and Vice Chair by Wednesday following the PRAB regular meeting for consideration. If time-sensitive matters arise, PRAB Chair and Vice Chair may amend the agenda as needed. LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion following the consent agenda. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in- depth analysis. City Council Item (cc) Other Boards and Commissions (obc) Community Engagement and/or Events (e) Holiday/Closure (h/c) Italics indicate a tentative date or plan. 2 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: April 12, 2021 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Elliott Hood, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Tim Duda, Regina Elsner, Morgan Gardener, Jean Gatza, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffmann, Kathleen King, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Chris Passarelli, Ali Rhodes, Christy Spielman, Jonathan Thornton Guests Present: Alli Fronzaglia, Consultants with DesignWorkshop: Becky Zimmermann and Amanda Jeter Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:01 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Brock. Second by Unger. Passed 7-0. Seymour honored those lost in the King Soopers shooting. Agenda Item 2: Procedural Items A. Honoring Departing Members Staff and Board members appreciated Alli Fronzaglia for her service. B. Induction and Welcome Elliott Hood was sworn in for a five-year term as a member of PRAB. C. Officer Elections Two nominations for PRAB Officers for the 2021-2022 term were receiv ed via email to the board secretary before the meeting: Raj Seymour was nominated as Chair and Pamela Yugar was nominated as Vice Chair. Both candidates accepted their nominations. No other nominations were made during the meeting. Motion to elect Raj Seymour as PRAB Chair for the 2021-2022 term. Motion by Unger. Second by Winer. Motion passed 7-0. Motion to elect Pamela Yugar as PRAB Vice Chair for the 2021 -2022 term. Motion by Brock. Second by Seymour. Motion passed 7-0. 3 Agenda Item 3: Future Board Items and Tours Seymour and Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 4: Public Participation Riley Mancuso spoke about the approach to encampments and homelessness. He thanked the staff for including SPUR coexistence guidelines and shared concerns about gatekeeping. Eric Tussey, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns about the new restaurant at the Reservoir and mentioned that the former restaurant at the Flatiron’s golf course was not comparable. Sharon Anderson, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns about the new restaurant at the Reservoir especially with regards to wildlife. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 5: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from February 22, 2021 Motion to approve the minutes from February 22, 2021 as presented. Motion by Yugar. Second by Unger. The motion passed 7-0. B. Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. • How will improved skate and bicycle facilities serve underprivileged youth? Will youth be able to check-out bicycles? • Is the goal of 16% tree coverage across the city? Is there equity focus for distribution of this coverage near apartment buildings and other dense areas of the city? Is there consideration of how to distribute tree coverage to a void heat island and equity impacts? • Thank you to Mo and Jennifer Segal for their donation to the Sleepy Bear Playground at Chautauqua. • Thank you to staff for another great improvisation with the Arts in the Parks program. • How will use of the leisure pools work for families this summer? • Has there been proactive outreach to the swim community in advance of the summer? Agenda Item 5: Items for Discussion/Information A. Master Plan Research and Trends This item was presented by Haley, Elsner. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Glad to see proactive outreach to Spanish-speaking community members. 4 • Were there only 463 responses to the first questionnaire? Does staff believe that number is low? • How many surveys will be sent out as part of the statistically valid survey? How many responses are expected? • How does staff ensure that the surveys will not be skewed by interest groups? • As part of Taking Care of What We Have, what key facilities were identified as potentially lacking? • How will the project team engage unhoused individuals? • How is the project team engaging people with disabilities? • Will there be opportunities to for more in person engagement as COVID guidelines change? What will those activities be? • Many responses to the questionnaire noted that parks were crowded, which was surprising since the population of Boulder has not increased. Does staff believe that those comments were related to increased use during COVID? Does staff plan on addressing the difference between use in COVID and pre-COVID times as part of future surveys? • Suggestion to include more play equipment for teenagers and adults. • Suggestion to design for flexible uses of space in the park to accommodate different recreation habits that evolved during COVID. This could include areas for uses like picnicking, reading books in solitary spaces and other shared spaces. • Suggestion to consider integrating technology to connect people using the parks and looking for opportunities for engagement. • Suggestion to consider the aging demographics of Boulder and an increase in use of parks as a social gathering place. • How does BPR work with Boulder Valley School District (BVSD)? • Will the mission and vision statement change as part of the master plan update? • Suggestion to focus on programming opportunities and financial support for middle class families. B. 2020 Year End Financial Review and 2022 Budget Strategy This item was presented by Hite and Hoffmann. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Did Staff receive the a “cost-of-living” increase to wages for 2021? • How does the city handle increase when forecasting for the next year? • Concern about city employees not being able to afford housing in Boulder. • Is the sizable reduction in hours of operation of the Recreation centers due to lack of demand or due to limited budget? Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department A. East Boulder Subcommunity Plan This item was presented by King. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Does Boulder still use the concept of “15-minute neighborhoods”? • A new park might be most desired by residents near the new housing development at 55th and Arapahoe. 5 • Is there a possibility that there would be a train station at that 55th and Arapahoe transit hub in the future? • How do you make sure that new development or zoning changes do not cause current businesses to leave? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A. Recruitment and Orientation PRAB requested to add time for introductions at the next meeting to hear from new member Elliott Hood. B. May Study Session To accommodate in depth budget discussions, staff recommends adding a study session on May 10. Members of the PRAB were instructed to email Seymour and O’Donnell if they could not make it. C. Annual Board Email Check in Board members discussed extending the resident response plan developed in 2020. With the departure of board member Fronzaglia, Seymour or others will respond to emails about the Reservoir as needed. D. PRAB Community Engagement Updates The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Yugar is working part time for PLAY to facilitate the PLAY pass program. • Is Community Cycles a partner to BPR? Would it be possible to partner with them? Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, April 26, 2021, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 9:30 p.m. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 6 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: April 26, 2021 A. Approval of Minutes April 12, 2021 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o East Boulder Community Park Restroom o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Project o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP) o Pleasantview Fields Access and Parking Study o Master Plan Update 7 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Major construction activities at Chautauqua Playground have been completed. The playground is expected to be fully complete and open to the public for the weekend of Mother’s Day, beginning May 8. Prior to this opening, some minor elements such as installation of a basketball goal, installation of pickleball nets and restriping of the pickleball courts, final landscaping, irrigation renovation, and nature play elements are being completed. A larger, celebration and grand opening will likely occur in early June. • Skate Park and Pump Track - Howard Heuston Park, Scott Carpenter Park, Valmont City Park: After over a year and a half of community input, design, and permitting, the construction of three new skate parks and a bike pump track in Boulder is anticipated to begin this April. New skate parks will be installed at Scott Carpenter and Howard Heuston. A new skate park and bike pump track will be provided at Valmont City Park. The existing parking lot at Valmont City Park (Valmont Rd. lot) will also be renovated to provide better pedestrian and vehicle connections. The addition of the new skate features and the pump track at the three parks are supported by community members and stakeholder groups and will almost double the amount of skateable space in the city. It will also provide much needed outdoor, socially distant recreation opportunities and beginner skate features for those starting to learn. Each of the three locations will be accessible to all community members. General information on the skate park improvements and pump track project can be found here. Scott Carpenter Skate Park: The new skate park at Scott Carpenter will add approximately 5,300 square feet of skateable area to the existing park. Catering more to beginners, the Scott Carpenter skate park is designed with flat terrain for slower speeds and smaller, low-impact street features. Construction is anticipated to begin this April and last through the end of May. Howard Heuston Skate Park: Howard Heuston Park will see the construction of a new 4,200 square foot sculpted skate park. The skate park has been designed with lower impact for users of all levels. The park will use berms and tree plantings to 8 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 integrate into the existing, surrounding park. Construction at Howard Heuston is anticipated to begin in April and last through the end of May. Valmont City Park Skate Park and Pump Track: A new 10,000 square foot skate park and bike pump track will be installed at Valmont City Park beginning in May. In addition to the skate and bike elements, the existing parking lot will be renovated to improve pedestrian and vehicular connections and provide a new storm water garden for water quality. The new parking lot will also address on-going maintenance and operational issues that have often resulted in the closure of the lot for short periods of time. The skate park includes a bowl, transition elements, and street features and has been designed for users of all skill levels. The new bike park pump track will be a beginner level, 10,000 square foot track. The track will be comprised of asphalt trails, a beginner slant wall, and a hammock. A generous donation from Alex & Ana Bogusky will help fund construction of the new 10,000 square foot skate park and similarly sized pump track at Valmont City Park. This project would not have been possible without their contribution. Construction Impacts at the Park Sites: Construction impacts will be specific to each park. The public is encouraged to visit websites for each of the individual park sites for impacts and general construction information. Generally, the public can expect the following at each site during construction: • Closures around the construction area. • Detours of adjacent walks or paths. Detours will be posted at the specific park site. • Intermittent increase in construction traffic as materials are delivered or removed from the site. • Construction hours are Monday through Friday, 7.30 a.m. to 5 p.m. unless otherwise noted. 9 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Below are links to the websites for each of the individual parks: Scott Carpenter Park: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/scott-carpenter-park Howard Heuston Park: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/howard-heuston-park Valmont City Park: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/valmont-city-park Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. • Volunteer Programs: Natural Lands Outreach Volunteers: Recruitment for this program is ongoing. Shifts are anticipated to begin in May to support staff educating visitors throughout the busy summer season. Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Urban Wildlife Management; o Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration; o Visitor Management; and o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination. C. Operations Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific BPR services in the parks or facilities. This section is not all inclusive of all current operations and intends to provide awareness on key accomplishments, new happenings, service level adjustments, or other information impacting operations. COVID-19  The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus.     • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery: Boulder County Public Health has announced a dial framework for COVID-19 guidance where Boulder County will be in Level Blue, allowing slightly increased capacity indoors and encouraging in-person interactions outdoors, through May 15. If new hospital admissions remain low, Boulder County will enter Level Clear for 90 days, tentatively through August 15. Under Level Clear, local capacity restrictions and mitigation are no longer required buy may be encouraged. Staff will continue to provide regular updates to the PRAB on opportunities to restore department services. Outdoor Pools Staff have completed analysis to determine at which phases of recovery the Scott Carpenter Lap and Leisure Pools can operate and have developed a plan for operations for all outdoor pools. Scott Carpenter Lap Pool: Scott Carpenter Lap Pool will operate as weather allows if maximum capacities are not limited beyond a 50-person capacity. 10 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Flank Season: Scott Carpenters flank season is currently being defined as any operational hours available before Memorial Day and after Labor Day. The anticipated opening date for the lap pool is May 3, weather permitting. Initial hours of operation will be limited to 11am-6pm due to temperature considerations. The projected closure date for the lap pool will be October 1, weather permitting. o Memorial Day to Labor Day operating hours will resemble historic years of operation: Monday-Friday 6am-8pm; Saturday and Sunday 7am-7pm. o The current Boulder County COVID-19 dial limits lap swimming to two swimmers per lane while in Orange through Blue of recovery stages. While lap swimming is limited to two per lane the lap pool will remain in a 25-yard configuration with reservations on the hour. Should the county move to the dial stage Clear on or after May 16, after a short transition period, operations will revert to a new normal, at which time both 50 meter and 25-yard lap swim times will be made available. Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool: So long as maximum capacities are not limited beyond a 100- person capacity, which is allowable in both Blue and Clear of the current Boulder County COVID-19 Dial, the leisure pool will be available. It is not feasible to operate the leisure pool in recovery stages of Purple through Yellow, in which case leisure pods in the lap pool would again be made available. The current anticipated operation will run from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day from 10am-6pm daily. Spruce Pool: will operate from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day from 10am to 6pm daily. This is a reduction compared to historic operating hours and is due to historic under- utilization and the increased availability of the Scott Carpenter Pool. 11 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 26th, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: Boulder Reservoir Update: Driftwind Partnership PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Stephanie Munro, Recreation Regional Facilities Manager Jeff Haley, Planning Ecological Services Manager Stacy Cole, Reservoir Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The intent of this item is to provide the PRAB with updates and solicit the board’s input related to Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) efforts to address neighbor concerns about the new hospitality partnership and Driftwind Restaurant at the Boulder Reservoir. While all activities align with the PRAB-approved vision established in the 2017 Boulder Reservoir Visitor Center Concept Plan and all relevant city code and ordinances, BPR has been working since September 2020 to address feedback and questions about perceived negative impacts from the new partnership, to build trust with neighbors, and to ensure communication with the neighbors and stakeholders at the Boulder Reservoir. Community concerns have been studied and addressed with adjustments to eliminate or minimize impacts; however, some continue to express worry that activities at the Reservoir will negatively impact the rural character of the area, nearby wildlife, or safety. BPR is committed to fulfilling commitments made so that these worries are eased. The PRAB’s role in these items is to advise the department, and the board’s input is being sought to answer these two questions: Questions for the PRAB: 1) Does the board have any input on the draft Good Neighbor Agreement? 2) Does the board support staff shifting focus to summer 2021 operations? BACKGROUND: The City of Boulder Reservoir (“the reservoir”) is one of the most popular and heavily visited park facilities in the city and region. It is also one of only six northern Front Range facilities supporting water-based and powerboating recreation opportunities and though smaller than other area facilities, the reservoir offers a significant range of services to the community and maintains one of the highest visitation rates of approximately 300,000 per year. The Reservoir has always operated a concessions area near the beach provided by an outside contractor. Prior to the demolition of the previous 12 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 2__ Bathhouse and Administration Building and patio as described previously, the concessions area was on the ground level and provided a snack bar concessions experience with grab and go food and drinks. In 2012, the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan indicated that the most critical facility serving reservoir visitors was needing repairs and renovation, and in 2016, staff began planning for its replacement based on the cost of rehabilitation exceeding that of a new facility. The final concept plan, approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) in January of 2017, was developed based on feedback from a cross-section of Boulder community members, reservoir user groups and the PRAB. The details of that process and concept plan may be found in the PRAB Memo January 2017 (starting on page 27). Through the public process and development of the concept for the new building, Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) talked to the community. Based on that input and policy direction from the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan and Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan, these goals were established and approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB): • Extending shoulder season use opportunities of the Boulder Reservoir Regional Park; • Establishing partnerships with various groups to expand programming and offset construction and operating costs; • Expanding concessions offerings with possibilities of obtaining a liquor license for the site and for exploring a partnership with a larger scale concessionaire; • Creating a “welcoming” and “family oriented” design character, promoting a healthy and athletic lifestyle, and focusing on sustainability of the facility; and • Creating multi-use spaces serving a variety of events across all generations of user groups. Timeline Overview: • 2016-2017: Visitor Services Center Concept Plan developed with comprehensive community engagement and approved by PRAB. • 2017-2018: Public Private Partnership Exploration and Development includes listening session with industry subject matter experts for input on opportunities to enhance the visitor experience and a formal Request for Information/Request for Qualifications issued to gather interest/concepts from potential partners. The RFI/RFQ process did not result in a successful partnership, and BPR began soliciting partners through individual negotiations. • 2018: PRAB approval of lease, negotiation did not proceed. • 2019-2020: Negotiations and Lease Development with Dine & Dash, LLC. with PRAB approval in January 2020 and City Council approval in February 2021. Beginning in September 2020, BPR has provided a substantial amount of direct, targeted engagement with some of the Reservoir’s neighbors. Staff have worked carefully to ensure the partnership is set up to serve the community while maintaining good relationships to our neighbors and stakeholders. This outreach has included significant 13 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 3__ correspondence with the surrounding neighbors at the Reservoir. See Attachment A for the emails that have been sent all neighbors who have signed up for direct communication with us, and also shared with neighbors Valhalla and Waterstone via two neighbors who offered to serve as communication liaisons. In addition to these general emails, staff have responded to individual emails, hosted onsite meet and greets, responded to concerns expressed at public meetings, and hosted virtual meetings to understand the concerns and develop solutions. In February 2021, staff committed to developing a Good Neighbor Agreement to build strong two-way communication with Reservoir neighbors by documenting BPR’s communication commitments and providing a clear process to share feedback on Reservoir operations. In addition to the outreach, BPR has outlined responses to the neighbor’s concerns in this online Reservoir Restaurant FAQ, developed to make public the commitments being made. The areas of concern and BPR response are summarized here: Sound/Lighting : Some neighbors have expressed concerns that Reservoir activities and associated sound and/or lighting will impact their neighborhood and nearby wildlife. BPR manages 700 acres surrounding the Boulder Reservoir, all of which are carefully planned and managed with a balance of preservation and recreation as outlined in the vision from the BRMP. A staff ecologist working with consultants will consistently be monitoring the sound, lighting and any other aspects that might interfere with wildlife. The intention is that sound is not audible within wildlife areas and that any lighting does not impact breeding and/or nesting. In addition, BPR staff are currently developing Sound Monitoring protocols and exploring fixed Sound Monitoring equipment. Sound levels will regularly be tested at the property borders to ensure compliance with the city ordinance, with data captured to ensure compliance and address concerns. In addition, sound from the facility will be designed to face north and east, away from the reservoir entrance, and buffered by the building. Finally, several sound checks are being planned and will be communicated to neighbors so that they are aware of the events and can monitor if they like. The lighting at the facility will continue to be compliant with the city’s lighting ordinance that follows the “dark sky” approach. Traffic: Some have expressed concerns about increased traffic on 51st and the potential for increased conflict among motor vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists. In response to these concerns, staff have consulted with Boulder County Sheriff, City of Boulder Transportation, Boulder County Transportation and City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks. Regarding vehicle traffic: 51st Street is classified as a collector street in Boulder County’s Transportation system and has the capacity to handle up to 10,000 vehicles/day. Last traffic study had volumes at less than 25% of this number during the busiest times and far less most of the time. And so, from a need 14 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 4__ standpoint, adding another signalized access from State Highway 119 would be an unnecessary and costly duplication of service while creating impacts on 119. To continue to improve safety and multi-modal access to the Boulder Reservoir, City of Boulder and Boulder County will focus investments on enhanced multi- modal facilities on 51st Street. While it does have wider shoulders, separated and/or protected lanes for pedestrians/cyclists would be better at balancing 51st St as both a collector road and a neighborhood street for those who live adjacent and promote multi-modal access to the Boulder Reservoir. Another option is an off- road collector trail outlined in OSMP’s North Trail Study Area plan (see Figure 1). These facilities are currently unfunded. Both the city and county will continue to evaluate these projects with other needs as capital funding is allocated each year. Figure 1: OSMP North Trail Study Area Plan Recommendations: Boulder Valley Ranch In addition, while Boulder County does not have plans to reduce the speed limit (45mph) right now based on the street's designation and crash data, they have 15 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 5__ committed to performing a speed study this summer and will analyze the results. The outcomes will be considered with crash data and Vision Zero goals in mind. Events: Some have expressed concern that events negatively impact the neighborhood. During community engagement for the BRMP, neighbors provided a lot of feedback on such concerns, as the Reservoir does host a variety of Special Events that contribute to the social, economic and environmental health and well- being of the community. The Reservoir is a unique amenity in the community, providing the community’s only venue for open-water swimming. The water, along with the adjacent trails and roads, make it an ideal and safe venue for running and triathlon events in this community of athletes. To balance this positive benefit with the neighbor’s concerns and requests, since 2013 the city has: -Developed a Special Event Review Team and policy to ensure event promoters comply with requirements related to amplified sound, parking and transportation, safety and security. The policy includes a deposit so that special event organizers can be held accountable for lack of performance against these requirements. Since 2013, no deposits have been held due to lack of performance. -All special event applications are reviewed by the Special Event Review Team that has City of Boulder representatives from Police, Fire, Risk Management, City Attorney’s Office and Transportation. In addition, all special events that use the roads around the reservoir are required to submit a separate application to Boulder County. Those applications are reviewed by Boulder County Transportation and Boulder County Sherriff's Office. -Events are classified as small (<200 participants), medium (200-800 participants) and large (800 participants or greater) and the monthly number of events is managed based on participation, anticipated traffic and size impacts. Alcohol: Originally, Driftwind intended to include a liquor license to serve alcohol as an accompaniment to the food and as outlined in the 2017 Concept Plan. A liquor license is designed specifically to control alcohol consumption, putting the burden of such control on the holder of the license. A license was seen as supporting the monitoring and control of consumption and that was the city and partner’s intent with the application- to support responsible consumption as an accompaniment to a meal and Reservoir experience. The Dine and Dash group withdrew their liquor license application in February 2021 as a gesture of good faith to the neighbors. For 2021, operations will focus on supporting great experiences within the guidance of currently allowed activities at the Boulder Reservoir – which includes an exception from the city’s ban on open containers. Visitors will continue to be allowed to bring their own alcohol, private events at the VSC may serve alcohol when the guest list is closed, and special events will continue to be allowed to apply for liquor permits as outlined in the city’s Special Events policy and materials. 16 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 6__ This background information is provided to outline some neighbors’ concerns and the city’s responses and shifts to respond to them. ANALYSIS: In addition to responding to neighbor concerns, and based upon neighbor request, BPR committed to developing a Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA). The GNA was developed following the timeline outlined in Table 1. The draft GNA (see Attachment B) spells out BPR’s communication commitments and outlines the process for neighbors to provide feedback or express concerns. This second draft of the GNA is also available online. Additionally, per clause 3.B of the lease and as requested by the neighbors, the commitments made in conversation and as posted online have been documented in the 2021 Driftwind Operations Overview (see Attachment C). BPR staff reviewed the Operations Overview with city attorneys to ensure two goals are accomplished: that there is a policy document that ensures compliance and to again confirm that the management plan complies with all city zoning and ordinances. Neighbor Input on GNA BPR solicited input on the first draft via an online form and received 56 responses. Of these, 26 followed a consistent template of requests and input and others provided individualized feedback (see Attachment D for the feedback). Generally, the input fell into three key areas: 1) A request that operational commitments be documented so that they were not just “words on a webpage” or verbal commitments. This has been done with the Operations Overview. 2) Requests for adjustments to operations as outlined to date. Some of the requests have been completed: We are committed to complying with all city code and sound/lighting ordinances. Event-related requests (such as posting events online the 2021 Events Calendar) are largely addressed. Some requests are not feasible (such as the access to Highway 119 previously mentioned). 3) Continued demonstration that the city is not trusted to say what it will do based upon events of the past. Some neighbors also shared that the GNA does not feel like an agreement and is instead a unilateral “memorandum” issued by the city. Staff understands this perspective and acknowledge that some neighbors do not agree with the operations nor does the GNA • March 3 – 17 Neighbors provided feedback on the first draft of the GNA. • March 18 – April 2 Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) reviewed feedback from neighbors and develops revised draft. • April 5 BPR shared GNA second draft with neighbors. • April 12 Meeting with neighbors to review the second draft. • April 26 BPR will consult with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board • Thursday, May 13 The final GNA published. Table 1; Reservoir Good Neighbor Agreement Development Timeline 17 AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 7__ express this agreement. Instead, as the city must balance input and needs from a wide variety of stakeholders, the GNA includes the commitments the City of Boulder is making to build trust, relationships, and to be a good neighbor. This draft includes strengthened language to acknowledge that these are BPR’s commitments, and that all user groups and partners will be expected to comply with them. The second draft of the GNA also modified the response time from 72 hours to “a reasonable time” to acknowledge that some issues may require a faster response while other non-urgent concerns might take more time to reasonably resolve. Despite the significant outreach with neighbors and substantial changes to operations for 2021, staff recognize some neighbors are still concerned. This is disappointing, as BPR has spent a lot of effort to develop and implement reasonable responses and solutions and has no intentions of being a nuisance or not complying with the allowable uses and agreements. Staff must now focus on providing great experiences this summer. The intent is to do a good job, comply with all applicable rules, policies and ordinances, fulfill the commitments we have made and avoid the need for any complaint process. Staff hope that these efforts, along with satisfactory resolution of any issues that might arise, will contribute to improved trust and relationships moving forward. Questions for the PRAB: 1) Does the board have any input on the draft Good Neighbor Agreement? 2) Does the board support staff shifting focus to summer 2021 operations? NEXT STEPS: The PRAB’s input will inform the final GNA, to be published May 13. Staff will focus on developing and implementing operations to ensure a successful peak season, which launches Memorial Day Weekend. This fall, as outlined in the BRMP, staff will again apply the BRMP outlined adaptive management approach to evaluate trends, issues, and successes to develop the 2022 operations. This process includes input from stakeholders such as user groups, event promoters, and partners. Neighbors will be consulted for feedback in the fall and annually moving forward. Any major operation changes will be informed by input from the PRAB, as well as the stakeholders mentioned above. Attachments: Attachment A Boulder Reservoir Neighborhood Communication Attachment B Draft Good Neighbor Agreement Attachment C Operations Overview Attachment D Summary of GNA Feedback 18 April 5th, 2021 Email Dear Reservoir neighbors, Please see the attached second draft of the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA) the city is making at Boulder Reservoir. We look forward to discussing it at the upcoming meeting on Monday, April 12. Please note that this meeting is now scheduled 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. to accommodate the rescheduled Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) meeting. More details and a link to join are included below. Attached to this email are several documents: • Second Draft: Good Neighbor Agreement: We’ve attached both a clean copy of the second draft and a copy with the changes tracked. You also view these online: clean copy and version with tracked changes. Below, we have summarized the changes made in response to your feedback and that of our advisors (e.g. attorney, elected/appointed officials). • 2021 Driftwind Operations Overview: We’ve also attached the 2021 Driftwind Operations Overview, which documents our operating agreements for 2021. Per clause 3.B of the lease, this document must be complied with by both parties. While the GNA addresses the city’s commitments at the reservoir, this 2021 Driftwind Operations Overview reflects requests that the operating commitments be more than “just words on a webpage.” This can be viewed online here. We look forward to sharing more information (e.g. 2021 event information) and discussing the GNA at our April 12 discussion. We will discuss the ideas and requests we have received and note which are included, being considered, or not feasible. Our next steps are to hear your feedback on the second draft of the GNA on April 12. This input will be considered for a final draft we share with the PRAB for their input at the April 26 meeting. The PRAB’s advice will inform the final document, which we will publish on May 13. Neighbor Meeting on Monday, April 12 at 5:00 p.m.: The March PRAB meeting was postponed due to the tragic shooting at King Soopers. PRAB will now meet on April 12 at 6 p.m. Due to this rescheduling, the neighbor meeting to discuss the second draft of the Good Neighbor Agreement on April 12 will be from 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Thank you for your flexibility – we recognize our entire community was impacted by this crisis. In addition to noting the reschedule, we acknowledge that each of us are processing and coping in a different way and along a different timeline. This is a normal reaction to traumatic events. If you are unable to participate in this engagement session at this time, we understand; if you like, you may send your feedback by responding to this email by end of day Sunday, April 11. We hope you will join us for this conversation: You can click this link to Join the Virtual Meeting Now or dial in by phone: (346)-248-7799 and enter meeting ID: 952 0335 2660. The city’s Neighborhood Liaison, Brenda Ritenour, is going to once again support us with her facilitation and expertise. We recognize that there are still some concerns about our operations at the Boulder Reservoir. The Boulder Parks and Recreation Department (BPR) is committed to fulfilling our intentions and agreements, and looks forward to improved neighbor relationships based upon the commitments made in the documents. Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 19 If you had this email forwarded to you and would like to receive communications directly from BPR, please email us at Reservoir@bouldercolorado.gov. As we wrap up this engagement, we are eager to focus on operating the Reservoir this summer and fulfilling our commitment to be good neighbors. We look forward to discussing how this season went as part of the annual After Action Review this fall. As always, please feel free to reach out with any questions. Thank you, Ali Rhodes Summary of changes to the GNA: • There are non-material updates to grammar, format, and order based upon input. • We acknowledge that this is not a bilateral agreement; this document includes the commitments the City of Boulder is making in an effort to build trust, relationships, and to be a good neighbor. We strengthened language to acknowledge that these are BPR’s commitments, and all user groups and partners will be expected to comply with them. • The quarterly meeting frequency has changed to biannual to better fit the business rhythm of the Boulder Reservoir. We also added clarification that biannual meeting will continue through 2022. We will reevaluate the frequency of these neighbor meetings at the Fall 2022 meeting. • The 72 hour response to complaints has been changed to “a reasonable amount of time” in response to feedback that 72 hours may be too long in some cases and to allow staff flexibility to respond as needed. • The reference to project plans being evaluated by the Planning Department has been removed as this is already part of a planning process for any relevant projects and was redundant. Here is the GNA Development Timeline: • March 3 – 17 Neighbors provide feedback on the first draft of the GNA. • March 18 – April 2 Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) will address feedback from neighbors and make revisions to the next draft. • Monday, April 5 BPR emails GNA second draft and April 12 meeting link. • Monday, April 12 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. BPR will host a meeting with neighbors to review the second draft. • Monday, April 26 6:00p.m. BPR will consult with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) at their April business meeting. • Thursday, May 13 The final GNA will be published and go into effect. Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 20 March 11th, 2021 Email Dear Neighbors, This is a reminder and request to submit feedback on the first draft of the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA) by Wednesday, March 17 through this survey. Your feedback will inform the next draft that we discuss with neighbors and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) in April. Also, as a reminder, we have outlined our 2021 Operational Plans in the online FAQ. These are being translated into a document that confirms these commitments and will become a policy document that will guide our operations through this fall and with which all of our partners (including Driftwind Restaurant) must comply. As noted on the timeline below, we will be using your feedback to revise the GNA and provide a second draft for discussion scheduled for April 12. We hope you will join us for this virtual meeting on Monday, April 12 5:30-6:30pm. We will email the link and dial-in number for this meeting a week before the date. Various city teammates will be in attendance to support, and the city’s Neighborhood Liaison, Brenda Ritenour, is going to once again support us with her facilitation and expertise. Here is the GNA Timeline: • March 3 – 17: Neighbors provide feedback on the draft GNA through this survey. • March 18 – 31: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) will address feedback from neighbors and make revisions to the next draft. • Monday, April 5: BPR emails GNA second draft and April 12 meeting link. • Monday, April 12: BPR will host a meeting with neighbors to review the second draft. • Monday, April 26: BPR will consult with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) at their April business meeting. • Thursday, May 13: The final GNA will be published and go into effect. As always, please feel free to reach out with any questions. Thank you, Ali Rhodes Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 21 March 3rd, 2021 Email Dear Boulder Reservoir Neighbors, Thank you to all those who attended the virtual meetings earlier in February. Discussing your concerns helped us update our FAQ and develop the first draft of the Good Neighbor Agreement. We hope you will review this updated information and provide your input going forward. Driftwind Restaurant As mentioned in our email on February 12, our partners decided to withdraw their liquor license application. More information on that decision was shared with our Advisory Board at their meeting this week, and we’re repeating some of it here: We have been working incredibly hard to address your concerns about this partnership. It became increasingly clear as the hearing approached that the Beverage Licensing Authority (BLA) would have had to choose between a neighborhood that wanted to maintain its quiet enjoyment and an operator that wanted to responsibly serve the community—and that those two things were being viewed as mutually exclusive. In the words of our partner: We’ll hope that this is seen by the neighborhood as the gesture of good faith that it’s intended to be. We’re conceding to their concerns over a license being granted because, by our estimation, if we went in “for a fight” there were two possible outcomes: lose by winning, or lose by losing. We’re not interested in any fight really, but particularly one with those odds. - Josh Dinar Our partnership is a long-term one, as is our relationship with our neighbors. We are moving ahead and all excited to focus on great experiences this summer, with the goal of enhancing a place that is already special. We continue to be hopeful that all our hard work and communication will help to address concerns while also allowing us to operate the Boulder Reservoir for the benefit of the broader community. The online FAQ has been updated to reflect changes because of the license application withdrawal, including an overview of current operating plans. We hope you will also see these modifications as a gesture of good faith, along with all the requirements and process we are creating to avoid and address issues. Being Good Neighbors A draft of the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA) is attached to this email and can also be viewed online. This GNA spells out our communication commitments and a process to address input from the neighbors moving forward for reservoir operations. Please let us know your feedback by March 15 through this survey. The timeline for finalizing this GNA is: • March 3 – 17: Neighbors provide feedback on the draft GNA through this survey. • March 18 – 31: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) will address feedback from neighbors and make revisions to the next draft. • April 12: BPR will host a meeting with neighbors to review the second draft. • April 26: BPR will consult with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) at their April business meeting. • May 14: The final GNA will be published and go into effect. Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 22 Upon finalization of the GNA, we look forward to more regular communications with our neighbors and a successful, safe summer. As a reminder, we plan on doing a sound check in May when conditions more closely mirror those of summer. Neighbors will also be notified of that event. In addition to the Good Neighbor Agreement, here are links to several documents that were requested during our meetings with you all on February 10. • While the Visitor Service Center at the Reservoir did not require a traffic study, a traffic study was done as part of the construction of the nearby Boulder Wildland Fire Facility. Learn more by reading this 2013 traffic study for the Wildland Fire Facility. • 2017 Visitor Concept Plan Community Engagement Documents: Extensive planning documents are available online related to the South Shore Capital Strategy and the Boulder Reservoir Visitors Center Concept Plan development. Thank you, Ali Rhodes Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 23 February 12th, 2021 Meeting Follow Up Dear Boulder Reservoir Neighbors, This email follows up on the sessions we hosted on Wednesday and provides an update on the partnership. Wednesday Sessions Thank you so much to those who were able to join us on Wednesday. We know there is a lot going on in the world and our lives and found it valuable to talk (albeit virtually) face to face and to hear your concerns firsthand. For those who could not make it, the sessions were recorded and are available via these links: o Session 1 (9a.m.) o Session 2 (5:30p.m.) We are working on updating the FAQ with some of the questions we were not able to get to during Session 2, those will be updated by the end of next week. The session recordings will be posted there as well. Driftwind Restaurant Our partners have decided to withdraw their liquor license application. Together, we will focus this first year on building great experiences and the positive relationships that will allow us to fulfill the community vision created with this project. Please stay tuned for updates as more information is available. Being Good Neighbors We are working on a draft Good Neighbor Agreement that will spell out our communication commitments and a process to address input from the neighbors moving forward. Per the great suggestion as Wednesday’s afternoon session, we will circulate that for comment and then host a virtual meeting to hear your suggestions on the agreement. Also, in the works and planned for warmer days is the sound check we discussed in the afternoon session – where we will announce the testing of various sound levels associate with the new partnership and test their impacts at various points. Communications Moving Forward Because we want to ensure our communications are inclusive, we appreciation Sharon and Bernee for offering to ensure our communications are shared with Valhalla and Waterstone neighbors via your internal communication channels. We will continue to send these emails to the list of community members that have requested to receive reservoir restaurant updates, but appreciate you forwarding this to others who may not be on that list. If someone would like to sign up for this list to ensure they get our communications directly, please email Boulder Reservoir Manager, Stacy Cole. We recognize there is still more information and relationship building to come and hope that this update is helpful in the meantime. Thank you, Ali Rhodes Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 24 February 8th, 2021 Next Door Posting Boulder Reservoir Neighbors- the City of Boulder has been having virtual dialogue with many neighbors about our new hospitality partnership at the Visitors Services Center. You can find more information about the restaurant, including details about sound, events, traffic and safety, in this online FAQ. If you have questions or concerns, please join us at one of two upcoming sessions. We will gather virtually on Wednesday, February 10 from 9-10 a.m. and again that same day from 5:30- 6:30 p.m. Please register here to receive a link to the meetings. February 8th, 2021 Neighbor Session Reminder Email Dear Boulder Reservoir Neighbors, We wanted to write to remind you about Wednesday’s sessions and hope you can join us – the details are in our January note below. The intent of these sessions is to build strong two-way communication between the neighborhood and the city. The sessions will give us a chance to address “in-person” the questions and concerns we have been addressing via email and through the online FAQ. We know that this is a new type of partnership and are eager to provide accurate information and clear up any misunderstandings that may persist about the operating agreements and the mechanisms we are building to ensure compliance. We are also posting this invitation to the verified Reservoir neighbors on Next Door to ensure we are being inclusive. We truly do hope you can join us. Again, we thank you for continuing to engage about the Boulder Reservoir as a neighbor and partner. We are committed to building trust and continuing forward together. Sincerely, Ali Rhodes Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 25 January 29th, 2021 Email Update and Session Invitation Dear Boulder Reservoir Neighbors, In December and with our last email, we let you know that we would send our next update in February. We’re reaching out now because we have been listening hard to the concerns some of you have shared about our partnership at the Boulder Reservoir and recognize that we need to talk sooner in order to be good neighbors. With this note, we address a few key areas and invite you to join us for a virtual conversation on February 10 as we also recognize email is not a productive problem solving medium. We understand and honor that you have real concerns about how our operations will impact your lives and about safety. We are here to acknowledge those concerns, to share solutions already in place and to outline next steps. Trust and Being Good Neighbors Several conversations have indicated that there are some of you who don’t trust us to do what we say we’ll do based on challenges in the past with special events. We also recognize that concerns about past event performance are impacting concerns about our partnership at the Boulder Reservoir. To move forward, we propose a few methods for improving our relationship, and thus trust. Through our conversations and emails, we hear a lot of concerns based upon events with past Special Events at the Boulder Reservoir. Following significant concerns from neighbors after Special Events in 2013, the city implemented specific requirements for events at the Boulder Reservoir. Those requirements are spelled out in the city’s Special Events Guide. This process applies to any event open to the public and for more than 50 people. We also implemented a performance deposit to guarantee the event performs within these specifications. We have documentation and memory of less than five complaints in each of the last four years (not including 2020 where events were significantly limited by the pandemic) and have not had to withhold a deposit. This data has led us to believe we have addressed those specific concerns and we are open to hearing where we may still be falling short. Moving forward, we will implement a Good Neighbor protocol that outlines a complaint process you can utilize to ensure your concerns are both shared and addressed. You can expect us to finalize and share this protocol by the end of February and that it will include avenues for sharing concerns, processes for addressing them, and a proposed regular frequency for neighborhood communications. In addition, the commitments we are making about operations have been posted on our webpage, visible and available to all, along with an FAQ section. Our intention here is to demonstrate that these are not just things we are saying to quiet complaints-they are the standards we are setting for this first summer of operations. The FAQ includes answers to many of the questions you have asked and the facts we’ve provided about our intentions. Moving Forward Together We invite you to join us at one of two sessions we’re hosting to communicate our plans and talk through concerns. We hope these sessions will provide groundwork for continued dialogue. We recognize life is busy, and are providing two options in the hopes that one will work for those who want to hear more Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 26 (and if you want to talk to someone and neither option works, let us know-we can set up a 1:1 if needed). We will gather virtually on Wednesday, February 10 from 9-10 a.m. and again that same day from 5:30- 6:30 p.m. Meeting information can be found below. In the Fall of 2021, we will include an evaluation of the new operations in our annual After-Action Review of the post-season, and input will inform adjustments to operations. In the meantime, complaints can and will certainly be addressed through the Good Neighbor process. Meeting information (for both times on Wednesday, February 10) : https://tinyurl.com/y3764484 Meeting ID: 938 9090 4382 Passcode: 865699 One tap mobile: +16699006833,,93890904382# Dial by phone: +1 669 900 6833 To keep our meetings secure, we ask that you do not share the direct meeting link on social media platforms or other public forums. Do feel free to forward this email to specific neighbors who you think may be interested in the conversation. If you would like to share more publicly, please use this registration link instead: https://bouldercolorado.formstack.com/forms/boulder_reservoir_neighborhood_meeting If you are unable to attend these meetings and would like to set up another time to talk, please reach out to me or Stephanie Munro (munros@bouldercolorado.gov). Thank you for continuing to engage about the Boulder Reservoir as a neighbor and partner. We are committed to building trust and continuing forward together. Sincerlery, Ali Rhodes Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 27 December 8th, 2020 Email Dear Neighbors, This note provides our next update on the status of our partnership at the Boulder Reservoir. As we’ve said before, we strive to be good neighbors and are hopeful that our regular communications will help demonstrate our commitment. First and foremost, we again want to recognize that so many of our friends, neighbors, and employees are personally being impacted by the pandemic; we sincerely hope that you and your families are safe. The shift to the Red Status in the State’s COVID Recovery Dial has delayed implementation of the partnership as both Dine and Dash and Parks and Recreation focus on more urgent and immediate needs. We are in constant communication, and still, both look forward to next summer when we anticipate a Grand Opening. The Beverage Licensing Authority (BLA) Hearing is now scheduled for February 17, 2021 and we will issue our next update to the neighbors by the end of February 2020. While we believe that our finalized lease captures the commitment of each partner to ensure that the Boulder Reservoir is operated with a balanced approach that is sensitive to impacts on surrounding neighbors, we have been working with our partner to clarify areas where some of you have expressed concern. This information will be included with the packet submitted to the BLA in advance of the hearing, and below are some of the details you might find helpful: Further, while a management plan is not required for this use, we have worked with Dine and Dash group to create an operational overview to further clarify some of the areas of concern and areas where there is continued misinformation despite our best efforts to clarify (e.g., this will not be a concert venue).  I am inserting a summary of those characteristics here, as they answer some of the council members’ questions: Hours of Operation • Generally, the hours of operation are 9am-10pm Monday-Thursday. • Friday-Sunday there may be fluctuations based upon the season or private events. • The incoming gates will close at 9:00p.m. Monday-Sunday (in line with reservoir operations and except for taxi and/or rideshare). Entertainment and Events • Live music, outdoor games, and other activations appropriate to the setting will promote responsible consumption and enhance the experience at the newly renovated area. • Entertainment and events are a value-add for visitors of the Reservoir, and any event that includes the following activities will require additional permission from the city: o Requires adjustments to operation hours, or o Requires additional amplified sound (equipment or hours beyond what are previously agreed to by partners. Sound • Types of Sound o Ambient music during dining hours, fed via built-in speakers indoors and out. Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 28  Sound level will be set with the intention of enhancing the environment but not inhibiting conversation.  To address impact on neighbors, outdoor speakers will be turned off at 9:00p.m. Monday-Thursday and 10:00p.m. Friday- Sunday. o Live music outdoors for enjoyment on the patio and beach. o On occasion, a DJ or other entertainment may be hired when hosting special or private events. o Except with specific permission as required by code by the City of Boulder, outdoor sound will align with the City of Boulder ordinances. • Sound Mitigation Strategies o Sound levels will regularly be tested at the property borders to ensure compliance with ordinance. o Sound from the facility will be designed to face north and east, away from the reservoir entrance, and buffered by the building. Until then, if you have any questions or would like to discuss, please do reach out. You can also fill out this form if you would like to be contacted with more information. Thank you, Boulder Parks and Recreation Reservoir Management team Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 29 October 19th, 2020 Email Dear Valued Neighbors, Thank you for your patience in awaiting this response to the questions we have been hearing about our partnership at the Boulder Reservoir. First and foremost, we know that many of our friends, neighbors and employees are personally being impacted by the pandemic and fires in Boulder County and we sincerely hope that you and your families are safe. While we intended to follow up with you last week, our thorough response was limited by challenges related to the pandemic and further this weekend due to the fires in Boulder County. The city and the Park and Recreation Department are supporting fire response and the Incident Command center at the Reservoir. Thank you for your patience, as we know we are all eager to move forward positively. If you were able to join us last week, thank you! We appreciated the opportunity to show off the new facilities and introduce you to our partners with the Dine and Dash group: Chef Daniel and Josh and Kate Dinar. We value and appreciate your feedback and are committed to addressing your concerns so that this new partnership can fulfill the community goals on which it was designed. Below we outline further why we believe that providing food and beverage services at the Reservoir will enhance the experience and why we are so excited about our partnership with Dine and Dash. While we answered many questions during our conversations this past week, the intent of this email is to document the concerns we heard, our approach to addressing them and to share next steps in the partnership process. During the sessions and our conversations with some of you, we have heard four main concerns: • An interest in understanding why the city is entering into in a hospitality partnership at the reservoir, • Concerns about excessive noise, • Concerns about increased traffic on 51st Street, and • Concerns about an increase in unsafe alcohol consumption and potential related impacts such as unsafe driving or other irresponsible behavior. We will address these concerns specifically below, and want to call out that we are attaching to this note the lease agreement with the Dine and Dash group, who will operate the restaurant at the Reservoir with the name Dockside. In particular, we call your attention to the Operating Guiding Principles in Attachment B. These guiding principles capture the spirit of the agreement and commitment of each partner to ensure that the Boulder Reservoir is operated in a manner that is accessible, safe and welcoming to the general public. In addition, note that the partners commit to a balanced approach that is sensitive to impacts on surrounding residential neighborhoods. With that in mind, we offer responses to the four main concerns. Why is the city interested in having these services available? In 2012 Boulder Reservoir Master Plan indicated that the most critical facility serving reservoir visitors was past its useful life, and in 2016, staff began planning for its replacement. The final concept plan, approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) in January of 2017, was developed based on feedback from a cross-section of Boulder community members, reservoir user groups and the PRAB. The details of that process and concept plan may be found in PRAB Memo Jan 2017 (starting on page 27), and here we provide a brief summary. The concept plan development included an interest in Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 30 achieving these goals, developed based upon policy direction from the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan and Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan and on community input: • Extending shoulder season use opportunities of the Boulder Reservoir Regional Park; • Establishing partnerships with various groups to expand programming and offset construction and operating costs; • Expanding concessions offerings with possibilities of obtaining a liquor license for the site and for exploring a partnership with a larger scale concessionaire; Creating a “welcoming” and “family oriented” design character, promoting a healthy and athletic lifestyle, and focusing on sustainability of the facility; and • Creating multi-use spaces serving a variety of events across all generations of user groups. Upon PRAB’s approval of the concept plan, and as the final building was designed, staff began planning for the operations of the new facility. The background on the partnership is outlined in this January 2020 PRAB Memo and Lease Agreement (background found starting on page 115 and lease pages 143- 156). In summary, and with the PRAB’s input, staff determined that a hospitality partner in the form of a public-private partnership would deliver on those goals, documented in the lease which has been approved by the PRAB and City Council: • Enhances the service and business model of historical seasonal concession operations at the Boulder Reservoir as desired by the community and reflected in the approved Boulder Reservoir Visitors Center concept plan; • Ensures public access and allow for supplemental use of the facility beneficial to the operator and the city; • Codifies the operator’s intent to invest up to $400,000 in impermanent infrastructure (kitchen appliances and furnishings) offsetting such investments by the City; • Codifies the operator’s intent to support expansion of the Boulder Reservoir patio in order to accommodate supplemental use of the site; • Anticipates the operator’s pursuit of a licensure for the sale, service and consumption of alcoholic beverages at the site; and • Aligns with Master Plan direction concerning the financial sustainability of the department’s facilities and programs (Master Plan Theme 3D – leverage partnerships to increase funding and optimize service provision) as well as the Boulder Reservoir Business Plan. Having said all of that, solidifying Dine and Dash group as the hospitality partner adds another bonus: a local partner invested in serving the community as demonstrated in their philanthropy and interest in partnering at this site. Concerns about the potential for restaurant business to result in noise that impacts neighbors’ solitude in the evenings: The lease ensures that activities comply with noise ordinances and align with the rural nature of the setting. Per the lease, Dockside can provide indoor amplified music, however, outdoor amplified sound is subject to Boulder’s noise ordinance and also shall consider the proximity of the premises to other properties and the rural nature of the setting. We also refer again to the guiding principles of the partnership, which affirm that the Boulder Reservoir should be managed and preserved in a manner consistent with the community’s sustainability goals and with sensitivity to impacts on surrounding residential neighborhoods. Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 31 In addition, we want to reiterate our desire to be good neighbors and spend our time providing great experiences rather than dealing with concerns or complaints from loud music. Concerns about the traffic. We understand that neighbors are concerned that the restaurant will result in increased traffic along 51st St, creating conflict with recreationists such as runner and cyclists. To connect with overarching city sustainability goals, and as outlined in the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan, staff have been working to address traffic on 51st since 2012. For example, entry improvements have reduced the stacking of vehicles on 51st with special events. Staff commit to continuing these improvement efforts, and to working with GO Boulder and appropriate agencies to develop a Traffic Demand Management (TDM) strategy that promotes and supports alternative transportation mode use and carpooling to the Reservoir, and establishes incentives for pricing strategies to encourage carpooling and multiple occupancy vehicle visits. One example of this in progress is the per car $10.00 Twilight Fee being proposed – this fee will be available in the summer season post-6p.m. to incent carpooling. Concerns about Safety We understand the perception that hospitality will increase unsafe alcohol consumption at the Reservoir, however, a liquor license is designed specifically to control alcohol consumption, putting the burden of such control on the holder of the license. If the restaurant were to open without a liquor license, and without changes to current city code, reservoir beach visitors will continue to be able to bring their own alcohol on premise and consume it without oversight or third-party responsibility. A license can only help with the monitoring and control of the consumption that has not been in place in the previous years. We also understand there are concerns that there will be an increase in unsafe driving due to the provision of alcohol at the reservoir. Driving under the influence of alcohol is illegal. Both Dockside and Parks and Rec are committed to supporting safe consumption, including working with the Sheriff’s Office to increase patrolling on 51st, incentivizing ride share/taxi, and promoting designated drivers. Next steps Finally, there have been questions about the timing of the liquor license process and application. After zoning and use approval, as well as the approval of the tenant lease and proposed use by the City Council and Attorney, the liquor license application was submitted to the Boulder Liquor Authority (BLA). The next step is a public hearing (liquor board determining if this will be on the December or January schedule), in which the liquor authority will hear comment and evidence both in favor of and in opposition to the issuing of a liquor license. The authority takes into consideration neighborhood concerns as well as many other factors in making the decision to issue the license or to deny the application. If the application is accepted, the application goes to the State for final approval and issuance. The license needs to be renewed every year. If the license is denied, the tenant is still able to operate per the lease but will not be allowed to serve alcohol. In this case, park visitors will continue to be allowed to bring their own alcohol, and the tenant will not have the authority or responsibility to manage consumption. We hope the information we have provided demonstrates our commitment to working with the Dockside team to develop a place that you will enjoy. We value your support and feedback and ask for help in providing positive solutions. Will you please complete by Tuesday, October 27 to help us gauge the effectiveness of the information we’ve provided? Your input will inform next steps and the restaurant program. Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 32 Lease January 2020 PRAB Memo and Lease Agreement (Lease can be found on pages 143-156). Tha nk you, September 28th, 2020 Email Dear Boulder Reservoir Neighbors;     The City of Boulder Parks and Recreation is excited to share a unique opportunity with our Boulder Reservoir patrons.     Please join us for a special preview of Dockside, the new restaurant at Boulder Reservoir. Dockside owners, Josh and Kate Dinar, alongside Chef Daniel Asher, are excited to meet you and introduce their new restaurant at the Boulder Reservoir. The team at Dockside knows you have a vested interest in preserving what makes the reservoir special and welcomes this chance to share their plans with you.      Together, we invite you to engage with us, tour the new Visitor Services Center facility, and share your thoughts around this unique private/public partnership. Community outreach is important to us, and we value your feedback.    Sign up to attend one of two physically-distanced meet-and-greet events at the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Service Center.     Session 1: Wednesday, Oct. 7, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.  Session 2:  Sunday, Oct. 11, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.    Sign up link    We follow all local and state guidelines based on the guidance we receive from public health officials to ensure everyone’s safety at these meet-and-greets. Face coverings are required, attendance size will be limited, and physical-distancing guidelines will be followed. We continue to monitor this fluid situation alongside our public health partners; if additional guidelines are implemented or altered, we will adjust these events accordingly and provide you an update.    Thank you and we look forward to seeing you Dockside!  Attachment A: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Communication 33 Good Neighbor Agreement: Boulder Reservoir 5565 51st Street Boulder, CO 80302 Draft: April 5 2021 Table of Contents 1.Introduction and Purpose 2. Guiding Principles 3. Community Engagement & Communication 3.1 - Complaint Process. 3.2 - Opportunities for Community Engagement. Attachment B: Draft Good Neighbor Agreement 34 Good Neighbor Agreement: Boulder Reservoir April 2021 1.Introduction and Purpose The Boulder Reservoir, located at 5565 51st Street, is one of the most popular and heavily visited park facilities in the city and region. It is also one of only six northern Front Range facilities supporting water-based and powerboating recreation opportunities and though smaller than other area facilities, the reservoir offers a significant range of services to the community and maintains one of the highest visitation rates of approximately 300,000 per year. While creating positive experiences, the City of Boulder also recognizes that some of these operations may have created issues for nearby neighbors. This Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA) acknowledges and specifies the ongoing commitments of the city in serving the goals of delivering quality recreation experiences as well as the well-being of the neighborhood. As used in this document, these terms have the following meanings: community in this document refers to all residents of Boulder as well as other stakeholders in the city and county of Boulder (“Community”). Stakeholders include other visitors, user groups, business partners and governm ental partners. Neighbor in the document refers to all those who live in the Valhalla and Waterstone neighborhoods and other nearby Boulder Reservoir neighbors (“Neighbors”)., The Good Neighbor Agreement for the Boulder Reservoir was drafted by City of Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) in February 2021. It will be reviewed by neighbors in March and April 2021 and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) in April 2021 and finalized and published for implementation in May 2021. The city is committed to conscientious and thorough implementation of this Agreement. The city will share this Agreement with all of its user groups and partners to enhance consistent implementation. Moving forward, any proposed amendments will be notified to the community for input prior to final approval by the PRAB. The purpose of the Good Neighbor Agreement is to: •Engage the Community in decisions about the operations of the Boulder Reservoir. •Establish formal and informal methods for continued communication with the Neighbors, bolstering positive partnerships between BPR and neighbors and facilitating problem resolution. 2.Guiding Principles A Public Place Boulder Reservoir is a shared community resource and a public place. Its first and foremost purpose is a valuable drinking water supply for the City of Boulder. The recreational activities at the Reservoir are provided in a manner that is compatible with the protection and management of the water supply and have grown to be deeply Attachment B: Draft Good Neighbor Agreement 35 Good Neighbor Agreement: Boulder Reservoir April 2021 appreciated by community members. It is essential that it remain a place that is accessible, safe and welcoming to the general public. Boulder Parks and Recreation Mission The mission of Boulder Parks and Recreation is to promote the health and well-being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, facilities and programs. Fidelity to this mission is paramount to sustaining the spirit of the B oulder Reservoir and fulfilling the goals of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. A Balanced Approach Boulder Reservoir encompasses multiple operational and contractual uses and missions . The needs and interests of many must be balanced in a manner that protects the site and spirit of Boulder Reservoir and in keeping with principles 1 and 2. Management decisions about surrounding uses should be made with sensitivity to potential impacts on Boulder Reservoir. At the same time, Boulder Reservoir should be managed and preserved in a manner consistent with the community' s sustainability goals and with sensitivity to impacts on surrounding residential neighborhoods. Neighborhood Enjoyment The Boulder Reservoir sits among rural residential areas, and neighbors desire to maintain the health, safety, attractiveness, and livability of the area and to proactively address good neighbor practices. 3.Community Engagement & Communication Communication between the city, its Partners, the Community and the Neighbors is critically important to develop and maintain positive relationships. Methods to ensure good communication, feedback, and monitoring of this Good Neighbor Agreement will include the following: •Biannual neighborhood meetings, and proactive outreach by BPR to the community. During the Fall meeting of 2022 we will re-evaluate neighborhood meeting frequency; •Information posted on BPR website connecting Stakeholders to all pertinent information including contact information for BPR, Boulder Facility Supervisor and partners; •Implementing a process for submitting feedback; •Including Neighbors in the feedback gathered from Stakeholders as part of an annual After Action Review of reservoir operations each fall. Neighbors will be consulted on policy and operational alternatives and notified of decisions. Concerns will be listened to and acknowledged and we will share feedback on how public input influenced final decisions. Attachment B: Draft Good Neighbor Agreement 36 Good Neighbor Agreement: Boulder Reservoir April 2021 3.1 Complaint Process In the event of any illegal activity, Neighbors should immediately notify law enforcement via 911. Community Grievance: In the event of a problem, Neighbors are asked to notify BPR through the city’s online customer service portal, Inquire Boulder. A BPR Reservoir employee will use best efforts and acknowledge complaints within a reasonable time frame. We anticipate being able to address most issues. If the Reservoir employee cannot or does not satisfactorily resolve the problem, the complaint will be elevated through supervisory levels, on up to and including the Parks and Recreation Director. If the problem remains unresolved, the complainants may bring their concerns to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board via email or at public comment at the next regular business meeting. If this does not resolve the issue, both parties may consent to work with a mediator (from the City of Boulder Community Mediation Service) to help the complainant and city to resolve the dispute. In the unlikely case that a complainant is not satisfied with the process, City Council meetings provide an open comment period for residents at the start of each meeting to hear from the public about important issues facing Boulder and its citizens. 3.2 Opportunities for Community Engagement BPR will host regular, bi-annual Neighbor meetings that will be open to the entire Community. These meetings will provide an opportunity for Community members to raise concerns, ask questions, learn about, and provide feedback on operations at the Reservoir. In 2021, a late September meeting will focus on debriefing the peak season and to inform 2022 operations. BPR will next host a Spring 2022 meeting for a pre-season consultation. In the future, the schedule may be amended based on need. During the Fall meeting of 2022 we will re-evaluate neighborhood meeting frequency. Attachment B: Draft Good Neighbor Agreement 37 2021 Boulder Reservoir Driftwind Operations Overview Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) manages all areas of the Boulder Reservoir with a balance of preservation and recreation as outlined in the vision from the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan. This operation overview outlines 2021 operation agreements between BPR and Driftwind Restaurant. Per clause 3.B of the lease, this document must be complied with by both parties. These agreements apply to 2021. Data and feedback will be collected throughout the season and considered in the After-Action Review (AAR) conducted each fall. The AAR is how the city applies an adaptive management approach to resource protection and enhancement as outlined in the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan. An adaptive management approach involves the ongoing monitoring of resource conditions, assessment of the effectiveness of management actions, revisions of management actions based on new information from research and learning from experience. HOURS OF OPERATIONS Driftwind’s regular hours of operation for 2021 are 9:00 a.m.- 9:00 p.m. Monday - Thursday and 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Friday - Sunday. There may be fluctuations based upon the season or private events. Incoming gates will close by 9:00 p.m. every day (except for taxi and/or rideshare). EVENTS Private Events - Private events facilitated by Driftwind are allowed through the Lease, with requirements to ensure they are a value-add for the community and minimize impacts on the site or neighbors. These events are governed by City of Boulder regulations, Boulder Parks and Recreation policies, the Lease and this Operations Overview. Private events must end by midnight per the Lease. Private events that are allowed with no additional permission from the city include: •Do not require any noise variance for additional amplified sound; •Do not require support from City staff (e.g. any activity past 9:00p.m.); or •Do not exceed 200 attendees. Special Events - Special events are governed by all requirements of the City of Boulder Special Events Guide. Reservoir specific requirements are outlined in Appendix A. All Medium and Large Special Events (those with over 200 participants) are posted on the City of Boulder website by May 15. This list is updated regularly to reflect any changes. This listing includes impacts to the site based on the type and use requests of the host organization through the Special Event application process. Attachment C: Driftwind Operations Overview 38 SOUND All sound will adhere to the City of Boulder noise ordinances. In addition, and more restrictive than the city ordinance, outdoor speakers will be turned off at 9:00 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 10:00 p.m. Friday-Sunday. Staff will monitor and record sound levels throughout the year at various times, at multiple locations throughout the site and during a variety of uses. Data collected will include: •Location of measurements •Decibel Level •Time and Date of Measurements •Activity/Use (special event, private event, general restaurant operations) This data will be considered as part of the AAR. LIGHTING All lighting at the facility will continue to be compliant with the City of Boulder’s lighting ordinance. SAFETY All Driftwind staff will be trained in Boulder Reservoir Emergency Action Plans. A city of Boulder employee will be onsite anytime members of the public are at the Reservoir. Alcohol – Alcohol is allowed at the Boulder Reservoir under the Boulder Revised Code, which excludes the South Shore from the city’s ban on open containers of alcohol in public. In addition, Special Events may include alcohol with approval through the city’s Special Events process. No alcohol is allowed in swim area at any time. This is enforced by Parks and Recreation staff on the swim beach during the hours that the swim beach is open. Driving under the influence of alcohol is illegal. Both Driftwind and Parks and Recreation are committed to supporting safe consumption, including working with the Sheriff’s Office, incentivizing ride share/taxi, and promoting designated drivers. Attachment C: Driftwind Operations Overview 39 Attachment D: Summary of GNA Feedback on First Draft PRAB April 26, 2021, Items for Discussion/Information A BPR solicited input on the first draft via an online form. The following questions were asked: 1. Do you believe that the draft Good Neighbor Agreement addresses the right issues? 2. Please share more about your answer to #1. 3. Do you believe the draft Good Neighbor Agreement strikes the right balance between the needs of neighbors of the reservoir and other community members? 4. Please share more about your answer to #3. 5. What changes do you want to see made to the draft Good Neighbor Agreement? Why? BPR received 56 responses. Only 3 respondents thought that the draft GNA addressed the right issues and struck the right balance between the needs of neighbors and other community members. When asked to elaborate, 26 of the responses received repeated a list of requests (List 1). A collection of comments from the other 30 respondents is included below (List 2). List 1: Repeated response • “This Document is for addressing communication and complaints as directed by the City not the neighborhood. It does not proactively address any specific issues of the neighborhood that have already become subjects of heated communication and avid complaints. Good Neighbor means that an attempt is made to satisfy both parties. So far, the City has not made any concessions on any of our issues. To have a Good Neighbor Agreement, first the parties have to come to the table to agree. That has not happened so a Good Neighbor Agreement cannot be signed unless agreements are made about: o specific operational activities are stated in writing and not presented as good intentions and need to be agreed upon between neighbors o historical hours of the Reservoir are maintained; out gate closes at 9 and all gates closed through off season o share calendar of events o agreed upon events whether they be special, private or public. -in number, character, size, frequency and with traffic and environmental considerations. o no amplified sound after 7 and if heard by the neighborhood anytime it will be turned down o no added light pollution o return to RFP agreements of Café concept o discuss sub-leasing agreements and rules o conflict between what is said and what is done including the use of alcohol o neighborhood and community showing strong opposition to the use of alcohol at Driftwind in any fashion especially after dark and all year. o History of the Reservoir not enforcing rules and misusing property within and out 40 o Reservoir events moved to east side o Make entrance from 119 o Multi=use path from Reservoir to Jay o Reduce speed limits on 51st., 25mph residential zone” • “The "community" is not represented at the table except through the City and therefore should not be a part of the Good Neighbor Agreement. Or if it could be represented by real people than it should be a balanced representation. The City has not shown proof that anyone in the community has asked for a restaurant and alcohol and changes of hours and days open. There has been no public forum debating these issues by anyone. Instead there have been repeated attempts to steamroller plans through.” List 2: Other Individual Comments • “Yes, this document is helpful. But a 72 hour wait on a complaint that needs immediate attention is not okay! In 2019 there were so many events it was horrible getting in and out of our neighborhood! One time it took me 30 minutes just to turn from 51st onto Jay Rd and get out of the neighborhood because the line of cars leaving the res was so long and you should preemptively have traffic control from 51st on to Jay anytime you have an event!“ • “I'm really concerned that there is just way too much wiggle room in all the "concessions," to the point that they aren't concessions at all. In particular, I do not want people at the reservoir past its normal closing time, particularly if they are drinking and consuming "small plates" or food truck fare. I might feel differently if this were truly a nice, high-end restaurant, which it sounds like was the original plan. I definitely do not want loud parties going on after dark. It sounds like what you want is a bar that serves alcohol and beer nuts with loud music - that does not match with the purposes of the reservoir or with the character of our neighborhood.” • “I think the Good Neighbor Agreement as written is setting up a complaint process if things go wrong but it does not lay out the standards to which the city is committing itself. I think the neighborhood is concerned about two issues: music/amplified sound and traffic. My issue is music/amplified sound for which I think the city's commitment is "no music/amplified sound to be audible at the park boundary after 9:00pm and that it is never a nuisance." I would like the Good Neighbor Agreement to lay out the city's commitments before talking about complaints.” • “After reading the Mission and Vision Statements of the Boulder Parks and Recreation in addition to the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan, it is apparent that the Good Neighborhood Agreement does not meet many of the subdivision's needs. The expansion of recreational activities from wedding venues to alcohol related events, is not even in concert with YOUR OWN goals for lake use. Wildlife protection is mentioned, but the reality is, loud music and parking lights with even MORE visitors flooding the reservoir does not align with the protection for the number of raptors, deer, coyote, and other animals that live in the area, not to mention the sanity of the neighborhood.” • “The Good Neighbor Agreement is vague and does not address any concrete issues. It does not address any issues on paper that we are already in dispute about. It only allows for what will be on-going, expansive, intense overuse of the Boulder Reservoir. It begs 41 the question why the Reservoir is the only avenue for the Parks Department to raise their revenue?” • “It does not proactively address any specific issues of the neighborhood that have already become subjects of heated communication and avid complaints.” • “I don't trust that the neighborhood will be considered like they say. This is from all the years of being overrun by special events.” • “It's hard to "move ahead" when the history between the needs of the immediate community and the City of Boulder and Boulder Parks and Recreation are not in alignment. We agreed to and support the Fire Burn Station, we are now fighting the noise from the shooting range which wants to expand, and now we will have steady spring, summer, and fall weekend events from the likes of Iron Man to a 365 day event center. The proposed "Good Neighbor Agreement" is hard to swallow.“ • “The neighborhood is already impacted too much by special events. Traffic, noise, safety. To add all this will certainly impact the neighborhood way too much.” • “The issues that seems to be most bothersome are traffic, number of events and hours of events. Adding more events at the Reservoir seems to be counterproductive. And as a long time boater (30+ years) it seems more events cuts into boating time.” • “As long as the details of the community engagement and communications are workout fairly and agreed upon by all.” • “The final negotiated lease went beyond acceptable RFP parameters to commercialize the entire Reservoir to make money (for the vendor) at the expense of the nearby neighborhoods and the local ecosystems. It turns the Reservoir into a nighttime destination / bar / concert venue. The GNA does nothing to address this.” • “My needs as a neighbor are not given enough credence. Instead, it feels like the City is looking for loop holes to get around neighborhood concerns.” • “There is too little substance in the agreement about how these needs will be balanced.” • “There are no teeth in the agreement that the neighbors can use when the reservoir or its vendors don't follow the guidelines they have set out. There doesn't seem to be a balance at all.” • “The ongoing issues of use and expansion around the Boulder Reservoir that impact the neighborhood have not been addressed to our satisfaction. Balancing the needs of the reservoir neighborhoods with that of the public community MUST take into account how much more impact Boulder's Parks and Recreation Department has on the Reservoir neighborhoods. Unilateral decisions, without neighborhood input and consent, and a puny complaint web site don't inspire confidence in good faith efforts, ultimately by the City, and Parks and Recreation. An example of unilateral action? signing a lease with Driftwood (or whatever their name is this week) before communication with the neighborhoods about just what Parks and Rec is planning to insert here. It further appears that the function has been a moving target, trying to navigate hurdles in order to achieve the expansive goals of the lease. Replacing an aging food and drink stand with a function that morphs (cafe > restaurant/bar> subleasing to food trucks and BYOB events) does not inspire confidence that the neighborhoods really can trust that the City/BP&R understand nor really listens to their impact on the neighborhoods.“ • “As I said before traffic & safety is a huge issue. The neighborhood does not need this. There are plenty of other facilities in boulder to cater to this use. Let's face the fact, WE DON'T NEED THIS. It all about your agenda & DOLLARS” 42 • “This document is not in the best interest of the neighbors at all.” • “It's true the Boulder Reservoir is a public facility. But like the Disneyland expansion of the proposed Boulder Rifle Club which the County and City fully supported, North Boulder residents had to fight so hard just to maintain the on-going peace of our neighborhoods. The proposed expansion of the Boulder Reservoir is not in keeping with the size and scope of this facility either. I've lived here 27 years and we already deal with the traffic of huge events every weekend from May through October. I do not see much balance of anything going on here based on your document between the needs of the reservoir and the community. After going through an egregious experience regarding the Boulder Rifle Club's expansion, you will be hard pressed for neighbors to want to trust your intentions unless you put them down on paper in a written document. Put together a proposed calendar that will show exactly what this area can expect from all events proposed at the Boulder Reservoir 365 days a year.” 43 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 26, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: 2022 Budget Strategy: Recreation Activity Fund PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Tim Duda, Business Analyst Stacie Hoffmann, Administrative Supervisor Chris Passarelli, Business Analyst EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item builds upon the 2022 BPR budget development and budget strategy process as discussed over the past two months, with a focus on recreation access fees. The item introduces different options for the PRAB’s input in preparation for the study session in May, which will inform the 2022 budget, fee structure, and levels of service. BACKGROUND: At the February 22, 2021 PRAB meeting, staff introduced the 2022 Budget Strategy conversation. The memo summarized the PRAB engagement that informed 2020’s recreation access fees, impacts of COVID on revenue in 2020 and 2021, and the opportunities, challenges and recommendations for the 2022 Budget Development Strategy. Staff also shared the plan to consult and engage the PRAB with 2022 budget development each month March through June. Finally, as each step builds on the previous month’s discussions, PRAB’s input was sought on the proposed opportunities, challenges, and recommendations. At the April 12, 2021 PRAB meeting (rescheduled from March 29), staff provided an update on the 2019 and 2020 actual revenues and expenses, the 2021 approved budget, and a 5-year financial look-ahead. The item summarized the department’s funding sources, their uses and financial outlooks, along with an overview of the current fee structure and levels of services. The item was intended to provide foundational information to ensure the PRAB members have a strong understanding of the department’s financial outlook, potential challenges, and budget approach as the 2022 budget is developed. 44 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 2__ RAF Financial Strategy In previous conversations, staff has consulted with the PRAB to inform the development of and provided updates on implementation of the department’s Service Delivery Model, which ensures thoughtful management of recreation programs. The model ensures that programs are intentionally designed and delivered as outlined in the Parks and Recreation Master plan. Operations at the Boulder Reservoir and Flatirons Golf Course are informed by other plans (including the Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan approved by PRAB on April 27, 2020 and the Flatirons Golf Course Fees discussed on November 23, 2020 and December 21, 2020. For the 2022 budget cycle, the PRAB’s input is requested regarding facility entry fees and the associated General Fund subsidy for recreation operations. In May 2019, the PRAB provided input to establish the overall pricing and revenue strategy for 2020. While the fees were standardized across the system in January 2020, COVID has impacted the operation of recreation facilities with decreased hours of operation, facility entrances and revenues at the three indoor recreation centers. During the 2020 outdoor season, Boulder Reservoir had fewer COVID restrictions on operations compared to indoor facilities and experienced strong visitation despite reduced services (e.g. swim beach was not open). The outdoor pools operated on a reservation based system that had significant demand given availability. These ongoing impacts have made it difficult to gauge the entire impact of the updated recreation facility fees implemented in 2020. Current 2021 Entrance Fees The current entry fees, implemented in January 2020, were established at the May 28, 2019 PRAB meeting. At that meeting, the following entrance fees were recommended through 2020 and 2021 (see Tables 1 and 2). Table 1. Daily Entry Fees Single Visit 10 Visit Punch Pass Age Resident/Worker* Non- Resident Resident/Worker* Non- Resident Adult 19-59 years $9 $11 $81 $99 Senior 60+ years $6.75 $8.25 $61 $74 Youth 3-18 years $5.50 $6.50 $50 $59 Daily 4- Pack (NEW!) 4 entries; Max 2 adults $24 $29 * Individuals who live or work in the City of Boulder are eligible for Resident/Worker rates with proof of residency. Table 2. Unlimited Entry Fees Monthly Pass Annual Pass Age Resident/Worker * Non- Resident Resident/Worker * Non- Resident Adult 19-59 years $62/month $76/month $648/year $792/year 45 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 3__ Senior 60+ years $47/month $57/month $486/year $594/year Youth 3-18 years $38/month $45/month $396/year $468/year Househol d See note belo w $99/month $122/mont h $1,037/year $1,267/yea r * Individuals who live or work in the City of Boulder are eligible for Resident/Worker rates with proof of residency. The fees were based on the following policies endorsed by the PRAB: • Age-based Subsidy - Youth and Senior entry fees should continue to be subsidized through the General Fund at an approximate subsidy of 40% for Youth (under 19 years old) and 25% for Seniors (60+ years old). • Financial Aid – Subsidy should continue to support under-resourced residents in gaining entry to department facilities and participating in department programs. • Worker Fees - Those that work in the City of Boulder should continue to pay the same fees as those that live in the City of Boulder, to support Boulder’s economic vitality goals, for facility membership and entrance. • Non-resident Fees - Non-residents should pay higher fees than those who live or work in the City of Boulder. The PRAB supported a standard non-resident premium of 22% above the resident rate for daily entrances and memberships. • Entry Fee Increases – After reviewing market analysis, value of service, and financial sustainability goals, the PRAB supported a base increase to entry fees by an average of 9%. • Seasonal Facility Entry Fees – The PRAB supported an option to align seasonal facility entry fees for Scott Carpenter Pool, Spruce Pool, and Boulder Reservoir with the fees charged for the Recreation Centers to simplify pricing for customers and based upon customer input. The PRAB also supported continuing to include these seasonal facilities in system-wide Annual, Monthly, and Punch Card entry options. • Streamlined Multi-Visit Pass Options – The PRAB supported an option to reduce the number of Punch Card pass options, while adding a more flexible monthly access option Recreation Centers The fees discussed above, now largely consistent throughout the system, are charged when you enter a facility or buy an unlimited pass.1 This revenue generated by the entire recreation operation, with a modest subsidy from the General Fund, must pay for operation of the facilities, staff that operate the facility, and everything else needed to deliver the recreation experience including lap pools, leisure pools, gymnasiums, 1While under Public Health Orders, with the PRAB’s input, and in June-October 2020, a $15 fee for non- resident daily entry was implemented to discourage out of area travel and to address financial challenges. The Boulder Reservoir entrance fees were reduced based on a decrease of availability amenities including the swim beach, locker rooms and Visitor Service Center based on COVID restrictions. 46 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 4__ racquetball courts, hot tubs, saunas, steam rooms, weight rooms, cardio equipment, lighted tennis courts, outdoor sand volleyball, drop-in fitness classes, and drop-in mind/body classes. By purchasing a multi-visit pass (10 punches), members receive discounted access (10% per visit) to the three recreation centers, the two outdoor pools, and the Boulder Reservoir. With the purchase of an unlimited pass, members receive discounted access to all the previously mentioned facilities and programs at an even greater discount, as well as additional discounts on registered programs as available. Historically, unlimited pass members have received childcare and towel services; however, these services have been halted due to COVID-19 and will be reconsidered as part of 2022 budget planning. While 2021 operations continue to be refined, the Recreation Centers’ current operations and usage information is identified below in Tables 3 and 4 as compared with 2019’s baseline pre-pandemic service levels and usage. Across the board, the recreation centers’ service levels were impacted by sharp declines in revenues, expenses, visitation, operating hours and the number of patrons using the facilities per hour. Facility Summer 2019 Weekly Operating Hours Summer 2021 Weekly Operating Hours North Boulder Recreation Center 100.5 hours 75 hours East Boulder Community Center 102 hours 70 hours South Boulder Recreation Center 94 hours 35 hours TOTAL 296.5 hours 180 hours Table 3: Recreation Facility Operational Hours Recreation Center Statistics 2019 Baseline 2020 Baseline Change 2019 to 2020 Expense $4,587,887 $2,723,785 -41% Hours of Operation 14,987 6,729 -55% Total Visits 483,935 131,146 -73% Usage/Hour 32.3 patrons 19.5 patrons -40% Pass/Entry Fee Revenue $2,878,067 $786,411 -73% Average Fee $5.95 $6.00 1% Revenue to Expense % 63% 29% -54% Table 4: Recreation Facility Usage Statistics Outdoor Pools and Boulder Reservoir Scott Carpenter Pool andSpruce Pool, are operated seasonally, approximately Memorial Day through Labor Day. Services available at the outdoor pools include locker rooms, and lifeguard-supervised lap and leisure swimming. The Boulder Reservoir is open year- round for passive recreation and adds a lifeguarded swim beach and lake patrol services 47 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 5__ during peak summer months, approximately Memorial Day through Labor Day. Other services available at the reservoir include boat rentals, picnic site rentals, as well as support for fishing, boating, open water swimming opportunities and special events. Like the recreation centers, revenue from the recreation system must sustain delivery of these services and amenities, and were impacted in 2020. Weekly hours of operation for seasonal facilities are shown in Table 5. The increase in level of service anticipated for 2021 is largely due to the addition of a leisure pool at Scott Carpenter. Facility Summer 2019 Weekly Operating Hours Summer 2021 Weekly Operating Hours Scott Carpenter Lap Pool 92* 94 Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool N/A 56 Spruce Pool 86 56 Boulder Reservoir 112 98 TOTAL 286.5 hours 304 hours Table 5: Outdoor Recreation Facility Usage Hours (excludes Flatirons Golf Course) *2018 hours, based on Scott Carpenter Pool being closed for construction in 2019. To support the services offered at the Boulder Reservoir outside of the peak summer season, off-peak entrance fees were implemented in 2021 based on PRAB input in October 2020 to better align expenses and revenue. These reduced flank (spring and fall) fees will offset the costs associated with providing active site management during the shoulder season while the twilight fee will encourage carpooling after 6:00p.m. during peak season and is supported by the reduction in service when the swim beach closes at that time. The flank season fee for 2021 is set at $5.00 per person, while the twilight fee is $5 per person or $10.00 per car. Subsidy Use In 2020, the RAF received a $1.43M transfer from the General Fund to subsidize community benefit services that include: age-based facility access discounts, financial aid support, and health, wellness, and recreation services to underserved community members, including low-income families and individuals with disabilities. In 2021 the projected contribution from the General Fund remained flat at $1.43M. The General Fund subsidy is distributed based on the Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index, which sets cost recovery goals for programming based on community input and values expressed in the department’s master plan. Programs that most benefit the community receive the greatest share of subsidy, while programs that most benefit individuals receive little to no subsidy and users pay for services received. The General Fund subsidy is spread across recreation programs, facilities, and entrances, which is discussed further in the Analysis section. To further support and expand health equity, staff seek alternative funding which, in 2020, injected an additional $145K in subsidy for Youth and Families, an additional $70K in subsidy for EXPAND, and an additional $75K for recreation center access. While still significant, these numbers represent a decrease of 50% compared to 2020 original award based on economic uncertainty faced by the city’s Health Equity Fund and 48 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 6__ the need to reprioritize funds to provide greater assistance to those impacted directly by the pandemic. In 2021, there will be continued financial impacts of the pandemic with alternative funding being projected at levels only slightly higher than 2020. The department’s General Fund subsidy remained flat from 2020 to 2021 and helps ensure equitable access to all recreation facilities, services, and programs. Based on need, additional alternative funding sources have been pursued to further support the community. ANALYSIS: The PRAB’s initial feedback on where to focus for the facility revenue strategy will inform the May Study Session on 2022 fees and operations. As a reminder, the department is viewing 2022 as a continued recovery year following the dramatic declines in indoor recreation usage in 2020 which have persisted into 2021. With this in mind, staff propose any of 2022 adjustments to fees as a one-year adjustment, and further analysis will be done in 2022 to evaluate the recovery experienced to make further refinements to the 2023 operating budget and proposed fees across the entire recreation portfolio. This one-year plans also allows for refinements to the fee strategy based upon outcomes of the Master Plan update. 2022 Scenario Planning The recreation centers typically recovery ~63% of operating expenses through fees. The remaining expenses are funded through center-based programs and the General Fund subsidy. As the PRAB is aware, indoor recreation usage declined significantly based on the reduced hours and offerings of the three recreation centers, public health restrictions, and decreased customer comfort in shared indoor workout spaces. In 2019, the recreation centers had 483,935 visits by passholders and drop-in patrons. This number decreased to 131,146 in 2020, a 73% drop in visitation. To plan for 2022’s budget, staff have developed four scenarios using 2020 data as a baseline to project center recovery based upon revenues, expenses, visitation, hours open and the number of patrons using the facilities per hour. At this time, based upon revenue projections and without additional subsidy, staff do not anticipate 2022 service levels to recover to match the 2019 operating hours. Scenario 1: Modest recovery in hours and usage over current 2021 levels • 35% recovery in hours compared to 2020. • 35% increase in usage compared to 2020. • Results in ~35% Cost Recovery. Scenario 2: Greater increase in hours with notable recovery in usage • 50% recovery in hours compared to 2020 with 10,094. • 50% increase in usage compared to 2020. • Results in ~35% Direct Cost Recovery. 49 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 7__ Scenario 3: Almost full recovery in hours with notable recovery in usage • 90% recovery in hours compared to 2020. • 50% increase in usage compared to 2020. • Results in ~60% Cost Recovery. Scenario 4: Full recovery in hours with usage almost equal to 2019 • 100% recovery in hours compared to 2020. • 60% increase in usage compared to 2020. • Results in 63% Direct Cost Recovery It is still unclear which scenario will occur in 2022. Staff recognizes both the valuable role Boulder’s parks and recreation system plays in the lives of community members and the need to ensure sustainable operations. These choices are presented with thoughtful consideration of the need to be fiscal stewards of limited community resources and to maintain accessibility to all community members. 2022 Fee Options To develop a balanced budget in the Recreation Activity Fund (RAF), staff is looking closely at facility usage fees which account for approximately 30-40% of the fund’s revenue in a typical year. Historically, recreation centers have collected revenue that amounts to 63% of direct expenses to operate the facilities. Remaining revenue comes in the form of General Fund subsidy and revenue from programs offered inside of the facilities. To align revenue and expense projections and identify a 2022 recreation fee usage recommendation, staff has prepared options to adjust operations (anticipated visitation and hours of operations) and fees (drop-in rates, non-resident subsidy, age based discounts and financial aid). Question for PRAB: Of the options identified below, which options are worth considering or not considering, and would additional information or data help inform your decision making on different options? Outside of this conversation with the PRAB, staff is also exploring operational efficiencies such as evaluation of towel and childcare services, as well as streamlining rental rates and processes for room rentals, picnics, and birthday parties. These additional modifications can either decrease expenses or increase revenues to achieve a balanced RAF. Staff is still analyzing these operational proposals and will inform the PRAB of recommendations later in 2022. Alignment of Recreation Center Hours with Usage In 2020 and continuing into 2021, recreation center hours of operation have changed dramatically as identified in Table 3. The operating hours of recreation centers will continue to be adjusted over time as recovery levels become clearer and users return to 50 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 8__ the facilities. The centers must be operated in a way that is financially sustainable, can support user demand and meets the health and wellness goals of the community. Options to consider: No Change from 2021 reduced hours Decrease hours incrementally during summer / Increase hours incrementally rest of year or as operations recover Close an indoor facility during outdoor pool operations Market analysis: The current pandemic impacted recreation center operations substantially across the market. Some communities, such as Denver, still have not opened facilities while others have maintained some operations. Public feedback: Current facility usage numbers indicate that there is still some hesitation to return to indoor activities as average utilization by hour of operation are still well behind historical levels and not recovering quickly. It is unclear what the recovery trajectory will be leading up to 2022. Estimated Budget Impact: approximately $4,000 per week of closure. Adult Drop-in Baseline Entry Fee Facility entry fees and packages are all based upon the Adult Drop-in fee (e.g. Youth fee is 60% of the Adult fee; Adult annual pass provides discount based upon 6 visits per month at Adult Drop-in Fee). This baseline fee has typically been adjusted every 2 years, increasing between 3-9%. This fee was last increased in January 2018 by 9%. Options to consider: No Change 3% increase ($0.25) 6% increase ($0.50) 8% increase ($0.75) 11+% increase ($1.00 +) Market analysis: BPR facility access fees are higher than other local public agencies’ entry fees. This can generally be attributed to business practices that include the cost of service delivery in fee consideration, lower General Fund subsidies to recreation services compared to other agencies, and the scope and quality of amenities available. However, BPR services are priced below the market rate of private facilities. Public feedback: Historically, the department has noted very little price sensitivity through 5-9% increases on a 2-year schedule. Estimated Budget Impact: Significant - up to $500,000 Staff notes: In 2020, based on PRAB’s input from the May 11, 2020 study session chose to implement a “no beach” fee at the Boulder Reservoir for 2020 since the swim beach 51 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 9__ was closed due to COVID restrictions and the facility was operating on reduced hours. As a result, the “no beach” fee reverted back to 2019’s fee structure of $7 per adult, $5 per senior, and $4 per youth entrance fee. There could be a greater sensitivity for any price increase in 2022 based on the reduced fees provided in 2020 corresponding to decreased levels of amenities at the Boulder Reservoir. To streamline cash-handling and operations, BPR recommends all entrance fees be denominated in quarter ($0.25) increments to approximate the percentage as implemented in 2020. Since this fee is the baseline for all other rates (multi-visit, monthly and annual), prices for memberships and passes would be adjusted accordingly, along with Youth and Senior rates if directed in the sections below. Non-Resident Fee Premium Residents are considered anyone who lives or works in Boulder, while those who reside and work outside of city limits are treated as non-residents. In 2020, BPR implemented a non-resident fee for use of the indoor recreation facilities and outdoor pools for single drop-in entries to align with punch passes and annual memberships, which already had established non-resident rates. In 2020, the non-resident fee for adult daily use was set at 22% above the resident fee. During June to October 2020, to discourage out of area travel, address financial challenges, and price entrances to reflect the reserved, dedicated recreation spaces available during COVID, the department increased the non-resident premium to 67% for non-residents at the indoor recreation facilities and outdoor pools which operated on a reservation system. Even with the price premium from June to October 2020, 12% of all users at these facilities were non-residents. Throughout the duration of 2020, non-residents represented 26% of daily entrances, 33% of punch passes, 30% of monthly memberships, 29% of annual memberships, and 53% of summer memberships. It should be noted that the Boulder Reservoir did not offer the typical amenities because of COVID restrictions which impacted the swim beach, locker rooms and Visitor Services Center. As a result, there was a “no beach” fee in place at the Boulder Reservoir for the 2020 season. Options to consider: No Change ($11.00 adult daily, ~22% above Resident) Increase NR Premium for daily drop-ins Increase NR Premium for all passes Market analysis: Most other local public agencies have a 25-50% premium for entrances by those living outside the district. Public feedback: Both the 2014 Master Plan’s statistically-valid survey and the March 2019 survey administered to Parks and Recreation users conveyed strong support for a higher non-resident fee. City Council direction has provided that those who work in the City of Boulder be considered residents to support the city’s economic vitality strategy. Community members living in Area II (land not in but often adjacent to city limits and 52 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 10__ under county jurisdiction, e.g. some parts of Gunbarrel) and neighbors adjacent to Boulder Reservoir express frustration at paying non-resident fees due to lack of clarity about residency. Estimated Budget Impact: Significant – up to $350,000 Staff notes: Non-resident fees can be time-consuming to administer, with some agencies eliminating them for efficiency. At the entrance point to facilities, staff ask patrons their residency status for daily drop-ins and charge the corresponding fee. When a patron purchases a resident-rate multi-visit, monthly, or annual pass, staff verify residency with documentation such as a driver’s license or utility bill. Staff must then confirm that the address is within city limits, causing a burden to both the staff member and patron. At facilities such as the Reservoir or outdoor pools, where a high number of non-residents may visit, this will have clear impacts on efficiency. In 2020, 67% of entrances at all facilities were by residents, while 33% were by non-residents. Due to the rate structure, 2020 was the first year with comprehensive data on the percentage of patrons who were resident versus non-resident. To streamline cash-handling and operations, BPR recommends all entrance fees be denominated in quarter ($0.25) increments to approximate the percentage as implemented in 2020. Age-Based Subsidized Entry Fees Subsidized entry fees are currently provided based on age and/or income. Individuals 3- 18 years of age are eligible for a subsidized Youth entry fee. Individuals 60 years of age and older are eligible for a subsidized Senior entry fee. Residents of any age are eligible for a discounted entry if household income is below 50% of Area Median Income. Options to consider: No Change from 2020 rates Rate increase Corresponding to Adult daily fee Reduce Percentage of Subsidy compared to Adult daily fee Market analysis: All other local agencies offer a Senior entry fee, with subsidy-funded discounts ranging between 20%-50% of adult entry fees and a Youth entry fee discount averaging between 14%-60% of adult entry fees. Boulder Senior and Youth entry fees have a 25% and 40% discount off the Adult fee, respectively. Both the senior and youth fees were increased in 2020 to align with the discounts represented above. The City and County of Denver provides 100% subsidized access to resident youth and seniors (5-18 years, 60+ years) through a fully funded “MY Denver Prime” program. Now that it covers entrances at all recreation centers, SilverSneakers membership usage for older adults has been rising, while paid older adult usage has been declining. Since 2019, BPR has observed approximately 56% of entries by older adults are made through the SilverSneakers program, while the remaining 44% are paid Senior entries. 53 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 11__ Public feedback: In 2019’s survey administered to Parks and Recreation users, 57% of survey respondents indicated that entry fee subsidy should be prioritized based on age, while 34% most supported subsidy based on ability to pay, and 8% had no opinion. Estimated Budget Impact: Moderate – up to $200,000. Staff notes: SilverSneakers reimbursement rates are set at a specific reduced percentage of the published Senior entry fee, with a maximum total reimbursement per month. Reducing the subsidy provided to Senior entry fees could also increase SilverSneakers reimbursement rates up to the monthly maximum. In 2020, BPR negotiated a new agreement with SilverSneakers that extends into 2024. To streamline cash-handling and operations, BPR recommends all entrance fees be denominated in quarter ($0.25) increments to approximate the percentage as implemented in 2020. In addition, the Master Plan Update will again explore this question through community engagement and policy development Financial Aid In 2020, low-income Boulder residents eligible for Financial Assistance (50% or less than Area Median Income) received a 100% discount for recreation access and included those who qualified for unemployment benefits given the large community economic impacts from COVID-19. Financial Aid participation grew 34% over 2019 to include 3,458 active enrollees, including 1,394 youth, 1,738 adult, and 326 senior participants representing 12% of all visitations. The subsidy award is approximately $61,000. Since the individuals benefitting from this subsidy would likely not be able to afford to participate without this support, options for consideration are structured around the funding of this program rather than fees collected from individuals: Options to consider: No Change; rely on General Fund subsidy Continue to seek one-time funding opportunities to support subsidy Seek out multi-year funding support from the Health Equity Fund Market analysis: Local agencies all provide varying levels of financial aid. Public feedback: In 2019’s survey administered to Parks and Recreation users, 57% of survey respondents indicated that entry fees should prioritize subsidy based on age, 34% based on ability to pay, and 8% had no opinion. Estimated Budget Impact: Minimal – highly dependent on usage, up to $60,000 Staff notes: Based on the success of pilot programs funded through Health Equity Fund, staff feel that this program could be more effective through either a sliding scale of aid for increased subsidy or a funding framework that supports fully subsidized access. 54 AGENDA ITEM V-B-i_ PAGE 12__ NEXT STEPS: The PRAB’s discussion and guidance will inform the May Study Session, as staff will conduct additional research and/or analysis on the options the board determines most feasible and in alignment with the department’s community well-being and financial sustainability goals and policies. Question for PRAB: Of the options identified, which options are worth considering or not considering, and would additional information or data help inform your decision making on different options? The Board’s input will inform the department’s final budget submission. Attachments: • Attachment A – March 2019 Recreation Facility Access Survey 55 Report for March Survey - Recreation Facilities Completion Rate:100% Complete 924 Totals: 924 Response Counts 1 56 Should pay higher fees than residents Should pay the same fees as residents No Opinion Responses Access recreation facilities Count Row % 618 68.2% 212 23.4% 76 8.4% 906 Participate in recreation courses & programs Count Row % 563 62.4% 265 29.4% 74 8.2% 902 Totals Total Responses 906 1. Please provide your opinion on how fees should be set for individuals that do not live or work in the City of Boulder, but would like to : 2 57 2. If you were to hold a pass that provided year-round entry to recreation facilities, would you prefer to: 70% Manually renew the pass when it expires. 70% Manually renew the pass when it expires. 31% Automatically renew the pass like a subscription, until cancelled. 31% Automatically renew the pass like a subscription, until cancelled. Value Percent Responses Manually renew the pass when it expires.69.5%628 Automatically renew the pass like a subscription, until cancelled.30.5%276 Totals: 904 3 58 3. On what basis would you prefer the automatic renewal: 36% Monthly36% Monthly 60% Annually60% Annually 4% Other - Write In4% Other - Write In Value Percent Responses Monthly 35.6%98 Annually 60.0%165 Other - Write In 4.4%12 Totals: 275 4 59 4. Which statement do you most agree with? 55% All recreation facilities should have the same entry fee. 55% All recreation facilities should have the same entry fee. 45% Entry fees should vary based on the services and amenities provided by the recreation facility. 45% Entry fees should vary based on the services and amenities provided by the recreation facility. Value Percent Responses All recreation facilities should have the same entry fee.55.2%500 Entry fees should vary based on the services and amenities provided by the recreation facility. 44.8%406 Totals: 906 5 60 5. I think recreation facility entry fees should be discounted (subsidized) based on: 58% Age (eg. Youth, Senior 60+)58% Age (eg. Youth, Senior 60+) 34% Ability to Pay34% Ability to Pay 8% No Opinion8% No Opinion Value Percent Responses Age (eg. Youth, Senior 60+)57.5%527 Ability to Pay 34.4%315 No Opinion 8.1%74 Totals: 916 6 61 6. Have you held any of the following passes in the past year?PercentAnnual Pass (Individual or Family) Silver Sneakers, Silver & Fit Punch Card (10 punch, 20 punch, 40 punch) Promotional Pass (Twilight Pass, 30 day, 3 month, BHP Pass) None of the above 0 10 20 30 40 50 Value Percent Responses Annual Pass (Individual or Family)37.5%343 Silver Sneakers, Silver & Fit 20.3%186 Punch Card (10 punch, 20 punch, 40 punch)47.8%437 Promotional Pass (Twilight Pass, 30 day, 3 month, BHP Pass)6.8%62 None of the above 7.1%65 7 62 7. Which do you more strongly agree with? 44% I wish Silver Sneakers or Silver & Fit memberships provided access to Scott Carpenter and Spruce Pools 44% I wish Silver Sneakers or Silver & Fit memberships provided access to Scott Carpenter and Spruce Pools56% Access at Spruce and Scott Carpenter Pools as part of my Silver Sneakers or Silver & Fit membership is not important to me 56% Access at Spruce and Scott Carpenter Pools as part of my Silver Sneakers or Silver & Fit membership is not important to me Value Percent Responses I wish Silver Sneakers or Silver & Fit memberships provided access to Scott Carpenter and Spruce Pools 43.6%78 Access at Spruce and Scott Carpenter Pools as part of my Silver Sneakers or Silver & Fit membership is not important to me 56.4%101 Totals: 179 8 63 NPS Score:43.4 Promoters 56.2%474 Passives 31%261 Detractors 12.8%108 Totals: 843 8. On a scale of 0–10, how likely are you to recommend Boulder Parks and Recreation facilities to a colleague or friend? 9 64 Rating - 5 Stars - Highest Cleanliness of facility      Count: 841 Not Applicable: 0 Availability of equipment/amenities     Count: 828 Not Applicable: 0 Variety of drop-in classes/programs     Count: 734 Not Applicable: 0 Customer service provided by staff      Count: 831 Not Applicable: 0 Value of entry fee      Count: 829 Not Applicable: 0 9. Please rate the following based on your satisfaction with your past year's pass: 10 65 10. If you were purchasing a multi-visit pass, would you prefer it be based on: 46% Unlimited visit basis (through a monthly/annual pass) 46% Unlimited visit basis (through a monthly/annual pass) 54% Per-visit basis (through a Punch Card) 54% Per-visit basis (through a Punch Card) Value Percent Responses Unlimited visit basis (through a monthly/annual pass)45.6%406 Per-visit basis (through a Punch Card)54.4%484 Totals: 890 11 66 Not Important Somewhat Important Very Important Total Checks I hold memberships to other facilities (Y, Private Club, Crossfit, Yoga, etc) Checks Row Check % 233 52.5% 105 23.6% 106 23.9% 444 It provides a discount over the daily drop-in fee Checks Row Check % 23 4.9% 98 21.0% 345 74.0% 466 It is more convenient than paying for daily drop-in fees Checks Row Check % 26 5.6% 152 32.7% 287 61.7% 465 So I can share the punch card with family or friends Checks Row Check % 141 30.3% 148 31.8% 176 37.8% 465 I visit infrequently or seasonally Checks Row Check % 56 11.8% 132 27.7% 288 60.5% 476 To take advantage of promotions and sales that offer 'extra punches' Checks Row Check % 119 26.2% 187 41.1% 149 32.7% 455 I find punch card fees are more within my available budget Checks Row Check % 78 17.1% 157 34.5% 220 48.4% 455 None Checks Row Check % 1 100.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 I travel out of town often Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 0 0.0% 1 11. Are any of the reasons below important to your preference for a Punch Card based pass? 12 67 Travel frequently, and cannot access so the annual pass or monthly doesn’t make sense for me. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 0 0.0% 1 Was convenient for family member/resident who was Home from college Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 0 0.0% 1 All comes down to cost per use- punch vs monthly Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 As I'm currently assessing what my best options are for fitness, the punch card buys me more time to decide! Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Because other cities have more reasonably priced facility fees with more up to date services so we end up traveling more than we like outside of Boulder to swim, etc Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Cards are redeemable for $$ when necessary Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Discount through BVSD employee Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Easier to plan with toddlers with unpredictable schedules Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Flexibility Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Not Important Somewhat Important Very Important Total Checks 13 68 Free punches for donations to varied help centrrs Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I go in frequently and that seems to be the best value for me. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I live a half hour away from the nearest rec center so can only get there sporadically Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I take classes and pay additional fees so pass isn’t the main way I use Rec facilities Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I travel quite a bit for work Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I use different facilities (but do not have a membership anywhere). punchards are the best balance of cost and commitment. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I weigh the cost vs the visit to see which one is better for me at the time Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I wish they didn't expire. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 I'm a senior without Medicare/Silver access. I'm frustrated by complexity and cost. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Not Important Somewhat Important Very Important Total Checks 14 69 Infrequently in Boulder now, so prefer Punch Card now, but unlimited pass certainly my choice if I was in Boulder more often. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Its cheaper on a per visit basis for how often I use the facilities Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Punch card more cost effective for consistent, but light, usage. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Punch cards are good for two years Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Punch cards match usage with cost better than passes for occasional users Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Punch cards should not expire Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Seasonal user Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Share with visitors Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 The facilities at my local Rec Center are not that great, and the parking is terrible too, so I can't rely on a membership to this Rec Center, and for why you get I think the monthly membership is too high. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Not Important Somewhat Important Very Important Total Checks 15 70 The other options are very expensive versus anticipated use Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 They aren't so tightly bound to a time period Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Yearly passes are too expensive for me. I do visit 2-3 times a week during the school year, but less in the summer. I’d rather do an annual pass- but it’s soooo much $. Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 all day access per punch for 2 years Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 no expiration date Checks Row Check % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 1 Total Checks Checks % of Total Checks 677 20.8% 982 30.1% 1601 49.1% 3260 100.0% Not Important Somewhat Important Very Important Total Checks 16 71 12. In ideal circumstances, how many times per week would you visit recreation facilities with an Unlimited Pass? 3% 13% 1 12% 212% 2 38% 338% 322% 422% 4 15% 515% 5 4% 64% 6 5% 7+5% 7+ Value Percent Responses 1 3.1%12 2 12.1%47 3 38.3%149 4 22.4%87 5 14.9%58 6 4.1%16 7+5.1%20 Totals: 389 17 72 Where you live Where you work Total Checks North Boulder Recreation Center Checks Row Check % 437 66.9% 216 33.1% 653 East Boulder Community Center Checks Row Check % 393 67.0% 194 33.0% 587 South Boulder Community Center Checks Row Check % 332 73.0% 123 27.0% 455 Scott Carpenter Pool Checks Row Check % 250 64.9% 135 35.1% 385 Boulder Reservoir Checks Row Check % 255 74.6% 87 25.4% 342 Total Checks Checks % of Total Checks 1667 68.8% 755 31.2% 2422 100.0% 13. Please indicate which of these facilities are most convenient to where you live or work? 18 73 14. Multi-visit passes are currently priced and sold based on access to all recreation facilities (three recreation centers, two seasonal outdoor pools, and the Boulder Reservoir). Would you prefer that a multi-visit pass be priced and sold based on access to: 12% Single Facility12% Single Facility 20% Multiple Facilities20% Multiple Facilities 67% All Facilities (current state)67% All Facilities (current state) Value Percent Responses Single Facility 12.4%111 Multiple Facilities 20.4%183 All Facilities (current state)67.2%602 Totals: 896 19 74 15. Which facility would you most prefer for a single facility membership? 38% North Boulder Recreation Center 38% North Boulder Recreation Center 27% East Boulder Community Center 27% East Boulder Community Center 16% South Boulder Recreation Center 16% South Boulder Recreation Center 4% Scott Carpenter Pool4% Scott Carpenter Pool 1% Spruce Pool1% Spruce Pool 15% Boulder Reservoir15% Boulder Reservoir Value Percent Responses North Boulder Recreation Center 38.2%42 East Boulder Community Center 27.3%30 South Boulder Recreation Center 15.5%17 Scott Carpenter Pool 3.6%4 Spruce Pool 0.9%1 Boulder Reservoir 14.5%16 Totals: 110 20 75 Item Overall Rank Rank Distribution Score No. of Rankings North Boulder Recreation Center 1 734 141 East Boulder Community Center 2 680 143 South Boulder Community Center 3 469 119 Scott Carpenter Pool 4 364 99 Boulder Reservoir 5 349 97 Spruce Pool 6 243 78 16. 'Drag and Drop' any locations to the column on the right to rank which facilities you would most be interested for including in a Multiple Facilities pass: Lowest Rank Highest Rank 21 76 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 26, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: 2022-2027 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Ecological Services Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of this agenda item is for the Parks and Recreation Department (department) to review the current 2021-2026 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and to initiate discussion of the upcoming 2022 – 2027 CIP process. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) will have an opportunity to ask questions and provide comments on the current CIP projects and upcoming process. The Board’s input is essential throughout the capital budget process as the PRAB’s role includes providing a formal recommendation of the CIP, including the appropriation of the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Given the continuing uncertainty of the pandemic, the department continues to review the overall budget, including capital projects, to provide strategic decision-making in response to COVID-related financial and staffing constraints. Staff will provide PRAB with all the necessary information to make informed decisions on approving the CIP. Once approved by the PRAB, the department’s CIP will then be submitted to the Planning Board and City Council for review and respective consideration and approval. IMPACTS Fiscal: $8.54 million recommended for 2021 with the 2021-2026 CIP projecting an investment of $30.9M throughout the six-year program. This equates to average annual CIP funding of $5M and reflects the total uses of funds projected for 2020 in the Lottery (Fund 2100), .25 Cent Sales Tax (Fund 2180), Capital Development Fund and Permanent Parks and Recreation (Fund 3300). The total portfolio of assets managed by the department has an estimated Current Replacement Value (CRV) of $215M and the facility portfolio represents a significant investment in public infrastructure critical to the execution of our mission to provide quality park and recreation facilities to the community. 77 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 2 PUBLIC FEEDBACK This item is intended to provide the PRAB with information related to the CIP definitions/criteria found in Attachment A (CIP Process and Methodology), current capital improvement projects Attachment B (2021-2026CIP Project Summary Sheet) and linkage to the master plan as it relates to the 2021 – 2026 CIP. The community’s input is also valuable to inform capital planning. A follow-up CIP discussion with the PRAB is scheduled for the May regular meeting, and public comment is available for both the April and May conversations. A public hearing is scheduled for June with PRAB’s action on the CIP program. The public will also have an opportunity to comment during the Planning Board’s CIP review and City Council’s discussions and review of the 2021 recommended budget during future public hearings in fall 2020. Additional public engagement will continue to be solicited for the individual projects identified for improvements as part of the master plan goals. BACKGROUND CIP Process The CIP is how the city manages its assets and implements capital projects that are chosen by residents through their elected representatives, City Council, with recommendations from advisory boards. The department budget is formulated within the context of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan (master plan) that was adopted by the PRAB and accepted by City Council in February 2014. The master plan is currently being updated throughout the next year and will inform new CIP priorities. The CIP has always been developed in support of achieving master plan goals and will continue with the new, updated plan. The current master plan included several significant strategies and action items that will guide future capital investments for the department. These include: Focus on “Taking Care of What We Have” – With over $215 million in current replacement value (CRV) of built assets and a current projected backlog of $16 million the community expressed a clear intent to spend priority funds on maintaining and enhancing existing park and recreation facilities to a high standard. The city’s desired Facility Condition Index (FCI) is .05 to .06 and the current backlog of department assets is a projected FCI of .08 (FCI equals total estimated backlog of repairs divided by total CRV). The department’s master plan outlines an FCI goal of .07 to ensure the assets are in a safe and acceptable standard for public use. Throughout the past six years and since master plan acceptance, the department has been able to reduce the FCI by addressing major deficiencies and completing major projects such as the Civic Area redevelopment, many neighborhood park renovations, athletic field upgrades and improvements to the regional facilities such as the Flatirons Golf Course. The recent renovations to the Scott Carpenter Pool and Boulder Reservoir Visitor’s Center will contribute to an improved FCI as both facilities were past their life-cycle and major sources of backlog (maintenance needs). Equitable Distribution - In planning and developing the CIP, the department strives to provide equitable distribution of improvements throughout the city, both geographically and socio-economically. In planning projects and identifying needs, the department 78 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 3 reviews all asset management information to prioritize the critical deficiencies and engages staff as well as the PRAB to understand the capital priorities that exist throughout the community. The planned six-year CIP includes a variety of projects throughout Boulder’s many subcommunities and even emphasizes development of assets within areas not currently serviced as park amenities. Total Cost of Facility Ownership (TCFO) – The master plan also recommends that proposed development of any new park and facility assets shall be evaluated through a feasibility study that includes a needs assessment, user profile, projected participation analysis, development funding method, life cycle cost pro forma and alternative development trade-off analysis. This move toward life cycle management of assets using a concept called the Total Cost of Facility Ownership or TCFO is at the heart of the department’s effort to better manage assets through the Asset Management Program (AMP). This approach frames agency asset management decisions in a framework of ‘cradle to grave’ consideration of how an asset is conceived of, designed, built, managed and maintained, recapitalized and eventually disposed of as shown in Figure 1 (below). Figure 1: Asset Management through the life cycle. Two areas of significant impact for both new and existing facilities is the desire to allocate adequate funding to take care of the Operation and Maintenance (O&M) annual costs and establishing a sinking fund to provide for the anticipated Renovation and Refurbishment (R&R) of facilities to maintain them at the desired standards intended of a new facility. While the O&M and R&R vary depending on the type of facility and the level of use, there are national standards that the department is reviewing to develop recommendations for future investments. The estimated values of each of these requirements are listed below: • Operations and Maintenance (O&M) – This includes all activities required to operate facilities and parks and is included in the operation budget of the department. National standards indicate that approximately four percent of the asset’s current replacement value is required to keep all system components open and functioning at desired levels. With approximately $215 million in CRV, the annual O&M should be approximately $8.4 million. The department is currently evaluating all outdoor operations for O&M functions through the Master Plan 79 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 4 Update and ongoing General Maintenance and Management Plan (GMMP). The department has also finalized the Facility Strategic Plan that provides information on O&M for major recreation buildings. The findings of these reports inform development of the department’s budget, including operating and CIP expenses and will be refined throughout the updated master plan. • Renovation and Refurbishment (R&R) - These are funds required to keep the backlog of regular repairs and renovations of existing assets at the desired condition. Most park major assets can have a useful life of between 30 and 50 years if regular preventative maintenance (PM) and periodic renovations are provided. Using a standard of two percent annual investment in a typical asset, the total recommended annual budget for capital maintenance projects is $4.3 million. Capital Investment Strategic Plan – Working with the PRAB in 2015, staff developed a comprehensive 10-year capital investment strategy (CIS), (see Attachment C, CIS Overview) that outlines changing recreation uses for existing facilities, needs for capital maintenance and development of new facilities. To prepare for and inform the CIS, the department has conducted several planning projects over the past few years as outlined in the MP. These studies are related to the larger goals outlined in the master plan that would significantly replace existing aging facilities while at the same time developing new facilities desired by the community. These studies identified the investment level required to maintain and operate existing facilities as well as provide cost estimates to build new facilities and/or replace aging infrastructure as needed. The capital investment strategy (CIS) is needed to meet those projects that are identified as critical public improvements needed over the next ten years that are beyond existing financial resources. Sources of funds may include additional long-term bonding, pay-as-you-go sales tax, private/public and public/public partnerships, as well as opportunities for private investments for commercial rate facilities and services. To help inform the CIS, the PRAB participated in a voting exercise to help establish a ranking and priority for the capital projects that are most needed and meet the largest needs in the community to allow the department to continue the programs, services and facilities that the community supports. These projects have ultimately become the priority for future funding and demonstrated within the CIS. PRAB’s Role Once again, this year, staff is providing the PRAB with a “three touch” approach to addressing CIP. These “touches” include: 1) the discussion item presented at this meeting that will communicate process, policies and procedures and definitions/criteria that guide the CIP development; 2) a discussion item presented at the May meeting to review draft projects and prioritization as it relates to the 2022-27 CIP; and 3) a PRAB public hearing to be held in June to consider motions approving and recommending the Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program. 80 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 5 Budget and Current Funding Status As illustrated in Table 1, the department’s 2021 CIP is funded primarily from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund (Fund 230), .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (Fund 118) and Lottery Fund (Fund 111). Not all these funding sources are the same and it is important to recognize certain restrictions and characterizations the funding provides. • Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund – property tax dedicated funds for the “permanent improvement of parks and recreation infrastructure” specific to the Parks and Recreation Department. • .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund – dedicated only to Parks and Recreation but can be used for a wide variety of needs across the department. Currently only used for personnel, non-personnel and capital within the administrative and mostly land- based work groups. Could be flexible and repurposed for recreation needs if necessary and deemed appropriate. • Lottery Fund – state funded lottery proceeds with certain restrictions, requires tracking and reporting. Currently only used for capital ($428K) Additional sources of funding that have limitations on the type of capital investment and are not managed exclusively by the department, include the: • Capital Development Fund (Fund 110), • Boulder Junction Improvement Fund (Fund 250) and • Capital Improvement Fund (Fund 260). CIP Prioritization Criteria City-wide, these criteria are used to prioritize capital investments: 1 Safety and Deficiencies: Projects represent important deficiencies and address essential safety and health concerns. Project may include ongoing infrastructure repairs, restrooms, replacements and/or refurbishments of park play equipment and park amenities and critical facility improvements to prevent shutdowns or emergency closure of assets. 2 Compliance and/or Commitment: Projects that are required by law or a ballot initiative or are in process of development and/or are required to be completed within a specific period. Projects on department action plan or council work plan. (Pool, Rez, ADA Access Enhancements, Boulder Revised Code, master plan reference, etc.) 3 Operational Efficiencies: Projects that represent important operational and/or maintenance efficiencies resulting in 81 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 6 improved life cycles, cost efficiencies and savings in resources, energy or water usage. The criterion considers an asset's importance to day-¬to-¬day park management and employee satisfaction. (playground resurfacing, parking lot renovation, turf and irrigation repair, tennis court resurfacing, etc.) 4 Revenue Generation: Projects that support facilities and assets that generate revenues to support valued recreational opportunities in the Boulder community. Projects will enhance the department's ability to earn more revenue after initial investment and operational costs are considered (e.g. Flatirons Golf Course ) and/or possible collaboration/partnerships leveraging outside funding sources. Asset plays a direct role in providing a profitable funding source to the community or has a positive cash flow or asset has demonstrated high RPI scoring. Table 1: Current 2021 Parks and Recreation Capital Projects Aquatics Facility Capital Enhancements Based on recommendations of the 2015 Boulder Aquatics Feasibility Plan, this project provides implementation of priority indoor and outdoor pool enhancements for Boulder's aquatics programs. In 2021, the East Boulder Community Center leisure pool will be redesigned with community input to determine a new and improved family aquatics experience. This work will include a new multi- use leisure pool for warm water classes and instruction, a new play structure and an outdoor splash pad will be completed in 2022 in partnership with Facilities and Asset Management funding necessary facility repairs. $ 120,000 Athletic Field Capital Enhancements Based on key recommendations of the Athletic Field Study, this program will allow implementation of field repairs and enhancements including turf, field renovations and expansion to accommodate additional capacity for sports uses. Average cost for a complete renovation of an irrigation system is $63K and which is necessary to ensure preventative maintenance of the systems. System failures can lead to field closures and loss of revenue from field use. In 2021, funding will be used to explore access improvements for Pleasantview Fields. $ 50,000 82 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 7 Natural Lands Management The department's natural lands team manages over 1,000 acres of wildlife and vegetation conservation areas to support the regions vulnerable ecosystems within urban areas. Capital funding helps support planning and implementation of critical conservation measures and management strategies on the properties. In 2021, funding will provide an opportunity to partner with other departments in developing a comprehensive restoration and management plan for Boulder Creek to balance recreation and public use with maintaining the streams ecosystem which is critical to Boulder. $ 50,000 Boulder Reservoir South Shore Capital Enhancements Continuing to implement the 2012 Master Plan and recent Concept Plan and Capital Strategy, this project will provide key improvements to the south shore recreation area and various visitor amenities to serve the region. Funding is planned through 2026 to continue key enhancement priorities that are outlined each year in the recently approved Concept Plan and Capital Strategy. Projects include a variety of amenities including but not limited to signage, dock repairs, trail connections, pavilions, facility maintenance, road repair, landscaping, and parking lot repair. $ 200,000 Urban Forest Management This project provides annual funding to continue the EAB response by allowing critical safety measures of removing identified trees throughout the city and replacing with new tree species to slow the spread of the pest and ensure safety of the public as well as expanded urban forest management practices. This project also provides treatment of trees designated for preservation and associated infrastructure improvements such as irrigation to ensure sustainability of the new trees. $ 500,000 Flatirons Golf Course Capital Enhancements The Flatirons Golf Course is the only public course in Boulder and provides a highly desired recreation amenity while also contributing to funding sources through revenue generation. The golf course has many planned enhancements to ensure playability and provide necessary visitor amenities. This project will provide design and construction of a new pro shop, clubhouse and staff office to replace the former events center that was demolished as a result of the 2013 flood. The design of the replacement facility will occur in 2019, permitting in 2020 and construction to begin in 2021. $ 6,490,000 83 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 8 Department Master Plan Update This project will provide funding for consultants and staff to complete a 5-year update to the department's master plan to ensure alignment of departmental programs, services and facilities to meet the needs and goals of the community. This project will include various research tools such as a recreation facilities and programs assessment, an updated community survey and outreach to all members of the community to analyze the mission and offerings of the department. A comprehensive historic and cultural plan will be completed in conjunction with this master plan update to provide for goals and recommendations to ensure the sustainability of the departments' historic and cultural assets over time. $ 200,000 Neighborhood and Community Park Capital Maintenance This project provides funding for asset maintenance throughout the system as well as a complete renovation of one neighborhood park annually to meet the goals outlined within the BPR Master Plan and Capital Investment Strategy. The renovations typically include playground replacement, irrigation renovation, forestry maintenance, ADA compliance and shelter repairs. In 2021, renovations will be focused at Scott Carpenter Playground and North Boulder Park. $ 900,000 Recreation Facility Capital Maintenance Based on recommendations of the 2016 Facility Strategic Plan and upcoming Recreation Needs Assessment, this program will provide annual capital funding for implementation of key facility repairs and renovations at the city's three recreation centers to ensure acceptable facility conditions and continue cost-effectively meeting the needs of health and wellness opportunities within Boulder. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Division of Public Works. In 2021, exterior security cameras will be installed at all three recreation centers to increase safety outside the centers within the parking lots and discourage illegal activity outside of normal operating hours. $ 30,000 The City of Boulder takes seriously its responsibility to the community as a steward of public funds and of parks and recreation assets. This commitment requires ongoing analysis of expenditures, and monitoring and evaluation of revenue. For example, staff monitors revenues to help ensure the city uses ongoing revenue sources, such as taxes, to fund ongoing work of delivering city services. This also limits one-time funding revenue to one-time expenditures to ensure it can maintain core services without incurring operational deficits. 84 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 9 Continual monitoring and prudent fiscal management have helped maintain the City of Boulder’s strong financial position. For example, the city has a healthy reserve of funds and a favorable bond rating and the city uses policies, fiscal tools and metrics to fund efficient and effective delivery of city services while remaining resilient to changing economic and environmental conditions. Currently, about twenty-five percent of the department’s capital is funded in the .25 cent Sales Tax Fund while the remainder is primarily funded by property tax via the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. As additional information and guidance is available related to revenue projections, the department’s budget development will align with updated strategies. The PRAB will be informed and future touches will include updates as appropriate. 2021 Budgeted CIP Projects Attachment B (2021-2026 CIP Project Summary Sheet) outlines the currently approved CIP and provides an overview of 2021 projects as well as planned priorities through 2025. Staff will present a brief review of the projects during the regular meeting on April 27 as well as describe current updates that are under consideration for 2020 and beyond for the PRAB’s review. QUESTIONS FOR THE BOARD • Does the PRAB have any questions or seek clarification related to the current 2021 projects? • Does the PRAB have comments regarding the department’s CIP project list for 2022 – 2026 and updates that are considered? • Are there any priority project areas for the PRAB in the upcoming CIP program that align with the departmental master plan and capital investment strategy? NEXT STEPS Important milestones for the CIP process are included below but are subject to refinement. The city’s budget and finance staff are still actively working on the guidelines, schedule and process for the budget development for 2022 and beyond. More information will be available to PRAB at the May meeting. The anticipated schedule is below: PRAB -1st Touch CIP Discussion April PRAB – 2nd touch Discussion Item May PRAB – 3rd touch Approval (Action) June CIP PB/Council Tour TBD Planning Board Hearing August Council Study Session September 85 AGENDA ITEM V-B-ii _ PAGE 10 Attachments: A. CIP Process and Methodology B. 2021-2026 CIP Project Summary Sheet C. CIS Overview 86 1 Attachment A CIP Process and Methodology The city develops a CIP that addresses the ongoing major business needs and maintenance and repair of city assets as well as enhancements and expansion called for in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP). The CIP is a strategic document that assures that the municipal organization maintains a strong bond rating, implements community values, and has fiscal integrity. This includes projects defined as any major project with a cost greater than $50,000 for purchase or construction, or major replacement of physical assets. CIP projects are potentially subject to a Community and Environmental Assessment Process (CEAP) review that evaluates any potential environmental, traffic or social impacts to Boulder residents, neighborhoods and businesses. These projects are budgeted within the framework of the City of Boulder’s CIP Budget. CIP projects are categorized as: • Capital Enhancement o Expansion or significant improvement of an existing asset o Repair damage to existing infrastructure o Enhancement results in a durable, long lasting asset, with a useful life of at least 15 years • Capital Maintenance o Renovate, repair, or replace an existing asset o Enhancement results in a durable, long lasting asset, with an extended useful life of at least five years • Capital Planning Studies • Land and Asset Acquisition • New Capital Project o Construction or acquisition of a new asset o Expanded square footage of an existing asset with associated new use o Project results in a durable, long lasting asset, with a useful life of at least 15 years • Transfers CIP Guiding Principles The city and department prioritize investments both across and within funds based on the following guiding principles: 1. Capital improvements should be consistent with and implement Council accepted master plans and strategic plans. 87 2 2. Capital improvements should achieve Community Sustainability Goals: a. Environmental – sustainable materials, construction practices, renewable resources, etc. b. Social – enhancements that improve accessibility to city services and resources provided to the community c. Economic – effective and efficient use of public funds across the community. 3. As potential capital investments are identified, the city must demonstrate in the CIP process that there are sufficient funds to operate and maintain the project or program. This approach adopted by BPRD is reflected in the Total Cost of Facility Operations (TCFO) policy of the department. 4. The CIP should provide enough capacity and flexibility in long-term planning to be able to respond to emerging, unanticipated needs. 5. The CIP should maintain and enhance the supporting city-wide “business systems”, such as information and finance systems, for the city over the long term. 6. The CIP should sustain or improve maintenance of existing assets before investing in new assets. 7. Capital improvements should: a. Meet legal mandates from federal, state, or city levels; b. Maintain or improve public safety and security; c. Leverage external investments; d. Promote community partnerships; and e. Reduce operating costs and improve efficiency. 8. Capital programming should maximize efficiency of investments demonstrated by measurable cost/benefit analyses and coordination of projects across departments within and across funds. 9. The CIP should provide sufficient reserves to allow for a sound fiscal foundation with benefits that include: a. A strong bond rating; and b. The ability to address emergencies and natural disasters. To plan and prioritize capital investments, department staff applies specific guiding principles based on the city’s CIP Guiding Principles and the department’s master plan goals. The following departmental framework is also utilized to determine and plan CIP projects and make budget decisions that are sustainable over time. These priorities are also focused on maintaining the integrity of the current infrastructure and facilities before expanding and/or enhancing programs and facilities. 88 3 1. Safety/Compliance (S) – Projects represent important deficiencies and are essential safety and compliance concerns. Projects may include ongoing infrastructure repairs, replacements and/or refurbishments of park play equipment and amenities, irrigation systems, landscape and turf upgrades and facility improvements. Compliance considerations also include meeting local, state and federal requirements that are required to be completed to comply with specific regulations, such as city ‘dark sky’ lighting ordinance and the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Commitment (C) – Projects that are required by law/ballot (e.g., Elks Park), are in-process of development (e.g., Valmont Community Park), as part of a prior development agreement, are recommended as part of the department master plan (e.g., playground and irrigation system renovations) and/or are required to be completed within a specific period. 3. Efficiencies (E) – The department will consistently seek efficiency improvements in both operational and capital investments. Projects will represent important operational and/or maintenance efficiencies resulting in improved life cycles, cost efficiencies and savings in resources, energy or water usage (e.g., Flatirons Golf Course irrigation system replacement, computerized irrigation system). 4. Revenue (R) – The department will invest in facilities and programs that generate revenues to support valued recreational opportunities in the Boulder community. Projects will enhance the department's ability to earn more revenue after initial investment and operational costs are considered (e.g. Flatirons Golf Course playability enhancements) and/or possible collaboration/partnerships leveraging outside funding sources. 89 • • 90 • • 91 92 93 94 95 • • • • Parks & Recreation Estimated Total Cost 2021 Recommended 2022 Projected 2023 Projected 2024 Projected 2025 Projected 2026 Projected Capital Program Total 30,974,500$ 8,540,000$ 3,478,000$ 4,710,000$ 6,157,000$ 2,606,500$ 5,483,000$ CIP-Capital Enhancement Total 17,768,000$ 6,610,000$ 1,638,000$ 1,790,000$ 3,630,000$ 100,000$ 4,000,000$ Aquatic Facility Enhancements 2,858,000$ 120,000$ 1,638,000$ -$ -$ 100,000$ 1,000,000$ Capital Infrastructure Enhancements 2,580,000$ -$ -$ 1,580,000$ 1,000,000$ -$ -$ East Mapleton Ballfield Enhancement 2,100,000$ -$ -$ 210,000$ 1,890,000$ -$ -$ Flatirons Golf Course Enhancement 6,990,000$ 6,490,000$ -$ -$ 500,000$ -$ -$ Based on recommendations of the 2015 Boulder Aquatics Feasibility Plan, this project provides implementation of priority indoor and outdoor pool enhancements for Boulder's aquatics programs. In 2020, funding will provide the final touches to the new Scott Carpenter pool with infrastructure and equipment to operate the facility. In 2021, the East Boulder Community Center leisure pool will be redesigned with community input to determine a new and improved family aquatics experience. This work will include a new multi-use leisure pool for warm water classes and instruction, a new kids play structure and an outdoor splash pad will be completed in 2022 in partnership with Facilities and Asset Management funding necessary facility repairs. Finally, in 2025, funding is provided to partner with City Transportation to begin the design of the 30th street improvements along Scott Carpenter park to remain in compliance with necessary infrastructure required through the city's regulatory planning and development review process for Scott Carpenter Pool enhancements. The construction of the 30th street improvements is anticipated to be approximately $1M and is required to be complete by 2026. This project is categorized as "helpful". This project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. Currently undeveloped park sites such as Violet Park in north Boulder and Eaton Park in Gunbarrel have planned amenities that need to be implemented to meet service levels of surrounding neighborhoods. Other properties have seen a dramatic shift in land use adjacent to the park and warranting a redevelopment option to serve more residents such as Mapleton Ballfields. Additionally, this project will provide implementation of planned amenities at developed park sites that haven't been constructed such as restrooms, ballfields, additional sport courts and play areas. The Recreation Facility Needs Assessment completed in 2021 will also outline future priorities that will be funded through this project that will enhance the existing recreation facilities. In 2021, funding is identified to support the redevelopment of the Flatirons Golf Course facility to meet the needs of the community. The new facility will result in an increase of square footage and capital development funds are being used to address the growth related aspects and expansion of city services at Boulder's only public golf course. This project is categorized as helpful. The Flatirons Golf Course is the only public course in Boulder and provides a highly desired recreation amenity while also contributing to funding sources through revenue generation. The golf course has many planned enhancements to ensure playability and provide necessary visitor amenities. This project will provide design and construction of a new pro shop, clubhouse and staff office to replace the former events center that was demolished as a result of the 2013 flood. The design of the replacement facility will occur in 2019, permitting in 2020 and construction to begin in 2021. In 2024, funding is provided to allow for various course improvements including tee boxes, cart paths, turf and irrigation maintenance. This project is categorized as amenity. As a result of the implementation of the Boulder Junction area along 30th street near Mapleton, the area has increased in residential units resulting in more demand for community park and recreation amnenities such as playgrounds, dog parks, open lawn areas and other multi-use amenities. The original area plan indicated a goal of providing park and recretion amenties to this new residential area as development occurs. This project will result in the addition of new amenities at the existing East Mapleton Ballfield site that is in close proximity to Boulder Junction connected by the underpass along Goose Creek.A community planning project will be completed to determine the final design and priorities for construction. Any reduction in ballfields will be replaced at other sports complexes as included in the department's Athletic Field Study completed in 2015. 96 Valmont City Park - Phase 2 3,240,000$ -$ -$ -$ 240,000$ -$ 3,000,000$ CIP-Capital Maintenance Total 13,006,500$ 1,730,000$ 1,840,000$ 2,920,000$ 2,527,000$ 2,506,500$ 1,483,000$ Athletic Field Improvements 176,000$ 50,000$ -$ 63,000$ -$ 63,000$ -$ Boulder Reservoir South Shore 2,676,500$ 200,000$ -$ 1,300,000$ 355,000$ 721,500$ 100,000$ Columbia Cemetery Capital Maintenan 168,000$ -$ 40,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ This project provides for the development of the next major phase of Valmont City Park, south of Valmont Road. Potential amenities to be built include adventure playground elements, community garden space, a splash pad, skate elements, an event pavilion and additional parking. Final plans will be completed in 2023 to determine amenities for development as well as available funding. Final design and permitting will occur in 2024 with construction to commence in 2026. This project also allows for increased park service to the surrounding areas of east Boulder as well as the entire Boulder community. This project is categorized as helpful. Based on key recommendations of the Athletic Field Study, this program will allow implementation of field repairs and enhancements including turf, field renovations and expansion to accommodate additional capacity for sports uses. Average cost for a complete renovation of an irrigation system is $63K which is necessary to ensure preventative maintenance of the systems. System failures can lead to field closures and loss of revenue from field use. In 2021, funding will be used to design parking lot expansion improvements for Pleasantview Fields. This project is categorized as "helpful". Continuing to implement the 2012 Master Plan and recent Concept Plan and Capital Strategy, this project will provide key improvements to the south shore recreation area and various visitor amenities to serve the region. Funding is planned through 2026 to continue key enhancement priorities that are outlined each year in the recently approved Concept Plan and Capital Strategy. Projects include a variety of amenities including but not limited to signage, dock repairs, trail connections, pavilions, facility maintenance, road repair, landscaping, and parking lot repair. This project is categorized as helpful. The cemetery is a designated landmark and requires ongoing maintenance to meet the preservation requirements associated with all the infrastructure ranging from headstones, markers, ornamental fencing and grounds maintenance. This project will provide necessary funding to complete projects as well as local match for leveraging state grant funds. This project is categorized as a helpful project. Parks & Recreation Estimated Total Cost 2021 Recommended 2022 Projected 2023 Projected 2024 Projected 2025 Projected 2026 Projected General Park Improvements 5,481,000$ 900,000$ 1,000,000$ 900,000$ 640,000$ 1,190,000$ 851,000$ Natural Lands Management 675,000$ 50,000$ 50,000$ 75,000$ 500,000$ -$ -$ Recreation Facility Capital Maint 1,030,000$ 30,000$ 500,000$ -$ 500,000$ -$ -$ Urban Forest Management 2,800,000$ 500,000$ 250,000$ 550,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ CIP-Capital Planning Studies Total 200,000$ 200,000$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Master Plan Update 200,000$ 200,000$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Based on recommendations of the 2016 Facility Strategic Plan and upcoming Recreation Needs Assessment, this program will provide annual capital funding for implementation of key facility repairs and renovations at the city's three recreation centers to ensure acceptable facility conditions and continue cost-effectively meeting the needs of health and wellness opportunities within Boulder. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Division of Public Works. In 2021, exterior security cameras will be installed at all three recreation centers to increase safety outside the centers within the parking lots and discourage illegal activity outside of normal operating hours. In 2022, facility maintenance will be focused on the East Boulder Community Center in conjunction with the planned improvements to the leisure pool. This project is categorized as helpful. Trees are important assets to the community and provide many benefits to Boulder. In September 2013, Forestry staff discovered an Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation within the city. The subsequent delimitation survey showed that EAB was well established within a corridor in central Boulder. Over the next 15 years, EAB management, including tree removal, tree replacement, wood disposal and pesticide treatments will have a significant direct budgetary impact to the city and private residents. The loss of tree canopy will have considerable economic, social, and environmental impacts for decades. In September of 2015, an Information Item detailing the Emerald Ash Borer management plan was presented to City Council. As a result of the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a response plan has been developed to slow the spread of the pest and maintain a safe community from the potential hazards This project will provide funding for consultants and staff to complete a 5-year update to the department's master plan to ensure alignment of departmental programs, services and facilities to meet the needs and goals of the community. This project will include various research tools such as a recreation facilities and programs assessment, an updated community survey and outreach to all members of the community to analyze the mission and offerings of the department. A comprehensive historic and cultural plan will be completed in conjunction with this master plan update to provide for goals and recommendations to ensure the sustainability of the departments' historic and cultural assets over time. This project is categorized as important. The department's natural lands team manages over 1,000 acres of wildlife and vegetation conservation areas to support the regions vulnerable ecosystems within urban areas. Capital funding helps support planning and implementation of critical conservation measures and management strategies on the properties. In 2021, funding will provide an opportunity to partner with other department's in developing a comprehensive restoration and management plan for Boulder Creek to balance recreation and public use with maintaining the streams ecosystem which is critical to Boulder. In 2022, funding will allow for the replacement of a trail bridge at Coot Lake Natural Area that is in disrepair and in danger of failure if not replaced within the next year. In 2023, funding will allow the department to complete and inventory and prioritization of the department's populations of prairie dogs across the system to better manage the colonies aligned with the department's goals. In 2024, funding will allow the department to begin relocation of the prairie dogs at Valmont Park to allow for the next phase of planned improvements. This project is categorized as "Important". This project provides funding for asset maintenance throughout the system as well as a complete renovation of one neighborhood park annually to meet the goals outlined within the BPR Master Plan and Capital Investment Strategy. The renovations typically include playground replacement, irrigation renovation, forestry maintenance, ADA compliance and shelter repairs. The current list of parks within the CIP include: 2021 -North Boulder Park 2022 - East Boulder Community Park 2023 - Martin Park 2024 - Parkside Park 2025 - Shanahan Ridge Park 2026 - Elmer's Two-Mile Park This project is categorized as important. 97 43 a b c d e f g h i j k Jay Rd tS ht82tS ht03tS ht74tS ht91US H w y 3 6 Monarch Rd Canyon Blvd Iris Ave Pine St Baseline Rd Lee H i l l D r tS mosloFdR enipStS ht9Valmont Rd Arapahoe Av Pearl St Pearl Pk w ydR egatS edlOWalnut St tS ht67tS ts16Linden Dr South Boulder Rd Colorado Ave tS ht75Violet Ave Mineral Rd tS ht71Gil l a sp i e D rFlagstaff RdtS ht55Independence Rd dR elavyrrehCF o o t h i l l s P kw y Balsam Ave Mapleton Ave Yarmouth Ave Lookout Rd Sunshine Ca n y o n D r Edgewood D r College Ave Spruce St tS ts17State Hwy 119 Marshall Rd Kalmia Ave University Ave tS dr36tS ht55tS ht57tS ht55Foothills PkwyyawdaorBtS ht03Diagonal Hwy28 t h S t Baseline RdBaseline Rd Table Mesa DrtS ht9Valmont Rd GreenbriartS ht82tS dr36B r o a dw a y South Boulder CreekSkunk CreekBoulder Creek Goose Creek W o n d e r l a n d C r e e k 4-Mile Creek Bear Cr e e k Viele Channel Capital Investment Strategy Map February 2016 A B C D E A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Legend Major Capital Investments Park Assets (over 20 years) Nature Areas within 10 minute walk of Parks (1/2 mile) Bike and Ped Trails Designated Bike Route On Street Bike Lane Paved Shoulder Parks Community Areas Maintained by Parks Natural Lands Schools Open Space and Mountain Parks County Open Space Main Creeks YSI /Housing Partner Sites City Limit 1 a Map ID L O CA T IO N 1 Boulder Reser v oir 2 F latir ons G olf Cour se 3 V almont City P ar k 4 P ear l Str eet Mall 5 Civ ic Ar ea P ar k 6 Staz io Ath letic F ields 7 P leasant V iew F ileds 8 Satelitte Ath letic F ields 9 Map leton Sp or ts P ar k 10 Tom W atson P ar k 11 Sc ott Car p enter P ool 12 Sp r uc e P ool 13 Nor th Boulder Rec Center 14 South Boulder Rec Center 15 East Boulder Rec Center 16 Coot L ak e 17 Columb ia Cemeter y 18 Andr ew s Ar b or etum 19 Har b ec k House 20 Haw th or n Com G ar dens 21 Haer ting Sc ulp tur e G ar den 22 Hic k or y Community G ar den 23 Ar ea I I I 24 V iolet P ar k 25 Boulder J unc tion Rail P laz a 25 Boulder J unc tion P ar k 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 3 7 9 2 15 14 11 5 4 17 21 19 22 18 13 12 25 6 10 16 20 24 23 BPR CAPI T A L I N V E S T M E N T STRATEGI C P L A N 2 0 1 6- 2 0 2 6 Prepared f o r t h e C a pi t al I n v e s t m e n t T e a m January 2 0 1 6 BPR CAPITAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2026 Prepared by the Capital Investment Team March 2016 BPR Planning Process & Results Capital Investment Strategy Boulder P&R 100+ Years of Excellence CIS Three Top Projects Scott Carpenter Pool $8M Boulder Reservoir $3M Valmont City Park South $4M In 2014 the City Council adopted the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan and guiding principles. This plan reected over two years of public input as to the future of the urban park system. The master plan identied a clear vision, mission and six core themes to implement the community vision. In addition to the BPRD Master Plan the department has undertaken a number of site plan studies that were identied in the master planning process required to meet future park and recreation needs or address current deciencies. These plans have been summarized in the Capital Investment Strategic Plan. The Capital Investment Strategy provides a development framework plan with specic, implementable urban park design and development recommendations for the enhancement of Boulder’s urban park system. The strategy addresses the need to invest up to $40 million in existing assets as well as $24 million in backlog or enhancements and the desire to invest an additional $60 million in new facilities as identied in the department’s Master Plan over the next ten years. This strategy includes three areas of focus that builds on the vision and values set by the master plan desired to be achieved over the next 10 years through strategic investments in the CIP process. The plan includes a long-term investment strategy as well as an action-oriented implementation strategy that includes both public and private sector investment and partnership opportunities. The project calls for a new 50-meter 10-lane pool would be built for $8 million and an outdoor water park to the site for $5.3 million. The project calls for a new bathhouse and administration building, upgrades to south shore amenities and repairs to boat house and maintenance building. Phase one includes completion of disc golf course, nature playground, picnic area and shelters. Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D rddRReeggggaattSSeeddllOOA 1 2 8 The 1910 Plan for Boulder by the Olmsted Brothers above established parks and open space as community priority. The 2016 Capital Strategy Map to the right builds on this 100 year legacy to invest capital in close to home parks, greenways and major attraction sites for future generations. The department has $75 million to invest over the next 10 years in capital projects. This includes $8.9 million for the Civic Area, $3.3 million for Boulder Junction that is committed. In addition the department is projecting an addition of $50 million from dedicated park funding and approximately $3-5 million from DET funding. . Attachment C 98 Asset Management Systems (AMS) Financial Background Major Facility CRV FCI 90% Standard 80% Standard Savings Backlog EBRC $18,907,343 0.10 $3,079,892 $3,146,599 $66,707 $1,962,118 NBRC $21,337,047 0.06 $5,166,970 $5,428,246 $261,276 $1,377,900 SBRC $9,376,617 0.13 $1,642,329 $1,876,919 $234,590 $1,181,104 Res-Admin $1,500,000 0.31 $837,779 $1,062,297 $224,518 $471,729 Res-Boat House $800,000 0.14 $129,476 $135,551 $6,075 $109,738 Res-Maint $750,000 0.19 $258,080 $305,886 $47,806 $144,623 Totals $52,671,007 0.10 $11,114,526 $11,955,498 $840,972 $5,247,212 Dierence between maintaining facility at 90% over 80% condition saves $840,972 and provides higher quality facilities with higher customer satisfaction. Farnsworth 10-Year Investment Strategy Current Replacement Value = $215 Million Facility Condition Index = .11 Operation & Maintenance - 4% annually of CRV estimated at $8.9 Million Preventative Maintenance (PM) plus Regular & Recurring Maintenance (RR) –2% per year of CRV estimated at $4.4 Million Deferred Maintenance (DM) - items that have not been repaired or replaced based on industry standards estimated at $24 Million. Work Completed Next Steps Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well-being of the entire Boulder communi- ty by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, facilities and programs. Community Health & Wellness Taking Care of What We Have Financial Sustainability Building Community Youth Engagement Organizational Readiness Goals In 2011 the community voted to extend the .25 Sales Tax that funded urban park and recreation facilities and programs. This extension provides an additional $2.2 million in funding available in 2016. In 2011 the community also passed a 3-year bond that provided approximately $9 million in urban park upgrades to existing facilities. In 2014 citizens approved ballot proposition 2-A that included $8.7 million for the Civic Area improvements, $5 million for Boulder Creek Path improvements and $1 for Chautauqua Park improvements. The department’s 6-year Capital Investment Plan (2017-2022 CIP) proposes a total of $40 million in investment in assets. In addition Facility and Asset Management (FAM) proposes to invest $2.7 million in major recreation facilities repairs during the same time period. This represents an annual investment in assets of approximately $7.1 million or $2 million more than outlined in the scally constrained budget of the master plan. This level of investment will maintain existing facilities as well as begin to make the level of investments in key aging facilities required to maintain public service levels. It does not address the full action or vision strategies desired by the community. The facilities portfolio is typically the most valuable asset that public park and recreation organizations manage and often are considered critical to the execution of the organization’s mission. Updating facilities management practices to reect sustainability and asset management principles for these facilities requires the application of complex, interconnected, and comprehensive facility management practices to the asset portfolio. This includes ; 1. Determining the total cost of ownership for the asset portfolio. 2. Developing systems and sta knowledge to support agency implementation of life cycle management. 3. Approval of a capital investment strategy for the agency that focuses on the organization’s mission and is nancially sustainable. This eort will take time and resources; it will require the department to prioritize asset management initiatives as a primary responsibility of our sta, park board, and community. This commitment to the asset management practices uses the simple process below, combined with long range capital investment planning. The department has already begun to address the rst three questions above. It has inventoried all major assets department wide, calculated a portfolio and established a baseline Facility Condition Index (FCI) from which to measure the condition of our portfolio: While the majority of Boulder Park and Recreation assets are in good to excellent condition approximatively 10 percent of existing assets have a poor or worse rating greater with an FCI of .30 or greater. Many of these assets have not been upgraded for a number of years with some aging infrastructure over 60 years old. Investments in these aging assets is a high priority of the department and includes renovations of the Civic Area with 2-A funding that will be constructed in 2016-2018. In addition the department has prioritized Scott Carpenter Pool and the Boulder Reservoir for complete renovations in the next few years. While these improvements and enhancements will dramatically lower our overall FCI there still remains a number of historic assets in need of ongoing repair or replacement. Taking Care of Aging Assets One of the principles of asset management is establishing benchmark standards for each asset to achieve community desired conditions. The city has hired Farnsworth Ltd. to evaluate current condition of major buldings including the three recreation centers and to develop a 10-year preventative maintenance work plan for each building. The chart at the right illustrates the life cycle curve on building maintenance to extend the overall life of a facility. The table above illustrates the investment required over 10-years to maintain facilities at 80 percent versus 90 percent condition. By maintaining facilities at a higher standard the city can increase customer satisfaction while spending less over time. Why Have High Standards? 99 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: April 26, 2021 A. WasteLess Parks Pilot Evaluation Background Starting in September 2020, the WasteLess Parks Pilot allowed BPR to test the appropriate level of service in smaller neighborhood parks by removing trash cans from nine sites. Staff informed PRAB on this pilot in the August PRAB Consent Agenda (pages 15-16). The intent of this item is to review results of the pilot and gather feedback from PRAB on recommendations for the continuation of this program. In 2020, staff analyzed many labor standards for efficiencies to best serve the community and to be good stewards of tax dollars. This is especially relevant given significant reductions in funding because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Park operations staff spend significant amount of time addressing waste in the parks. For example, parks with high visitation such as Chautauqua and Eben G. Fine requires staff to remove waste up to three times a day during the peak season. Removing trash cans from sites with lower usage allows staff to focus efforts on these areas where more clean-up is needed and allows time for other maintenance throughout the system. Parks chosen for this pilot met criteria based on their small size, limited visitation, and proximity to other facilities with trash services. Additionally, staff considered travel time as part of trash routes to each site when calculating potential savings. The WasteLess Pilot is modeled closely after industry leading practices for more sustainable parks. The National Parks Service (NPS) and other state and local parks around the country promote “Trash Free Parks” by removing trash cans from select urban park sites. NPS reported an 80-95% reduction in waste in the parks where this was implemented starting in 2013. In addition to a reduction in time and materials (for trash bags), removal of trash cans also spreads awareness of Leave No Trace™ principles and encourages park users to reduce, reuse and recycle. Analysis 2020 Pilot Results Removing trash cans from the nine pilot sites saved an average of 3 hours of staff time per week. These staff hours were redirected to clean up along the creek corridor, downtown and other heavily used areas which helped maintain safe and useable parks. 100 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Annual savings from the pilots total approximately $6,200. This includes staff time, fleet/fuel, trash bags and other materials. Staff monitored all nine sites regularly and did not find any increase in litter or piling of waste in place of cans. In Sinton park, a site with historic litter issues and complaints, staff found an overall reduction in waste and litter after removal of the cans. Staff reported no piles or overflowing receptacles near Bear Creek despite concerns from community members. Community Engagement and Feedback In advance of the project staff posted signage in the nine parks involved in the pilot, posted information on the city website and posted on NextDoor for each impacted neighborhood. In September we heard from concerned community members who live near Bear Creek and Catalpa Parks. There were only a few or no complaints from the other seven parks involved. Several dozen responses were received for these two locations with requests that the cans be returned due to usage by those walking dogs and those who stop at nearby bus stops. Responses decreased in frequency after the initial pilot launch as many learned more about the pilot program and adapted to removal. At Bear Creek, in late fall there was a report that nearby waste receptacles at a private development and tennis court were over-filled. Based on this limited feedback, staff propose these next steps: -In most locations, the community seems ready for a revised level of service and adapted to the Leave No Trace concept. Thus, due to savings with no increase of litter at the sites, staff recommends continuing this program at the nine sites. -Staff are coordinating with other departments to explore dog waste composting at Bear Creek Park. -As capacity allows, staff would like to identify additional locations where the service level may be too high. In doing so, similar community engagement would include consulting with impacted neighbors and ensuring that levels of service are not disproportionately lower in neighborhoods with higher percentages of people of color. -As staff adjusts the appropriate service level for waste, we will codify this level of service in the Design Standards manual. (Currently listed on page x) based upon park typology, amenities, and visitation. Staff will continue to evaluate operations to ensure resources are being allocated appropriately and efficiently to maintain an equitable and enjoyable park experience. Staff also hopes to engage community members and partners in opportunities to increase sustainable practices and to provide education on sustainability issues including waste diversion. This includes the potential for dog waste composting. Traditional composting, available at many parks in the system, cannot handle dog waste which is a significant source of the waste at many sites. Currently, dog waste composting is offered at the Valmont Dog Park; the program is funded by plastic bag fees and costs $15,000/year. These funds continue to decrease as plastic bag usage decreases across the city. The program is cost-prohibitive to expand to other parks without tradeoffs to other levels of service or new funding. 101 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 B. Summer 2021 Service Levels and Boulder Parks and Recreation Capacity As pandemic conditions improve and warm weather returns, community members are looking forward to all the fun that comes with summer in Boulder. Staff, too, are eager for all the great memories and health benefits that will be facilitated in our parks, facilities, and programs this summer. The PRAB has benefited from many items regarding the budget since the pandemic began (outlined in this December 2020 Matter from the Department, Item C, page 8) and the intent of this item is to provide an overview of summer services and to define where service levels are reduced due to the ongoing financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic or limited capacity. The PRAB’s understanding of, and support for, staff’s reduced and limited capacity will be important to helping to manage community expectations. Specific impacts by program area are addressed below. BPR would also like to remind the PRAB and community that based on decreased capacity and the overarching challenges of continuing to work amidst a pandemic (e.g. regularly changing public health guidance, fluctuating staffing levels due to quarantines or isolations), the general business of operating the parks and recreation system is more consuming than typical. Communications and responses may take additional time based upon urgency, prioritization, and capacity. General Resource Overview 2021 resources are reduced over pre-pandemic levels and as such, services continue to be limited. Some services are restricted due to lack of funding. In some areas, services are not offered as they would require the hiring of additional standard staff. While summer revenues may support such expenses, the long-term recovery into the fall and winter remains uncertain and staff continue to proceed cautiously to ensure fiscal responsibility. 2019 Actual 2021 Budget* % Reduction Operating Budget $21.5 million $20.2 million 6% Standard Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) 141.50 125.75 11% *Reflects budget projected as of April 2021. Budgets are revised regularly based upon revenues, trends, and economic forecasts. COVID-19 Recovery Dial Boulder County Public Health has announced a dial framework for COVID-19 guidance where Boulder County will be in Level Blue, allowing slightly increased capacity indoors and encouraging in-person interactions outdoors, through May 15. If new hospital admissions remain low, Boulder County will enter Level Clear for 90 days, tentatively through August 15. Under Level Clear, local capacity restrictions and mitigation are no longer required buy may be encouraged. Recreation Centers and Outdoor Pools For the three recreation centers and Spruce Pool, staff utilized 2018-2019 attendance data to outline summer 2021 operating hours. Scott Carpenter hours are set based upon pro 102 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 forma projections for lap and leisure pool operations. Lacking sufficient funds to operate all five facilities at pre-pandemic levels, 2021 summer operating hours reflect these goals: • Streamlined service hours across the portfolio; • No increased need for standard staffing; • Sustainable workloads for existing employees; and • Balanced budget with no unintended use of subsidy. Tables 1 and 2 reflect the pre-pandemic operating hours (summer of 2019) and 2021 Operating Hours for the recreation centers and seasonal facilities. A detailed list of anticipated summer operating hours compared to pre-pandemic hours can be found in Attachment A. Facility Summer 2019 Weekly Operating Hours Summer 2021 Weekly Operating Hours North Boulder Recreation Center 100.5 hours 75 hours East Boulder Community Center 102 hours 75 hours South Boulder Recreation Center 94 hours 30 hours TOTAL 296.5 hours 180 hours Table 1: Recreation Center Operating Hours Facility Summer 2019 Weekly Operating Hours Summer 2021 Weekly Operating Hours Scott Carpenter Lap Pool 192 94 Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool N/A 56 Spruce Pool 86 56 Boulder Reservoir 112 98 TOTAL 286.5 hours 304 hours Table 2: Seasonal Facility Operating Hours General Recreation Programs (Health & Well-being, Sports, and Gymnastics) Staff continue to utilize the Service Delivery Model to offer programming based on staff capacities and what is safe and financially feasible. • Health and Well-being will offer both indoor and outdoor fitness opportunities for a variety of community members. The number of classes being offered is extremely limited due staff capacities, current demand, and instructor availability. Current program and drop-in classes represent roughly 15% of historic offerings. The focus this summer will be on general programming and special events (e.g. Yoga Under the Stars, Goat Yoga) will not occur. 1 2018 Operating Hours 103 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Gymnastics continues to offer programming to a variety of experience levels. The program is currently at roughly a 65% recovery. High level competition is still on hold; however, staff have recently supported mock meets to encourage friendly competition. Minimal gymnastic camps programs are available this summer. • Sports is focusing on offering the most popular programming this summer while temporarily discontinuing services with the least impact:  Adult Softball and Kickball are currently being offered and are at a roughly 30% recovery.  Adult Soccer is currently being offered as a pilot through a contracted partner.  Youth programming, such as Gonzo Tennis, Skyhawks Sports, and youth lacrosse continue to be offered through contracted partnerships.  Adult leagues, such as Spikeball and Pickleball, and Youth Rock Climbing will not occur and will be revisited as staff capacities allow. Community Recreation Programs (Youth & Families, EXPAND, Camps, Financial Aid) Staff continue to prioritize the restoration of services first for those that need them most, including participants in YSI, EXPAND, Camps, and Financial Aid programs. • Youth Service Initiative (YSI) will continue to provide in-person opportunities for under-represented and under-resourced community members through:  Rec on Wheelz mobile ‘van-based’ physical activity at manufactured home communities.  Getting Fit for physical activity tailored for teens living in Boulder Housing Partners sites and manufactured home communities.  Boulder Housing Partners physical and social programming at Madison and Manhattan housing authority sites.  Healthy Together physical activity for cohorts of students in the I Have a Dream Boulder County program • EXPAND will enhance the lives of people with disabilities through:  Camp AMICO for youth and teens age 12 to 18 years old with developmental disabilities, running for 6 weeks over the summer  Outdoor Adventure Camp for elementary age children with mental health diagnosis/behavioral needs  Special Olympics sports training for soccer and swimming  In-person physical activity through ‘Stretch and Smile’, ‘Twist and Shout’ cardio dance, and Water Aerobics  Adaptive Waterskiing for people with physical disabilities in partnership with the EXPAND Beyond organization at the Boulder Reservoir.  Inclusion Support to provide individualized support plans for the inclusion of all people in summer programming, with a strong focus on the camp offerings below. • Camp programming for Summer 2021 will provide campers and working parents with summer care options through:  Kidz Kamp East: for campers age 5-11 at the East Boulder Community Center, this camp seeks to replace a long year of ‘screen time’ with gym games, arts, crafts, water play, and more in-person programming. To 104 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 support COVID safety best practices on contact tracing/grouping, enrollment will be in two-week sessions.  Rez Camp: to be hosted at the newly renovated Boulder Reservoir facilities, this camp for ages 7-14 provides a mix of sports, water activities, soccer, nature walks, and water ecology.  Goats & Gardens: one of Boulder’s most popular camps, this offering for kids aged 5-11 combines the wonders of Growing Gardens, the goats at Mountain Flower Goat Dairy, and the activities of the adjacent North Boulder Recreation Center.  Partner camps: in alignment with Master Plan direction, specialty camp programming is largely provided by local specialty providers. 2021 options include Drama, Pottery, Sports, Technology & Engineering, Sailing, and Biking. • Access and Inclusion: BPR is committed to providing access for everyone to facilities, services and programs, including support through the Financial Aid Program and by providing accommodations for people with disabilities.  Temporary Expansion of Financial Aid: To address some of the unique challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Financial Aid Program has been temporarily and automatically expanded to extend benefits to current participants through April 30, 2021. Additionally, new applications have been opened to online enrollment, with appointments available for in-person or online-video support, and income documentation extended to include proof of unemployment insurance benefits. The Financial Aid Program is partially funded by the Health Equity Fund. Boulder Reservoir 2021 fees and service levels at the Boulder Reservoir reflect analysis included in the annual post-season evaluation and input from the PRAB at the October 2020 meeting (see item online: 2021 Boulder Reservoir Operations). All Reservoir recreational services will resume when the peak season launches Memorial Day weekend, including the swim beach and Driftwind restaurant in the new Visitor Services Center. Peak season hours are outlined in Table 3 below. 2019 Peak Season: 2020 Peak Season: 2021 Peak Season: Monday – Sunday: 5:00 am – 9:00 pm Monday – Thursday: 8:00 am – 7:00 pm Friday – Sunday: 7:00 am – 8:00pm Monday – Sunday: 7:00 am – 9:00pm Table 3: Reservoir Summer Operating Hours The new flank season and twilight access fees began April 15 (see Table 4 for Reservoir Seasons). Jan 1-April 15th April 15th- Memorial Day Memorial Day -Labor Day Labor Day to - October 15th October 15th- December 105 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 31st Season Low Season Flank Season High Season Flank Season Low Season Gate Staffed All Open Hours Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Gate Fee No Yes Yes Yes No Swimming area Water Safety No No Yes No No Lake Patrol Begins in March Yes Yes Yes Ends in November Boating Access- (permit and ANS protocol required) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Table 4: Reservoir Seasons Flatirons Golf Course With sustained revenue through the pandemic, Flatirons Golf Course will operate on a schedule very similar to historic operating hours. Current standard staffing levels reflect one lay-off in 2020, and adult programming is currently provided by a pilot partnership. Youth Programming is again provided by The First Tee, an international youth development organization introducing the game of golf and its inherent values to kids and teens. The summer programs at Flatirons GC aim to shape the lives of young people from all walks of life by reinforcing life skills like integrity, respect, and perseverance through the game of golf and fun. Land Operations: Urban Parks, Natural Lands and Forestry Operations Our parks, natural lands and urban forest are increasingly challenged by growing visitation, vandalism and impacts from a changing climate in the form of drought, snowstorms and wind events. All these stressors limit the capacity of our staff to address ongoing operations and maintenance. Similarly, the pandemic has added stress through reduced budgets and staffing availability. Land operations are primarily funded by the General Fund and .25 Cent Sales Tax fund – both of which are sourced from sales tax that has seen fluctuations as demonstrated in our recent budget presentations. As a result, the 2021 operating budget only maintains funds for services that ensure the safety of park properties, including mowing, playground maintenance, hazardous tree removal, waste management, graffiti ordinance compliance and mitigating the impacts of illegal encampments in public spaces. Other services levels are reduced for 2021. Staff looks forward to the current master plan process and other initiatives underway to review BPR’s overall financial strategy to increase our ability to serve the community and focus on taking care of what we have. 106 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 The service levels reduced in the 2021 budget related to park operations, forestry and natural lands include those that enhance the visual experience of visiting a park, proactive maintenance, and preventative work related to the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation in Boulder. Examples include: • Reduced materials and labor to perform the cultural practices (such as topdressing, aeration, and weeding) that support healthy turf without the use of pesticides and allow for rapid repairs, resulting in delays in restroom and lighting repairs. • Reduced frequency for work that enhances the neat appearance of a park but do not impact safety, such as string-trimming and edging. • Limited issue of Shelter Rental and Large Group permits to align with available staff resources dedicated to maintenance. • Reduced the contract with Boulder County Sheriff’s Office for the jail inmate work crew and BridgeHouse Ready to Work; these crews typically perform weeding, mulch distribution, and vandalism repair across the system. • Reduced funding for small equipment transitions to electric equipment, resulting in longer life cycles of current gas-powered pieces and potentially increased maintenance on older equipment. Re-planting fewer trees then what is needed to meet target goals for maintaining current urban canopy throughout the city, the target set in the 2019 Urban Forest Strategic Plan. • Minimal EAB or tree-related outreach, continuing lower-cost methods such as news releases, notifications (letters/doorhangers), and website. • Canceled the annual Tree Sale and Tree Giveaway. • Increased rotational pruning (which makes trees stronger, healthier and more resilient to storm, freeze and snow damage) to 15 years for street trees (previously 10 years) and 9 years for park trees (previously 8 years). The Urban Forest Strategic Plan sets standard at 8 years for both based upon industry recommendations. • Eliminated contracts for EAB tree removals, now performed by in-house crew and reducing capacity for preventative parks pruning rotation as Ash removals are a higher priority. Attachments Attachment A 2021 Summer Operating Hours Compared to Pre-Pandemic Hours 107 April 26, 2021 Matters from the Department. Attachment A : 2021 Summer Operating Hours Compared to Pre-Pandemic Hours NORTH BOULDER RECREATION CENTER MON-THURS 2019 2021 FRI SAT SUN EAST BOULDER COMMUNITY CENTER MON- FRI SAT SUN SOUTH BOULDER RECREATION CENTER MON- THURS FRI SAT/SUN SCOTT CARPENTER POOL MON- FRI LEISURE SAT/SUN LEISURE SPRUCE MON- FRI SAT SUN TOTAL OPERATING COVERAGE MON- FRI SAT SUN Pre-Pandemic Hours 2021 Anticiapted Hours Leisure Pool Outdoor Pool Operations 8 9 10 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 5 6 7 5 6 7 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 1089 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 3 4 5 6 7101112 5 6 7 8 9 1 256789 8 9 10567891011121234567 10123456 105567834678910 3 31011 10 11 12 9111212 7 8 9 10 10 4 5 6 7 8 9 5 6 7 8 94 12 1 2 10 11 12 1 256789 5 6 7 8 9 108 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: April 26, 2021 A.New Board Member Introduction (verbal) B.July Meeting Date Change Staff recommends moving the July meeting to Monday, July 12 at 6:00 p.m. This will allow staff to incorporate feedback from PRAB on the Master Plan before presenting to City Council on July 27. C.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) 109