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04.12.21 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting6:00 p.m. March 29, 2021 Rescheduled for April 12, 2021 due to King Soopers Tragedy 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Raj Seymour Charles Brock Elliott Hood Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (2 minutes) II.PRAB PROCEDURAL ITEMS - Updated April 7, 2021 A.Honoring Departing Board Member (verbal) (15 minutes) B.Welcome and Induction (10 minutes) C.Officer Elections (15 minutes) III.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (2 minutes) - Updated April 7, 2021 IV.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (15 - 30 minutes) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. V.CONSENT AGENDA (5 minutes) - Updated April 7, 2021 A.Approval of Minutes from January 25, 2021 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update VI.MATTERS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION A.Master Plan Research & Trends System Snapshots (90 minutes) B.2020 Year End Financial Review and 2022 Budget Strategy (60 minutes) VII.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT A.East Boulder Subcommunity Plan Update (20 minutes) VIII.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS - Updated April 7, 2021 A.PRAB Recruitment and Orientation Update (15 minutes) B.May Study Session (5 minutes) C.Annual Board Email Response Check-in (10 minutes) D.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. IX.NEXT BOARD MEETING: 6:00 p.m., April 26, 2021 X.ADJOURN I, Elliott Hood, do solemnly swear (affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States of America and of the State of Colorado and the Charter and ordinances of the City of Boulder, and faithfully perform the duties of the office of a member of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board which I am about to enter. Elliott Hood STATE OF COLORADO ) ) COUNTY OF BOULDER ) SS.: ) CITY OF BOULDER ) Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of _______________, 2021. Board Secretary OATH OF OFFICE TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: PRAB Procedural Items – Officer Elections DATE: April 12, 2021 A. PRAB Officer Elections There are currently two nominations for PRAB Officers for the 2021-2022 term: • Chair: Raj Seymour • Vice Chair: Pamela Yugar Both candidates have accepted their nomination. Other nominations may be made during the PRAB meeting on April 12 before voting occurs. PRAB OFFICER ELECTION PROCESS 1. There are two officer positions on PRAB’s 7-person membership (described below). Chair – • Leader and facilitator of PRAB; Calls, conducts and adjourns meetings • With Vice Chair, Department of Parks & Recreation Director and staff PRAB Liaison, establishes each meeting agenda • Drafts PRAB annual letter to Council (with input of entire PRAB membership) • Coordinates PRAB annual Work Plan • Primary PRAB liaison to City Council • Confirms PRAB meeting dates and may call additional PRAB meetings or study sessions • Signs Meeting Minutes Vice Chair – • In absence of Chair, performs Chair duties during public meetings • With Chair, Department of Parks & Recreation Director and staff PRAB Liaison, establishes each meeting agenda • Coordinates PRAB annual Work Plan • Secondary PRAB liaison to City Council 2. Absent a resignation or termination, incumbents hold the role for a one (1) year period. 3. Current PRAB members may self-nominate and/or may be nominated by another member. Staff may not nominate PRAB members for Officer roles. A PRAB Member may be nominated for one or both the Officer positions. 4. Letters of interest in nomination/formal letter of nomination of another PRAB member must be submitted directly to the board liaison annually. 5. Those nominated are then contacted by staff to determine their interest in accepting nomination(s). 6. Staff will then notify standing PRAB members of nominees for each role with the meeting packet. Nominees for Officer MAY submit a letter expressing their interest in the position(s) to staff who will forward same to the entire PRAB membership. 7. In order to ensure transparency of process, elections for officer positions will be held during the April PRAB meeting. Absentee votes may be submitted directly to staff in writing in advance of the meeting. 8. Standing or incoming PRAB members MAY participate in voting or may choose to abstain in the voting for officers. 9. Selections are determined by majority of votes of participating PRAB members. PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS UPDATED: April 7, 2021 MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE PRAB March 29: April 12 • PRAB Procedural Items (p) (40min) o Departing Board Member o Welcome and Induction o Election of Officers • Master Plan Research & Trends System Snapshots (d/i) (90min) • 2020 Year End financial review and 2022 Budget Strategy Continued (d/i) (60min) • East Boulder Subcommunity Plan Update (md) (20min) • PRAB Recruitment and Orientation Update (mb) (15min) • May Study Session (mb) (5min) • Annual Board Email Response Check-in (mb) (10min) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) (10min) April 26: • 2022 Budget Strategy Continued (d/i) o Scenario Planning and Fees o 2022-2027 CIP 1st touch • Boulder Reservoir Update (d/i) • New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • WasteLess Parks Pilot Review (md) May 24: • Financial Strategy (d/i) o 2022 proposed operating and fees o 2022-27 CIP 2nd touch • Master Plan: Study Session (d/i) • Master Plan – Sharing Youth Voices (md) • COVID Recovery (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 28: • 2022-27 CIP (a) • 2022 Operating Budget (md) • Racial Equity Plan (md) • Master Plan Follow- up for Council Study Session (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) Department Events and Items of Interest • March 4, 9, 11: Board Applicant Interviews (cc) • March 16: Board Appointments (cc) • March 22-27: BVSD Spring Break • Master Plan Engagements will be posted here (e) • April 20: CU South Direction on Key Issues (cc) • April 27: Update on Encampment Resourcing and Safe Camping (cc) • May 4: Severe Weather Shelter, Coordinated Entry, and Health & Safety Regulations in Public Spaces (cc) • May 10: PRAB Study Session on Budget • May 11: 2021 Ballot Items (cc) • Memorial Day Weekend: Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool, Spruce Pool. Reservoir Swim Beach Opens for season. AGENDA SETTING The PRAB Chair, PRAB Vice Chair and BPR staff set the agenda for the next month on the Thursday directly following the regular PRAB meeting. PRAB members can submit agenda requests to the Chair and Vice Chair by Wednesday following the PRAB regular meeting for consideration. If time-sensitive matters arise, PRAB Chair and Vice Chair may amend the agenda as needed. LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion following the consent agenda. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in- depth analysis. City Council Item (cc) Other Boards and Commissions (obc) Community Engagement and/or Events (e) Holiday/Closure (h/c) Italics indicate a tentative date or plan. CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: February 22, 2021 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffmann, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Chris Passarelli, Ali Rhodes, Christy Spielman, Jonathan Thornton, Dennis Warrington Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:02 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Seymour. Second by Brock. Passed 6-0. Yugar arrived at the meeting. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Kim Bixel, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns about the new restaurant at the Reservoir. Shirley Schaller, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared her family history living near the Reservoir and concerns about increased traffic on 51st St. Jason Smith, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns about the new restaurant at the Reservoir. Eric Tussey, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns about the new restaurant at the Reservoir including the lack of specific operating details in the lease. Tannis Sampson, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns the new restaurant based on bad experiences with past events at the reservoir and about past violations of the liquor license at another restaurant operated by Dine and Dash. Bernee Strom, neighbor to the Reservoir, shared concerns that the restaurant would change the character of the reservoir and that the lease was too lenient. Greg Kass, former neighbor to River and Woods, another restaurant operated by Dine and Dash, shared complaints about River and Woods alcohol and event management. Parker Dodd, president of the board of directors of Boulder Tennis Association, introduced his organization and mentioned several issues regarding tennis courts. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from January 25, 2021 Motion to approve the minutes from January 25, 2021 as presented. Motion by Yugar. Second by Scott. The motion passed 7-0. B. Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. • Could you tell us more about the focus groups that are taking place for the BPR Master Plan this week? What key stakeholders are included? • The current questionnaire on BeHeardBoulder is complicated and may take longer than people are willing to spend. Is the goal to reach the general community with this questionnaire? Will the complicated language discourage people from taking it? • Are this week’s BPR Master Plan focus group meetings private or open to the public? • How many responses is BPR hoping to receive on the current questionnaire? How does this compare to previous questionnaires? • The current number of responses seems low. Can BPR offer an incentive to complete this questionnaire? Is it possible to do a phone survey? • Are we missing responses from the Hispanic community on this questionnaire? Will BPR be going door to door to get answers? • How can BPR make it exciting to participate in this planning effort? • PRAB members can help spread the word by forwarding the questionnaire or talking to their contacts about what parks and recreation includes. • Though current COVID restrictions allow up to 50% capacity in gyms, this seems like too high of a number. Since the virus is mainly transferred through the air, what HVAC or air filtration improvements have been made? • Given plans for a restaurant at the golf course, is BPR reconsidering plans for neighborhood outreach efforts for that project given the issues with the restaurant at the Reservoir? • Pictures of the playground at Chautauqua look incredible. • The prioritization of youth programming is greatly appreciated. • Will PRAB hear details about the trends of changing programming and uses of indoor recreation as part of the 2022 Budget conversation? • A community member with a disability shared that he had a fantastic experience Scott Carpenter this past fall. Motion to amend agenda to discuss the Reservoir Restaurant Update directly after the 2022 Budget. Motion by Seymour. Second by Unger. Motion to amend agenda to discuss the Reservoir Restaurant Update before the 2022 Budget. Motion by Brock. Second by Scott. Seymour rescinded his motion. The motion by Brock and Scott passed 7-0. Agenda Item 5: Matters from the Department A. Reservoir Restaurant Update This item was presented by Rhodes. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • It feels like BPR is being reactionary to neighbor complaints. What public process happened already and what may have been missed? • What issues occurred at the restaurant River and Woods, operated by Dine and Dash? How can BPR ensure those issues do not occur at the Reservoir? • Will private events be evaluated on a case-by-case basis? Will the impacts of traffic and the total number of people be regulated? • For concerns related to traffic safety at night, has BPR asked the county traffic engineer and sheriff about adding a speed hump or something to physically slow cars? • Waiting for crashes to occur before making modifications is reactive, while Vision Zero aims to be proactive in preventing crashes before they happen. • The evening session of the BPR meeting with neighbors had lots of questions and concerns shared. Staff showed willingness to collaborate with neighbors on solutions like including them in a future sound check. Another good thing that came out of the meeting was the discussion of the Good Neighbor Agreement and the draft will be reviewed by neighbors. Neighbors also brought up concerns of headlights shinning in houses at night which was a concern that had not been considered before. It was great to have council, staff and neighbors discuss this topic together. • The advisory board’s role is to advise staff, but the board does not make decisions for staff in this case. • Will the restaurant operations and any concerns be reviewed every year? Agenda Item 6: Matters for Discussion/Information A. 2022 Budget Strategy This item was presented by Hite, Passarelli and Hoffmann. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Given that the financial recovery may be longer than expected, recommended that staff focus on taking care of what we have. • Is the projection for income from sales tax developed by the City of Boulder or BPR staff? • Does BPR currently have any debt? • Has BPR considered the impact of a potential $15 minimum wage? • Has BPR considered potential impacts of federal COVID recovery aid? • By 2026 BPR would be nearing the reserves we had pre-pandemic. Why is BPR focused on recovering reserves so quickly? Agenda Item 5: Matters from the Department (continued) B. Safe and Welcoming Public Spaces This item was presented by Rhodes. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Park Rangers could be a positive presence in the parks and could be better than police. • The staff work to clean-up encampments and parks is greatly appreciated. • The skate park under the library would be a positive addition. Where in the process is this idea? When might that project be completed? • Are staff considering regulated camping in parks? PRAB’s letter to council stated that they did not support unregulated camping, but regulated camping in parks was not discussed. • Support for positive activation of spaces and all the ideas presented. • In-house cleanup has many advantages. • Public spaces will likely be in high demand again this summer. Garbage and other negative uses may be a problem during this busy time. • Is there an update on the possibility of having restroom attendants? • The clean restrooms at Harlow were appreciated. • PRAB’s letter, which did not support camping, did represent many voices in the community. Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) • Brock and Winer attended the Microaggression and Bias Training offered by the city. • Is it possible to use this time for PRAB members to raise any other topics of conversation or questions? • In the past, PRAB did use this time for open discussion and it sometimes created pressure to share unrelated information. • PRAB members can use the time to share any comments or questions if they have them. • It would be helpful to receive update on all properties. • Can staff include an update about activities at the Harbeck House at the March meeting? • The PRAB Chair and Vice Chair meet with staff to set the next agenda three days after the last PRAB meeting. If PRAB members send requests to the Chair and Vice Chair before that meeting, topics can be discussed for addition to the next month’s agenda. • It would be helpful if PRAB members can keep the same subject area for responding to community emails for more than one year. • No other board in the city handles emails like PRAB agreed to last year, but some boards showed interest in adopting a similar system depending on how it works for PRAB. • The email responses will shift based on what projects or topics need attention at any time. Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, March 29, 2021, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 9:01 p.m. Motion by Fronzaglia. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: March 29, 2021 Rescheduled for April 12, 2021 due to King Soopers Tragedy The Boulder Parks and Recreation Department joins the chorus of voices from our community as we are heartbroken by the lives lost during the March 22 tragedy; our deepest condolences go to the families of those who lost their lives and those impacted. All employees, elected and appointed officials and community members are encouraged to take care of their family, their neighbors, and themselves. Here is a list of community mental health resources and ways to donate. At the April 6, 2021 City Council meeting, Mayor Sam Weaver read the Boulder Day of Remembrance Declaration. Every year, March 22 will forever be marked as Boulder Day of Remembrance, and our community will pause and remember the ten people who died, we will celebrate their lives and on that day, every year, we will say their names out loud so that, in our hearts, they will live on. Now, more than ever, we need to circle around our family, friends, and neighbors to provide support and be supported. Our mission to promote the health and well-being of the entire Boulder community is even more critical in light of the ongoing trauma to our community from this recent tragedy and the ongoing challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. To that end, we are eager to work together to stay connected, resilient, and allow spaces for healing and recovery. A. Approval of Minutes from February 22, 2021 B. Parks and Recreation Department Updates The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. City Manager Recruitment On March 16, Boulder City Council approved the recommendation of the city manager hiring committee, voting unanimously to name Nuria Rivera-Vandermyde as Boulder’s top leader. Rivera-Vandermyde will move to Boulder from Austin, Texas, where she currently serves as deputy city manager. A bilingual native of Puerto Rico, Rivera-Vandermyde will become the first female city manager of color in Boulder’s history and the second female city manager. “I am truly honored and excited to become Boulder’s next city manager,” she said. “Boulder has been a dream destination for me and my family for some time now. As a public servant, I have had the privilege of working in cities that are leaning in and addressing some of ou r most challenging issues, and I look forward to collaborating with council, talented staff members and an engaged, passionate community.” Council Member Aaron Brockett, who served on the hiring committee, told his colleagues this evening that “the feedback was really quite overwhelming in favor of (Rivera-Vandermyde’s) selection, and I think she will make an extraordinary leader.” Rivera-Vandermyde has been a local government leader since 2013 when she was hired by the City of Minneapolis, Minn., as the director of regulatory services. She progressed to the roles of deputy city coordinator and city coordinator within that time. In 2019, she moved to Austin to take on a deputy city manager role. Rivera-Vandermyde received her Juris Doctor degree from New York University School of Law and her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and English from Amherst College. Interim City Manager Chris Meschuk will continue to serve in this role until Rivera- Vandermyde’s start date, which is May 10. Racial Equity Plan City Council unanimously accepted Boulder’s first Racial Equity Plan at the February 17, 2021 meeting. This plan is part of the City of Boulder’s work to advance racial equity, and much of it focuses on steps the city organization must take to eliminate systemic and institutional racism in its policies and practices. City staff created the Racial Equity Plan with significant and valuable community input guiding the development. It is a living road map that will lead the City of Boulder government through the process of prioritizing goals, specifying details and assigning resources to achieve meaningful change. The plan describes goals and strategies for staff, boards, City Council, as well as coordination with the community and partners to advance racial equity. Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) will support implementation of citywide efforts related to equity-focused leadership, employee training, and community partnership. In 2021, BPR-specific efforts to implement the plan include: • Developing of a BPR staff-based equity team to lead implementation of Racial Equity Action items within the department (Q3). • Piloting the departmental assessment to identify areas of focus to be woven with Master Plan implementation/strategy development (Q3-4). • Integrating racial equity into Master Plan – the process will reveal community input/needs on addressing equity (Q1-4). • Utilizing the Racial Equity Instrument in our budget process to inform the 2022 operating budget and 2022-2027 Capital Improvement Program. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Philanthropy Update: The Planning and Ecological Services Team has been actively working with donors and grant agencies over the past several months to explore leveraged funding that supports the department’s capital projects and operations. Donations made improving the City’s urban parks, paths, tree canopy and recreational facilities help our entire community become healthier, safer, and more sustainable benefiting this and future generations. Providing vibrant, accessible, inclusive spaces for all members of our community is critical to our way of life. Mo and Jennifer Siegel have lived near Chautauqua for many years and the playground represents a special place for their family. In the 1990’s, Jennifer and her father, Bob Cooke, actually built the existing children’s playhouse that mimics the auditorium with a local Girl Scout troop and still spend time in and around Chautauqua daily. Upon learning of the renovation planned for the playground, Mo and Jen realized an opportunity to partner on the project and continue their family connection to the playground. Through a generous contribution, Mo and Jen made this renovation possible and funded upgrades to the playhouse, the 2-5 yr. old play structure, the Eldorado Climbing Boulder. The playground will be considered the “Sleepy Bear Playground” with the final addition of a special feature to be revealed this spring when he returns from hibernation. Great Outdoors Colorado Grant Award! The application submitted to GOCO’s Resilient Communities grant program was funded by GOCO’s board on March 11, 2021 BPR’s portion of the application was funded in full, in the amount of $62,000. The Natural Lands team is excited to begin recruitment for the seasonal naturalist/ranger position supported by this funding, as well as the infrastructure improvements that will occur this season. A few other gifts and donations are currently underway and will be shared with the PRAB as the gifts become finalized with the donors. • Skatepark and Pumptrack Update: As part of the early concept planning of the Scott Carpenter Park and Pool Renovation, the idea of renovating and improving the skate park was a high priority for the community. More recently, throughout the past year, staff have kept PRAB updated on the progress of adding new skate features throughout the city and specifically at Valmont City Park in conjunction with the planned improvements to the access off Valmont Road. After delays due to COVID impacts, the project has come closer to reality with final designs and permitting followed by construction occurring this spring and summer. A full summary and reminder of the project can be viewed here. Although recently awarded the #1 place to live in the country by US News and World Report, Boulder still has serious income disparities and BPR serves a significant number of people with limited incomes. Especially in the time of COVID -19, Boulder has seen the sport of skateboarding / BMX riding prove to be one of the few opportunities that supports an active lifestyle by getting kids outside safely with appropriate physical distancing and no shared equipment while still allowing free, safe recreation and socializing in this difficult time for our youth. Boulder has only one small skate park to serve a community of over 100,000, of which 42% are under the age of 24. This existing skate park, Scott Carpenter Skate Park, was one of the first built along the Front Range over 21 years ago. In a recent informal online questionnaire hosted on the BPR website for the public to give feedback, 27% of those responding explained that they prefer to drive as far as Arvada and Denver to skate and ride to enjoy more modern amenities. The addition of the new skate features and pumptrack planned for construction the city are supported by community members and stakeholder groups and will provide these benefits: • Almost double the amount of skateable space in the city • The location will serve a large portion of the city’s low-income residents • An accessible, low entry-cost activity • Outdoor, socially distant recreation opportunities • Much needed beginner features for learning The anticipated schedule for the improvements includes: • April: Apply for building permits • May through early mid-June: Pump track installation and site work/amenities around pump track • Early May: Begin major Valmont site work • April 12 through May 21Construct skatepark at Howard Heuston and Scott Carpenter • Early May through end of July : Construct skatepark at Valmont • Harbeck-Bergheim House: Tenant Status Update (Women’s Wilderness): In June 2020, BPR entered into a three-year lease agreement for the property at 1206 Euclid Ave, Harbeck-Bergheim House (house/property) with Women’s Wilderness (tenant) as the master tenant. The lease, which is set to renew prior to June 1, 2023, was structured to provide the tenant with ability to sub-lease additional office space to other non-profits. This master-tenant/sub-tenant leasing structure provides the department an ability to receive supplemental proportional sub-lease income payments, annually. For 2020, the supplemental payment was initially set at either the greater proportional minimum of $5,000 or the lesser proportional payment at 5% of total sublease income, generated by the master tenant. The payment is due by the master tenant the following January of each fiscal year. While social and financial limitations due to COVID -19 impacted the tenant’s ability to sub-lease additional office space, at the level initially projected for cost recovery and generating sub-tenant income, Women’s Wilderness continued a thorough programing schedule throughout their highest months of activity, June through August. Just prior to January 2021, the department reviewed the sub-lease proportional income payment structure with Women’s Wilderness and offered them a partial waiver of the initial terms (Section 2.1.D.ii) through a second amendment to the lease. The partial waiver eliminated the 2020 annual payment of the greater proportional minimum of $5,000, yet retained the 2020 annual payment of the lesser proportional minimum at 5% of sub-lease income ($531.85). The intention of extending this partial-waiver was to accommodate limited tenant sub-lease income due business, financial and social impacts from COVID-19. The department will gauge any projected impacts for 2021 with Women’s Wilderness as they continue to support our community through their mission to support girls, women and LGBTQ+ people in accessing their power and improving their health through outdoor and community connections. • CU South Property: With the approval of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Update in 2017, the City of Boulder and Boulder County approved new land use designations and guiding principles for the CU South property. The guiding principles are now incorporated into Chapter 5 of the comprehensive plan and will be used to guide future decisions around annexation of CU South. The city is working to determine the conditions of annexation for “CU South” under which the University of Colorado’s South Campus would fulfill both the desires of the University system and meet the goals of the City of Boulder. The annexation agreement will be guided by the BVCP CU South Guiding Principles, and a modified annexation process that will provide opportunities to influence the annexation terms through city boards and commissions and the city council meetings. If annexed, the CU South would come under the city's jurisdiction like the other campuses. Utility services also could be extended to the site. Annexation would not mean the city would own the site. Visit the CU Boulder project web page and City’s webpage https://bouldercolorado.gov/flood/cu-south for more information. The university submitted an annexation application in February 2019. The primary document used in the negotiation between the city and CU Boulder is a term sheet structured around the CU South Guiding Principles. The intent of these discussions is to “translate” the guiding principles into enforceable annexation terms. The annexation agreement will include general topics that impact the entire site (e.g., administrative processes, wetland protection standards, transportation impacts) and more specific standards that apply to geographic areas of the site. City and CU Boulder staff are aligned or mostly aligned on many topics. City staff identified several issues relating to Parks and Recreation facilities, including: • A formal running track with field sports as part of the university’s overall construction of recreation facilities. The university has proposed that 30 acres of the site be set aside for future recreation fields. The city has proposed that these recreation fields be available to the public and include a formal running track. Throughout the past several years, the city has received increasing numbers of track and field athletes approaching requesting a new facility for these types of sports. This is in large part to decreased acc ess of the public on to CU Boulder tracks and limited availability on Boulder Valley School District tracks. A new track and field venue at CU South, with some level of public access, would solve many of these types of challenges. • A publicly accessible dog park in their future for CU South. This area has long performed as an off-leash dog area for all the various residential areas adjacent to the site and this area of the city could use a designated dog park. Currently, the city provides dog parks in the east part of the City (East Boulder Community Park, Valmont) and the north at Foothills Community Park. The city and university are in ongoing negotiations and expect to share more information in early April. Some key dates in the project include: o April 12 Transportation Advisory Board meeting. City Council formally requested the board’s opinion on the submitted traffic study and overall approach to transportation-related issues. o April 18 Planning Board meeting to weigh in on key issues and development- related topics. o April 20 City Council meeting to review the status of the negotiations and weigh in on any points of disagreement. Staff expects a second reading of the annexation ordinance in August, though that timing is dependent on the progress of negotiations between the city and CU Boulder. • East Boulder Community Park Restroom: The current Capital Improvement Program provides funding for the design and construction of a new year-round restroom facility at East Boulder Community Park. The new restroom will provide much needed services for users of the park, athletic fields, tennis and handball courts, dog park, and playground. Other improvements will include a new shade shelter with tables, a year -round drinking fountain with bottle filling station, and installation of water hydrants in the small and large dog park. Installation of the restroom is currently projected for the late spring / early summer of 2021 depending on product availability and fabrication times. Previous PRAB updates indicated that the installation of utilities was planned to begin in March of 2021. To provide ample and adequate communications with the public and user groups, the utility installation has been rescheduled until April. Temporary disruptions along Sioux Drive can be expected during the utility installation. All impacts will be coordinated with the city’s Right of Way and Transportation Department. Impacts will also be coordinated with the East Boulder Community Center staff and other user groups that may be impacted. All construction activities, including the installation of the restroom facility, will be planned to minimize impacts to athletic field programming and general park use. Future updates will be provided as the construction schedule is finalized. • Planning Projects Underway : Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP) o Skate Park Improvements and Pump Track Project o BPR Master Plan Update (see Discussion item) o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Major construction activities at Chautauqua Playground have been completed. Some elements of the park renovation will occur in the spring with warmer temperatures. This includes installation of a basketball goal, installation of pickleball nets and restriping of the pickleball courts, final landscaping, irrigation renovation, and nature play elements . • Scott Carpenter Athletics Building: The Athletics Building at Scott Carpenter, the old pump house for one of the city’s previous waste-water treatment facilities, has served the Parks and Recreation Department in many different capacities over the years. Along with the 2020 redevelopment of the outdoor pool facility, the Athletics Building was also renovated by the department’s Parks’ Construction staff to provide a multi-use space for staff and the community. The Athletics building now provides spaces for lifeguards, a space that can be used for trainings, meetings, and eventually community events or activities during the season. • Scott Carpenter Public Restrooms: The public restrooms at Scott Carpenter, located at the south end of the new bathhouse, were temporarily closed to address warranty items related to the overall redevelopment project. These items have been addressed and the restrooms are expected to reopen within the next two weeks when the facility can be added back into the cleaning rotation. Forestry The Boulder Forestry workgroup is responsible for all aspects of tree care for approximately 50,000 public trees including planting, pruning, removals, integrated pest management, tree risk assessments, inventory, development review and tree protection. Arborist licensing, public education and enforcement of diseased and dangerous tree codes allow the workgroup to influence management of an estimated 600,000 trees on private property. • Recent Recognition The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) along with the Arbor Day Foundation has recognized the City of Boulder with the Tree Cities of the World designation for the second year in a row. Boulder is one of only 120 cities from 63 countries recognized, and one of only 38 cities in the U.S. The international program celebrates cities across all continents that meet core standards for the care and planning of urban trees and forests. To achieve recognition, the city met the five core standards: establish responsibility, set the rules, know what you have, allocate the resources and celebrate achievements. The vision of the Tree Cities of the World program is to connect cities around the world in a new network dedicated to sharing and adopting the most successful approaches to managing city trees and forests. Since 2013 and the discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB) in the city, Boulder Forestry has planted more than 3,200 trees on public property and has provided more than 3,900 trees for residents to plant on private property. In June 2018, PRAB approved the Urban Forest Strategic Plan (UFSP), a comprehensive assessment of and 20-year plan for the Boulder urban tree canopy. The UFSP stablished an overarching goal to maintain a 16% urban tree canopy within Boulder. The plan outlined four themes of sustainable urban forestry including Plan, Manage, Protect and Engage and detailed action items within this structure to guide the future management of Boulder’s urban forest. The Tree Cities of the World program is built off the success of the Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree City USA program, which has provided recognition to cities within the United States for more than 40 years. In addition to this new designation, Boulder has been named “Tree City USA” for 36 consecutive years and was also awarded the Tree City USA Growth Award in 2018 by the National Arbor Day Foundation. More information is available at TreeCitiesoftheWorld.org. • American Elm Pruning In the 19th and early 20th century, American elm was a common street and park tree in the eastern U.S. and was planted heavily across the Colorado Front Range owing to its tolerance of urban conditions, rapid growth, beautiful yellow fall color and vase-shaped form. An invasive fungal pathogen, Dutch elm disease, ravaged American elm populations across the country from the 1950’s through the 1990’s. Dutch elm disease led to the mortality and removal of over 30,000 American elms across Colorado including approximately 1,000 elms within the city of Boulder between 1972 and 2011. Fortunately, we have been able to control the spread of Dutch elm disease within the city through proper pruning practices and good sanitation including prompt identification of infected trees, removal of diseased trees and proper wood disposal. As a result, we still have 174 American elms over 10” diameter left in city parks and public street rights -of- way. Some beautiful specimens can be found in Chautauqua Par k, the western portion of the University Hill neighborhood and in the rights-of-way on both the east and west sides of North Broadway Ave. near the North Boulder Recreation Center (NBRC). Due to other pests and additional stress from drought, late spring freezes and severe temperature fluctuations, our American elms needed extra care to ensure their long -term preservation. In 2016, we started trunk injections of a low toxicity pesticide, azadirachtin, to help reduce elm scale populations and two years ago we started a special program to provide dormant season, deadwood pruning to our significant American elms. American elms should only be pruned during the dormant season, so the fresh pruning cuts do not attract the banded elm bark beetle, vector for the Dutch elm disease fungus. An example of this pruning occurred on March 2 when our Forestry workgroup teamed up with Blue River Forestry, a local tree care company, to prune the eight large American elms on the west side of North Broadway across from the NBRC. The project took considerable coordination including auto and pedestrian traffic control plans and set up, notification to adjacent property owners, reducing conflicts with parked cars on private property, and scheduling for the contractor. The pruning not only removed significant deadwood and improved tree health but also removed previous storm damage improving public safety for the traffic on Broadway. Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. • Urban Wildlife Management: Birds of Special Concern: Closures to protect sensitive nesting species went into effect March 15th for the western side of Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake Wetland. Signage has been installed to inform visitors of these important resources. Recruitment and virtual training for the annual Birds of Special Concern volunteer program has begun. These monitors provide valuable data about the behavior and success of nesting species around the Reservoir. • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration; o Visitor management; o Volunteer Programs; and o Boulder Aeromodelling Society coordination. C. Operations Update COVID-19  The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus.     • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery: Boulder County has been approved for participation in the State of Colorado 5 Star Certification Program. BPR staff are coordinating with citywide teams to determine feasibility to apply for 5 Star Certification under the Gyms/Fitness category and will remain active in these efforts. Staff will continue to provide regular updates to the PRAB on opportunities to restore department services. • Recreation Programs and Facilities: Department services continue to be adapted in schedule, format, or capacity to align with Level Yellow in the state’s COVID -19 dial framework. Staff have been closely monitoring operations to be responsive to community needs and demands based on the utilization of services, industry best practices, and working to deliver a broad spectrum of access options while also focusing on financial sustainability. Over the coming months, a range of incremental adjustments are anticipated to manage these operations as follow: March-April: • Swimming Pools: o Advanced reservations will continue to be required, though entry fees will now be collected at check-in rather than in advance. o Lap swimming lane availability will expand to allow 2 swimmers per lane. o Lap swimming hours for vulnerable populations will be made available, with a limit of 1 swimmer per lane. o Shared leisure swim hours are being piloted at the EBCC leisure pool and NBRC lap pool/plunge slide for a limited number of reservable household bookings. • Weight Rooms/Fitness Classes/Gymnasiums: o Advanced reservations will no longer be required except for high-demand classes. Patron information will be captured at check-in for contact tracing. o Capacities will initially be limited to 30% (Blue/Yellow guidance allows 50%) and adapted based on utilization. o Hours for vulnerable populations will continue to be made available. May-June: • Swimming Pools: o The Scott Carpenter Lap Pool is being prepared for an early-May opening, dependent on weather. o The Scott Carpenter Leisure Features and Spruce Pool are being prepared for a Memorial Day Weekend opening, dependent on weather. o Full operational plans will be shared at the April PRAB meeting. Tentatively, staff are exploring: • Scott Carpenter Pool • Advanced reservation, with timed entry. • Capacity based on current public health orders, operational limitations, and community member compliance during Spring leisure pool pilot at the recreation centers. • Spruce/Recreation Center Pools • Advanced reservations continue to be required, though entry fees will be collected at check-in rather than in advance. • Lap swimming lane availability will expand to allow 2 swimmers per lane. • Lap swimming hours for vulnerable populations will be made available with a limit of 1 swimmer per lane. • Boulder Reservoir o Swim Beach: Capacity will be managed based on current public health orders, operational limitations, and community member compliance during April leisure pool pilot at the recreation centers. o Picnics: Picnic applications are currently being accepted. Picnics will be facilitated at 4 of 9 designated picnic sites for 2021. All Picnic groups will be required to follow the current COVID-19 guidelines according to the Boulder County Dial. All groups will be required to provide a COVID plan at least 30 days prior to reserved date. o Boating: Capacity limits will be managed based on normal operating procedures, and first come first serve. When lake boating capacity reaches between 20-25 powerboats and based on type of activity on the water, lake will move to a one off, one on protocol. Smallcraft use will be managed in a similar way with numbers on water being monitored and move to one off/one on protocol. • Park and land-based operations will continue to operate under relevant COVID dial guidance for personal gatherings and outdoor events . Staff will maintain the posting of community health safety reminders, emphasize personal responsibility, and work closely with partners in Boulder County Public Health to address reports of health order violations. While these areas have seen strong community compliance to date, increased management has been occasionally necessary to remedy issues around sport tournament spectators, basketball court use, and gatherings in Eben G. Fine Park. • Vaccines: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has oversight of the distribution of all COVID-19 vaccines for local communities. City staff are working closely with Boulder County Public Health to evaluate the potential use of sites and facilitie s for the purpose of vaccine distribution. Gov. Jared Polis has announced that the state will open the next phase in its vaccine distribution plan on Friday, March 19. In addition to local government employees, Phase 1B.4 will include people age 50 and up as well as a variety of other job field-specific groups. The city continues to explore setting up a vaccination clinic for staff, to make the vaccination process as easy as possible. The city’s prioritization approach for any city-exclusive vaccine slots will be for in- person employees first, and remote workers following the completion of in-person workers. For the most recent information on services available, the department regularly updates the Status at a Glance found on this webpage.  Arts in the Park In response to COVID-19's significant impact on local arts and culture, and in alignment with Boulder’s Civic Area Master Plan, the Department has developed Arts in the Park - a new program providing a vibrant blend of arts and cultural performances to be held at the historic Glenn Huntington Bandshell in Central Park. The program will run from May to September and provide event infrastructure for performing arts groups as place to put on socially-distanced outdoor performances, helping create safe and welcoming activation within the downtown park. Events will be ticketed, and part of the program sponsorship criteria includes creating an “accessibility plan” a imed at keeping these ticketed programs welcoming and accessible to all members of the community. Most groups applying for dates have committed to providing free or discounted tickets, and discussions are underway with the PLAY Boulder Foundation to assist in distribution for under-resourced community members. Currently, a call for artists has been put out to design a poster and logo for the Arts in the Park program. Compensation for creating the design project will be given for two components: a log o for the program and a poster design for the program. Any artists interested in participating should contact Events Manager Justin Greenstein at greensteinj@bouldercolorado.gov for submission guidelines. Looking ahead, department staff will work with partners in the Office of Arts & Culture, and the Office of Special Events to select performing arts groups, schedule the performances, and offer sponsorships and stipends (in the form of ‘Arts to the Rescue’ support for Audio/Visual equipment) to qualified organizations. Boulder Creek Festival Presented by the City of Boulder, The Boulder Creek Festival has been the official kickoff to summer in Boulder and has been hosted annually for more than 30 years. Typically held over Memorial Day Weekend, the festival is produced and managed by Team Player Productions and was cancelled in 2020 after careful deliberation and discussions with Boulder County Public Health, community partners, and the City of Boulder. With vaccines becoming more widely available - along with continued mask wearing, staying 6 feet apart, and limiting gatherings – organizers believe the community is headed in the right direction and are cautiously optimistic that Boulder Creek Festival will be able to celebrate Boulder community and culture in 2021. Accordingly, organizers are excited to share that the date for the 2021 Boulder Creek Festival has been set for July 16-18. This event will undergo review from the citywide Special Event Review Team and will include a complete COVID-19 operation plan in compliance with current state and local guidance. Summer Sundays Market New this year, the City of Boulder presents the Boulder Creek Summer Sundays Market, hosted in the Civic Area near the Bandshell from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays. This free community event, produced and managed by Team Player Productions, features handcrafted goods and wares from artisan vendors typically found at Boulder Creek Festival. Yet another way to support local Boulder businesses and makers leading up to Boulder Creek Festiva l, the weekly event kicks off on May 16 with its last installment on June 27. This event will undergo review from the citywide Special Event Review Team and will include a complete COVID-19 operation plan in compliance with current state and local guidance. Updates to Boulder Revised Code 5-7-2 Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP), in collaboration with the Boulder Police Department and the Parks and Recreation Department, are seeking to update the language for Boulder Revised Code 5-7-2 to correct outdated information. There is a need to update and make changes to the City Code to clarify that the prohibition of alcohol found in B.R.C. 5-7-2 applies to OSMP property located outside of the city limits as well as inside. This update will enable enforcement under City Code and provide city -wide consistency with regulations, enforcement, signs and messaging. Parks and Recreation is using this opportunity at updating the code’s outdated language so that it will accurately reflect current facility names and operating hours for locations where consumption is permitted since the code was adopted in 1986. The revision will also remove the natural land area of Coot Lake from the list of locations where consumption is allowable without a permit. To implement these changes to B.R.C. 5-7-2, OSMP and Parks and Recreation staff will be working with the City Attorney’s Office to prepare a draft ordinance for City Council consideration. PRAB Reservoir Update Dredging project The reservoir dredging maintenance project has been completed. Draining and removing sediment as well as dam outlet inspection were all completed without incident. This will ensure dam safety and effective water delivery to municipal and agricultural water users. In addition, erosion control work at Fisherman's point and along the North shore will reduce sedimentation in the reservoir and enhance visitor safety. North shore closures have been lifted in most areas, the remaining closures are to allow restoration of undesignated trails and shore stabilization areas while still allowing water access. Water levels are returning to normal. It is expected that water levels will be consistent with 2019 levels for the 2021 season. The reservoir reopened water access, including boating, on April 1. There has already been significant use over the past week; 498 recreationists visited the South Shore April 1-5. Flank Season fees Flank Season Gate Fees, as discussed with the PRAB in October 2020, will be implemented on April 12. As a reminder, these fees take effect as weather warms up and all services are offered except for the swim beach. Boulder Reservoir’s peak season fees begin May 27. For Flank Season visitors, an access gate fee of $5.00 per visitor or $10 per car applies. This reduced fee aligns with the reduced level of service while still having visitors pay for the services provide, including front gate supervision, restroom accessibility, Lake Patrol and North shore patrol. Boat Permits New this season, the Boulder Reservoir staff implemented an online boat permit sales process to facilitate access amidst the pandemic and to make the process more accessible for custom ers. BPR staff created an online sale process through Active.Net, the city’s existing recreation software, that included the purchase of permits, storage, and collecting the necessary signatures for all supporting documents. Boulder Reservoir staff held Zoom meetings for all boaters to update them on operational changes, remind them of the importance of ANS protocols, and revisit safety procedures. This process was well received. Season permits include 7days per week access and holidays; weekday permits include access Monday-Friday and exclude holidays. All powerboat and sailboat permits are sold out. Full season smallcraft permits are also sold out and weekday access permits are s till available... Permit sales to date (Table 1) Permit Type Number Sold to Date Season Power/Sail Permits (Sold Out) 206 Weekday Power/Sail Permits (Sold Out) 25 Season Small Craft (Sold Out) 1200 Weekday Smallcraft (178 Available) 322 Weekday Smallcraft Permits- In 2020 staff sold an additional 300 smallcraft permits given the increased demand during the pandemic for a total of 1,500 smallcraft permits. While allowing the Reservoir to serve more customers, it created traffic and safety challenges during peak times. Since these smallcraft permits are in high demand and sell out quickly, and based upon PRAB input in October 2020, the staff offered 500 weekday -only passes along with returning to the historic limit of 1,200 all-week passes. This will encourage more visitation during the quieter times of the week while promoting safety at all times. 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: March 29, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: Master Plan Update: Research and Trends Analysis and Findings PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design & Community Engagement Manager Regina Elsner, Parks Planner Tina Briggs, Parks Planner Morgan Gardner, Associate Planner Becky Zimmermann, Principal-in-Charge, Design Workshop Amanda Jeter, Project Manager, Design Workshop EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Since the project kick-off in September and the December discussion related to the overall process and approach with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB), staff and the consultant team have been hard at work in the initial phase of the Master Plan Update. The Research and Trends phase has been an opportunity to look back at all that has been accomplished since 2014, identify growth, as well as opportunities for continued improvement in the future. The purpose of this item is to review the findings from Research and Trends, including outcomes of stakeholder, staff and public engagement, key outcomes from those findings and how they are influencing the next phase of the project, Needs Assessment. Upon review of the memo and presentation, PRAB will be engaged in the following key questions to ensure alignment and confirmation to proceed to Needs Assessment. A few key questions that PRAB will be asked are at the end of the memo to frame PRAB’s review. 2 PRAB’s overall role in this process is to shape the master plan update and policy to ensure that the community’s needs for its parks and recreation system are being delivered in alignment with the values outlined. Success will be measured by the board’s recommendation of the plan for acceptance by City Council. Figure 1 very briefly indicates where we are at in the process and where we are headed. A more comprehensive timeline and approach can be viewed here. Figure 1: BPR Master Plan Update Process as of March 2021 BACKGROUND: PRAB has been engaged multiple times for the Master Plan Update. At the December 2019 meeting, PRAB provided input on the overall approach for the update to ensure alignment between staff and PRAB. In April 2020, staff shared an update with the PRAB given COVID-19 impacts on timing and budget. Following successful contract negotiation, PRAB participated in the project kick-off during the September 2020 meeting. At the November 2020 meeting, PRAB reviewed the public engagement plan and helped staff prepare for a study session with City Council in December 2020. An update from that council study session was provided at the December 2020 PRAB meeting. Some of the key comments and direction from PRAB at our last meeting in December that have shaped our process and approach include: 1. Ensuring the impacts and lessons learned from COVID impact this process and the outcomes. 2. Understand the impacts of climate change and how that will influence all aspects of our work. 3. Effectively engage our neighbors and residents specifically in a time of isolation and distancing. 4. Work to reach unengaged and non-users of our system and programs. 5. Seek to understand the benefits of Parks and Recreation both economically and socially/mentally. 3 Project Approach As a reminder from previous PRAB engagement with the project, the Master Plan Update is broken into five phases. The list below provides a high-level description of the milestones, deliverables or meetings for each phase that will result in a final Master Plan and provides an update as to what has been completed to date: Project Initiation and Kick-off  Kick-off Meetings to confirm project critical success factors, schedule and risk management.  Draft Public Engagement Plan outlining the four engagement windows.  Formation and meetings with BPR staff Management Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) and Working Technical Advisory Group (WTAG)  November 23 PRAB Meeting  December 8 City Council Study Session  Development of master plan graphic themes, templates, and table of contents  Informational video to support community engagement – In Progress. Research and Trends  Update of 2012-14 White Papers that provide information, research and best practices to inform the update – In Progress.  Past Planning Efforts Review to pull out key takeaways and cross-reference planning efforts since the 2014 master plan to white paper topics.  December 15 White Paper Charette with BPR staff and consultant team to identify research gaps and prioritize content to inform the current state snapshot.  Four stakeholder focus groups in 2021 to uncover on-the-ground trends, challenges and opportunities.  System overview snapshot to provide graphic, high-level overview of the current state of BPR parks and recreation facilities – In Progress. Needs Assessment  Review and update of BPR facilities inventory and assessment – In Progress  Gap analysis updates to the per capita level of service tables for 2020 and future population projection point – In Progress  New gap analysis map or analysis around equity – In Progress  Supply and demand trends memo and maps – In Progress  Statistically valid survey with Spanish version as well as open participation link – In Progress  Benchmark update of 2014 study – In Progress  Scenario planning and draft strategy matrix – In Progress 4 Implementation Plan  Draft implementation plan  Draft plan on a page that highlights big moves of master plan.  Financial overview and funding strategies memo Master Plan Acceptance  Master Plan Draft #1 (word document)  Master Plan Draft #2 (graphic, PDF document)  Master Plan Draft #3 (PDF for online and stakeholder review)  Master Plan Final Document ANALYSIS: As outlined above, the Research and Trends phase of the project includes a few project deliverables and approaches moving forward that staff would like to share with PRAB within the analysis section of this memo: • Results from Engagement Window #1 • Synthesis of Outcomes and Findings • What will the next 5-7 years look like? Results from Engagement Window #1 The project team utilized the Public Engagement Plan shared previously with the PRAB to develop the content and tactics utilized in Engagement Window #1. Engagement Window #1 focused on developing interest and awareness of the project with decision-makers, staff, as well as community members. This engagement developed a common understanding of the current mission and vision of the department, outcomes achieved since the 2014 plan and agreement on the future opportunities and challenges to further explore in this process. The full Engagement Window #1 Summary is provided in Attachment A. This section is intended to provide PRAB a high-level overview of engagement activities and findings. How those findings are influencing the process is included in the second section of analysis. Communication and Engagement Tactics Engagement Window #1 formally opened on February 3, 2021 with a press release that was picked up as a short news brief published in the Daily Camera on February 4, 2021. This was followed closely by citywide and BPR specific newsletter, social media posts and other virtual outreach. A short segment on the Master Plan Update was included as an Inside Boulder News story released on February 5, 2021. Additional social media posts and newsletter follow-ups were sent to encourage participation up until the final deadline of February 28, 2021. This included posts to Gobiernoboulderco, a citywide Facebook page with exclusively Spanish content. All content on the project’s Be Heard Boulder webpage were fully translated into Spanish, except for the previously developed 5-year Progress Report and video. 5 The project team has on-boarded two Spanish-speaking community members to be a part of this process. These Community Connectors are supported by the Communications and Engagement Department with funding from BPR to serve as consultants on this project. Their role includes participating in a staff sub-committee focused on community engagement to ensure opportunities are culturally relevant and meaningful for the Spanish- speaking community. They are also tasked with helping to facilitate engagement opportunities within their community, whether that is through targeted one-on-one conversations with others or helping ensure service providers working with underserved communities share the engagement opportunities through their networks. Specific engagement activities were provided on the project’s Be Heard Boulder project page, including an anecdotal questionnaire, an interactive map exercise, a memory tab to share about a BPR park or facility, and a questions tab to submit their questions to staff. Metrics and Participation in Online Engagement At the conclusion of the questionnaire on February 28, 2021, 463 questionnaires had been submitted, including 24 from staff and three in Spanish. Community members were asked to choose three of the key themes that they wished to provide comments on and then asked three additional questions for each theme. Finally, community members were asked for the one big idea that they felt would be the most beneficial for the department to pursue in the short term. The number of questionnaires was higher than anticipated, especially with the limited in- person opportunities for staff to engage with community members. In addition to a high response rate for the survey, the project’s web pages received over 3000 hits. Targeted Engagement To capture a broad cross section of engagement, the team has worked with many different groups to solicit feedback and find alignment or differing opinions, the following outlines key information from each group: Decision-maker Engagement (PRAB and City Council): On December 8, 2020, the project team held a study session with City Council to present the project approach and engagement plan, key themes from 2014, and brief overview and approach to equity and resilience. Overall, council was supportive of the process and approach as presented and indicated that equity and resilience are appropriate topics for additional evaluation. See the City Council Study Session Summary for more information. Staff Engagement: On December 15, 2020, staff came together for a three-hour facilitated conversation focused on identifying specific accomplishments and areas for improvement related to the existing and new white papers. The charette was kicked off with keynote speakers from Vancouver, San Diego and Denver discussing their lessons learned from incorporating equity into their master plans and everyday work. Breakout sessions then focused on 6 conversations about asset management, recreation programs and services, resilience, and equity. Staff identified specific accomplishments, areas for improvement, information or data gaps, areas for greatest impact, and big ideas for each of these topics. All BPR staff were invited and encouraged to participate in the anecdotal values questionnaire presented as part of general community engagement on Be Heard Boulder. 24 BPR staff responded to that questionnaire. Generally, staff responses were included with community responses as discussed below. Overall, staff responses mirrored very closely the community responses. The key themes of Taking Care of What We Have and Community Health and Wellness were the most popular themes to discuss for respondents. Staff then focused on Financial Sustainability, while the community focused on Youth Engagement and Activity, Equity, and Resilience before Financial Sustainability. This is an understandable difference given how invested staff are in the ongoing financial wellness of the department. Stakeholder Engagement (Select reps from key partners or user groups): Four focus groups were held in late February to dive into topics around equity of access to recreation, programming, parks, indoor facilities and outdoor amenities. Attendees came together from across Boulder and the surrounding areas to discuss parks and recreation trends. Most stakeholders were those that provide similar services and programs to BPR and others that frequently partner with BPR. This included stakeholders from underrepresented groups including aging adults, youth program providers, affordable housing and homelessness advocates, and nonprofits that work mainly with the Latinx community and other communities of color. Youth Engagement (Growing Up Boulder & Youth Opportunities Advisory Board): Throughout this spring semester, the project team has been working with both Growing Up Boulder (GUB) and the Youth Opportunities Advisory Board (YOAB) to hear from youth voices. GUB is partnering with several teachers and classes across the district to engage on this process. A team of high schoolers from YOAB are working on targeted methods to engage with their peers. This work is ongoing throughout the spring semester with reports expected later in quarter 2, along with results from Engagement Window #2. What did we hear? The project team received 463 questionnaires, each with the opportunity to provide up to 11 open-ended responses. Staff reviewed and analyzed those responses and found a high level of alignment with discussions from stakeholders, staff, PRAB and City Council. Below is a highly condensed summary of those the engagement discussions and 7 responses. A more detailed summary can be found in Attachment A: Engagement Summary #1 and the full list of questionnaire responses can be made available upon request. Overarching Themes: There were several overarching ideas commonly mentioned within different contexts depending on the key theme. • Concerns about homelessness, encampments and the specific challenges related to parks and recreation. • Impacts of a growing and changing population on the overall parks and recreation system including the need for additional facilities. • Challenges with resources and capacity related to sustainable funding. Equity and Resilience: There was a general acknowledgement that the City of Boulder has done significant work to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and access. These issues must continually be addressed proactively and deliberately. Overall, equity and resilience were expected to explicitly weave into every key theme rather than becoming additional new key themes. • Ensure that everyone in Boulder has access to parks and recreation programs and services and feels welcome in those spaces. • Leaving people unheard and disconnected would be a detrimental non-action. • Ensure that BPR and its staff are ready and able to adapt and respond to future change and/or crises. • BPR has a role to play in the preservation of urban ecosystems promoting resilience throughout the community. Key Themes: Key themes were used to organize the responses and discussions to evaluate the continued importance and validity of those key themes for the master plan update. Outcomes of those discussions indicated the six key themes identified in the previous master plan are still important and valid for this update. The key themes most discussed were Taking Care of What We Have and Community Health and Wellness. Other themes with a higher level of discussion included Youth Engagement and Activity along with Building Community and Relationships. Financial Sustainability and Organizational Readiness sparked less engagement with the realization that there are considered internal-facing core functions of BPR, an expectation without either of which none of the other key themes could be addressed. 8 • Taking Care of What We Have o Continue to maintain the high-quality facilities already within the system, while focusing new facilities to address increased demands from a growing population. o Boulder is lacking in some key necessary facilities that other communities have developed, and residents must travel other places to participate. o Need to continue implementing approved plans for a variety of existing parks to provide for a range of amenities for the community. • Community Health and Wellness o This is the core role of Parks and Recreation. The services offered need to meet the community’s needs, provide access to otherwise inaccessible facilities or programs, and provide opportunities to strengthen community bonds. • Youth Engagement and Activity o Parks and recreation play an important role in youth health, wellness, and engagement to maintain a high quality of life and address the challenges faced by youth today. o Nature deficit disorder continues to be a challenge due to screen time and in many cases the damage has been done and now need to focus on new mental and emotional issues with our youth compounded by the COVID- 19 pandemic. o Obesity and overall physical health of youth continues to be a challenge especially in certain populations. • Building Community and Relationships o The community cited the importance of partnerships in recovery efforts. o Strengthen existing relationships with private providers, nonprofit advocates, and other public partners like the school district. o Partnerships should be leveraged to improve all the other key themes. o The diversity of program providers is valued and although some overlap is necessary, it is important to communicate with partners and competitors to make sure they are best serving the residents of Boulder. o Partnerships allow the department to foster social resilience and promote equity within its programs and services. o Connectivity – linking neighborhoods with parks, schools and shops. • Financial Sustainability o Continued near-term and long-term financial health of the department. o Department and its staff continue to be flexible and adapt to future conditions. o Continue to use department resources to meet the needs of the community. o Cost of government outpacing revenues (Structural Gap) • Organizational Readiness o Respond to the increased use of BPR outdoor parks and amenities and the need for increased maintenance. 9 o Balance maintenance with pent-up desires for more courts/amenities and big ideas for large-scale new facilities (e.g., pool, tennis center). o Acknowledged the limited budget of BPR for the increasing demands of maintenance and new facilities. A Look Ahead to Engagement Window #2 The project team is currently preparing for Engagement Window #2, to accompany the development of the technical content associated with Needs Assessment. Engagement Window #2 will be focused on better understanding community needs and desires. This will be accomplished using several techniques including a statistically valid survey with an accompanying open community survey, a virtual public open house, and short interactive polling questions posted periodically on Be Heard Boulder. Targeted outreach in Engagement Window #2 will include: • Homeless populations within Boulder through partner organizations such as Boulder’s Department of Housing and Human Services, among others. • Spanish-speaking community members, working closely with the Community Connectors to ensure participate in both the survey and the open house. • Youth voices across the topics of both Engagement Window #1 and #2. Both GUB and the YOAB action team will be presenting their findings to PRAB later in Quarter 2 this year. Synthesis of Outcomes and Findings The System Overview Snapshot is the culmination of the Research and Trends phase of the project. The snapshot itself is intended to provide a highly visual overview of the research, information gathering and engagement findings to set the project on the right course moving forward. Attachment B is the draft content for PRAB’s review and the Snapshot will be finalized following this discussion. The information provided below is an example of the triangulation that will be used through the project: synthesizing the project team’s Research Findings, Public (analysis above) and Policy Directive (PRAB and City Council input) (see Figure 2 below) into key themes. This method was utilized successfully in the development of the 2014 Master Plan and the project team is using this method again to ensure that the Master Plan Update is founded on a balanced planning process. 10 Figure 2: Balanced process approach for determining key themes. Much of the targeted engagement during Research and Trends focused on asset management and recreation programs and trends, as major contributing findings informing the key themes of Taking Care of What We Have and Community Health and Wellness. The project team also took this opportunity to get targeted feedback from staff and stakeholders on the two new key issues of Resilience and Equity. Since those are new topics for this plan to explicitly evaluate, it was crucial to better understand the perspectives from staff, stakeholders and the community on what is BPR’s role within those two issues and what does the department have the power to impact. Key Findings Summary • Equity and Resilience are critical components to weave into the Master Plan Update in a meaningful way. o Due to their prevalence within each key theme discussion, the opportunity may be to ensure both are explicit within the Guiding Principles (pages 55- 56 of the 2014 Master Plan), as well as strategies and initiatives within each Key Theme. o Equity and resilience are already woven into BPR’s operations and financial plans and practices. The department is guided in these areas through citywide efforts: Boulder’s Racial Equity Plan and the City Resilience Framework. • The way BPR provides programs and services has changed significantly since 2014. 11 o There is now a system in place to evaluate and determine subsidies and fees, but it seems complicated to utilize. The work now is to streamline this system and make it more staff friendly. o COVID-19 has greatly impacted which programs and services are provided and how. The challenge will be to continue to adapt as recovery continues and fluctuations in registration are anticipated. o Customer service that is adaptable and flexible is essential to reach current and future clients. • BPR has a robust set of guiding documents in place to facilitate taking care of what we have, or asset management. o Fully implementing these guiding documents will require additional conversations with the community and working with staff to continue to incorporate this into their daily work. o Funding has been flat since 2000. There continues to be a tension between the maintenance, repair and replacement of existing facilities with a community desire for new or additional facilities. Balancing those needs and priorities will be a challenge moving forward. • The population of Boulder is growing and changing. How BPR adapts to these changes and continues to provide the programs and services the community needs and desires will be key in the future. o Boulder’s population is aging and daily habits for work and recreation are shifting. o The city has an increased focus on racial equity and continued resiliency in the face of budget, climate and pandemic stressors. o The community, staff and stakeholders highlighted that demand for youth and family programs, senior recreation, close-to-home outdoor recreation and volunteerism is trending up. Below is a brief discussion the current areas of focus (not directly tied to Master Plan Key Themes) and how this is informing the next phase of the project Needs Assessment. Recreation Programs and Services The 2014 Master Plan informed much of the work of the Recreation Program within BPR since that time. Among the accomplishments since 2014 are: • Silver Sneakers programming offered at all three recreation centers (2016) • Financial Aid program was simplified (2016) • The Sports Physical Activity Recreation for children (SPARK) summer program through Youth Services Initiative (YSI) was launched (2016) • Health Equity Fund grant funds now help provide FREE on-site fitness passes (Pass) for qualifying residents of Boulder Housing Partners properties (2017) The 2014 Master Plan also directed a key shift in the way BPR offers programming, specifically to act as a facilitator of programs that are appropriate for other providers. This 12 has been accomplished in several ways, primarily through contracted providers, such as Studio Arts Boulder, Kinesis Dance and Gonzo Tennis. The Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index work together to evaluate programs based on service categories (Community, Recreation, Exclusive) and then determine the level of subsidy to provide while considering fees. A challenge with this system is sometimes the detailed approach to evaluation loses the big picture and how programs relate to and support or detract from one another. Conversations with staff about the implementation of these tools highlights the need for improved data tracking and reporting, with the wide degree in variability of data reported from contracted providers. There is also a need to simplify registration processes, as sometimes a single participant must navigate multiple webpages and processes to participate in multiple programs. In the three years prior to COVID-19, participation in BPR directly delivered recreation programs was trending down. Additional declines occurred due specifically to COVID-19, given public health orders that restricted indoor activities and discouraged gathering in groups to avoid transmission of the virus. As COVID-19 restrictions have ebbed and flowed, participation in recreation programs and services has evolved, from more virtual offerings to reservation systems for daily use at the recreation centers and pools. Conversations with staff and stakeholders have begun to bring into focus the reality that there is likely a pent-up demand for recreation programs and services coming out of the pandemic. The challenge of the Master Plan Update will be to tease out how to adapt programming to the way people live and work today, e.g., flexibility in timing of offerings, mobile or virtual classes. The idea of partnerships as it relates to the recreation programs and services offered by BPR came up several ways throughout stakeholder and community engagement. Partnerships were identified as a key tool to continue to provide exclusive or specific programming, but also a way to ensure the department is meeting the needs of underrepresented communities. Through partnerships, typically quieter voices can be heard and the specific needs of those communities start to be addressed. Asset Management Since the acceptance of the 2014 Master Plan, BPR has made great strides in taking care of the parks and facilities that make up the system, both on-the-ground and strategically. BPR has renovated fifteen neighborhood parks, reduced the backlog of deferred maintenance and recently finished construction of the new Scott Carpenter Pool and Boulder Reservoir Visitor Services Center. A suite of guiding documents, the Asset Management Plan (AMP), General Maintenance and Management Plan (GMMP), Capital Investment Strategic Plan and Design Standards Manual (DSM), have been developed to shape the department’s investments in capital improvements, as well as operations and maintenance activities. BPR has participated in the implementation of a city-wide asset management software program, called Beehive to track city assets and the work associated with those assets. This 13 has been an enormous accomplishment, but there continues to be work to improve the implementation of this tool. The AMP and by extension Beehive, work to address two components of a particular asset, a condition assessment and a criticality score. The condition assessment is simply an evaluation of the given asset’s quality. The criticality score is a measure of the asset’s importance, including community value. These two measures together are meant to help the department prioritize investment in these assets. The conceptual framework for this prioritization is contained within the AMP, but the functional metrics need to be developed with heavy input from the staff that will be collecting the information, as well as the community helping to determine importance of given asset types. The Needs Assessment phase of the project will help to focus on gathering input on a functional model for criticality that can be used to help prioritize these investments. A key area of discord has emerged as the project team begins to understand community values on a high level. While Taking Care of What We Have continues to be important to both community members and stakeholders engaged thus far in the project, there has also been a significant call for new and/or additional facilities within the BPR system. This can range anything from a few new tennis and pickleball courts to full indoor sports complexes. During the stakeholder focus groups, while these new facilities were imagined as “One Big Idea” for the future, the stakeholders also acknowledged that funding is limited, and these types of facilities may not be in the immediate forecast for the department. A critical distinction for the Master Plan Update to address is how to balance the need to take care of the existing facilities within the system with the desire to add new facilities that address increasing or pent-up demand within the community. Equity Equity has been confirmed as an important issue to address within this Master Plan Update. The direction has come from decision-makers, as well as the input received from staff, stakeholders and the community. Equity was not listed as an explicit goal of the 2014 Master Plan but was rather captured implicitly within the guiding principles of the plan. BPR made some positive strides in beginning to address equity, from efforts to provide printed materials and communications in multiple languages to the expansion of subsidy programs for individuals with low incomes and providing programs specifically for people with disabilities. The National Parks and Recreation Association (NRPA) defines several categories of system-wide metrics to utilize when considering equity within a parks and recreation master plan: 1) system-wide metrics, 2) distribution metrics, and 3) population and outcome indicators. The 2014 Master Plan primarily utilized system-wide metrics to measure levels of service and benchmark Boulder with other peer communities. In this Master Plan Update, the project team intends to start looking at this data in a more granular way, analyzing the distribution of parks and recreation facilities within Boulder’s subcommunities to get a better picture of services provided to different population groups. This level of analysis can build upon the work within asset management discussed 14 previously to further prioritize projects to provide the maximum community benefit. While thinking about population and outcome indicators are important at this point, citywide conversations about data sources and coordinating systems are crucial to ensuring that systemic inequities are not perpetuated. Boulder’s recently adopted Racial Equity Plan outlines a number of key short term goals, including that “City staff will collect relevant data, coordinate data systems to understand and track needs and impacts.” Collecting and analyzing meaningful data will ensure that equity is included in all decisions, powering continuous improvement for underrepresented communities and begin to address NRPA’s third type of equity metrics (population and outcome indicators). The Racial Equity Plan calls out other short-term outcomes that impact departments citywide. Along with other departments, BPR staff is already participating in and facilitating equity trainings. The Master Plan Update Public Engagement Plan also seeks to prioritize inclusive community engagement, another short-term outcome identified in the Racial Equity Plan. Other short-term outcomes BPR is evaluating integrating into the Master Plan Update include collaborating with institutional partners and developing a department-based equity team to lead BPR equity action items. Conversations with stakeholders and community members echoed many of the themes staff are already working to achieve as it relates to racial equity. Specific suggestions include ensuring that programming, staffing and facilities create environments where people from all walks of life feel welcome, safe and supported. In fact, community members indicated that one of the worst things BPR could do is nothing as it relates to equity. One of the most impactful ways BPR can advance equity issues is to actively seek to engage and listen to underrepresented communities to offer the programs and services to those communities that are not available or accessible from other providers. Members of Boulder’s unhoused community are one of the underrepresented communities this project will include. In addition, addressing homelessness and the symptoms of homelessness in Boulder’s public spaces consistently is a topic of concern. The relationship to equity in this context is determining BPR’s role within the larger community and how to provide safe and welcoming spaces to all community members, including unhoused individuals. In 2020, SPUR (a nonprofit public policy organization in the San Francisco Bay Area) and the Gehl Institute published a report titled “Coexistence in Public Space”. Within this report, it is acknowledged that homelessness is systemic issue with many causes and that until those many roots of homelessness are addressed, there will continue to be a tension in public spaces between housed and unhoused individuals. SPUR and Gehl also created the Coexistence Toolkit to assist in public discourse around “designing and managing spaces to allow for people of all backgrounds to find joy and belonging within a shared space while feeling safe and secure.” An important component of the Master Plan Update, especially in Needs Assessment, will be engaging appropriately with unhoused individuals and the community to create a dialogue that will inform future policy and decision-making. 15 Resilience Adaptability and preparation to address sudden or extreme change was a constant theme in many discussions held throughout Research and Trends. This organizational attribute was linked to many components of the department’s work, from the programs and services provided to the need to address the climate emergency. Staff expressed the need to be proactive as it relates to resilience within the department to ensure there is the capacity to adjust quickly in emergency situations, such as with extreme storm events, wildfire and even the COVID-19 pandemic. The prior investment in staff education and development ensured that the department could quickly pivot to address these situations as they evolved. Community members also highlighted the importance of local ecosystems and their continued preservation and management to ensure the continued high quality of life in Boulder. A concern expressed by community members was the loss of these urban greenspaces to overuse or development because these resources are viewed as nonrenewable once they are lost. What will the next 5-7 years look like? The BPR Master Plan Update is intended to guide the department’s decision making for the next five to seven years. As such it is useful to start thinking about what the trends in data and findings from engagement are projecting into that future. Below is a brief description of what the project team is currently anticipating for the next five to seven years. Community Health and Wellness: Based on staff, stakeholder and community discussions there is anticipated to be continued demand for virtual fitness programs and flexible programming that meets the needs of an evolving work/life balance. It is anticipated that the love for the outdoors and recreation that has been reawakened will not likely abate, but rather increase the need for access to all kinds of programs and facilities. The intersection with equity and resilience will be realized in how BPR provides access to programs and facilities for all segments of the community, making everyone felt welcomed and heard. Taking Care of What We Have: Predicted increases in facility use will increase the necessary maintenance to continue to provide the high-quality amenities Boulder has come to know and expect of the department. There will be an ever-increasing demand that will need to be addressed through appropriate prioritization and balancing the needs of the community. Looking at the BPR system with a finer lens may be the first step in identifying imbalances within the system to potentially start to address issues of equity, to evaluate the need for new facilities or to develop plans for undeveloped parkland to support the growing population of Boulder. Volunteers and utilizing community members to care for the parks and facilities they use and love could potentially build the resilience both spaces and the community that cares for them. Financial Sustainability: Financial sustainability continues to be a primary concern of the department and the community. Stakeholders and the community both recognize that 16 without appropriate funding, the programs, services and facilities they use are in jeopardy. When considering inflation, the BPR budget has remained flat since 2000, yet the department has continued to add services, increase pay and establish a Living Wage, implemented sustainable practices that require additional resources, and increased contributions to financial aid. With the budget reductions experienced dure to COVID-19, only time will tell how long recovery of those budgets takes. In fact, NRPA predicts that recovery from COVID- 19 will take longer than recovery from the Great Recession of 2007-2009, barring additional federal assistance. This will require a structured approach to funding projects and priorities to maintain existing facilities while providing additional opportunities for unmet needs. Building Community and Relationships: Building partnerships and relationships across community organizations is identified as one potential opportunity to address some of the capacity and resource needs related to COVID-19 recovery. Additionally, pursing these opportunities could promote equity and resilience goals by creating inclusive recreation programs and services, as well as facilities that meet the needs of underrepresented communities. Building relationships can leverage the expertise within the Boulder community to address the climate emergency to have a positive impact on the larger community. Youth Engagement and Activity: Recent national trends have shown a continuing downward trajectory in the time youth spend active and/or outside each day, only accelerated through the COVID-19 pandemic. Mental health of young people is a growing concern and research has shown that activity and time spent outdoors support mental well- being. Continuing to offer programs and services that promote activity within the youth community will be key to ensuring the long-term health and well-being of the community. Organizational Readiness: Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, BPR staff has demonstrated a great capacity for adaptability and changing to meet the current needs of the community. This has been accomplished in part because of the prior focus on staff development and training to stay current on technology trends, with much of the credit due to the incredibly passionate, talented and dedicated public servants on the BPR team. Continuing to build staff capacity to react to future conditions is critical to ensuring the needs of the community are being met by BPR. As funding continues to stretch, data-driven decision making will ensure decisions made are based on sound logic and judgement. The city’s Racial Equity Plan identifies several goals for staff training and representation to help break down some systems of injustice. Questions for PRAB 1. Engagement Discussion Questions We just completed our first round of engagement, shared the overall summary attachment of engagement and want to make sure we’re on track with PRAB’s expectations as well as receiving meaningful input from the community. 17 a. Based on what we’ve shared from this round of engagement, and the plans outlined for the next, is the engagement plan working? From what you’re seeing now, do you feel that the tactics and approach in our engagement were effective or any refinements needed before the next round? b. Responding to PRAB’s input specifically about reaching youth, underrepresented demographics and people experiencing homelessness, we’ve shared work to date and plans for weaving these groups’ perspectives in the master plan. Do you support the approach to reach these groups? c. Do our findings and input from the community resonate with you in terms of what you would expect? Is there anything that surprises you in the feedback? Is there anything you didn’t hear that you would have expected? d. Any of the specific feedback that you would like to highlight as a focus area for staff? 2. Research and Trends Questions This current phase of the project researched our status and accomplishments since the 2014 master plan and specifically our existing key themes. The team has also explored trends that we understand will need to be considered in our plan update and summarized all the findings in the snapshot overview. a. Does the research and key findings align with your understanding of the status since the last master plan? Are there areas the team might have missed or need to circle back on? b. What areas do you feel the team should focus on and explore through the needs assessment to understand the current pulse of the community? As example, we heard a lot about still maintaining existing facilities, but we also need new infrastructure as well as challenges with equitable access while maintaining safe and welcoming spaces. c. We are hearing specific focus on Taking Care of What we Have as well as Community Health and Wellness. Do these resonate with PRAB as well and can you share your feedback on these or other themes? 3. Weaving Equity and Resilience into the Master Plan As discussed with PRAB throughout the process, the team remains focused on Equity and resilience principles that can be found within all the current master plan themes. Highlights from research and trends work include: 18 i. BPR staff have learned resiliency lessons from weathering the pandemic and storm events. The pivots required for recovery involved staff training, partnerships and focus on providing core, essential services. Focus groups and discussions with Boulder leadership also call for increased coordination and partnerships. ii. BPR’s accomplishments in providing services more equitably range from existing efforts like the Youth Services Initiative to close collaboration and participation with city departments on the ongoing Racial Equity Plan. The community affirmed this is an important hope/concern for the master plan update to explicitly address. a. With these outcomes in mind and as you read through the public feedback and research and trends related to equity and resilience, are there additional considerations or key highlights that we need to capture at this phase related to equity and resilience? In other words, have we captured it all or are there other aspects to the story that should frame the master plan? Next Steps In April, the project team will continue to finalize the deliverables for the Research and Trends phase based on outcomes from this PRAB discussion. Concurrently, work has already started on the next phase of the project, Needs Assessment. Needs Assessment includes technical analysis of facility assessments, financial scenarios, and supply and demand. The Level of Service (LOS) and gap analysis is a mapping exercise to understand the geographic underpinnings of the BPR system. All these components will inform the benchmark analysis, understanding how BPR compares to peer communities both within Colorado, as well as nationwide. The Needs Assessment is truly the synthesis of the research, public input and policy directive to determine what the critical needs are in our community that will be the focus of the implementation phase. In other words, what do we need to do for Boulder and then how will we do that? During Needs Assessment, the second engagement window will focus on identifying community needs and barriers through several methods. A community survey is under development that will provide statistically valid information about community needs. The project team will also be hosting short polling type questions on Be Heard Boulder throughout Needs Assessment to gather additional information not covered in the community survey. Community engagement will also include a virtual public open house to share information from needs assessment and gather input to further inform the final deliverables. The PRAB’s next milestone engagement with the Master Plan is scheduled for May, when PRAB will be hearing about the targeted youth engagement ongoing through GUB and YOAB. A study session with PRAB will be scheduled in early June to review and get the PRAB’s input on the findings from the Needs Assessment phase. 19 Attachment A: Engagement Window #1 Summary Attachment B: DRAFT System Overview Snapshot Content 20 Attachment A: Engagement Window #1 Summary BOULDER PARKS AND RECREATIONMaster Plan UpdateRestore Connect Sustain Engagement Window 1 Summary March 12, 2021 iiii Introduction to Engagement A critical component of the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update is community engagement. The importance of community involvement in the decision-making process is a priority for the City of Boulder. The engagement plan should compel the community to be active in the development of the recommendations and priorities which should progress into support of the approval, and ultimately the implementation of the plan allowing the department to effectively deliver community-oriented park and recreation opportunities to its community members. An overview of community engagement in the City of Boulder was used for guidance and available for review. Overall, the process must be equitable, open, and collaborative to build trust community-wide. The process is documented carefully to secure support for, and approval of, the Master Plan by city management, advisory groups, City Council, department staff, as well as the diverse user groups of the community. COVID-19, the current pandemic, has heavily influenced the engagement to include a much higher level of online engagement than would traditionally be planned. We are Parks and Recreation and being out in the community is part of our heart and soul. As the pandemic evolves, tactics may include more in-person engagement (as public health orders allow). The safety of our community members and staff is the highest priority. Our decision is partly based on the 2018 ACS data (conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau) which shows that 96% of Boulder’s population have a computer and 90% have broadband internet. Great care will be taken to safely reach out to populations that are most likely to have limited access. Staff and consultants will remain flexible with resources to address any additional opportunities and needs that may arise throughout the process. In these unprecedented times, staff may be using new engagement strategies that are unproven and may need additional time or to pivot midstream as the effectiveness is evaluated. Contents Introduction to Engagement ii Engagement Overview 1 Engagement Window #1: Share a Foundation of Information and Inquiry 2 Engagement Methods for Feedback 3 Outcomes Questionnaire 6Stakeholder Meetings 10 Summarized Outcomes 13 Engagement Methods Underway 14 Next Steps 15 11 Engagement Overview The engagement for the BPR Master Plan Update includes 4 windows of engagement designed to correlate with the project process to ensure the community voice has a role at each key decision-making point. Summaries of each engagement window will be available to demonstrate transparency and trust in the process. A visual timeline is available to demonstrate the alignment of the process phases and engagement windows with major touchpoints for information or discussion with boards and City Council. • Engagement Window #1: Share a Foundation of Information and Inquiry February-March 2021 This engagement window focused on developing interest and awareness of the project. Staff presented a foundation of information for the community to develop common understanding of current mission and vision of the department, outcomes since 2014 plan and agree on future opportunities and challenges to be explored in the master plan process. • Engagement Window #2: Identify and Evaluate Options March – June 2021 This engagement window will focus on collecting and evaluating feedback from the community using anecdotal and statistically valid methods to better understand the community needs and desires. • Engagement Window #3: Developing Recommendations June – October 2021 This engagement window will focus on reviewing the high-level recommendations and prioritization to garner support for the plan and to verify it is representative of the community. • Engagement Window #4: Making and Communicating Decisions October -December 2021 This engagement window will focus presentation of the draft plans highlighting values and recommendations to guide the next 5-10 years. Click the timeline image above to view it in a full-size PDF. March 2021Restore | Connect | Sustain BOULDER PARKS AND RECREATION Master Plan Update File Location: City of Boulder\Master Plan Update - Documents\PublicEngagement\Engagement Planning\Poster Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb MarTimeline1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter 1st Quarter20212022 PROCESSENGAGEMENTBOARDS & COUNCILWe AreHereWe AreHere RESEARCH & TRENDS NEEDS ASSESSMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Strategies &ImplementationMatrix Deliverables NeedsAssessment FinancialOverview FundingStrategyAnalysis MasterPlanDRAFTStaffReview MasterPlanDRAFTOnline PublicReview MasterPlanDRAFTGraphicSummary MasterPlanFINAL Department Overview SNAPSHOT WhitePapers/Research FacilityInventory & Assessment Introduction &Background•Key Policies/Issues/Needs•Recommendations& InvestmentPrograms•Implementation/Next Steps Level ofServiceAnalysis GapAnalysis ScenarioPlanning Supply &DemandAnalysis FINALPLANMASTER PLAN ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY#1 SUMMARY#2 SUMMARY#3 SUMMARY#4 Surveys Meetings Engagement Windows BeHeardBoulder Youth Voice StakeholderMeetings PublicOpen House PublicWorkshopStakeholderMeetings QuestionnaireResults QuestionnaireResults YouthSummary CommunityConnectors Connect0rSummary SurveyResults Stories/Places/Questions Polls/Questions Polls/Questions Forums/Questions IDENTIFY & EVALUATE OPTIONS MAKING & COMMUNICATINGDECISIONSDEVELOPING RECOMMENDATIONSSHARE A FOUNDATION OF INFORMATION & INQUIRY #1 #2 #3 #4 FINALSUMMARY PRAB Discussion - 3/29 Summary of Research, Trends & Values Evaluation PRAB Study Session May TBD Summarize Needs Identify Strategies & Initiatives PRAB Matters - 5/24 Youth Voice Presenations PRAB Study Session - TBD in Sept Prioritize Strategies & Initiatives PRAB Discussion - 1/24 DRAFT Plan PRAB Action - 2/28 Request Recommendation CC Study Session - 6/22 Summarize Needs Identify Strategies and Initiatives CC Study Session - TBD 4th Qtr Prioritize Strategies & Initiatives DRAFT Plan CC Public Hearing - TBD Mar. Request Acceptance PLANNING TBD 4th Qtr Informational PLANNING TBD 1st Qtr Request Recommendation Parks & RecAdvisory Board Planning Board City Council 22 Engagement Window #1: Share a Foundation of Information and Inquiry Objectives The first engagement window was designed to accomplish several key objectives: • Develop community awareness of and interest in the BPR Master Plan. • Inform the community and stakeholders of the master plan objectives, collect contact information for interested community members, provide an opportunity to verify existing community values and define emerging interests. • Consult with stakeholders to understand the current opportunities and challenges for their interest groups. • Integrate equity tools and practices to confirm a broad cross section of the community is engaged. Base of information and Inquiry The BPR Master Plan project web page web page was the main conduit for providing the base information to the community including background, project approach and timeline. The base information is important to build a level of understanding to obtain more informed feedback. A 5-year progress report and video were included to help the community understand the parks and recreation system with key accomplishments driven by the previous master plan. Project updates and key documents are also located on the page to provide a transparent history of the project process and provide information about upcoming opportunities for engagement. Closely linked to the project web page is BeHeardBoulder.org, the City of Boulder’s online engagement platform. Engagement opportunities are hosted at this location for multiple large projects within the City of Boulder, including the BPR Master Plan. It is an interactive site that allows the community convenient access to major City projects actively seeking community feedback. Outreach Tactics for Awareness Staff used a myriad of tactics to develop interest and awareness. BPR is fortunate to have a strong community following in several digital platforms. It was also imperative to reach community members across the community who may not be current users or connected to BPR through those digital platforms. A combination of digital platforms, traditional print media and community connection was used to reach a broad segment of the community. • Digital platforms were used to drive the community to project information and engagement opportunity pages. The web pages received approximately 3,000 hits during engagement window #1. • A press release picked up by the Daily Camera on Feb. 4 as a short news brief • Multiple BPR email blasts reaching approximately 30,000 subscribers for general BPR information. • The BPR Recreation Guide included a full-page bilingual announcement An Instagram post from February 25. 33 in the digital format that reaches approximately 45,000 subscribers • Monthly updates are sent directly to approximately 300 email subscribers requesting project specific information. • A NextDoor post that was distributed to 48,000 community members on the platform • Multiple social media campaigns were posted on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook (BPR Facebook page, City of Boulder Facebook page and Gobiernoboulderco, a citywide Facebook page with exclusively Spanish content) • Community connectors invited service providers working with under-served community members to re- share social media throughout their networks. • Other City department with outreach methods such as the library and OSMP re-shared social media throughout their networks. • An Inside Boulder News story on Boulder TV 8 (Channel 8) in English and Spanish that continues to live online. • A staff newsletter was sent to all BPR staff providing project information to share with their direct contacts, partners and patrons to provide a more personalized invitation to engage in the project. • Links to the BPR Master Plan are located on high traffic BPR web pages to help inform community member while they are visiting the site. • Print media was used in combination with digital methods in effort to increase awareness for community members with less access to digital platforms. • A full page bi-lingual flyer was included in every utility bill mailed within the City of Boulder, reaching approximately 20,000 residents not participating in a digital utility billing system. • Bi-lingual signage has been posted at all facilities and at major park sites. • Door Hangars commonly used for forestry related messaging will include BPR Master Plan Engagement Methods for Feedback Several methods for engagement were used to encourage the community to participate and provide feedback about existing community values and define emerging interests. This early engagement also provides valuable information about current opportunities and challenges from the community perspective. • Be Heard Boulder is the City of Boulder’s online engagement platform. Four platform tools were used to accommodate different styles and preferences of providing feedback. Engagement window #1 included English and Spanish translations for all content. Restore | Connect | Sustain Master Plan Update BPRmasterplan.org Boulder Parks & Recreation Welcome to the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update. To ensure the plan update is guided by the Boulder community.We want to hear from you! For more information, please visit the project page: BPRmasterplan.org or take a picture of the QR code Restore | Connect | Sustain Master Plan Update BPRmasterplan.org Boulder Parks & Recreation Para más información, visite la página web del proyecto: BPRMasterPlan.org o tómele foto al código QR ¡Se viene la actualización del Plan Maestro de Parques y Recreación de Boulder! Para ello, nuestra finalidad es que la actualización del plan esté guiada por la comunidad de Boulder, ¡y deseamos escuchar de usted! English and Spanish versions of a flyer that was posted around the recreation centers and other facilities. 44 • An Anecdotal Values Questionnaire was developed to verify community values and define emerging interests as they relate to BPR, which is aligned with similar questions discussed with PRAB and City Council in late 2020. The anecdotal questionnaire targeted the broad community and BPR staff to develop a high-level understanding of the project while providing an opportunity to share their thoughts and ideas. • The digital and paper version of the questionnaire were available in English and Spanish from February 1-28, 2021. The digital questionnaire was posted on the Be Heard Boulder page with paper copies available at any BPR facility, such recreation centers. The questionnaire was available for the community and staff. This opportunity has been closed for analysis of the feedback to inform this phase of the master plan. • An interactive map exercise that lets the community drop a pin on their favorite park, playground, recreation center or other BPR facility and tell us why it is their favorite is still available. Check it out on the map tab to see what people are saying. • The memories tab provides a place to share a story or memory about a BPR park or facility. Memories are posted by the community for other community members to enjoy. This opportunity is still available and open for community contributions. Check out on the memories tab to see what the community is sharing. • The questions tab was an opportunity for community members to submit questions directly to staff with an anticipated response with 72 hours. This tab has been closed for engagement window #1 to include in the analysis. • Stakeholder Meetings were conducted by staff and consultants to provide intimate discussions with 55 smaller groups of community leaders on specific issues and needs or desires. It provided an opportunity for community members to better understand other groups with similar or competing needs with transparent discussion of financial limitations, which leads to priority development. Multiple sessions were scheduled to accommodate as many community leaders as possible. The sessions were designed to provide a base of information for the whole group with breakout sessions for a deeper dive with planned groups of stakeholders. Multiple sessions were scheduled to accommodate as many community leaders as possible. The sessions were designed to provide a base of information for the whole group with breakout sessions for a deeper dive with planned groups of stakeholders. A screenshot from one of two stakeholder meetings held. • PRAB: The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) has already been engaged multiple times for the Master Plan Update. At the December 2019 meeting, PRAB provided input on the overall approach for the update to ensure alignment between staff and PRAB. In April 2020, staff shared an update with the PRAB given COVID-19 impacts on timing and budget. Following successful contract negotiation, PRAB participated in the project kick-off during the September 2020 meeting. At the November 2020 meeting, PRAB reviewed the public engagement plan and helped staff prepare for a study session with City Council in December 2020.  • City Council: A study session was held with City Council on December 8, 2020. The primary goal of the session was to allow staff to present key process information early in the project to ensure alignment with City Council on the various aspects of the project including the overall process, approach to community involvement strategies and key topics that will be explored. Another goal was to remind City Council that the project is a comprehensive update to the current BPR master plan and not a completely new planning process. Staff presented the project approach and engagement plan, key themes from 2014, and brief overview and approach to equity and resilience. Council was supportive of the process and approach as presented and indicated that equity and resilience are appropriate topics for additional evaluation. • Staff: On December 15, 2020, staff came together for a three-hour facilitated conversation focused on identifying specific accomplishments and areas for improvement related to the existing and new white papers. The charrette was kicked off with keynote speakers from Vancouver, San Diego and Denver discussing their lessons learned from incorporating equity into their master plans and everyday work. Breakout sessions then focused on conversations about asset management, recreation programs and services, resilience and equity. Staff identified specific accomplishments, areas for improvement, information or data gaps, areas for greatest impact, and big ideas for each of these topics. All BPR staff were also invited and encouraged to participate in the anecdotal values questionnaire. 66 Outcomes: Questionnaire 463 Anecdotal Values Questionnaires were submitted, including 24 staff submissions and 3 submissions in Spanish. All of the submissions were read and analyzed to provide a summary of comments under each key theme as presented in the questionnaire. All of the questions were provided as open-ended questions requiring a qualitative analysis of the comments. The summary below provides a digestible overview of the feedback while providing enough detail to capture the true nature of, and common threads in, the community feedback. The full detail of all comments can be made available. The key theme most community members chose to discuss was Taking Care of What We Have, indicating that this is still an important concept to the community. Following that, the key theme of Community Health and Wellness was the next most common theme chosen. Youth Engagement and Activity, Equity and Resilience all had similar number of community members desiring to discuss those topics. There were a number of overarching ideas that community members repeatedly mentioned throughout their responses, within different contexts depending on the key theme. These ideas included concerns about homelessness and encampments, as well as the impacts a growing and changing population will have on the overall parks and recreation system. Three questions were asked under each key theme. • Why is this key theme important to you? • What hopes do you have for the future? • What concerns do you have for the future? Summary of Comments for Key Themes • Community Health and Wellness - Ensure public health and wellness through parks, facilities, and programs to keep Boulder a healthy and vibrant community. • Many people commented that it was important for its impact on the overall community: providing services that meet the community’s needs, providing access to otherwise inaccessible facilities or programs, providing opportunities to meet others and strengthen community bonds, as well as the resulting impacts that health and wellness has on a community’s healthcare system, crime, and taxes. • A significant number of people mentioned the importance of Community Health and Wellness for individuals: the benefits it provides for one’s physical and mental health and its ability to improve resilience and provide strength in difficult times. • For some, Community Health and Wellness is an important key theme simply because it’s the main purpose of having a parks and recreation system. • In looking forward regarding Community Health and Wellness, most people were hopeful that our parks, facilities, and programs were well-maintained or even improved. There were quite a few suggested amenities or activities: more tennis and/or pickleball courts, more events (and especially culturally diverse events), more places to swim, more or improved dog parks and off leash areas, more mountain biking options, more personal exercise equipment in parks, more roller skating options, more cross- country skiing or snowshoeing options, and more trails. 77 • There was a general fear among many that the parks, programs, and facilities would be closed or not maintained due to a lack of funding or lack of resources. • It was also important to a large number of people that BPR facilities and programs show improved accessibility and inclusion so that everyone in the community can be healthy. “Diversity” and “inclusion” included references to age, socioeconomic status, race, and physical or mental abilities. • Many people discussed programming for community health and wellness – they wanted more great programs and quality instructors, but they should be accessible and inclusive to meet everyone’s needs in the community. There should be more subsidies for those who can’t afford to join in, and more programs for seniors and youth as well as more arts and EXPAND programs. • Taking Care of What We Have - Prioritize investments in existing parks and facilities to ensure the long-term viability of the park and recreation system. • The primary sentiment we heard from the responses about “Taking Care of What We Have” is that we have a good thing going, so we should continue to focus on keeping those parks and facilities clean and safe and upgrading only as necessary. It was stated in many different ways that “quality over quantity” was important here, and upgrading and maintaining what we have makes more sense financially then spreading ourselves too thin and building new. • When “more” was brought up, it was usually referring to the increasing user base and general growth of the city leading to issues with crowding and overuse. Requests for additional amenities or new facilities were usually relating to crowded and inaccessible locations like tennis courts and classes. There were suggestions for more multi-use and re-used equipment and space in creative ways, and better connecting the park system to be more walkable or accessible via public transit. More facilities and programs oriented towards youth and seniors was also suggested. • There was concern expressed around camping in the parks, preparing for emergencies such as wildfires, flooding, pandemics, and economic recession, and ensuring that BPR does not spread itself too thin or prioritize projects or services that are perceived to be too expensive or inefficient. • Financial Sustainability - Balance multiple and increasing demands within existing resources, recognizing the limits of public funding and the need to focus on core services. • Overwhelmingly, Financial Sustainability was considered important because, quite simply, it’s necessary to function. In order to care of what we have, we must have stable finances. • Many mentioned that it is important for planning for the future – Financial Sustainability provides reliability for our services and operations and avoiding debt or crisis. • Many worried that without it, parks and facilities would decay or be lost and programming would suffer, until finally BPR could no longer meet the community’s needs. • Others hoped that financial sustainability would include responsible spending, balanced budgets, and creative funding strategies so that we would avoid loss of funding and be better prepared to withstand hardships. 88 • Building Community Relationships - Build community engagement and cultural activities through outreach programs and initiatives. Promote a healthy community to address social and cultural inequities. • Most responses regarding the importance of Building Community Relationships cited a stronger, more unified community that benefited from a diversity of users through inclusion and accessibility. BPR provides events, programs, and spaces that allow socializing and connection, which allows the community to support each other, and the partnerships that BPR builds with other organizations improves access to these services across the board. • The primary concerns around Building Community Relationships is a fear that there will be little change in the diversity and accessibility of BPR’s services and partnerships in the future – that a lack of new or improved partnerships would result in voices remaining unheard, the community continuing to divide, and those who couldn’t access BPR services before still being excluded. • Youth Engagement and Activity - Engage youth with parks, facilities and programs that provide direct experience with nature, experiential learning and opportunities to close the educational achievement gap. • Most people mentioned that youth engagement and activity with BPR was important for the community’s youth because of the numerous benefits to the youth: making friends and connecting with the community, teaching them to be proud stewards of our environment, providing short- and long-term health benefits, education and emotional development, learning new skills, and finding new passions and hobbies. It was frequently stated that BPR programs and amenities that serve the youth get them out of the house and off the internet, providing a safe place to keep them out of trouble and an outlet for stress. • However, there were numerous benefits for the rest of the community mentioned as well. “The youth are our future” was most frequently brought up, as well as the importance of reaching all ages through equitable services. It was brought up that family-friendly cities attract families and affect quality of life. • Many people hoped that the future would bring a diverse community in which people of all ages, races, and socio-economic statuses could participate together, but most especially through opportunities for youth to interact with each other and learn to value the outdoors and be good stewards, appreciate their community, and learn and discover through various experiences. Some worried about a lack of programming for youth that would leave them disinterested and disconnected from their community, or inequitable programming that would exclude some. A loss of programs and poor facilities would also affect youth engagement. • Organizational Readiness - Leverage the use of new technologies, data driven decision-making and collaborative decision-making tools to respond to changes over time within the industry. • Organizational Readiness was stated to be important mostly because change is inevitable and we need to face it thrive. Using data, making proactive decisions, and staying up-to-date on technology would significantly benefit the stability of BPR in the future. It was also mentioned that staying on top of technology and processes is important to ensure customer satisfaction. • Many responses mentioned hopes for staying up to date with trends and technology, including a new system for the recreation centers and website. Others were hopeful that there would be strong internal organization and collaborative decision-making to embrace new opportunities, as well as improved 99 collaboration between BPR and other organizations and agencies. • Concerns about the future typically revolved around dealing with an increasing population, including an increasing senior population, as well as complacency resulting in inefficient systems, lower customer satisfaction, lost opportunities, inability to recover from setbacks, and poor implementation. • Equity - Provide safe, inclusive, culturally relevant and welcoming parks, facilities and programs in a way that works to address systemic and historic inequities. • Overwhelmingly, the most important thing mentioned about Equity as a Key Theme is the importance of ensuring everyone has equal access and feels welcome in BPR facilities and programs. It was mentioned often that Boulder still has significant issues with diversity, equity, inclusion, and access, and in order to fix it, it must be deliberately and proactively addressed. Despite the existing problems, it was clear in these responses that a diverse and inclusive community was desired, and that BPR could help by listening to typically unheard voices and offering unique services to low-income and underrepresented families that private entities cannot offer. • Many people mentioned that access could be helped by preserving and increasing the amount of inclusive programs and accessible amenities BPR offers, and ensuring equitable access by providing more free or subsidized programs and facilities, as well as improving park connectivity through walking/biking connections and public transit. • Several suggested by increasing staff’s awareness of privilege and equity issues, as well as increasing representation in leadership and staff, BPR’s system could become much more welcoming and inclusive. Many emphasized that the worst thing we could do is nothing, leaving people unheard and disconnected. Some worried that this issue is bigger than BPR, and we can only do so much. • There was concern that the increasing population in Boulder would force low- and middle-income families out, making the city more unaffordable and unwelcome, and distancing current users. Funding and resource limitations that result in a reduction of important inclusive programs was also a big concern. • Resilience - Create a parks and recreation department that is prepared to absorb the shocks and stressors of environmental and societal changes. • Resilience was considered an important key theme because change (or crisis) is inevitable and we need to be prepared. Being proactive and adaptable would help improve recovery and protect our assets and the community. • The primary hope cited for Resilience in the future is that BPR continues to serve the community and that its programs and amenities last a long time, as well as the preservation of the ecosystem and wildlife. Others mentioned hoping that sustainable tools and methods would be included in future projects and operations, as well as a better connected park system through walkability and public transit alternatives. There was concern that overcrowding and overuse would ruin our greenspaces, or that parks and facilities would be neglected or lost. • Many also mentioned a hope that through past experiences, studies, available data, and smart planning, BPR could be better prepared to deal with emergencies like wildfire and flooding. The biggest concern 1010 was that BPR would be unprepared in the future to handle such emergencies, and others worried that funding or resource limitations would affect response and recovery or that BPR would not do enough to prevent impacts. • “Big Ideas” and Other Comments The last two questions provided an opportunity for the community and staff to share insights on what would be most beneficial to the department in the next 1-3 years and an open-ended opportunity to share any additional thoughts. • Summary of “Big Ideas” and “Additional Thoughts” • By far the most common “big idea” that was heard were suggestions for more facilities and amenities. Of those requests, pickleball and tennis stood out drastically, likely because some tennis courts have been converted to allow both sports in recent years, but neither sport has seen new single- use courts added to match the growing users. The third most common ideas were related to increasing less-specific facilities such as “outdoor recreation”, “parks”, “trails”, “playgrounds”, and “track”. • Of the various categories of big ideas that were suggested beyond Additional Facilities, the remaining categories each had roughly one-fourth (or less) the number of comments. Nonetheless, quite a few suggestions for additional programming centered around the arts or the Pottery Lab, and then youth-oriented programming. • Comments related to the administration and management of BPR included pursuing more partnerships, opportunities for communication or feedback, and other miscellaneous suggestions. • There were ideas related to various community-wide issues such as addressing BPR’s climate resilience and our functioning urban ecosystem, transportation access, addressing homelessness in parks, equity, and pandemic recovery. • Less frequently mentioned but still important were ideas centered around renovating facilities (mostly focused on renovating current recreation centers), safety concerns (mostly surrounding encampments), additional engagement opportunities (mostly for youth), improving affordability and inclusion of BPR facilities and programs, and maintenance. • There were quite a few ideas categorized as “Other” that involved OSMP property or programming, no suggestions, Reservoir management, no categorization, or general appreciation for BPR. Outcomes: Stakeholder Meeting With the diversity of stakeholders and topics, it was significant to see several main themes rise to the top. Overall, everyone involved feels that equity of access is important and all those using BPR spaces should feel welcome and included. The variety of stakeholders also agreed that diversity of program providers is valued and although some overlap is necessary, it is important to communicate with partners and competitors to make sure they are best serving the residents of Boulder. Participants in all groups cited the importance of partnerships to recovery efforts and strengthening existing relationships with private providers, nonprofit advocates, and other public partners like 1111 the school district. Many groups brought up the increased use of BPR outdoor parks and amenities and the need for increased maintenance, while at the same time sharing pent-up desires for more courts/amenities and big ideas for large-scale new facilities (e.g., pool, tennis center). Participants also acknowledged the limited budget of BPR for the increasing demands for increased maintenance and new facilities. From the discussion groups, specific highlights on trends and big ideas are listed below: Parks and Outdoor Amenities • Trends • More use of almost all amenities due to COVID-19, especially those close to home (walkable/bikeable from home) and for youth and active adults • Dog park use is high and growing • Tennis has risen in popularity for the first time in many years and there is more stacking up (waiting) for court time. Some courts are in poor condition. • Pickleball also rising in popularity nationally and locally • Could continue to see more indoor events taking place outside, demand for outdoor event spaces rising • Increased demand for more access to family time in pools • Sports teams that have had flat participation seeing increases • Increased use has led to increased waste • Valmont Bike Park usage fees are helping to balance taking care/providing new and the ongoing maintenance • Also increased demand for resources to support people experiencing homelessness in parks • Big Ideas • Desire for specialized areas like dog parks, nature areas and parks for mountain biking • Desire for improvements to recreation centers, pools (participants cited success of Scott Carpenter Pool) and outdoor sports facilities • Some parks with youth sports fields are in parks that are perceived as less safe and welcoming • Strong desire for more streamlined partnerships and collaboration Recreation, Programming & Indoor Facilities • Trends • Indoor fitness classes on the rise before COVID-19 • Warm water pools are more popular now due to the increase in aging adults • Older adult participation increasing • Size limitations during pandemic recovery likely to be barrier to access • Families “begging” for things for kids to do outside (e.g., baseball and other youth sports) • Day and resident camps filling up fast • Childcare demand strong • YMCA has had successful Public/NGO partnership-taxpayers paid for construction but YMCA pays for operations-nimbler funding mechanisms than BPR. • Tracking 10% increase in use each year regardless of COVID-19 • Mixture of public and private providers important for providing full spectrum of access • Outdoor recreation (tennis, baseball, soccer) seeing increase of use • Challenges to maintenance, especially if used by dogs or after weather events 1212 • Many discussions on how to extend recreation facility use (e.g., lights and bubble over Scott Carpenter pool for cool weather use) • Pottery lab and arts program seeing high, growing demand pre- and post-COVID • Increasing duration of lease for pottery lab provider could free up more staff time • Big Ideas • Shared facility between providers so that they could split maintenance cost would be great – especially for costly multicourt facilities (tennis/pickleball) or large baseball/softball complexes • New tennis facility (10-12 courts) • Incentivize permitting and scholarships to get underrepresented groups involved • Recreation that is accessible to all - PlayPass is great start • Acknowledgment of role BPR has played in supporting community over last year with pivoting and reduced cost facilities • Streamlining bureaucracy for recreation registrants and recreation program providers (lease and facility agreements) Equity • Trends • Requity and PLAY Pass programs have been essential to social service providers and general public during this stressful time o Recreation incentives helpful for volunteer benefits • Demand high for everyday activities within walking distance of residents and for youth outdoor recreation and sports with non-pro, low-key options • Programs like Out Boulder softball team successful in bringing new populations to BPR facilities • Offering programs with representation and bilingual communications an opportunity • Boulder experiences more socio-economic diversity than cultural diversity • Big Ideas • During recovery, parks have special role in being real humans together again • Welcome home parties at recreation centers • Direct outreach to underrepresented groups to participate • BPR internships and career development for underrepresented groups o Information on how volunteers can play a role in creating a welcoming and active community PRAB and City Council Outcomes Discussions from PRAB, City Council, the community, stakeholders and staff demonstrated support of the continued importance the 6 key themes and for weaving equity and resilience as guiding principles with explicit strategies and initiatives under each key theme. Staff Outcomes 24 BPR staff responded to the anecdotal questionnaire. Overall, staff responses mirrored the community responses and were included as part of the questionnaire outcomes previously presented in this document. The key themes of Taking Care of What We Have and Community Health and Wellness were the most popular themes to discuss for staff respondents. Staff then focused on Financial Sustainability, while the community focused on Youth Engagement and Activity, Equity, and Resilience before Financial Sustainability. This is an understandable difference given how invested staff is in the ongoing financial wellness of the department. 1313 Summarized Outcomes Below is a highly condensed summary of the engagement discussions and responses. Overarching Themes There were several overarching ideas commonly mentioned within different contexts depending on the key theme. • Concerns about homelessness and encampments • Impacts of a growing and changing population on the overall parks and recreation system Equity and Resilience There was a general acknowledgment that the City of Boulder has done significant work to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and access. These issues must continually be addressed proactively and deliberately. Overall, equity and resilience were expected to explicitly weave into every key theme rather than becoming additional new key themes. • Ensure that everyone in Boulder has access to parks and recreation programs and services and feels welcome and included in those spaces • Leaving people unheard and disconnected would be a detrimental non-action • Ensure that BPR and its staff are ready and able to adapt and respond to future change and/or crises • BPR has a role to play in the preservation of urban ecosystems promoting resilience throughout the community Key Themes Key themes were used to organize the responses and discussions to evaluate the continued importance and validity of those key themes for the master plan update. Outcomes of those discussions indicated the six key themes identified in the previous master plan are still important and valid for this update. The key themes most discussed were Taking Care of What We Have and Community Health and Wellness. Other themes with a higher level of discussion included Youth Engagement and Activity along with Building Community and Relationships. Financial Sustainability and Organizational Readiness sparked less engagement with the realization that there are considered internal-facing core functions of BPR, an expectation without either of which none of the other key themes could be addressed. • Taking Care of What We Have • Continue to maintain the high-quality facilities already within the system, while focusing new facilities to address increased demands from a growing population. • Community Health and Wellness • This is the core role of Parks and Recreation. These services offered need to meet the community’s needs, provide access to otherwise inaccessible facilities or programs and provide opportunities to strengthen community bonds. 1414 • Youth Engagement and Activity • Parks and recreation play an important role in youth health, wellness, and engagement to maintain a high quality of life and address the challenges faced by youth today. • Building Community and Relationships • The community cited the importance of partnerships in recovery efforts • Strengthen existing relationships with private providers, nonprofit advocates, and other public partners like the school district. • Partnerships should be leveraged to improve all the other key themes. • The diversity of program providers is valued and although some overlap is necessary, it is important to communicate with partners and competitors to make sure they are best serving the residents of Boulder. • Partnerships allow the department to foster social resilience and promote equity within its programs and services. • Financial Sustainability • Continued financial health of the department. • Department and its staff continue to be flexible and adapt to future conditions • Continue to use department resources to meet the needs of the community. • Organizational Readiness • Respond to the increased use of BPR outdoor parks and amenities and the need for increased maintenance • Balance maintenance with pent-up desires for more courts/amenities and big ideas for large-scale new facilities (e.g., pool, tennis center). • Acknowledged the limited budget of BPR for the increasing demands of maintenance and new facilities. Engagement Methods Underway • Growing Up Boulder (GUB): BPR and GUB have partnered on the master plan to engage youth in the process. GUB has in turn partnered with several schools and youth organizations with interest in the plan. Each class and organization will engage in a customized program to fit the organization or curriculum with varied level of length and detail based on age and length of engagement. For the longer programs, they are in the early stages of providing students a base of knowledge as a building block to gain insightful feedback. Each class prepares a share-out presentation to staff, providing the opportunity for discussion and questions about the ideas. GUB will collect and analyze the youth feedback from all of the classes and organization to provide a useful summary for the community and PRAB at the end of engagement window #2. • Youth Opportunities Advisory Board (YOAB): YOAB has provided a team of four high school students to act as a liaison between BPR and the students in Boulder’s high schools. In a three-part, semester-long project, the team has sent out a shorter version of the Anecdotal Values Questionnaire to their classmates to determine high-school youth priorities for the key themes. They then plan to provide a follow-up video with the results as well as an explanation of their second survey, which will ask about preferred goals and action items for the top three key themes chosen in the first survey. 1515 Next steps Engagement Window #2: Identify and Evaluate Options (March – May 2021) This engagement window will focus on collecting and evaluating feedback from the community to better understand the community needs and desires. Four thousand statistically valid surveys, similar to the survey for the 2014 master plan, will be distributed to for longitudinal comparisons and analysis. The survey will also be available for all community members, even if not selected to receive a PIN number. In response to feedback from the first questionnaire, staff is developing a set of shorter and more visually engaging polling questions to compliment the survey throughout the second engagement window. Engagement window #2 will wrap up with a Virtual Open House. It is envisioned that a station/board-based approach will be used to gather input regarding research validation and workshop planning. Multiple stations/ boards, staffed with department staff or consultant team members if in person or in Zoom rooms, will be set up to facilitate focused input on specific topics and to allow for small group interaction. Public comment will be recorded and integrated into the overall public engagement findings. Specific objectives for the second engagement window would be to: • Present findings from research conducted to date, including mission/vision reviews, the organizational assessment, facility inventory, program inventory, financial analysis, stakeholder interviews, public survey, and other public engagement findings. • Gather input regarding each of the research topics mentioned above to confirm and validate findings. • Gather input regarding the format and content of the public issues workshop / summit to be conducted in the fall. 38 Attachment B: DRAFT System Overview Snapshot Content Boulder Parks and Recreation Current State Snapshot Outline Audience: 3rd to 8th Grade Reading Level Purpose: 1) To provide high-level snapshot of the current state of Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) by highlighting trends and describing current state the system. 2) To document top opportunities and challenges the needs assessment work will explore. 3) To provide the public with information to support understanding and inform their input on the project. N.B. The content below will be synthesized into a 12-page, graphic-designed snapshot. Contents Boulder Parks and Recreation Current State Snapshot Outline ...................................................... 38 Welcome to Boulder Parks and Recreation ................................................................................ 38 What Have We Achieved Since 2014? ........................................................................................ 39 What’s Trending in Boulder Parks and Recreation? .................................................................... 47 Spotlight: Equity & Resilience in Parks and Recreation ............................................................... 50 Welcome to Boulder Parks and Recreation a. Intro description to BPR: i. Mission: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) promotes the health and well-being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, natural areas, facilities and programs. Currently, BPR manages more than 1,800 acres of urban parkland and 138,000 square feet of recreation center space, plus many other recreation facilities, including the Boulder Reservoir, Valmont Bike Park and the Flatirons Golf Course. BPR is one of many providers of recreation programs in the community. Before the pandemic, BPR partnered with recreation and sports enthusiasts to provide over 2,500 different types of programs. Some of these programs are provided in line with of the City’s values of equity and service, while others are provided to users who pay a fee to support program and facility costs. b. Exhibit: Diagrammatic Map of BPR with inventory data highlights for: 1. Parks 2. Civic Spaces 3. Natural Areas 4. Recreation Centers 5. Pools 6. Playgrounds 39 7. Multi-Use Fields 8. Baseball & Softball Diamonds 9. Trails (pedestrian, multi-use) 10. Dog Parks 11. Sports Fields (tennis, ballfields, sports complex) 12. Specialized Facilities (Boulder Reservoir, Golf, Columbia Cemetery, Pottery Lab, Harbeck-Berghiem House) 13. Community Use Areas (arboretum, ponds, gardens, memorials) c. Call out infographic options: i. Partnering with other agencies, parks and playground facilities are within ¼ walk distance for many residents. ii. “I want to say thank you for working so diligently to keep some of our outdoor spaces open and available during this time of great stress and need in our communities.” What Have We Achieved Since 2014? a. Intro description to BPR Master Plan Themes & Community Hopes and Concerns: i. In 2014 the community helped craft a master plan that is the foundation for the work Boulder Parks and Recreation does and informed priorities that matter to our community. In 2020, Boulder Parks and Recreation began updating the master plan to guide our day-to-day work. The table below provides a snapshot of master plan accomplishments since 2014, organized by community-driven master plan themes. Also included are highlights from the 450 community responses to the February 2021 questionnaire on hopes and concerns for the future. b. Information for Graphic Table Organized by Theme i. Community Health and Wellness 1. Description Parks provide measurable health benefits, from encouraging direct contact with nature and a cleaner environment, to opportunities for physical activity and social interaction. This theme emphasizes the community’s desire for BPR to focus on public health and wellness through parks, natural areas, facilities and programs, emphasizing the important role parks and recreation services can continue to play in keeping Boulder a healthy and vibrant community. 2. Accomplishment Highlight a. BPR developed the Recreation Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index to ensure program 40 alignment with the Master Plan and appropriate management throughout a program’s lifecycle b. BPR joined with partners to create “Healthy Together,” a grant funded program that provides low-income youth with physical activity, education and mentors in their neighborhoods. c. Classes specifically designed for older adults are provided at all recreation centers, the Boulder Reservoir and other facilities. d. Walk With a Doc and Be Well Saturdays have expanded wellness programs in partnership with Boulder Community Health. 3. 2021 Questionnaire Hopes & Concerns Highlight The benefits parks and recreation provide relating to Community Health & Wellness are numerous. The community spoke of increased physical and mental health, which in turn helps decrease pressure on the healthcare system. Respondents also mentioned its role in decreasing crime. The parks and recreation system helps improve resilience and provide strength in difficult times. a. Hope i. That BPR facilities and programs show improved accessibility and inclusion, so everyone in the community can be healthy. “Diversity” and “inclusion” included references to age, socioeconomic status, race, and physical or mental abilities. ii. More tennis and/or pickleball courts, events (especially culturally diverse events), places to swim, more/improved dog parks and off leash areas, mountain biking options, personal exercise equipment in parks, roller skating options, cross-country skiing or snowshoeing options, and trails. iii. A hope that even with all the fiscal pressures and potential obstacles, “the community will continue to prioritize the effort and money it will require (to keep parks and recreation viable) for decades to come.” b. Concern i. That BPR is not providing appropriate programming and services for elderly members of the community. 41 ii. The growing economic gap – not understanding the support underrepresented community members require to maintain their health. iii. There was a general fear among many that parks, programs and facilities will be closed or not maintained due to a lack of funding/resources. ii. Taking Care of What We Have 1. Description Prioritizing the maintenance and replacement of existing facilities and parks was a consistent message during the 2014 Master Plan from the public and civic leaders. This theme focuses on the need to ensure the long-term viability of the park and recreation system through comprehensive asset management practices. This captures a broad spectrum of work ranging from daily operations to ongoing preventative maintenance to the large capital projects that are completed each year as part of the Capital Improvement Program. 2. Accomplishment Highlight a. Voter approved financial support allowed BPR to complete major replacement projects, reducing the department’s maintenance backlog. This helps ensure more efficient and cost-effective management of assets. b. The “Park at the Core” was completed in the downtown Civic Area with more than 250 community activities scheduled each year. c. 2,529 new trees were planted in public spaces and Boulder’s first Urban Forest Strategic Plan was adopted. d. BPR has started to update irrigation systems, following organic turf management practices, and implementing a Zero-Waste program in all parks. e. BPR completed construction on two very popular facilities – Scott Carpenter Pool and the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Center. Both partially opened summer season 2020. 3. 2021 Questionnaire Hopes & Concerns Highlight The primary sentiment among participants is that Boulder has a good thing going, and BPR should continue to focus on keeping existing parks and facilities clean and safe, and upgrading only as necessary. Requests for additional amenities or new facilities were related to crowded or inaccessible locations (e.g., tennis, classes). Respondents feel that “quality over quantity” should be BPR’s focus. 42 a. Hope i. That BPR can provide more multi-use spaces and find creative ways to use facilities. ii. That the park system can be better connected – offering more walkability or accessibility via public transit. iii. That “we can maximize enjoyment of our parks while maintaining what makes them special.” b. Concern i. There are concerns about camping in the parks and preparing for emergencies (e.g., wildfires, pandemics, economic recessions). ii. An increasing user base and general growth of the city will lead to overcrowding and overuse – the “loved to death” scenario. iii. BPR will not focus on core services and “try to be too many things to too many people”, spreading itself too thin. iv. Due to a lack of new facilities to keep up with demand and trends, residents must regularly travel to other communities to participate and excel in their sports and leisure activities. iii. Financial Sustainability 1. Description BPR is supported by several sources of funding (dedicated sales taxes, program and facility user fees, property tax, lottery and general fund revenues) that are used to support operations and capital improvement projects. Effective stewardship of these resources means directing them toward parks, programs, and facilities of greatest community benefit. Balancing multiple and increasing demands with existing resources is a challenge. Financial Sustainability efforts ensure BPR considers the total cost of facility ownership and service delivery in resource allocation and fee setting. 2. Accomplishment Highlight a. Volunteers have helped to sustain park assets through maintenance and project work. This enhances financial and community sustainability. Volunteer hours and internship recruitment have been added to the Count Me In portal. From 2014 through 2020, 16,621 BPR volunteers gave 172,699 total hours of their time to BPR projects and maintenance efforts. 43 c. In 2020, BPR created the Park Champs program to help with ongoing maintenance at 24 park locations. The help provided by the 87 community “champs” allowed BPR staff to focus on other park maintenance needs. The Natural Lands Outreach Volunteer program was also initiated based on the success of Park Champs. a. Boulder parks are a source of positive economic benefits, enhancing property values, increasing municipal revenue and attracting homebuyers, a quality workforce and retirees. b. BPR outsourced programs including dance, pottery, competitive gymnastics and some summer camps to community partners, allowing the department to focus more resources on community-benefit and recreation level programming. c. Many programs, including YSI, EXPAND, historic restoration, urban tree canopy projects and supplemental financial aid programs benefited from external funding from a variety of agencies, foundations, private and corporate donors. d. The Health Equity Fund grant now funds free on-site fitness passes for qualifying residents. 3. 2021 Questionnaire Hopes & Concerns Highlight At the most fundamental level, financial sustainability is necessary for the parks and recreation system to function well. Participants feel it is very important to future planning. It provides reliability for services and operations and helps to avoid municipal debt and anticipates issues so they can be addressed proactively. a. Hope i. That future financial sustainability will include responsible spending, balanced budgets, and creative funding strategies to be better prepared to withstand hardships. b. Concern i. Lack of financial sustainability will cause parks, programs and facilities to decay or be lost, affecting BPR’s ability to meet the needs of the community. iv. Building Community and Relationships 1. Description Focusing on community engagement and cultural activities through outreach programs and initiatives are an important 44 component of building strong neighborhoods and increasing social connections. Parks and recreation programs build social capital, promote a healthy community and help address social and cultural inequities. 2. Accomplishment Highlight a. The Recquity Pass program, which offers subsidized facility passes to help increase recreation center use among under-resourced/low-income residents, initiated over 5,000 visits in the first eight months of its operation. b. BPR and long-standing official nonprofit partner, PLAY Boulder Foundation have strengthened their partnership by bringing back the Tree Trust and Duck Race and focusing on three key priorities: Placemaking, Environmental Sustainability and Access for All. 3. 2021 Questionnaire Hopes & Concerns Highlight A focus on building community and relationships helps to strengthen and promote a diversity of users through inclusion and accessibility. a. Hope i. Participants hope to see more inclusion, opportunities to connect, outreach by BPR, and more affordable programming and events. ii. There is hope that more culturally diverse programming will be offered, and more members of the community will take advantage of parks and recreation services. b. Concern i. There will not be significant change in the diversity and accessibility of BPR’s services and partnerships, which could result in voices remaining unheard, the community continuing to be divided, and people still being excluded. ii. Some participants fear that there may be a future loss of funding for programs and maintenance resources, leading to worsening isolation and lost connections between community members. v. Youth Engagement and Activity 1. Description a. Youth are a priority for the community and there is a strong need to actively engage youth with parks, facilities and programs that are place-based. Parks offer 45 children the daily benefits of direct experience with nature, engage children in experiential learning through play and shared experiences, and provide a resource for closing the opportunity gap to drive children’s participation in community development, citizenship and democratic processes. 2. Accomplishment Highlight a. Over 1,800 youth were served through diverse & popular summer camp offerings. b. The Youth Services Initiative (YSI) program was awarded a grant to implement the SPARK After School Physical Activity Program – offering after school and summer programming to enhance youth (6-18 years old) physical activity and fitness. 3. 2021 Questionnaire Hopes & Concerns Highlight Participants feel that parks and recreation programs and services provide many benefits to youth, including opportunities to make friends and connect with community, providing an outlet for stress and time away from computer screens. Participating teaches youth to be proud stewards of our environment, provides short- and long-term health benefits, education, emotional development, and the discovery of new passions and hobbies. a. Hope i. That BPR builds a strong foundation of health and community early so it can sustain all our youth throughout their lives. ii. That BPR will continue to provide opportunities for youth to interact with each other and learn to value the outdoors, be good stewards, appreciate community and learn to discover. b. Concern i. A lack of youth programming that keeps kids interested and connected to community (especially for teens), or inequitable programming that will exclude some. ii. A lack of environmental awareness or commitment to environmental causes that will decrease use of parks and recreation programs and services in the future. 46 vi. Organizational Readiness 1. Description Many demands on budget and staff time face parks and recreation departments both locally and nationally. As a department, it is critical to create more business management practices leveraging the use of new technologies, data driven decision-making and collaborative decision-making tools to allow for a response to changes over time. 2. Accomplishment Highlight a. Beehive Asset Management Software implemented to manage $270 million in park assets more effectively. b. As part of the Climate Leaders Program, the City is also training leaders from Parks and Recreation in the science of climate change so that everyday decisions across the organization can be informed by a consistent foundation of knowledge and understanding. c. BPR offers staff a strong learning and growth program, which includes the development of a competency library, professional development plans and regular training. 3. 2021 Questionnaire Hopes & Concerns Highlight Participants feel that change is inevitable and organizational readiness is important to face it and thrive. a. Hope i. Respondents hope that BPR uses data, makes proactive decisions and stays up to date on technology in order to significantly benefit the stability of the department and to ensure customer satisfaction ii. Strong internal organization and collaborative decision-making with a goal to embrace new opportunities and improve collaboration between BPR and other community organizations and agencies. b. Concern i. Complacency could result in inefficient systems, lower customer satisfaction, lost opportunities, and inability to recover from setbacks and poor implementation. ii. An increasing population, including an increasing senior population, will need to be accommodated in a meaningful way – 47 proactively expanding services that excite residents. What’s Trending in Boulder Parks and Recreation? a. Intro Description 2020 was a difficult year, with people around the world struggling to cope with a global pandemic and significant social upheaval throughout our community. The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) predicts that “one-third of all park and recreation budgets will face cuts of 25 percent or more in their fiscal year 2021–2022 budgets, and substantial cuts in fiscal year 2022– 2023 budgets. Absent adequate federal assistance, the coming budget cuts will be shocking and likely will exceed those from the Great Recession of 2007– 2009.” BPR, like most recreation program and service providers, has had to pivot from business as usual to no in-person activities to limited registration to virtual options and slowly back again. While the pandemic has resulted in downward trends in certain areas, it has also led to positive trends that are good for the future of parks and recreation. b. Top 10 BPR Current State Trends 1. In 2019, BPR welcomed 512,420 recreation center visitors. From 2019 to 2020, recreation registration has pivoted a lot (e.g., program registration, partner providers, memberships, drop-ins) and fluctuated dramatically in 2020 (due to public health order facility closures) and the beginning of 2021 – going from pre-COVID numbers to no registrations, to virtual, to partial openings, to closing back to partial openings. Enrollment in all BPR program areas decreased and organized team sports were paused for most of 2020. As things begin to open up, BPR is generally filling capacity, especially at pools and tennis courts. 2. Youth and family programs are continually requested and special events, including the Halloween Drive-In Movie, have been more popular than expected. Parents in Boulder and surrounding communities are yearning to get their kids outside or in recreation programs/camps. 3. An unexpected uptick in a regional user population has been seen because many facilities throughout the region have been closed. Users who would not otherwise come to Boulder have been visiting BPR facilities because some of them are open, while facilities where they live may not be operating. 4. Community affirmed steady demand for walkable or bikeable access to parks, natural areas and recreation during workday and after school. Facilities are aging and parks and natural areas are declining due to overuse. 5. Demand is increasing and older adults are coming back at unexpectedly higher rates because BPR provides opportunities for social engagement in a safe environment. This trend and demand for programming for older adults, including use of warm water pools is expected to increase. 48 6. Considering inflation, funding has been flat since 2000, yet BPR has added services, increased pay, established a Living Wage, augmented sustainable practices that require more maintenance (no pesticides), and increased Financial Aid. 7. The community embraced virtual programming. Staff have worked to simplify the registration process and the user base is slowly growing. These increases in demand may be artificially high due to COVID-19, so it will be important to monitor changes in the next few years to fully understand trends. 8. BPR is ahead of many peers in data and push toward “total” asset management. For example, some communities do not have the data to understand order of magnitude deferred maintenance. 9. Volunteer hours are trending up as a result of city and BPR investments in staff capacity to design and deliver quality volunteer programs and use them as a vehicle for building social capital. 10. Strong partnerships and collaborations are creating more environmentally, financially and socially successful programming and services, including the Pottery Lab collaboration, partnerships with OSMP, CU, Boulder Housing Partners, HHS, PLAY and increased philanthropy. c. Top Trends the 2022 Master Plan Needs to Anticipate 1. Increased Indoor and Outdoor Recreation Demand. Once people discover outdoors and recreation, they are unlikely to return to the sofa. While demand has fluctuated during the pandemic, local and national trends point strongly to increased, sustained demand for indoor and outdoor recreation. 2. Change in Daily Habits. COVID-19 has changed the way people work, recreate and exercise. Many residents have signed up for virtual classes, purchased their own equipment, and daily routines have changed. Some people may not go back to the office five days/week moving forward, and this will impact demand and usage of BPR facilities, parks and natural areas. Until there is widespread immunity, community members may be hesitant to come back to physical indoor locations and may continue their increased use of our outdoor parks and natural areas. At the same time, people may crave the social aspects of in-person classes and fitness programs that they have not had access to for months. 3. Dynamic Youth Participation. Youth programming is also on the rise, as parents want to give their kids a sense of normalcy (e.g., day and summer camps). As things are opening back up, baseball and little league registration has been good, because it is not a “too close contact” sport, and parents are looking for activities their kids can participate in with others. Demand for outdoor recreation (passive and active) and programming is predicted to continue to increase, as more people have been discovering this type of programming due to COVID-19 indoor restrictions. 49 4. Increased Demand for Wellness Programs Especially Among Older Adults. Health and wellness programming interest (mind, body and spirit integration) is expected to trend upward, due to modern day stressors and anxiety about the post-COVID landscape. Boulder’s population is aging and this group is anticipated to have continued demand for recreation that creates social connections and improves health. 5. Adaptability and flexibility in future programming and services are key to recovery. BPR will need to continue to think more holistically and dynamically about programming and services. Specifically, adapting to the changes in how people live and work today will be important. Focusing on timing of offerings, combinations of programming, mobile options, flexible spaces and a continued virtual presence will help move BPR forward post COVID-19. Demand to have one-stop registration and communication portal that combines many different providers for ease of community participation. 6. Balancing Equity with Financial Sustainability. With future budget and space limitations, BPR will need to focus on determining the highest and best utilization of services and facilities, while still providing additional support to those who need it. Continued refinement of Financial Aid will be important to ensuring access for all. 7. Increased Maintenance and Staff Coordination. As parks recreation demands are anticipated to grow, BPR can anticipate increased demands for maintenance and will need to develop strategies to accommodate increased use. Stakeholders saw opportunities for more collaboration with BPR to provide services during a fiscally-constrained time. Additional staff time may be requested to expand existing and new partnerships. 8. Preparing for Potential Budget Decreases. Staff and stakeholders had concerns about maintaining existing funding and competition for limited general fund dollars as the financial effects of the pandemic are expected to impact Boulder’s budget over the next 2-3 years at a minimum. 9. Making Big Data Accessible. Boulder decision-makers and the community have a strong desire for data-based decision making. BPR has completed robust plans and policies with numerous data criteria to support current efforts of taking care of what we have as well as growing equity and resilience. Over the next 5-7 years, staff will need to synthesize information from these departmental and citywide frameworks to communicate decision-making succinctly and transparently. Additionally, the pandemic saw a demand for easy-to-use, centralized information hubs. With the current recreation partnerships network and multiple registration and data systems, the community desires a convenient, one-stop digital information source to learn about program and facility offerings and secure registration. 10. Responding to Climate Change. The climate is changing and compared to 50 years ago, Boulder is warmer and drier. Increased amount of maintenance and changes to work plans and priorities, especially as natural disasters 50 (e.g., flood, fire) increase due to impacts of climate change should be anticipated. • Call out infographic: • You too can help us predict the future of parks and recreation participation demand in Boulder. Please sign-up to take the survey here: add QR code? Spotlight: Equity & Resilience in Boulder Parks and Recreation Equity and resilience are important guiding principles to the Master Plan Update and weave through the current and future trends BPR will face in the next 5-7 years. BPR already has made strong achievements in providing recreation more equitably and responding to stressors through resilience. • What does equity and resilience mean for parks and recreation? o Equity is “the just and fair quantity, proximity and connections to quality parks and green space, recreation facilities, as well as programs that are safe, inclusive, culturally relevant and welcoming to everyone. When people have just and fair access, our health and social well-being improve, and our communities can protect and better recover from environmental, social and economic challenges” (National Recreation and Parks Association 2020). o Resilience is the capacity to prepare and plan for disruptions, to recover from shocks and stresses, and to adapt and grow from those experiences. Resilience is becoming an increasingly important issue as climate change and weather events continue to worsen. Parks and public spaces should be prepared for these extreme events and their long-term impacts. Creating resilient places can provide economic and social benefits as well. 1. BPR Current Achievements and City Framework for Equity and Resilience a. Equity i. Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) department has made positive strides in advancing equity within the work of the department. These accomplishments include concerted efforts to provide communications and materials in multiple languages (primarily English and Spanish) and providing significant access to programs and services for people with low incomes or disabilities. ii. BPR currently evaluates increases or decreases in budget allocation using an equity toolkit that looks at who will be impacted, are there alternatives and geographic areas. iii. While improvements have been made, there is still much work to be accomplished. A major focus of the department’s equity work is 51 defining how services and programs are distributed and provided in an equitable way. Many outdoor passive recreation opportunities are easily accessible to all and low cost. It is also critical to track meaningful metrics to ensure the goals and objectives of this work are being achieved and to report these achievements to the community. iv. Boulder Equity Planning Effort. Boulder Parks and Recreation cannot and is not embarking on equity work on its own. Creating collaborations and partnerships with other city departments and outside organizations will ensure a consistent and aligned approach to defining and incorporating equity into all city services. Collecting and analyzing meaningful data will ensure that equity is included in all decisions, powering continuous improvement for underrepresented communities. b. Resilience i. Overall, BPR is proactive and can adjust and restructure quickly when needed. This approach helps BPR deal with windstorms, the emerald ash borer, droughts, wildfire and other climate emergencies or other stressors such as the financial impacts of the pandemic. ii. City Resilience Framework (CRF). BPR uses the City Resilience Framework (CRF), which provides a lens to understand the complexity of cities and the drivers that contribute to their resilience. It also offers a common language that enables cities to share knowledge and experiences. The framework is built on four essential dimensions of urban resilience: Leadership & Strategy, Health & Well-being, Economy & Society, and Infrastructure & Environment. iii. The City of Boulder declared a Climate Emergency on July 23, 2019, Resolution 1260. That declaration included four targets to address the climate emergency: 100% renewable energy by 2030, 80% city organization emissions reduction by 2030, 100 MW of local renewable generation by 2030, and 80% community greenhouse gas emissions reduction by 2050. Boulder’s Department of Climate Initiatives has developed the Climate Mobilization Action Plan (CMAP) to fully address climate change with immediate, system-scale action to create an equitable future, rapidly reduce emissions and accelerate technological innovation. The programs and policies envisioned within the CMAP look to energy systems, regenerative ecosystems, a circular materials economy, land use policies and financial systems to address the climate emergency. 2. Opportunities for Equity and Resilience in the 2022 Master Plan Update a. Intro: Equity and resilience projects, policies, and programs will require partnerships or investment in resources (e.g., more time and money). It will be important in scenario planning to identify achievable, low-hanging fruit to accomplish for 5-7 year recovery period and look for additional 52 funding/maintaining funding opportunities through grants and local/federal funding support. b. Equity Opportunities • Add equity, inclusivity and diversity (with definitions) to the guiding mission/vision or leading documents of Parks and Recreation. • Think holistically about program fees and potential ways that users can pay them. The City of Boulder manages the Health Equity Fund (HEF) to promote health for all Boulder residents. The HEF provides grant funding distributed from the Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Product Distribution Tax to promote health equity. Boulder Parks and Recreation has received HEF funding since 2018 to further facilitate access to facilities for residents with low incomes. Look for funding through Colorado Health Foundation and other groups to support getting kids active, especially underserved • Adapt programs to how people live and work today - flexibility in time of offerings, programs go to them, mobile classes. • Partner with underrepresented communities to create programming/activities that are relevant. • During needs assessment, analyze level of service in finer detail beyond peer city benchmarking to Boulder Subcommunities. • Layer in collaboration points (e.g., staff training) from Boulder’s Racial Equity Plan effort that dovetail with the next 5-7 years planning horizon. • The number of people experiencing homelessness has grown throughout the United States and Boulder is no exception. As a result, encampments on public lands have become of increasing concern in the Boulder Community. Highlight BPR efforts on the interdepartmental task force working to draw on national best practices to develop and implement a strategy to support Boulder community members experiencing homelessness and ensure public spaces are safe and welcoming for all. c. Resilience Opportunities • It is important to maintain green spaces, natural areas and tree canopy during budget tightening to protect Boulder’s natural resources (ecosystem services). Urban parks are part of the fabric of the urban ecosystem, providing refuge for urban wildlife and areas to support native biodiversity and respond to a changing climate. • The 2013 flood provided opportunity to collaborate interdepartmentally, which will continue to become more important. Parks and Rec overlaps with almost all other departments – to do work effectively, need to strengthen citywide culture of collaboration. 53 • Provide volunteer and free educational opportunities – particularly those educational ops that focus on natural systems and resilience (low- cost, low-staff time activities). • Recreation ecology – explore practices to avoid the “loved to death” effect. • Consider environmental. Leverage opportunity for youth and climate programs or volunteerism to support BPR green efforts-youth polled in recent OSMP effort had extremely high support for environmental programming. • Boulder is well positioned to partner with thought leaders (e.g., NOAA) in the local community to help quantify how much Boulder’s park system contributes to cooling heat island effect and improved air quality. 3. Call out quote from community and stakeholder focus groups: a. “You belong here, you are safe here.” b. “Thank you for providing time in the East Boulder Recreation Center pool for Vulnerable Populations. The classes have been a lifesaver for me and I am sure for others.” AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: March 29, 2021 AGENDA TITLE: 2022 Budget Strategy PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Bryan Beary, Community Building and Partnerships Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Park Operations Manager Tim Duda, Business Analyst Chris Passarelli, Business Analyst Stacie Hoffmann, Administrative Supervisor EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item summarizes Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) 2019 and 2020 actual revenues and expenses, the 2021 approved budget and look ahead with a 5-year financial outlook. The background of this item summarizes the department’s funding sources, their uses, and financial outlooks (pages 1-8). It also provides an overview of current fee structure and Levels of Services (pages 8-14). The analysis of this memo introduces some of the challenges and options for developing a sustainable 2022 budget (pages 14-17). This item largely provides foundation information that will support future conversations. The intent is to ensure PRAB members have a strong understanding of financial outlook, potential challenges, and budget approach. BACKGROUND: At the February 22, 2021 PRAB meeting, staff introduced the 2022 Budget Strategy conversation. The memo summarized the PRAB engagement that informed 2020’s recreation access fees, impacts of COVID on revenue in 2020 and 2021 and the opportunities, challenges and recommendations for the 2022 Budget Development Strategy. Staff also shared the plan to consult and engage the PRAB with 2022 budget development each month March through June. Finally, as each step builds on the AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 2__ previous month’s discussions, PRAB’s input was sought on the proposed opportunities, challenges, and recommendations. Parks and Recreation Funds The Parks and Recreation Department receives funding from five major funds in addition to other funds that vary in frequency and dedicated for specific purposes. The department has sole responsibility over the revenues and expenses in three of those funds: • Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund • Recreation Activity Fund (RAF) • .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund For the remaining two funds, the General Fund and Lottery Fund, the department is responsible for developing a budget for expenses but does not oversee the revenue projections as these funds are shared with multiple other departments. See Attachment A (BPR Sources and Uses 2021 Chart). Below, each fund’s sources, uses, and outlook are summarized. The city’s Central Finance department is providing City Council with a financial and revenue update at the April 27, 2021 Budget and Revenue Update Study Session. The PRAB is invited to observe the City Council Study Session for timely information, and a summary of the meeting will be shared with the PRAB at the May business meeting.. Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund: The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund (PPRF) is the department’s primary capital improvement and acquisition fund. Property and development excise taxes generate revenue for the fund, which is dedicated for acquiring land and renovating or improving existing parks and recreational facilities. It may not be used to fund regular operations or routine maintenance. PPRF Revenue Outlook: The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund receives revenues from property taxes. These taxes typically grow as property values increase but lag other revenue sources during a recession. The property tax assessment is updated every odd-numbered year, so values will be updated in 2021 with those revenues being attributed to the 2022 budget year. The Central Budget division of the Finance Department is working with Boulder County to determine what any budget adjustments would look like based on reassessed values and the potential impact from the November 2020 approval of the Colorado Amendment B. Recreation Activity Fund (RAF): The RAF is used to operate the department’s many recreation, fitness, and sports facilities and programs. RAF funds are largely derived from program and facility user fees with some supplemental funding from the General Fund (primarily to subsidize programs for individuals with disabilities, provide financial aid to those with low incomes and age-based discounts for youth and seniors). See Table 1 below. As a quasi-enterprise fund, it is expected to balance its own revenue and expenses within the fund. AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 3__ RAF Revenue Outlook: The Recreation Activity Fund is funded primarily through user fees, with subsidy support from the General Fund. The subsidy from the General Fund has fluctuated year over year, with total amounts ranging from $1.4 million to $1.6 million over the past 4 years. Staff anticipate continued pressure placed on the General Fund for 2022 budget development based on needs from other departments and restoration of pre-COVID levels of services across the organization. User fees fund the majority of revenues collected in the RAF; however, the department has also been able to leverage state and private grants and donations to support operations for youth, families, people with disabilities and general access to recreation centers. RAF Revenue Totals 2018 2019 2020 2021 Projected General Fund Subsidy $1,633,336 $1,407,210 $1,562,466 $1,545,954 Earned Revenue $8,550,898 $8,894,909 $4,728,959 $8,567,835 Grants/Donations $244,352 $382,815 $162,381 TBD Transfers $13,000 $13,000 $263,000 $13,000 TOTAL $10,441,586 $10,697,934 $6,716,806 10,126,789 Table 1: RAF Revenues 2018 to present. .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (.25): The department receives voter-approved sales tax funds (0.25 cents per dollar) that are dedicated to acquiring, developing, operating, and maintaining parks and recreation facilities. In November 2012, voters renewed the tax with 85% voter approval through 2035. .25 Revenue Outlook: The .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund is tied to the city’s sales and use tax growth. At the conclusion of 2020, sales tax figures declined 4.76% compared to 2019. While this decline was less than expected, there is great uncertainty on the future recovery of sales tax in Boulder, and the shape of the sales tax recovery will vary based on multiple factors. General Fund: The city’s General Fund is supported by fees and sales, property, and other taxes. General Fund dollars are managed by Central Finance and allocated each year to city departments and projects by City Council through the annual budget process. The department primarily uses its allocation to fund park and forestry operations and department administration. GF Revenue Outlook: The General Fund’s largest sources of revenue are sales and use taxes and property taxes. Given the uncertainty of impacts from the global pandemic in 2020, the Central Budget office projected Boulder would have a decline in sales tax revenue of 11 to 17 percent. As previously noted in the context of the .25, sales and use tax declined by only 4.76 percent compared to 2019. While still a significant decline, it was less severe than original projections. A great deal of uncertainty remains into 2021 as the shape of the sales tax AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 4__ recovery will vary based on multiple factors. BPR believes there will be updated guidance at the April 27 Budget and Revenue Update Study Session. From 2018 until the pandemic began, the sales and use tax rates had a flattening rate of growth in Boulder, resulting in smaller percentages of revenue growth than increases to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Since the BPR does not receive General Fund revenues directly, the expenses are what is programmed for this fund each year. General Fund Uses 2018 2019 2020 2021 Projected BPR FTE 40.50 40.00 40.50 37.50 Personnel $2,416,385 $2,443,776 $2,382,283 $2,376,206 Benefits $757,597 $776,779 $827,152 $773,770 NPE $850,238 $1,156,010 $913,322 $907,243 One-Time* $900,000 - $850,000 - TOTAL $4,924,220 $4,376,565 $4,972,757 $4,057,219 Table 2: General Fund Expenses 2018 to present. *$900,000 provided for Reservoir Visitor Services Center CIP funding in 2018 & $850,000 for 2020’s September Snowstorm Forestry Clean Up Lottery Fund: The city lottery fund is a special revenue fund that provides state conservation trust fund monies allocated to local governments based on population. State conservation trust fund monies are dedicated to parks, recreation, and open space site maintenance and capital improvements. The city receives lottery money on an annual basis from the state and allocates money to the department. Lottery Revenue Outlook: The department relies on Central Budget’s guidance for the Lottery Fund, which assumes no growth for future out years. Other Funds: The department receives additional funding on a limited basis from the Capital Development Fund and Community, Culture and Safety (CCS) capital improvement bond (2012 and 2017). These funds vary in amount each year and are not guaranteed as ongoing sources of revenue. As such, these funds support one-time capital improvement program projects and are funds shared with other departments. Financial Outlook: Expense The department responded quickly to economic conditions in 2020’s reduced budget and 2021’s budget proposal to reduce expenses in alignment with the economic conditions impacting revenues above. As a result, the whole department has implemented significant expense reductions. The department developed a balanced 2021 budget through decreased staffing levels and operating costs, which correspond to the anticipated decline in recreation participation levels. 2020 original staffing levels were reduced by 19.5 standard positions through holding vacancies and layoffs. Over half of these positions were at the supervisory level to minimize the impact customers and residents see in services. Non-standard seasonal AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 5__ employment was also reduced throughout 2021 for revenue-generating programs based on declines in service levels. The strategies proposed to achieve a balanced budget are instrumental to the department’s efforts to support the mission of promoting community health and well-being through the provision of high-quality parks, facilities, and programs. These impacts persist through the 2021 approved budget and as we plan for 2022. Looking ahead, the department acknowledges added pressures on expenses including: • Continued safety and economic impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic • Some decisions must be made based on assumptions because of high ambiguity and unknowns • Increases in fixed operating costs • Overall fund health following 2 years of setbacks and shifts in funds • Decreased usage in indoor recreation centers and program participation • In creases in construction and CIP-related costs due to escalation, age of assets, and unfunded capital maintenance. At the March 2022 PRAB meeting, staff will provide an overview of the revenues and expenses for each of these funds from 2018 through 2021’s approved budget. Fund Health Since the department is responsible for developing balanced budgets in the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund, Recreation Activity Fund (RAF) and .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, the 6 year outlook is provided on the fund’s overall health. The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund’s budget is developed using revenue projections from Central Budget, and expenses from the department’s annual operating and capital improvement projects (CIP) budget. A significant portion of CIP expenses were moved from the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund to the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund as part of the 2021-26 CIP development and based on declines in sales tax funding. As a result, the ending fund balance dips below $1 million in 4 out of 6 out years. This fund is balanced; however, there is minimal room for error and revenue projections do not plan for any correction in assessed values. The overall health of this fund can be viewed as fair. The RAF operated at a deficit in recent years. While as a quasi-enterprise fund, it is designed to support fluctuations in revenues and expenses, the health of the fund is of concern unless expenses are decreased, revenues are increased, or additional operation efficiencies are identified. The .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund’s budget is developed using revenue projections from Central Budget, and expenses from the department’s annual operating and CIP. The projected revenue targets in this fund were increased after the 2021 final budget AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 6__ submission, resulting in higher revenue projections than originally planned. As a result, revenue is projected to grow quicker, while expenses were either reduced or move to the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. The fund is balanced and will continue to grow in the out years; however, there remains great uncertainty on the shape of the economic recovery and the budget does not assume any returns of service levels impacted by COVID. As part of 2022’s budget development, there will likely be some capacity for restoring some service levels and capital projects. While there are foreseeable pressures, overall the fund is healthy. As mentioned at the February 22, 2021 PRAB meeting, the Ending Fund Balance in each of these funds has decreased significantly with the 2021 budget submission compared to the 2020 approved budget. A great deal of work will be done by staff to create a greater balance between each of the funds, by shifting allowable expenses and CIP projects to other funds to increase the overall fund health of each of the funds. RECREATION FACILITIES: LEVELS OF SERVICE AND COMMUNITY SATISFACTION Considering the fund health and future financial pressures outlined above, this section seeks to affirm that the number and variety of recreation facilities provided by the department are appropriate for the resident population as compared to peer benchmarks, and that the delivery of services meets community satisfaction and industry best practices. To inform this analysis, staff have primarily considered and summarized: Level of Service in terms of Master Plan Benchmarks and current facility operations, community satisfaction in terms of perceived community value, customer loyalty and utilization trends, and customer feedback on facility access options (passes, packages, fees). Master Plan Benchmarks Benchmarks for recreation facilities are measured in terms of the quantity of various facility types per residents in the population, which generates a Level of Service (LOS) benchmark. LOS for the number of facilities per resident remain largely unchanged since the 2014 Master Plan besides increases to Boulder’s population (see Table 3, and note that the Master Plan Update Needs Assessment will include a substantial update to this analysis). Recreation Facility LOS Per # Persons Current Facilities Current LOS 2012 LOS Benchmark Median LOS Colorado Benchmark Median LOS TPL Median LOS* Diamond Fields Combined 10,000 24 2.24 2.46 2.45 2.89 1.60 Rectangular Fields 10,000 20 1.87 2.05 1.32 5.22 NA Playgrounds 10,000 40 3.73 4.11 3.96 3.96 2.60 Dog Parks 100,000 4 3.73 4.11 1.33 1.33 1.20 Skate Parks 100,000 2 1.87 1.03 1.24 1.33 0.69 Golf Course 100,000 1 0.93 1.03 NA NA 0.80 AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 7__ Indoor Pools 100,000 3 2.80 3.08 1.88 2.08 NA Outdoor Pools 100,000 2 1.87 2.05 2.49 1.79 NA Swimming Pools Combined 100,000 5 4.67 5.13 4.37 3.87 1.78 Recreation Centers 100,000 3 2.80 3.08 NA NA 4.11** Table 3: Boulder Parks and Recreation Facility Level of Service. Benchmark medians from 2014 Master Plan. *TPL LOS Median refers to the Trust for Public Land’s (TPL) City Park Facts Median for 2020 (includes the country’s 100 most populous cities). ** TPL “Recreation Centers” LOS also includes Senior Centers, increasing the median. These spaces are where many of BPR’s recreation activities occur, and facilities are available for delivery of recreation services. These facility levels of service is supported by the goal of Fiscally Constrained alternatives in the Master Plan with the department maintaining services levels as: • No new major structures or buildings will be developed. • Upgrades to existing facilities will continue. • Upgrades to recreation centers will be made to repurpose existing facilities. Projects like the Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement and the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Service Center, considered ‘Action’ and ‘Vision’ level enhancements, have been made possible through other one-time funding opportunities like the 2017 Community, Culture and Safety Tax, the use of Capital Development Funds and efforts of the PLAY Boulder Foundation. These facilities provide the environment for our recreation offerings, which brings up the next LOS conversation. Level of Service for Recreation Facility Operations As discussed above, the RAF is a quasi-enterprise fund, expected to largely sustain its expenses with revenue as we deliver recreation experiences to the community. This means the services we can offer are closely tied to the fees and expected revenue. This brief history reviews updates to entrance and pass fees over the last few years, and informs the LOS discussion that follows. Entrance Fees The current entry fees were established at the May 28, 2019 PRAB meeting. At that meeting, the following entrance fees were recommended for 2020 and 2021 (see Tables 4 and 5). Table 4. Daily Entry Fees Single Visit 10 Visit Punch Pass Age Resident/Worker* Non- Resident Resident/Worker* Non- Resident Adult 19-59 years $9 $11 $81 $99 Senior 60+ years $6.75 $8.25 $61 $74 Youth 3-18 years $5.50 $6.50 $50 $59 Daily 4-Pack (NEW!) 4 entries; Max 2 adults $24 $29 * Individuals who live or work in the City of Boulder are eligible for Resident/Worker rates with proof of residency. Table 5. Unlimited Entry Fees AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 8__ Monthly Pass Annual Pass Age Resident/Worker* Non-Resident Resident/Worker* Non- Resident Adult 19-59 years $62/month $76/month $648/year $792/year Senior 60+ years $47/month $57/month $486/year $594/year Youth 3-18 years $38/month $45/month $396/year $468/year Household See note below $99/month $122/month $1,037/year $1,267/year * Individuals who live or work in the City of Boulder are eligible for Resident/Worker rates with proof of residency. The basis of the fees focused on: • Age-based Subsidy - Youth and Senior entry fees should continue to be subsidized through the General Fund at an approximate 40% subsidy for Youth (under 19 yrs) and 25% subsidy for Seniors (60+ yrs). • Financial Aid – Use subsidy to continue to support under-resourced residents in gaining entry to department facilities and participating in department programs. • Worker Fees - Those that work in the City of Boulder should continue to pay the same fees as those that live in the City of Boulder, to support Boulder’s economic vitality goals. • Non-resident Fees - Non-residents should pay higher fees than those who live or work in the City of Boulder • Entry Fee Increases – After reviewing market analysis, value of service, and financial sustainability goals, the PRAB supported an option to increase base entry fees by an average of 9%. • Non-Resident Fee Premium & Daily Entry Fee – In addition to the increase to base entry fees, the PRAB supported an option to standardize a 22% premium for entry fees for those that do not live or work in the City of Boulder. The PRAB also supported the addition of a Non-Resident daily entry fee. • Seasonal Facility Entry Fees – The PRAB supported an option to align seasonal facility entry fees for Scott Carpenter Pool, Spruce Pool, and Boulder Reservoir with the fees charged for the Recreation Centers. The PRAB also supported allowing for these seasonal facilities to continue to be included in Annual, Monthly, and Punch Card entry options. • Multi-Visit Pass Options – The PRAB supported an option to reduce the number of Punch Card pass options, while adding a more flexible monthly access option Recreation Centers The fees discussed above, now largely consistent throughout the system, are charged when you enter a center or buy an unlimited pass 1. This revenue throughout the entire recreation operation, with a modest subsidy from the General Fund, must pay for operation of the amenities, staff at the desk, and everything else needed to deliver the recreation experience such as: lap pool, leisure pool, gymnasiums, racquetball court, hot tub, sauna, steam room, weight room, cardio equipment, lighted tennis courts, outdoor sand volleyball, drop-in fitness classes, and drop-in mind/body classes. 1While under Public Health Orders, with the PRAB’s input, and in June-Octboer 2020, a $15 fee for non- resident daily entry was implemented to discourage out of area travel and to address financial challenges. AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 9__ In purchasing a multi-visit pass (10 punches), members receive discounted access to the three recreation centers, the two outdoor pools, and the Boulder Reservoir. With the purchase of an unlimited pass, members receive all the previously mentioned benefits at an even greater discount and a discount on registered programs as available. Historically, unlimited pass members have received childcare and towel services; however, these services have been halted due to COVID-19 and will be reconsidered as part of 2022 budget planning. While 2021’s operations continue to be refined, the Recreation Centers’ usage information is identified below for 2019’s baseline compared to 2020 in Tables 6 and 7. Across the board, the recreation centers service levels were impacted in terms of revenues, expenses, visitation, hours open and the number of patrons using the facilities per hour. Facility Weekly Operating Hours Pre-Pandemic Weekly Operating Hours Current North Boulder Recreation Center 100.5 hours 75 hours East Boulder Community Center 102 hours 70 hours South Boulder Recreation Center 94 hours 35 hours TOTAL 296.5 hours 180 hours Table 6: Recreation Facility Operational Hours Recreation Center Statistics 2019 Baseline 2020 Baseline Change 2019 to 2020 Expense $4,587,887 $2,723,785 -41% Hours of Operation 14,987 6,729 -55% Cost per Hour $306 $404 32% Total Visits 483,935 131,146 -73% Usage/Hour 32.3 patrons 19.5 patrons -40% Pass/Entry Fee Revenue $2,878,067 $786,411 -73% Average Fee $5.95 $6.00 1% Revenue to Expense % 63% 29% -54% Table 7: Recreation Facility Usage Statistics Outdoor Pools and Boulder Reservoir Scott Carpenter Pool, Spruce Pool and the Boulder Reservoir are operated seasonally, approximately Memorial Day through Labor Day. Services available at the outdoor pools include locker rooms, lifeguard supervised lap swimming and leisure swimming. The Boulder Reservoir is open year round for passive recreation and adds a lifeguarded swim beach and lake patrol services during peak summer months. Other services available at AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 10__ the reservoir include boat rentals, picnic site rentals, as well as support for fishing, boating, open water swimming opportunities and special events. Weekly hours of operation for seasonal facilities are shown in Table 8. The increase in level of service anticipated for 2021 is largely due to the addition of a leisure pool at Scott Carpenter. Facility Weekly Operating Hours (Seasonal) Pre-Pandemic Weekly Operating Hours (Seasonal) 2021 Anticipated Scott Carpenter Lap Pool 92 94 Scott Carpenter Leisure Pool N/A 56 Spruce Pool 86 92 Boulder Reservoir 112 98 TOTAL 286.5 hours 340 hours Table 8: Outdoor Recreation Facility Usage Hours (excludes Flatirons Golf Course) *Pandemic hours varied greatly in 2020 as services were restored each month To support the services offered at the Boulder Reservoir outside of the peak summer season, off-peak entrance fees are being implemented in 2021 to better align expenses and revenue. These reduced flank (spring and fall) fees will offset the costs associated with providing active site management during the shoulder season while the twilight fee will encourage carpooling after 6:00p.m. and is supported by the reduction in service when the swim beach closes at that time. No-wake times are also simplified in 2021 to balance the needs of boating user groups (see PRAB items from October and November 2020 for details) completion of the Visitor Service Center, including public meeting and event spaces, children’s play areas, and new dining facilities. Community Satisfaction Unfortunately, due to the impacts of COVID, community surveys were not conducted in 2020. The most recent results from a Community Survey come from the 2018 Community Survey conducted in September and October of 2018. The survey was mailed to over 6,000 households selected through a randomization process to help ensure the results reflect a representative cross-section of Boulder. A total of 1,260 residents responded. The survey contained a broad range of questions, including quality of life, priorities for city government, ratings of city services, communication and outreach, use of city facilities and programs, and demographics. The project also included an open web survey. The overall quality of the services provided by Boulder as well as the manner in which these services are provided is a key component of how residents rate their quality of life. Nearly 85% of survey respondents rated the overall quality of City services as excellent or good, a score more than 50% higher than the rating given for the Federal Government. The ratings of both local and Federal Government service provision were similar to national benchmarks. City Parks, Recreation Centers, and Recreation Programs were ranked among the ten highest services citywide (along with Open Space, Libraries, Recycling, and Natural Area Preservation). AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 11__ In detail, respondents evaluated department services as: • Recreational Opportunities as 95% positive • Recreation Programs as 92% positive • Recreation Centers as 91% positive • Visited Boulder Recreation Centers at 62% participation The Boulder community still relies on BPR to sustain recreation offerings, and the specialized facilities where they happen. Past efforts to align expenses with revenue, especially in the RAF, provide a foundation as we continue our recovery into 2022. The balancing of LOS with constrained resources continues in our Urban Parks division, despite a different funding structure: URBAN PARKS: LEVELS OF SERVICE AND COMMUNITY SATISFACTION Parkland Levels of Service As with recreation facilities, here staff provide an overview of levels of service in urban parks as well as known information on community satisfaction. The master plan Needs Assessment includes an in-depth analysis of urban parkland provision. While this will be updated with the 2020 Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update, LOS is largely unchanged in this area as well with one new park development in the past five years (Bill Bower Park). The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) includes two metrics as it relates to provision of neighborhood parks: • Provide neighborhood parks of a minimum of five acres in size within one-half mile of the population to be served. • Provide playground facilities for toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children up through age 12 within one-quarter to one-half mile of residents. With the master plan analysis, parkland provides over 80% coverage for residences using the five-acre/half-mile standard. The coverage is 100% if non-department acreage (e.g., school property administered by BVSD) is included. The department currently provides enough playgrounds to yield approximately 75% coverage of the BVCP standard for one playground facility per quarter mile. The coverage increases to 100% if non-department facilities (e.g., BVSD school playgrounds) are included. Figure 1 below demonstrates the LOS as it relates to overall urban park acreage. While below the Trust for Public Land (TPL) median, the department’s acreage is well above the regional median (the six Colorado communities used as benchmarks) and above the overall benchmark median. AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 12__ Figure 1: Urban Park Acres per 1,000 residents, exceeding benchmark communities from 2014 Master Plan In summary and from the master plan: Given Boulder’s existing acreage and high LOS for urban parkland, the community is well poised to meet future needs. In fact, with the total supply of acreage available for development, the amount of open space supplied by Open Space and Mountain Parks Department (OSMP) and other providers, and the availability of land associated with schools, it is anticipated that there will not be any additional requirements to acquire new lands. This assumption is dependent on the department developing existing undeveloped lands in balance with growing recreation needs and maintaining a balance of developed and natural areas in urban parks. Park Operations Overview and Fiscally Constrained Operating Levels The 2015 General Maintenance and Management Plan (GMMP) evaluated operations and provided management recommendations related to the operations of Forestry, the Boulder Reservoir, Natural Lands, Flatirons Golf Course, Valmont City Park, and the breadth of urban parkland across the system. The GMMP also included an outline of the department’s asset management approach for parkland, to include improved data- collection to inform resource allocation. To support this, in 2019 the department implemented Beehive, a city-wide asset management software which will facilitate the Asset Management Program (AMP) and data-driven decision making. This will happen largely through improved data collection which will facilitate a more accurate understanding of workforce effectiveness and efficiency as well as labor needs. Beehive continues to be used by different workgroups as adoption and data collection increase each quarter. Meanwhile, the recommendations of the GMMP are already driving the department’s master plan aligned focus on asset management as it relates to staffing levels, maintenance standards, fleet and equipment management, and effective use of resources. Urban Park Operations is divided into five workgroups: Construction and Irrigation Maintenance The Parks Construction and Irrigation workgroup provides minor maintenance, renovation, and improvements of park infrastructure as well as management of all irrigation services. This workgroup performs water conservation, maintenance and AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 13__ operation of irrigation, GIS mapping of all irrigation systems, and coordination with the city Water Conservation Office and outside Water Management organizations. Athletic Fields This workgroup is responsible for sports fields, including trimming, edging, weeding, and other maintenance practices at the premier athletic facilities and satellite facilities. This workgroup also maintains all of the field infrastructure and facilities at the athletic facilities, along with preparing and managing facility and field rentals that range from single- to multiple-day events. This workgroup also provides turf cultural services in all park turf areas based on the organic-based Turf Management Plan. Of special note, the department’s organic turfgrass and athletic field management practices established maintenance practices to promote healthy turf without the use of pesticides. These practices include more labor hours than traditional turf management, however, align with the community’s environmental values. For example, the cultural practices that facilitate organic turf include increased frequency of topdressing and core aeration. Also, weeds are removed mechanically (by hand) rather than by a topical chemical application. Zone Management General park operations are divided into three maintenance zones to promote a community focus, staff ownership and pride, accountability, and increased cross-training and personnel development. Zone management also makes maintenance more efficient by enabling staff to respond more quickly and use less fuel. The maintenance zones are responsible for maintenance and management at all community parks, recreation center grounds, Pearl Street Mall, Boulder Creek Bike Path, Civic Area Park, Andrews Arboretum, Columbia Cemetery, neighborhood parks, and pocket parks. Operations include mowing, minor irrigation repair, shelter and playground cleaning and maintenance, the playground safety program, sign inventory and replacement, trash removal, and minor structural repair. Fleet and Equipment Management Fleet and equipment are managed in this area and include a mechanic to provide education for the operators, provide safety training, and maintain the department’s vehicle fleet and equipment. Horticulture The Urban Parks workgroup has no formal horticulture program but is responsible for maintaining approximately 370 landscape beds, mulching park trees, and pruning small trees and shrubs in the parks. The horticulturist is also responsible for training general park staff to assist with horticultural duties and provides tasks and training for park volunteers. Integrated Pest Management, researching growers’ and suppliers’ neonicotinoid use, supporting other workgroups and specialty areas, and performing other environmental research duties are also included in this program. Staffing Levels and Partnerships AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 14__ Currently, the Urban Park Operations workgroup includes 38 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) positions to perform the functions described above. In 2020, non-standard labor hours added an additional 4.7 FTE. In 2015 and years prior, non-standard labor hours contributed approximately 15 FTE in labor hours to the maintenance of urban parkland. The decrease in non-standard FTE can be tied to decreases in funding and a competitive job market. This has impacted service levels primarily in staff’s ability to proactively maintain key systems like irrigation. The department has relied on partnerships with Boulder County Jail and BridgeHouse to provide additional labor support. The maintenance standards in the GMMP will be evaluated and updated with Beehive implementation. Standards suggest that the Urban Park Operation workgroup would require 53 total FTE to deliver to the standards outlined. In tandem with Beehive implementation, staff are focusing on cost containment through effective procurement practices, process improvement and other strategies like the WasteLess Parks Pilot. Community Satisfaction The Urban Parks division receives passive input from community members on a regular basis through the Constituent Relations Management (CRM) system InquireBoulder and via complaints and compliments registered in the field. Compliments focus on the high quality of the system, with high appreciation for the horticulture in the Civic Area, Pearl Street Mall and other areas as well as the quality of athletic fields. In general, staff hear widespread appreciation for the breadth and excellence of the parks system. Complaint themes include graffiti, maintenance concerns (e.g. issues at playgrounds or on bridges), encampments, and litter. Active voicing of the customer input is received via the Community Survey outlined in the prior section. The city parks receive some of the highest ratings in the organization: • 95% of respondents visited a city park, and • 95% positively rated the urban parks. In summary, research and input would indicate that the department is providing the right amount of parkland and at the right quality (and this, too, will be thoroughly analyzed through the Master Plan Needs Assessment). With financial pressures, staff are challenged to outline options to improve efficiency or lower service levels to ensure expenses align with revenues. ANALYSIS: The majority of this memo outlines the current state to lay the foundation of the budget process. Looking ahead, there are many options that the PRAB will have to consider in advising the 2022 budget strategy and to make sure funding and LOS are balanced. Staff is meeting bi-weekly to review current recreation facility and program usage and will provide a first quarter usage report at the April meeting to further guide decision making. In evaluating the Recreation Center’s budget and usage, staff are currently tracking the following information: revenues, expenses, cost to operate a facility per open hour, total number of visits, number of patrons visiting per hour, average revenue collected per user and average revenues to expenses ratio. This information will continue to be updated and AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 15__ shared. Staff is using a combination of 2019 and 2020 baseline data, along with Q1 2021 to project what 2022’s planned usage by indoor facility would be. Unfortunately, due to facility construction and phased reopening of facilities in 2020, there is inconclusive baseline data to support this same level of analysis for the outdoor pools and Boulder Reservoir. Staff will work on forecasting usage for these outdoor facilities throughout the budget strategy conversations. In the meantime, at our recreation centers there are a few other levers that will be explored in March that could impact the centers revenues and/or expenses. These levers include resuming childcare, resuming towel service and resuming birthday parties or space rentals for different groups. By exploring these options now, staff hopes to have additional insight for the PRAB as we prepare for the April update and finalization in May. As a reminder, every parks and recreation agency has a different funding model, and the memo has laid out how BPR’s funding works. Attachment B provides an overview of area governmental and non-profit recreation facility fees. Comparing facility entrance fees for other municipalities, special districts, non-profits, and private agencies can be problematic as each of these has a different funding model that helps subsidize or reduce rates. For instance, in Boulder, recreation user fees fund approximately 85% of direct operating costs (like utilities and pool chemicals) as well as indirect expenses such as administration staffing and computers. It is not feasible to make an apples-to-apples with neighboring agencies like Broomfield, Westminster, and other Colorado neighbors that have more significant support for recreation operations from dedicated taxes, General Funds or other. The Boulder YMCA operates similarly to Boulder recreation operations as nearly all operations must be sustained through user fees. There is some good news to highlight, even though it comes with many unknowns: earlier this month, the city received confirmation that they would receive approximately $20 million from the American Rescue Act. The city is still identifying what this money can be spent on and how it will be prioritized to address COVID-related community needs and impacts. Staff will update the PRAB as information becomes available. Finally, it is important to acknowledge some items that are going to be outside the scope of our 2022 budget development process. While related to the 2022 budget strategy, there are two areas that will include placeholders in the budget but will require further community engagement and feedback from the PRAB before fees can be approved: • Flatirons Golf Course will be impacted by the construction of the new facility through 2022. Staff expects to return to the PRAB in late 2021 for consultation on the golf course’s business model based on the final facility design. While construction is expected to have a minimal impact to course operations, the modernized facility is expected to generate additional revenue. • The Community Access fee conversation will explore fees for a variety of reservable spaces (such as athletic fields). This is a new project driven by some of the COVID- related reorganizations to adjust staffing levels based upon budget reductions and organize functions around community priorities. The Community Access project AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 16__ intends to promote community use of public spaces while also providing recommendations on consistent rate structures across a broad portfolio. As discussed through the prior sections, the effort will continue into 2022 to balance recreation Level of Service with sustainable revenue. BPR has laid strong groundwork over the past few years, and staff appreciates the PRAB’s input as continue our recovery. The American Rescue Act and improving pandemic conditions give reason for excitement, but we continue to navigate a fiscally constrained environment with an unusually high amount of ambiguity and unknowns. NEXT STEPS: Moving forward, there will be two more opportunities for PRAB engagement on the 2022 Budget Development:. April 2021: Investment Scenarios In April, the department will review 2021 first quarter usage as the county transitioned from Level Orange to Level Yellow on the State COVID Recovery Dial and capacity and program usage increased. The department will inform PRAB of the real time trends and how this will impact the recovery anticipated in 2022. Staff will discuss several options the PRAB can consider to increase revenue, decrease expenses, or adjust programming levels to help achieve a balanced budget in 2022. The options discussed will include broad ranges of financial impact, and staff would like the PRAB to identify which options are worth analyzing further as the 2022 budget is developed. April also includes a first touch of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to discuss the planned capital investments and asset management for 2022 through 2027. May 2021: 2022 Fee and/or Service Proposals In May, the department will present the financial impacts from the options discussed in April and seek input on how revenues, expenses or service levels should be adjusted in 2022. While the PRAB’s role is advisory, the counsel is valuable, and the input is appreciated when reviewing the Parks and Recreation proposed budget with the Executive Budget Team, different boards and commissions and ultimately City Council. The PRAB will conduct a second touch of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to discuss the planned capital investments and asset management for 2022 through 2027. The Parks and Recreation budget submittal is due by early June for citywide review and synthesis. City Council review of the 2022 budget will begin in September and formal adoption by City Council is planned for October. Attachments: - Attachment A: BPR Sources and Uses 2021 Chart - Attachment B: Recreation Facility Entrance Fee Market Analysis Main1100 - General Fund 2110 - Lottery Fund 2180 - .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund 2300 - Recreation Activity Fund 3300 - Permanent Parks & Recreation Fund Desc.Governmental Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditurs neceassary to carry out basic governmental activities of the city which are not required to be accounted for in another fund. Funds many city services such as Public Safety, Libraries, Transportation and more. Special Revenue Fund accounts for State Conservation Trust Fund proceeds to be utilized for the acquisition, development, and maintenance of new conservation sites or for capital improvements or maintenance for recreational purposes on any public site. Special Revenue Fund for Parks & Recreation operating and capital needs. Accounts for earmarked sales tax authorized by the voters in 1995, renewed in 2013 and will sunset in 2035. Special Revenue/Quasi-Entersprise Fund to account for fees and services related to the provision of recreation, reservoir and golf course services/programs. Capital Improvement Fund accounts for dedicated property tax for the acquisition of park land or permanent improvements of park and recreation facilities.Summary of Sources of Funds$4,057,219 $428,000 $8,119,584 $10,126,789 $3,625,061 City wide fund comprised of: • Sales Tax • Property Tax • Fees • Other taxes (accomodations, admission, etc.) • State of Colorado distributes revenue to entities on a per capita basis • Parks & Recreation receives a portion of the City of Boulder's annual contribution (also to OSMP and PW-Tributary Greenways). • Fund specific to Parks & Recreaion • Approved by voters in 1995 for a 20 year period was extended by voters with an approval of 85% through 2035. • Fund specific to Parks & Recreaton • Grants/donations, user and participation fees • Subsidy transfer provided by the General Fund • Fund specific to Parks & Recreation • The City of Boulder receives $.14 of every property tax $ collected in Boulder. Out of the $.14, Parks & Recreation receives $.01 Summary of Uses of Funds$4,057,219 $428,000 $7,961,904 $9,625,921 $6,401,761 Operation and Maintenance • General Park Maintenance & Mgmt. • Playground and Shelter Maintenance • Horticulture, Turf and Irrigation Maint. • Pearl St. Mall and Boulder Creek Path • Ballfield Maintenance • Trash and Snow Removal • Forestry Administrative Support Services • Office of the Director • Business and Financial Mgmt • PRAB Support Capital Improvements • Land Improvements • Park Development Operations and Maintenance • Horticulture, Turf and Irrigation Maint. • Ballfield Maintenance • Trash and Snow Removal • General Park Maintenance & Mgmt. • Forestry • Natural Lands • Valmont City Park Administrative Support Services • Community Partnerships • Volunteer Services • Special Events Renovation and Refurbishment Capital Improvements • Park Development Cost Allocation Recreation Centers • North, East and South Recreation Centers Regional Facilities • Boulder Reservoir • Flatirons Golf Course Programs • Gymnastics, Yoga, Pilates • Therapeutic Recreation & Youth Services Initiative • Wellness, Fitness and Weight Training • Camps • Childcare • Contracted programs Marketing Aquatics • Spruce Pool and Scott Carpenter Pool Acquisition and Development • Acquisition of Park Land • Planning • Park Development/Construction • Construction Renovation and Refurbishment Capital Improvements Program Cost Allocation RestrictionsThe General Fund allocation was established to finance the basic functions of Parks and Recreation. Note: The General Fund Subsidy allocation dedicated for Recreation is provided through an annual transfer to the Recreation Activity Fund. Funding can be used for the acquisition, development, and maintenance of new conservation sites or for capital improvements or maintenance for recreational purposes on any public site. Primarily used for park maintenance, urban park refurbishment, renovation of facilities, pools, urban parks, historic/cultural facilities, civic center complex, development of all categories of parks, and new recreation facilities. Department manages all expenses, receives revenues from grants/donations, user and participation fees related to the provision of recreation, reservoir and golf course services/programs, and relies on a subsidy from the General Fund to support community benefit programming. Appropriations of the fund must be approved by the PRAB. The fund shall not be used for any purpose other than for the acquisition of park land or permanent improvements of park and recreation facilities. Funding is permanent according to city charter. Parks & Recreation Funds - 2021 Approved - Sources: $27.4 Million / Uses: $29.5 Million * This chart is only updated annually for the 5 Boulder Parks & Recreation Department Funds. Any additional funds received in a budget year from other funding sources will be called out directly. An additional $1 million is budgeted in 2021 in the Capital Development Fund, but excluded from the chart as funding amount is variable by year and managed by another department. The $1 million budgeted is included in the total approved uses of $29.5 million in 2021. General Fund $4,057,219 100% Business Services/Dept Admin $831,912 20% Community Building & Partnership $37,177 1%Urban Parks $2,628,987 65% Forestry $559,143 14% Colorado Lottery Fund $428,000 100% Sales Tax $7,983,32 9 98% Interest $32,255 <1% Valmont City Park $60,000 1% Other Revenue $44,000 1% Grants & Donations, $0, 0% Cost Allocation $564,323 7% Urban Parks $2,220,965 28% Admin $877,851 11% Community Building & Partnership $511,053 7% Valmont City Park $345,209 4% R&R $150,000 2% $0 0% CIP $2,165,000 27% Planning & Ecological Services $1,127,503 14% Golf $1,321,950 13% Reservoir 1,135,000 11% Recreation Centers 2,897,229 29% Recreation Programs 1,215,707 12% Aquatics 966,618 10% Sports 972,481 10% Expand/YSI (Access and Inclusion) 52,850 … Misc. Recreation Revenue 6,000 <1% Fund Transfers 1,558,954 15% Admin $1,194,629 12% Golf $1,209,195 13% Reservoir $1,088,347 11% Recreation Centers $2,570,317 27% Recreation Programs $1,197,727 13% Aquatics $1,447,937 15% Sports $313,526 3% Expand/YSI (Access and Inclusion) $604,244 6% Property Tax $3,588,584 99% Interest $36,477 <1% Other $0 0% Construction and Maint Mgt $517,425 8% CIP $4,947,000 77% Planning and Project Mgt $609,642 10% Cost Allocation, $127,694 2%R&R, $200,000, 3% CIP $428,000 100% 3/17/2021 Recreation Facility Entrance Fee SurveyAdult/GeneralYouthSeniorHouseholdAdult/GeneralYouthSeniorHouseholdBPR Current9.00$ 5.50$ 6.75$ 24.00$                15.00$                9.25$             11.25$           33.00$           YMCA of Northern Colorado: Mapleton/Arapahoe12.00$                6.00$ Broomfield, CO5.00$ 3.50$ 4.00$ 7.75$ 6.25$             6.25$             Foothills PRD, CO5.50$ 4.00$ 4.75$ 14.50$                7.50$ 5.50$             6.50$             24.00$           Fort Collins, CO5.00$ 4.00$ 4.00$ South Suburban PRD, CO5.75$ 4.50$ 4.50$ 15.00$                7.75$ 5.75$             5.75$             20.00$           Westminster, CO6.00$ MonthlyAnnualBPR Current 62.00$                648.00$              YMCA of Northern Colorado: Mapleton/Arapahoe70.00$                770.00$              Broomfield, CO 33.00$                396.00$              Foothills PRD, CO319.00$              Fort Collins, CO 35.00$                315.00$              South Suburban PRD, CO 40.00$                440.00$              Westminster, CO 29.00$                ResidentNon‐Resident (if applicable)Adult Resident PassesPRAB MeetingMarch 29, 20212022 Budget Strategy Attachment B 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: March 29, 2021 A. East Boulder Subcommunity Plan The East Boulder Subcommunity Plan is a long-range planning project to envision the future of the East Boulder subcommunity. The intention of the plan is to implement the citywide goals of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) at the local level. The process kicked off in the Spring of 2019 and to date has completed the first three phases of the scope of work (Project Kick-off, Inventory and Analysis and Concept Development). The project is current nearing the end of the fourth major phase, Scenario Testing and Alternative Futures. The deliverable of this phase of work will include a “Preferred Alternative Future” land use plan. To develop this alternative land use plan, the team recently completed a significant “engagement window” to collect community feedback on the trade-offs and opportunities of changing land uses in the area. This memo summarizes the process and feedback received to date. PRAB’s role is to simply be aware of the process as BPR has many properties within the subcommunity and the idea of parks and greenspace is a key desire for the subcommunity. PRAB doesn’t have a formal role in approval unless any disposition of park land is considered or changes to any approved plans such as Valmont Park Concept plan or others. At this point, this is just being provided as information and awareness. BACKGROUND Subcommunity Planning A Subcommunity Plan is a tool for residents, landowners, business owners, city officials and city staff that communicates expectations about the future of a subcommunity and guides decision- making about subcommunity preservation and change over a 20-year horizon. The subcommunity planning process is intended to identify how an area of the city can contribute to citywide goals outlined in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP). The final subcommunity plan will include the following major deliverables to implement community vision for the subcommunity: (1) Land Use Plan – should community members decide that changing land uses from the current BVCP land use map in East Boulder to new uses, an East Boulder land use plan will be created. This will update the BVCP land use map and will require Planning Board and City Council approval. (2) Conceptual Connections Plan – should community members identify a need for revised or new connections in East Boulder, an East Boulder connections plan will identify the type and 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 general location of connections needed to support land use changes and implement goals of the Transportation Master Plan (TMP). (3) Recommendations Matrix – Since February 2019, community members have been submitting ideas for improvements, changes or new initiatives for East Boulder. These recommendations will be evaluated against their ability to implement citywide goals of the BVCP and city master plans and will be categorized as one of the following: Policy Recommendations – municipal policy recommendations may include revisions to existing policies or new policies to be adopted as an amendment to the BVCP. Policy recommendations would apply citywide. Program Recommendations – recommendations for program development or expansion could benefit and impact programs local to East Boulder and/or citywide programs. Project Recommendations – project recommendations would identify capital improvements to be pursued through the capital improvement program, public-private partnerships, or private funding. East Boulder In January 2019, City Council identified East Boulder as the first subcommunity since North Boulder to go through a planning process as part of a re-established subcommunity planning program. The East Boulder subcommunity encompasses approximately 1600 acres, generally located east of Foothills Parkway and north of Arapahoe Avenue. The area includes some major community assets, such as Boulder Community Health, Valmont City Park and the Boulder Municipal Airport. It is also a destination for many local businesses and today, those businesses support approximately 1700 jobs. The BVCP Land Use Map, which defines future land uses in the Boulder Valley identifies over half of the land area (58 percent) in East Boulder for industrial uses. These include Light Industrial (616 acres); General Industrial (180 acres) and Community Industrial (76 acres). Other designations which make up a large portion of the land mass include Public (193 acres), Urban Park (161 acres) and Open Space Acquired (89 acres). BVCP Land Use map for East Boulder Subcommunity 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Considering Alternative Uses In January and February of 2021, the East Boulder Working Group, city staff and local partners completed a significant round of community engagement. The purpose of this engagement was to (1) present ideas about changes to the BVCP land use map; (2) describe what the impacts of those changes might be; and (3) ask community members to weigh trade-offs and opportunities and describe preferences for the evolution of the area into the future. For a description of the engagement tools and events, as well as participation statistics, see Appendix A. COMMUNITY FEEDBACK The East Boulder subcommunity planning process strives to implement citywide goals at the local level. To achieve this, much of the work is organized into the following six focus areas described in the BVCP. Themes from the community feedback received during the winter engagement window are organized into these focus areas. Focus Area East Boulder Vision Statement Community Feedback 2021: Key Themes Small Local Business The city will protect affordable business space, support a wide variety of businesses and deliver attractive neighborhoods for employers, employees and customers in order to help local businesses thrive in East Boulder. • Prioritizing business space is essential to this plan • Support for new businesses, accessible neighborhood-serving retail and food • Finding places and tools to create affordable business space and limit gentrification is essential to this plan • Be mindful of existing business’ future development plans and allow flexibility so businesses can evolve • Be strategic about location of new residential and established manufacturing uses to minimize negative impacts (i.e. noise, truck traffic, security) Arts & Culture The city will play an active role in facilitating East Boulder’s development of art spaces and experiences, installations, businesses and venues for professional and amateur creatives that reflect the subcommunity’s local culture. • Include arts / cultural / performance area (as well as space for artists/artisans) to support vitality and compliment community-building Design Quality & Placemaking East Boulder will evolve to include walkable neighborhoods, for all ages and abilities, whose aesthetic character reflect the subcommunity’s unconventional personality and industrial past. The area will welcome experimentation in design • Most support for approach to land use to convert a few areas from office/industrial to mixed use neighborhoods and opportunities for 15-minute walkable retail/food/services – for workers, existing and future residents • Access to green space and preservation of mountain views are really important! • Support for new gathering spaces, plazas, integrated with green spaces 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 and construction to build enduring and engaging places. • Allowing flexibility and some taller buildings could be okay with attention to design, plazas and places to gather, delivers benefits Housing Affordability & Diversity East Boulder will be home to a substantial amount of new and affordable housing that complements existing uses, includes a diverse mix of product type and ownership models and extends live-work-play choices to those interested in living in Boulder • Support for new affordable housing including support for housing aimed at workforce in the area, and support for affordable home-ownership housing • Support for San Lazaro annexation, preservation as affordable mobile home park so residents can access city services and programs • New housing should be integrated with other uses in targeted locations. There is little interest in creating new residential-only neighborhoods, the most support is for creating mixed-use neighborhoods. Resilience & Climate Commitment The built and natural environments in East Boulder will be integrated to make the most of the area’s natural resources and manage disruptions, including storm events. The subcommunity’s system of critical facilities, complete transportation networks, businesses and dedicated community members will provide a strong network for resilience in the face of economic disruption. • Ensure changes in and around flood plain don’t increase risk and provide benefits • Consider potential impacts of more industry, pollution and traffic Access & Mobility People and goods will easily and safely travel to, from and through East Boulder by a variety of efficient and affordable modes, employing advanced transportation technology where appropriate. • Support for new transit facilities and pedestrian improvements throughout subcommunity and recognition that 55th & Arapahoe is opportunity area • Support for land use changes near transit corridor to offset increased traffic • Concern about increase traffic and parking (there is too much and need it) 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 For a full capture of all community feedback, please see the project website. NEXT STEPS The next steps of the subcommunity planning process include: (1) Sharing community feedback with city Boards and Council (2) Develop a preferred alternative future land use concept with the East Boulder Working Group (3) Share the preferred alternative land use concept, as well as initial recommendations for policies, programs and projects with community members for feedback (4) Develop a 60% draft plan document for review by city staff, Boards, Council and community members. It is anticipated that the 60% draft plan will be available for review in early summer 2021. ATTACHMENTS Attachment A: East Boulder Trade-Offs and Opportunities: Winter Engagement Summary 1 East Boulder Subcommunity Plan Summary of recent engagement highlighting on Trade-offs & Opportunities Jan. 2021 - Feb. 2021 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The purpose of this East Boulder Engagement Plan engagement window was to get feedback on test concepts for land use changes to answer the question “Who Do We Want to Be?” The project’s staff team and Working Group hosted multiple venues for discussion and feedback and collected input from community members across the city and targeted specific audiences for participation, including residents of the San Lazaro Mobile Home Park, East Boulder workforce and commuters, East Boulder business owners and residents living in neighborhoods surrounding the East Boulder subcommunity. Engagement for this phase of the project included three major products: 1. Scenario modelling of each alternative future concept to provide measurable indicators that describe the potential impacts of proposed land use changes 2. Video presentations to describe the East Boulder context, the purpose of subcommunity planning and thechoices for changes that are image-rich and easy to understand in English and Spanish 3. A community questionnaire offered in English and Spanish that asked participants to make choices between significant trade-offs resulting from potential changes to land use in East Boulder. Completed Engagement Events and Links to Full Reports • Community Event (Online)– This event was designed to maximize time for participants to discuss subcommunitytrade-offs and opportunities with other community members in break-out rooms. Discussions were facilitated by East Boulder Working Group members. Participants shared feedback on what they liked and disliked about land use concepts, trade-offs and flexibility around building heights to achieve key goals. Details: Monday, Feb. 1 2021 with over 100 registrations, 80 attendees. Event Summary. • East Boulder Policy Roundtable Discussion (Online)– This event was hosted by the Boulder Chamber and included representatives from many of the key businesses and industries that are located in East Boulder, as well as other Chamber members and interested community members. Participants shared feedback about opportunities and constraints in the proposed concepts and offered critical feedback about potential land use changes. Details: Thursday, Feb. 11 2021 with 70 attendees. Event Summary. 2 • Spanish Event (Online)– This event was delivered in Spanish and included a project overview presentation, Q&A, and break-out rooms for discussion. Participants shared feedback about key concerns, especially for residents who live in the East Boulder Subcommunity at San Lazaro Mobile Home Park, hopes and needs for the future of the area. Details: Tuesday, Feb. 23 2021 with 20 attendees. Event Summary. • Community-wide Questionnaire - This community questionnaire was hosted on BeHeardBoulder.org for five weeks and paper copies were delivered and collected through Community Connectors. The questionnaire was available in both English and Spanish. The questionnaire responses provide quantitative and qualitative data about community choices impacting decisions about change in land use. The questionnaire included descriptions of proposed land use concepts, including a “no change” option, and analysis of the differences between choices for key indicators like number of homes that could be generated, types of jobs, and land use mix by area. Participants were also asked to prioritize outcomes based on tradeoffs and about priorities for the 55th & Arapahoe Station Area. Many participants also offered critical feedback and comments through open-ended questions included in the questionnaire. Details: Jan.- Feb. 2021 with 329 total respondents, 30 responses in Spanish, 55% nearby neighbors, 14% East Boulder Subcommunity employees and business owners. Event Summary. What We Heard Between the quantitative data included in the questionnaire and the hundreds of comments staff received during events and through BeHeardBoulder.org, participants in the East Boulder Winter Engagement session provided thoughtful and productive feedback that will move the East Boulder Working Group, city staff and decision makers toward a preferred land use alternative. Below is a summary of the key themes that have received consistent support or discussion from this phase of engagement. These are aligned with the six focus areas of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) and the East Boulder Subcommunity Plan (EBSP). • There is community support for the development of new housing in East Boulder • Community members would like to see new affordable and attainable housing aimed at supporting the workforce in the area as a key outcome of this plan • There is a desire to see new housing integrated with a mix of other uses. There is little interest in creating new residential-only neighborhoods. • There is community support for improving the quality of life for San Lazaro Mobile Home residents, protecting the mobile home park as an affordable housing option and providing residents access to 3 city services and programs. A recommendation for annexation of San Lazaro would be an outcome of this plan that could support these community interests. • There is general community interest in locating new housing near green spaces, city park space, and Open Space. • There is a community desire to prioritize business space for a variety of business types and sizes in East Boulder • There is general support for the development of new retail sites. Commonly requested retail types include grocery stores or markets and food and beverage. • There is some interest in expanding medical uses in East Boulder. • Some community members ask that plans be mindful of existing business’ future plans and allow flexibility so businesses can evolve, grow, and stay in Boulder • There is a community concern that the development of new housing could create conflict with some industrial uses (i.e. noise, truck traffic, security) and community desire to target housing to strategic locations to avoid conflicts. • Loss of business space and “gentrification” of East Boulder businesses is a concern throughout the community. Similarly, “losing” businesses to other near-by communities is a general concern. • Loss of industrial and service industry jobs is an economic concern shared by a variety of community members • There is general support for the development of mixed-use neighborhoods as a method for reducing the environmental impacts of commuters traveling by single-occupant vehicles and reducing the number of trips generated throughout the workday into and out of East Boulder • There is strong community support to ensure changes in and around flood plain don’t increase flood risk. There is some community interest in reducing the risk of flood by changing uses in the flood plain. • There is some interest in exploring the benefits of creating a vision for new uses at the Valmont Power Plant site 4 • Community feedback prioritizes the preservation of mountain views as a planning and design consideration. • There is community support for the development of new places for social gathering as well as passive recreation or green spaces • There is community interest in allowing taller buildings (up to 55’) in certain locations of East Boulder if these allowances would produce beautiful architecture; if redevelopment can allow for a more “open” ground plane; and if additional height would allow for more mixed-use buildings and neighborhoods. • There is a community desire for attention to aesthetic cohesiveness and architectural detail in the built environment • There is some concern that planning could result in regulation further limiting redevelopment, instead of incentivizing change • There is general support for the area at 55th and Arapahoe as a key site for redevelopment in East Boulder • There is general support for increasing and improving connections, transportation facilities and mobility options throughout the subcommunity • There is community support for making modes of travel, besides driving, more attractive in East Boulder • There is strong interest in reducing the amount of commuter traffic • There is general concern about increased traffic as a result of land use changes • There is interest in reducing surface parking in the subcommunity • There is general support for the development of mixed use neighborhoods as a method of reducing vehicular traffic. • There is community support for the development and/or preservation of space that can host/house art and performance in East Boulder • There is desire in the community for a gathering place, community center or cultural destination in East Boulder 5 • Incorporating art and culture throughout the area is highly valued by community members as a way to create neighborhoood vitality and compliment community-building Key Feedback on Land Use Concepts • Concept 3 had the most “love” – most positive ratings • Concept 1 was deemed to have the “most potential” • More people “hated” Concept 2 • People “aren’t digging” the No Change option – most negative ratings Representative and / or pivotal comments Likes : “I love the addition of small shops, groceries, stores in the area. The idea of having a main street that connects to Valmont Bike Park is particularly appealing.” “I like the idea of integrating neighborhoods that provide housing, services, dining as well as office space. I would be very much against a major increase in housing density and would especially be opposed to high rises.” “Like: increased mixed-use residential. Like: dense transit-oriented development. Like: housing near jobs. Like: bus rapid transit and protected bike lanes to support regional transportation.” Dislikes: “I don’t like the intensity along Arapahoe. Would like fewer jobs, more housing in the Flatirons office park along 55th..” “As a business owner in the proposed open space area on Arapahoe, my concern that our current property value has decreased with this plan. Would the city buy us out and at what value? Where could we relocate at a price we can afford in Boulder or will we need to leave Boulder and take our business outside the area along with our employees?” General: “Mixed use brings in residential and small retail while preserving space for industrial uses.” “Balancing jobs and housing is always tricky; the east side of Boulder is already under strain from the level of commuting traffic coming from the east of the city. I would like a solution that addresses Boulder’s housing problems without forcing jobs out of the city.” 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: March 29, 2021 Rescheduled for April 12, 2021 due to King Soopers Tragedy A. PRAB Recruitment and Orientation Update The intent of this item is to update PRAB on the recruitment process and provide details about orientation materials and meetings of interest. Five community members applied for the vacant PRAB position. City Council interviewed these applicants on March 4. On March 16, Council appointed Elliott Hood who will be sworn in for a five year term at the April 26 meeting. In 2019-2020, PRAB members led by Mary Scott developed an onboarding letter to welcome new members and help acquaint them with important parks and recreation information. Please review the updated version of this letter and send any edits to Mary. For 2021 new Board and Commission members, the City Attorney and other city leadership developed a packet with resources for all board members. Staff will distribute this packet to all board members once available in addition to the letter from PRAB. The City Attorney will also hold an orientation session to review the legal duties of board and commission members. While new board members are required to attend, all board members are welcome to join either of the sessions on Tuesday, March 30, 6:00p.m. - 9:00p.m or Saturday, April 10, 9:00a.m. - 12:00p.m. This year, city staff will also hold training for board chairs and vice chairs. Dates for these sessions will be sent to PRAB once available. B. May Study Session The intent of this item is to gauge PRAB availability for a study session about the 2022 Budget. To allow adequate time for this important agenda item, staff recommends scheduling a study session on Monday, May 10 at 6:00p.m. in addition to the regular May meeting. C. Annual Board Email Response Check-in (verbal) D. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) \ Dear Name, A warm welcome to the City of Boulder PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD! We hope this welcome packet will help to start a foundation for your five years of service and ease the transition to your new position. We, your fellow Board Members and City of Boulder Parks & Recreation Staff, are eager to meet and work with you! Your staff liaison is Charlotte O’Donnell, the Administrative Specialist in the Director’s Office. She can be reached at: PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov or 303-413-7223. She will be the best point of contact for your questions. As you will learn in the Board & Commission orientation, we do not use “reply all” or group email chains to ensure that public business is conducted publicly; rather, the staff liaison can be a common point of contact. Your fellow board members are: (in order of term end date) Raj Seymour rseymour35@gmail.com April 2017 - March 2022 Mary Scott msboulderprab@yahoo.com April 2018 - March 2023 Pamela Yugar tapatiochick@gmail.com 626-407-7144 April 2018 - March 2023 Charles Brock Charles.a.brock@comcast.net 303-887-2523 April 2019 - March 2024 Jason Unger junger29@yahoo.com April 2020 - March 2025 Tara Winer tara.winer@gmail.com 609-707-8385 April 2020 - March 2025 We look forward to connecting with each of you; please reach out at your convenience. As you will find, we all have different approaches to PRAB, and know that you will bring your own. Several guiding questions we might consider to support our first conversation: What moved us to apply to PRAB? How would we describe the role of a PRAB member? We also are currently setting up a PRAB mentor process, which we will discuss at your first PRAB meeting. Our meetings are generally held on the fourth Monday of each month. Due to the pandemic the PRAB meetings will be held on Zoom until further notice. Your first PRAB meeting will be on Monday, April 26. Please pay attention to your calendar appointments from PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov which will include a link to access the virtual meetings. We look forward to resuming in-person meetings, typically held in Council Chambers. There will be months in which we start early, with a tour of a park or facility, and some months we will meet in different locations. Dinner will be provided once we resume in person meetings; please notify the staff liaison about any dietary restrictions so that our meals can be inclusive. Parks and Recreation is a large department serving the needs of the people and the environment in our city. As you begin to acquaint yourself with all of the services provided, please feel free to ask questions and explore resources like the Parks and Recreation website as well as the PRAB website. Our community outreach toolkit will help you navigate upcoming meetings and potential communications from community members. Being on a board will often require reviewing somewhat large volumes of information. Foundational materials for PRAB include the PRAB Handbook and the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. As we begin working on the Master Plan update, please familiarize yourself with this document as quickly as possible as it will be very helpful for you feeling included in the issues that will be discussed in the coming years. Parks and Recreation has excellent social media accounts (this page has the various platform information as well as email lists to which you can subscribe). You are invited to follow the accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as BPR’s official philanthropic partner, the Play Boulder Foundation, to learn more about events and the work of Parks and Recreation. We look forward to collaborating with you, soon! PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Member Bios: Chuck Brock lives in the Newlands neighborhood near North Boulder Park; he grew up in Denton, TX and lived in Seattle and Arvada before moving to Boulder in 1997. He is a scientist at NOAA in Boulder, where he studies air quality and climate change. Mary Scott lives in the Sobo-Table Mesa hood, moved to Boulder from Santa Fe,NM in 2003 & was raised in Washington, DC. She works as a family nurse practitioner at an urgent care in Boulder County. Raj Seymour lives in the Whittier neighborhood. He moved to boulder in 1992 and is originally from Southern California. He works as a movement coach. Jason Unger lives in the Lower Chautauqua neighborhood, moved to Boulder from Washington DC in 2019 but is originally from Southern California. He works as a public policy consultant. Tara Winer lives in the Chautauqua neighborhood, moved to Boulder from Philadelphia, PA in 2010. She works remotely in sales and account management with ePromos. Pamela Yugar lives in the Newlands neighborhood & moved to Boulder in 2012 from Long Beach, CA. Pamela works as consultant Interwest Consulting Group in Boulder working in the field of staff augmentation as an Interim Parks & Rec Director for local municipalities & is the Director of the Interwest Community Foundation. PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR 2021 Date / Time Event / Task Location Details March 30, 6-9pm OR April 10, 9am-12pm Attend Orientation with City Clerk and Attorney Virtual • Meet with City Attorney and various other officials regarding your duties and obligations as a Board Member • Required for your tenure on PRAB Monday, April 26, 2021, 6pm Attend your first PRAB meeting Virtual • Please review the agenda and meeting packet emailed to you in advance of the meeting. • PRAB meetings will run from 6-8:00pm (may go as late as 9:30 pm depending agenda). Mondays, 6pm Attend PRAB Meetings Virtual until further notice. Details will be emailed in advance and posted online here. • Location changes, so please check your email each month. • For in-person meetings, dinner is provided from 5:30- 5:55pm. • PRAB meetings will run from 6-7:30pm (meetings may go as late as 9pm depending agenda). • Remaining Regular PRAB meetings for 2021 are as follows. Study Sessions may be scheduled as needed. • April 26, 20201 • May 22, 2021 • June 28, 2021 • July 26, 2021 • August 23, 2021 • September 27, 2021 • October 25, 2021 • November 22, 2021 • December 27, 2021 TBD Meet with Director of Parks and Recreation TBD • Please check email for contact from Charlotte O'Donnell, your liaison between PRAB and the Parks and Recreation City Staff • Time to be arranged to answer questions that you and the Department may have for each other: Please bring your questions to this meeting! • Staff will order your meeting name plate, t-shirt or baseball cap and official name badge for events and note any dietary restrictions. PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR (continued) Date / Time Event / Task Location Details Spring 2021 Self- orientation • Meet fellow board members individually. • Meet with your board mentor. • Submit your bio to be distributed to fellow PRAB members and PR staff. • Please familiarize yourself with the following resources: • City of Boulder Website • Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Website • Parks and Recreation Master Plan • Master Plan Update Project Page • 2020 Progress Report • PRAB Handbook • PRAB community outreach toolkit • Parks and Recreation social media accounts Summer 2021 Meet with City Staff Please reach out to the following City Staff to arrange meetings. Contact information can be found here. • Jeff Haley, Planning, Design & Community Engagement Manager • Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager • Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager • Megan Lohmann, Recreation Manager • Dennis Warrington, Park Operations and Assets Manager • Bryan Beary, Community Partnerships & Outreach Manager Autumn 2021 TBD PRAB Retreat TBD • Members volunteer to begin annual letter to Council • Board annual check-in TBD Welcome Party TBD • Mingle with incoming and outgoing Board and Commission members and City Council Members TBD Tour Sites TBD • Please check email and listen for discussion at your meetings for dates for this tour of select locations • Opportunity for new and sitting board/commission members to take a tour of select sites of interest associated with the work that you will do on this board Ongoing Participate in Additional Opportunities TBD Examples include: joint board meetings with other boards and commissions, new committee work and attendance at Parks and Recreation community engagement and masterplan engagement events, email categories for responses to citizen messages and inquiries.