Loading...
02.22.21 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., February 22, 2021 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Raj Seymour (Chair) Allison Fronzaglia (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV.CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A.Approval of Minutes from January 25, 2021 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.MATTERS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:25) A.2022 Budget Strategy VI.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (6:45) A.Safe and Welcoming Public Spaces B.Reservoir Restaurant Update VII.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:30) A.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. VIII.NEXT BOARD MEETING: 6:00 p.m., March 29, 2021 IX.ADJOURN PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS UPDATED: February 18, 2021 FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY PRAB Feb. 22: • Reservoir Restaurant Update (md) • 2020 Annual Report (md) • Welcoming and Public Spaces Update (d/i) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) March 29: • Master Plan Research & Trends System Snapshots (d/i) • 2020 Year End financial review and 2022 Budget Strategy (md) • East Boulder Subcommunity Plan Update (md) • CU South Planning (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB Review Orientation Materials (mb) • Departing Board Members (mb) April 26: • Board appointments (p) • Election of officers (p) • 2022 Budget Strategy: o Scenario Planning and Fees o 2022-2027 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) • Boulder Reservoir Update (d/i) • New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • WasteLess Parks Pilot Review (md) May 24: • Financial Strategy (d/i) o 2022 proposed operating and fees o 2022-27 CIP (2nd touch) • Master Plan: Study Session (d/i) • Master Plan – Sharing Youth Voices (md) • COVID Recovery (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) Department Events and Items of Interest • Feb. 2: Policy Agenda (cc) • Feb 9: Capital Infrastructure Tax (cc) • Feb. 10: Boulder Reservoir Neighbor Meeting (e) • Feb. 15: Offices closed for Presidents’ Day (h/c) • Feb. 16: Racial Equity Plan (cc) • Feb. 25: Public Engagement for City Manager Finalist Process (e) • Master Plan Engagements will be posted here (e) • March 4, 9, 11: Board Applicant Interviews (cc) • March 16: Board Appointments (cc) • March 22-27: BVSD Spring Break • April 20: CU South Direction on Key Issues (cc) • May 11: Climate Action Plan Update (cc) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. ------------------ City Council Item (cc) Other Boards and Commissions (obc) Community Engagement and/or Events (e) Holiday/Closure (h/c) Italics indicate a tentative date or plan. CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: January 25, 2021 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Kathleen Alexander, Bryan Beary, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Chris Passarelli, Ali Rhodes, Dennis Warrington Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:02 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Unger. Second by Yugar. Passed 7-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Riley Mancuso spoke against removal of encampments in the park and discussed other issues facing people who are unhoused. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from December 21, 2020 Motion to approve the minutes from December 21, 2020 as presented. Motion by Fronzaglia. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. B. Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. • When will the Chautauqua playground open? • What is the variance in COVID guidelines for organized sports and other groups? Do these apply for one-on-one instruction in the parks as well? • The meeting with several reservoir neighbors in February has been postponed at their request. Staff will work to organize another time or format to engage with those concerned about the new restaurant. • The breakdown of Public Engagement for the Master Plan was very helpful. Will the anecdotal questionnaire be posted online for PRAB members to share on social media or by email? • The forestry video was great and shared via social media. • Will the Chautauqua playground be open while the landscaping is being done? Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department A. Parks and Recreation 2021 Action Plan This item was presented by Rhodes. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Are there any new adjustments to engagement given COVID and virtual tools available? • How is the Beehive software working? B. Urban Forest Strategic Plan and Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Update This item was presented by Alexander. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • How do you determine if a tree needs to be removed because the EAB is not manageable? • If an infected Ash tree is next to another tree, can staff manage the other tree before it gets infected? • Do we know whether the pesticides used effect the birds and wasps? • Why was EAB discovered in Boulder in 2013 and why is it prevalent now? • Do the Ash Trees have natural resistance to EAB? • What would happen if a fire like Cal-wood is closer to the city? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A. PRAB March Meeting Date Due to local schools’ spring break, PRAB decided to move the March meeting to Monday, March 29, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. B. Board Equity Trainings The City is offering optional Bias and Microaggression training to PRAB members on Feb. 3 and Feb. 17. C. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) • Seymour spoke at council for Board and Commission reports on Jan. 12. Council asked if PRAB had discussed their opinion on Parks and Recreation staff handling the clean- up of encampments instead of contractors. • Fronzaglia participated on a panel with several other board members and city council members to encourage community members to apply to boards and commissions. Her term on PRAB will end in March 2021. She encouraged PRAB members to reach out to anyone who may be interested in applying to fill the seat that will be vacant. Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, February 22, 2021, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 7:43 p.m. Motion by Yugar. Second by Brock. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Bryan Beary, Community Partnerships and Philanthropy Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Megann Lohman, Recreation Manager Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: February 22, 2021 A. Approval of Minutes from January 25, 2021 B. Parks and Recreation Department Updates The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Board and Commission Recruitment Update This year PRAB has one open position on the board. The deadline for community members to apply to boards and commission was February 4. PRAB received three or more applications for the one position which meets the city guidelines for the number of applicants per vacancy. Council will interview candidates for all boards on March 4, 9 and 11 before making appointments at their March 16 meeting. The new PRAB member will be sworn in at the PRAB meeting on April 26. City Manager Recruitment The following information comes from a February 9, 2021 press release, and provides an update on the recruitment for the next City Manager: The City of Boulder invites community members to meet and provide feedback on finalists in its city manager search. The virtual community meeting will take place Thursday, Feb. 25 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The public will get a chance to hear from each of the finalists, ask questions and speak with candidates in small groups during virtual breakout sessions. Community members interested in attending the event can register online using this link to receive meeting instructions as the date approaches. The event will include interpretation in Spanish (regístrese para reunión con finalistas para gerente municipal). It will also be recorded and made available afterward. Those unable to attend can submit questions online for the candidates in advance of the event. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 “City Council is responsible for hiring the city manager and community input will play an important role in our decision-making process. I encourage Boulderites to share their voice and help us select the candidate best able to lead the city as we work to become more inclusive, sustainable and resilient than ever before,” said Mayor Sam Weaver. The city’s search process is ongoing and the names of finalists and some background information about each candidate will be shared publicly once selected, no later than Feb. 24. The city released a questionnaire in October seeking community input on the experience and skills required for the position as well as the priorities the new city manager will address when hired. The input has helped the city conduct its nationwide search, which started in November. Chris Meschuk has served as acting city manager since Jane S. Brautigam retired on Oct. 30 following 12 years in the role. The City of Boulder has a council-manager form of government where the elected City Council sets policies and the council-appointed city manager administers them. The city manager is responsible for overseeing operations and providing professional leadership in the administration and execution of city policy as established by council. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design: The Flatirons Golf Course Facility concept plans were approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board on Oct. 26, 2020. The project was approved by City Council as part of the 2021-2026 Capital Improvement Program. Staff is wrapping up the final stages of a contract extension with Z Design Group who was the architecture consultant working with the department through the development and approval of the concept plans. The contract extension will include further development of those plans though final construction documents, permitting and construction bidding. Below is an overview of the schedule with an anticipated start of construction in early 2022 with the completion by the end of 2022. The project web page will be regularly updated as milestones in the project are completed. Ongoing communication about project status will continue throughout the entire process. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • BPR Master Plan Update: A press release went out on February 3, 2021 to officially launch the first engagement window for the BPR Master Plan Update. Since that time, the engagement opportunity has been distributed widely through multiple department newsletters (including Library), across department and city-wide social media, a short segment on Inside Boulder News, and direct staff contact with partners and customers. As of February 12, 2021, the Be Heard Boulder project page has been visited 1,425 times, driven mostly by email click- throughs or direct access. Staff has received 277 completed questionnaires, 10 pins on a map identifying favorite BPR places, two stories or memories and two questions. The questionnaire will continue to be available on Be Heard Boulder through Sunday, February 28th. Please feel free to share this opportunity widely with community members. Additional project information can be found on the project webpage. Stakeholder focus groups are scheduled for February 23rd and 24th. Design Workshop will be facilitating these sessions to understand stakeholder’s unique perspective on trends, challenges and opportunities for Parks and Recreation in Boulder. Staff will be presenting additional updates to PRAB in March as the Research and Trends phase officially wraps up and work moves into Needs Assessment. • East Boulder Community Park Restroom: The current Capital Improvement Program provides funding for the design and construction of a new year-restroom facility at East Boulder Community Park. A restroom was originally planned as part of the 2009 Master Plan for the park, but due to limited funding, was not included in the major 2010-2011 project that included the construction of the multi-use, synthetic turf athletic fields and dog park. Representative Restroom Images The new restroom will provide much needed services for athletic field users, and users of the tennis and handball courts, dog park, and playground. Other improvements will include a new shade shelter with tables, a year-round drinking fountain with bottle filling station, and installation of water hydrants in the small and large dog park. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Installation of the restroom is currently projected for the late spring of 2021. However, the installation of utilities to service the restroom are currently planned to begin in March of 2021. Temporary disruptions along Sioux Drive can be expected during the utility installation. All impacts will be coordinated with the city’s Right of Way and Transportation Department. Impacts will also be coordinated with the East Boulder Community Center staff and other user groups that may be impacted. All construction activities, including the installation of the restroom facility, will be planned to minimize impacts to athletic field programming and general park use. Future updates will be provided as the construction schedule is finalized. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP) o Skate Park Improvements and Pump Track Project Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Major construction activities at Chautauqua Playground have been completed. Over the past month, the city’s Parks Construction team and contractors have completed the installation of the final playground elements and safety surfacing. Minor elements such as the placement of site furnishings (benches, picnic tables, trash/recycling) will be completed in the coming weeks. Final landscaping, irrigation renovation, and nature play elements will occur in the spring with warmer temperatures. The department will communicate and coordinate with the PRAB on any planned park opening or celebration. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. • Visitor Management: An application to GOCO’s Resilient Communities grant program was submitted on February 1, 2021. This application was developed in partnership with Open Space and Mountain Parks to address the impacts of increased visitation across the city’s open space and natural lands system. The overall application requested $190,095 in GOCO funding, matched by $211,441 in city funding and/or staff and volunteer resources. BPR specifically requested $62,000 to support additional staff and materials to manage the North Shore/Coot Lake area of the Boulder Reservoir in 2021. Notification of awards is expected from GOCO by March 12, 2021. Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Wildlife Management. o Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration. o Volunteer Programs. o Natural Lands Maintenance; o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination; and o Natural Lands Maintenance. C. Operations Update COVID-19 The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus. • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery: Boulder County has been approved for participation in the State of Colorado 5 Star Certification Program. BPR staff are evaluating the potential to apply for 5 Star Certification under the Gyms/Fitness category and will remain active in these efforts. Staff will continue to provide regular updates to the PRAB on opportunities to restore department services. • Recreation Programs and Facilities: Currently operating services have been modified in schedule, format, or capacity to align with Level Yellow in the state’s COVID-19 dial framework, including Recreation Center capacity increased to 50%. staff are working to implement the following changes as of Monday, February 15: 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 ▪ AquaFit classes will resume; ▪ The EBCC leisure pool will be available for limited family swim times, including use of the leisure pool slide; and ▪ Various sports leagues will resume following a registration period. • Vaccines: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has oversight of the distribution of all COVID-19 vaccines for local communities. City staff are working closely with Boulder County Public Health to evaluate the potential use of sites and facilities for the purpose of vaccine distribution. Additionally, city staff are awaiting direction from the state on which local government staff positions could be next in line for vaccines and will work to ensure that those working on the front lines and unable to telework are designated as a top priority. For the most recent information on services available, the department regularly updates the Status at a Glance found on this webpage. Community Programs Update As easing public health restrictions allow increasing levels of programming, staff continue to prioritize the restoration of services first for those that need them most, including participants in YSI, EXPAND, Camps and Financial Aid Programs: • Youth Service Initiative (YSI) serves under-represented and under-resourced community members through: o Rec on Wheelz: Provides mobile recreation programming using a program- branded van that carries staff and equipment on visits to manufactured home communities to deliver physical activity opportunities. Programming is funded through the Health Equity Fund and is set to resume March 29th (weather dependent). o Getting Fit: Provides targeted physical activity programming for teens living in Boulder Housing Partners sites and manufactured home communities. Programming has been delivered virtually on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and has successfully operated in-person on Mondays at Foothills Community Park. Reduced funding awards from the Health Equity Fund have prompted staff to focus programming on these year-round opportunities rather than traditional summer mentorships. o Boulder Housing Partners: Provides virtual physical activity and social programming on Wednesday and Fridays with residents of Madison and Manhattan housing authority sites. Outdoor programming is set to resume later this month (weather dependent) and planning is in progress for expansion to other housing sites as facilities become available. o Healthy Together (H2G): Intended to provide physical activity opportunities for cohorts of students through a grant administered by I Have a Dream Boulder County, this program has been on hiatus due to partner capacity and operating restrictions. Virtual programming is set to resume on March 1st. • EXPAND works to enhance the lives of people with disabilities through recreation and leisure activities. These community members have been deeply impacted by the 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 pandemic, as many regular participants are in high-risk health categories. To continue providing this vital support, staff have innovated and adjusted programming to provide: o No School Squad: Designed as a program to support teens with developmental disabilities on Mondays during the pandemic, when Boulder Valley School District does not provide classroom or remote programming. A half or full day program, mornings are focused on physical activity and afternoons on leisure and vocational skills. This program has been delivered in-person and is funded through a grant from Easter Seals. o Winter Workout: This program has acted as a pilot to establish comfort around in-person programming over the winter and has focused on pickleball and physical fitness on the outdoor courts at the East Boulder Community Center. Once weather conditions have improved, programming is set to resume with a focus on basketball. o Movement Mentors: Also funded through a grant from Easter Seals, this program creates small group (3 participant) ‘personal training’ and sports training opportunities. Regular participation exceeds 25 registrants attending 1-2 times per week. o Virtual Programs: Therapeutic recreation staff and interns deliver a variety of weekly programming including ‘Movement Monday’, ‘The Hangout’, game nights, and a virtual Marathon club. • Camp programming for Summer 2021 represent a tremendous effort by staff and partners to provide campers and working parents with summer care options in over 125 camp sessions, advertised in a dedicated camp guide, including: o Kidz Kamp East: for campers age 5-11 at the East Boulder Community Center, this camp seeks to replace a long year of ‘screen time’ with gym games, arts, crafts, water play, and more in-person programming. To support COVID safety best practices on contact/grouping, enrollment will be in two- week sessions. o Rez Camp: to be hosted at the newly renovated Boulder Reservoir facilities, this camp for ages 7-14 provides a mix of sports, water activities, soccer , nature walks, and water ecology. o Goats & Gardens: one of Boulder’s most popular camps, this offering for kids aged 5-11 combines the wonders of Growing Gardens, the goats at Mountain Flower Goat Dairy, and the activities of the adjacent North Boulder Recreation Center. o Partner camps provided by local specialty providers: in alignment with Master Plan direction, specialty camp programming is largely provided by community experts in partnership with BPR. 2021 options include Drama, Pottery, Sports, Technology & Engineering, Sailing, and Biking. • Access and Inclusion: BPR is committed to providing access for everyone to facilities, services and programs, including support through the Financial Aid Program and by providing accommodations for people with disabilities. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Temporary Expansion of Financial Aid: To address some of the unique challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Financial Aid Program has been temporarily expanded to extend benefits to current participants through April 30, 2021 automatically and without further documentation. Additionally, new applications have been opened to online enrollment, with appointments available for in-person or online-video support, and income documentation extended to include proof of unemployment insurance benefits. The Financial Aid Program is partially funded by the Health Equity Fund. 2020 Annual Progress Report To help ensure the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan functions as a living document that serves the mission of the department and goals of the community well into the future, progress and initiatives are captured and reported in an Annual Progress Report. We are pleased to share the 2020 Progress Report, which illustrates the ways Boulder Parks and Recreation has worked to respond, recover and revitalize during a very challenging year in order to support the health and well-being of the entire Boulder community. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: February 22, 2022 AGENDA TITLE: 2022 Budget Strategy Roadmap PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director of Parks and Recreation Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Stacie Hoffmann, Administrative Supervisor Chris Passarelli, Business Analyst Tim Duda, Business Analyst EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: PRAB’s input is requested in developing the 2022 Budget Strategy. This memo provides information on the PRAB engagement that informed 2020 recreation access fees, impacts of COVID on revenue in 2020 and 2021, and the opportunities, challenges, and recommendations for the 2022 Budget Development Strategy. The PRAB will be consulted on BPR’s operating and capital budgets monthly from March through June. As each touch point will build on the first, PRAB’s input is sought on the proposed opportunities, challenges and recommendations that will shape the conversation and analysis over the coming months. Currently, staff anticipates the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) will follow the 3-touch approach used in years past, while this item outlines the proposal for developing the operating budget and considering access fee adjustments. BACKGROUND: Historically, the department has consulted with the PRAB every two years to adjust facility fees for the recreation centers, outdoor pools, and the Boulder Reservoir. Steps taken since the 2020 Budget Development are identified below and provide context and foundation for the 2022 Budget Development Strategy. 2019 Budget Development and Fee Increase Process for 2020: In 2019, the PRAB spent several months understanding the 2020 Budget Strategy. In 2019, the PRAB had six touches on this topic which included: • January 28, 2019 – 2020 Budget Strategy Overview • February 25, 2019 – 5-Year Master Plan Progress Report / Overview of 2019 Priorities • March 2019 – 2020 Budget Strategy Financial Update and Levels of Service • April 22, 2019 – 2020 Budget Strategy: Recreation Activity Fund • May 7, 2019 – Study Session: Recreation Facility Fee Strategy • May 28, 2019 – Budget Strategy: Recreation Activity Fund AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 2__ In 2019, after reviewing the holistic department budget, looking at March 2019 Recreation Facility Access Survey (Attachment A), and discussing different levers to adjust revenues and expenses, PRAB recommended 2020 Facility Entry Fees that: • Accelerated departmental efforts to align fees with financial sustainability goals and with subsidy targets per the master plan – providing discounts to youth, seniors, and under- resourced residents with low incomes. o Entry Fee Increases: center fees increased approximately 9% for the adult resident/worker daily entry rate for a single visit, which is the baseline for establishing all other fees. o Age Based Discounts: were given to youth and seniors based off of the adult resident/worker daily entry for a single visit: ▪ Seniors (60+) ~ 25% discount (age consistent with other departments) ▪ Youth (3-18 years) ~ 40% discount o Affordability: Introduction of a daily 4-pack option. • The department committed to continue to build the financial aid program to promote accessibility for under-resourced residents with low incomes. These efforts were being bolstered by grants from the Health Equity Fund. o Financial Aid Program: As of December 31, 2020, there were 3,458 active enrollees in the program, consisting of 1,394 youth, 1,738 adult, and 326 senior participants. Even with the pandemic as a factor these participants accounted for 15,933 total visitations in 2020. For 2020 the program was expanded to include those who qualify for unemployment insurance benefits given the large community economic impacts due to the pandemic. Based on the full price, these subsidies accounted for approximately $1,836,684 in value provided to the enrollees of the financial aid program. In 2020 the financial aid program was supported by grant funds from the Health Equity Fund, allowing all of those eligible for financial aid to receive a 100% discount, which is greater than the 50% discount provided in 2019. o Health Equity Fund: Due to the financial reductions as a result of the pandemic, this funding award was reduced in 2020 by 50% or $75,000. o Leveraged Grant Opportunities: YSI and Expand received $210,661 in grant funding in 2020 to help support their operations. • Fee increases reflected the strategies discussed throughout 2019 related to non-resident rates, seasonal facility access and multi-visit passes. o Non-Resident Daily Entry Fee – Previously, all daily entrances were charged at one fee while residents benefited from discounted multi-visit passes. This new daily entry free provided residents a discount on daily entry frees as well as all multi-visit passes. o Non-Resident Fee Premium – a 22% fee differential for non-residents based on the adult resident/worker daily entry rate for a single visit, knowing that these users do not contribute at the same volume to the General Fund, which provides a subsidy to the department. o Seasonal Facility Entry Fees – universal pricing for all three recreation centers, two outdoor pools and Boulder Reservoir. Outdoor pools and Boulder Reservoir previously had different fees which made it confusing for patrons and staff. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 3__ o Multi-Visit Pass Options – simplified & more flexible options by only selling 10 Punch passes and removed all expiration dates. The current fees in place for 2020 and 2021 are identified in Tables 1 and 2 below: Table 1. Daily Entry Fees Single Visit 10 Visit Punch Pass Age Resident/Worker* Non-Resident Resident/Worker* Non-Resident Adult 19-59 years $9.00 $11.00 $81 $99 Senior 60+ years $6.75 $8.25 $61 $74 Youth 3-18 years $5.50 $6.50 $50 $59 Daily 4-Pack 4 entries; Max 2 adults $24.00 $29.00 *Individuals who live or work in the City of Boulder are eligible for Resident/Worker rates with proof of residency. Table 2. Unlimited Entry Fees Monthly Pass Annual Pass Age Resident/Worker* Non-Resident Resident/Worker* Non-Resident Adult 19-59 years $62/month $76/month $648/year $792/year Senior 60+ years $47/month $57/month $486/year $594/year Youth 3-18 years $38/month $45/month $396/year $468/year Household See note below $99/month $122/month $1,037/year $1,267/year *Individuals who live or work in the City of Boulder are eligible for Resident/Worker rates with proof of residency. 2020: Revenue Impacts from COVID The department adapted to challenges the COVID-19 pandemic created for 2020 operations. Adjustments include decreased recreational offerings based on the public health limitations, decreased participation levels in many recreation activities, decreased staffing levels and declines in revenues. The department responded to each shift and phase of the pandemic in a way that is responsible to participants and staff, while being financial stewards of public funds. The PRAB was informed of and consulted on these decisions at multiple touch points throughout the year, including: • April 27, 2020 – Parks and Recreation Department Response to COVID-10 and Financial Impacts Update • May 11, 2020 – Ad Hoc Meeting – Recreation Recovery Feasibility • May 27, 2020 – Financial Strategy: 2020 Budget Reductions, 2021 Operating Budget Development, 2021-26 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) • June 22, 2020 – Matters from the Department – 2021 Operating Budget; Public Hearing and Consideration of Motions Approving the 2021 Expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and 2021-2026 Park and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Fund • August 24, 2020 – Public Hearing and Approval of Revised 2021-26 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) • September 30, 2020 – Matters from the Department – Operating Budget Update AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 4__ • December 21, 2020 - Matters from the Department – 2020 and 2021 Operating Budget Update To ensure responsible fiscal stewardship, the department’s Business Services team has conducted bi-monthly analysis of all revenue and expenses which is then reviewed by the department’s leadership team and used to make real-time adjustments in operations. The revised 2020 budget assumed revenues declines in three areas: the General Fund was decreased 11% based on declines in sales tax and other revenue sources, the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund was decreased 14% based on declines in sales tax, and the Recreation Activity Fund was decreased 36% based on declines in user fees paid by users of recreation programs. As a result, expenses were decreased: 14% in the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, 32% in the Recreation Activity Fund. Final 2020 revenues and expenses will continue to lag six to eight weeks behind, so a comprehensive 2020 year-end revenue and expense analysis will be shared at the March 2021 PRAB meeting. 2021: Budget Stabilization In April 2020, during the beginning of the pandemic, the department began to prepare the 2021 proposed budget based on guidance from the Finance Department and the city’s Executive Budget Team. Revenue assumptions were developed in consultation with economists from CU Boulder for sales tax dependent funds, while department staff identified anticipated impacts to participation for revenue in the department’s Recreation Activity Fund. The approved 2021 budget is based on the best knowledge and assumptions of a recovery during the timeframe of April to June 2020. Nearly 8 months later, we recognize that the assumptions used are different than the observed trends and actual usage in the recreation industry and will continue to monitor and adjust 2021’s service levels, projected revenues and expenses accordingly. The department’s 2021 budget proposal responded to the Finance Department’s request for prioritizing a decreased budget that also adheres to the department’s 2014 Master Plan fiscally constrained planning scenario. The department utilized the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience definitions to categorize services and the city’s Rapid Response Racial Equity instrument, which allowed the department to fund 100% of Essential services and more significantly reduce those that fall into Helpful or Amenity categories. The department developed a balanced 2021 budget through decreased staffing levels and decreased operating costs, which correspond to the anticipated participation levels. A total of 19.5 standard positions were reduced from 2020 original staffing levels through holding vacancies and layoffs. Over half of these positions were at the supervisory level to minimize the impact customers and residents see in services. Additional reductions were made to non-standard seasonal employment throughout 2021 for revenue generating programs based on declines in service levels. The strategies proposed to achieve a balanced budget are instrumental to the department’s efforts to support the mission of promoting community health and well-being through the provision of high-quality parks, facilities, and programs. Building on all the previous items and conversations with the board regarding budgeting amidst the pandemic, the PRAB is provided this update on the outlook of department finances and to ensure the board is aware of the impacts included in the 2021 approved budget. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 5__ Recreation service reductions in the approved 2021 budget assume continued public health limitations and decreased demand from patrons: • Less drop-in visitation at recreation facilities and pools, including drop-in fitness and yoga, leisure swimming, and gymnasium access; • Significantly reduced portfolio of registered courses in every area with an emphasis on providing those programs with the most community benefit (per the PRAB accepted Recreation Priority Index); • Capacity limits on the swim beach, picnics, and special events at the Boulder Reservoir; and • 50% reduction in Health Equity Funded grants (to allow for HHS Funding of critical community needs) impacted service to underserved populations (in addition to limits in participations based on COVID) The department continues to follow Boulder County Public Health’s guidance and is planning to responsibly grow program offerings as it is safe and fiscally responsible to do so, and with equity a key priority. The department conducts bi-weekly monitoring of usage at all facilities to ensure revenues and expenses are in alignment with projections. The 2020 data indicates that outdoor activities such as reservoir visitation, park usage, rounds of golf and outdoor pools had higher levels of participation than a typical season, while indoor usage such as recreation center visitation, registered programs and camps had lower usage than a typical season. 2022: Budget Development Strategy Overview As part of the 2022 budget development, staff will engage the PRAB in several discussions to review the 2022 budget philosophy and make recommendations on a variety of opportunities, challenges, and recommendations. The budget strategies identified below will shape the PRAB’s conversation over the coming months. Opportunities: • Update to the Master Plan • Prioritized service levels • Reserve policy review • Potential increases in revenue through strategic fee increase • Staffing levels and utilization of partnerships and volunteers Challenges: • Continued safety and economic impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic • Full recovery timeline is unknown: some level of decisions will be based on assumptions for the 2022 budget development without complete information • Increase in fixed operating costs • Fund Health due to 2 years of reductions, setbacks, and fund shifts • Decrease / shift in indoor recreation center and program participation and potential long- term trends in fitness • Increase in construction / CIP costs due to escalation • Age of Assets / Unfunded Capital Maintenance AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 6__ Recommendations: • Equity/Equitable Access Focus • Conduct user fee study and develop data-based levers/options to balance funds • Define operating reserve policy • Prioritize service level offerings based on safety, financial sustainability and classification of services • Define CIP policies surrounding contingency and cost escalation • Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund CIP approval Two of the challenges identified are described in greater detail below, while the other challenges will be discussed in greater detail at future meetings: Impacts of Minimum Wage and Living Wage The department relies heavily on non-standard seasonal employees for many of the services within our portfolio. From 2017 through 2019, the department averaged approximately 200,000 hours of work by these non-standard staff each year. In 2020, that number decreased to 96,000 based on the impacts of COVID. Due to the seasonal nature of the work, and many job positions not requiring significant education or experience, entry-level positions start at minimum wage. In 2020, 21% of the hours worked in the Parks and Recreation Department were at minimum wage. With Colorado’s progressive move to pass Amendment 70, effective January 1, 2017, Colorado’s minimum wage was increased to $9.30 per hour and is increased annually by $0.90 each January 1 until it reaches $12 per hour effective January 2020. Thereafter it will be adjusted annually for cost-of- living increases, as measured by the Consumer Price Index used for Colorado.1 For 2021, the Colorado State Minimum Wage is $12.32. From 2016 to 2021, Colorado Minimum wage has increased from $8.31 per hour to $12.32 per hour, or a 48% increase. Every increase in minimum wage impacts our lowest earners, in addition to creating compression issues for workers’ currently above minimum wage. In 2018 and 2019, approximately 1/3 of the hours worked by non-standard employees were at minimum wage, while that dropped to 21% in 2020. In 2021, the department budgeted $110,000 to address the issues of an increased minimum wage and compression for other employees. The department also continues to see challenges in recruitment and retention from other business in Boulder paying a higher hourly rate. Non-standard wages account for approximately 10% of the department’s budget, so every increase puts additional pressure on the department’s budget. Additionally, the City of Boulder’s City Council sets the policy on Living Wage which is paid to all standard employees and contractors used for janitorial, landscaping and forestry services. The living wage increased from $15.67 in 2019 to $17.42 in 2020. The department recognizes the value of paying employees a minimum wage or living wage in these jobs; however, every increase impacts the operating budget and therefore results in a greater need to generate additional revenue or change programming levels to recover these costs. 1 Colorado Department of Labor and Employment – 2021 State Minimum Wage: https://cdle.colorado.gov/wage- and-hour-law/minimum-wage AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 7__ Shifts between Funds There have been multiple challenges over the past 3 year to all the city’s revenue streams. In 2018, the city recognized that sales tax was flattening after years of growth, resulting in cost savings measures in the General Fund and .25 Cent Sales Tax. This conversation continued into 2019, with the .25 Cent Sales Tax absorbing some expenses the General Fund would have historically funded. In 2020, COVID impacted the entire city’s finances, with the biggest burden being felt in the sales tax dependent funds including the General Fund and the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund. Additionally, the impacts of COVID affected the Recreation Activity Fund’s user-fee based revenues. The department has managed these General Fund and RAF reductions by reallocating dollars to fund key services through the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund and the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. The department recognizes the fortunate position we are in with multiple different funding streams that are dedicated (sales tax and property tax), user fees, general fund support and other fund support. The department seeks the board’s input on a budget philosophy that would inform what should be paid for out of each fund in a consistent manner year over year. Community input from the Master Plan Update will also inform this philosophy. Parks and Recreation Funds The Parks and Recreation Department receives revenue from five major funds: General Fund, Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund, Recreation Activity Fund (RAF), .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, and Lottery Fund, in addition to other funds that vary in frequency and dedicated for specific purposes. The department has sole responsibility over the revenues and expenses in three funds, the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund, Recreation Activity Fund (RAF), .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund. For the remaining two funds, General Fund and Lottery Fund, the department is responsible for developing expenses, but does not oversee the revenue projections as these funds are shared with multiple other departments. General Fund: The city’s General Fund is supported by fees, sales, property and other taxes. General Fund dollars are managed by Central Finance and allocated each year to city departments and projects by City Council through the annual budget process. The department primarily uses its allocation to fund park and forestry operations and department administration. Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund: The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund is the department’s capital improvement and acquisition fund. Funded by property and development excise taxes, the fund is dedicated for acquiring land and renovating or improving existing parks and recreational facilities. It may not be used to fund daily operations or routine maintenance. Recreation Activity Fund (RAF): The RAF is used to operate the department’s many recreation, fitness and sports facilities and programs. RAF funds are largely derived from program and facility user fees with some supplemental funding from the General Fund (primarily to subsidize programs for individuals with disabilities, provide financial aid to those with low incomes and age-based discounts for youth and seniors). AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 8__ .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (.25): The department receives voter-approved sales tax funds (.25 cent) that are dedicated to acquiring, developing, operating and maintaining parks and recreation facilities. In November 2012, voters renewed the tax with an 85% voter approval through 2035. Lottery Fund: The city lottery fund is a special revenue fund that accounts for state conservation trust fund monies allocated to local governments based on population. State conservation trust fund monies are dedicated to parks, recreation, and open space site maintenance and capital improvements. The city receives lottery money on an annual basis from the state and allocates money to the department. Other Funds: The Department receives additional funding on a limited basis from the Capital Development Fund and Community, Culture and Safety (CCS) capital improvement bond (2012 and 2017). These funds vary in frequency each year and are primarily intended for one-time capital improvement program projects and are funds shared with other departments. To submit a balanced budget, the department must have balanced fund financials in each of the 6 out years in a budget. The revenue projections and expenses are developed in consultation with the Central Finance Department. The Parks and Recreation Department is fortunate in the diversity of funds that are used to fund operations and capital improvement projects; however, each fund is subject to variability in revenue from different economic conditions. The perceived fund health will be addressed at the March 2021 meeting with the PRAB. Reserve Policy by Fund The impacts of 2021’s pandemic and subsequent declines in economic activity highlighted the importance of maintaining reserves. Reserves have different purposes but are generally intended for future outlays for capital or liability accruals, emergencies, economic downturns, and the inevitable unforeseen event that would trigger fiscal hardship. Recreation Activity Fund (RAF): The department maintains Emergency/Stabilization reserve for this fund, which is interchangeably referred to as the Operating Reserve. The reserve is intended to provide a cushion for revenue shortfalls, emergencies and for expenditure opportunities. In 2020, the department had a target reserve of 10% to provide stability to annual operations that may otherwise be affected by shortfalls in revenue. .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (.25): The department maintains an Emergency/Stabilization reserve for this fund, which is interchangeably referred to as the Operating Reserve. This is an unappropriated reserve for operating emergencies and/or revenue shortfalls. In 2018, a 15% reserve of the Fund’s operating budget (including transfers) was established (capital project budgets typically include a 10% or greater contingency). Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund: This fund does not currently maintain an Emergency/Stabilization reserve; however, capital project budgets typically include a 10% or greater contingency. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 9__ In addition to these Emergency/Stabilization or Operating Reserve, each of these funds also has a Pay Period 27 Reserve and a Sick/Vacation Reserve which are established annually by the Finance Department. The Pay Period 27 Reserve is intended to minimize the impacts from a 27th pay period which occurs every 11 years. The department holds money in this fund until the year with a 27th pay period occurs, which is scheduled for 2024. When employees retire, or move on to another job, they receive a payout of their vacation and sick time. The Sick/Vacation Accrual reserve protects restricted funds from the expense burden these payouts can generate by creating a reserve to cover the anticipated liability. The General Fund and Lottery Fund are both managed by other departments; the Lottery Fund does not maintain reserves, while the General Fund has an Emergency/Stabilization reserve, which is interchangeably referred to as the Operating Reserve. This is an unappropriated reserve for operating emergencies and/or revenue shortfalls. The reserve goal is to hold an amount equal to 20% of ongoing expenses, which was on track to be achieved before the pandemic, but is currently programmed at 17.4% in 2021’s approved budget. Government Finance Officer’s Association (GFOA) has a clear recommendation on General Fund Reserve policies typically being a minimum of 16% or 2 months of operating expenses. There isn’t a clear recommendation on enterprise funds, but they recommend starting with a minimum of 45 days of reserves and increasing or decreasing those levels based on multiple factors including: strength of collection practices, historical consumption of inventories and prepaids, support from the general government, transfers out, cash cycles, customer concentration, demand for services, control over rates and revenues, asset age and condition, volatility of expenses, control over expenses, management plans for working capital, separate targets for operating and capital needs and debt position.2 The department seeks the PRAB’s input on increasing the operating reserve target in the Recreation Activity Fund and .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, while establishing a reserve policy in the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Additionally, input on the importance of establishing a reserve target for capital needs in the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund and Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund would be appreciated. NEXT STEPS: At the February 22, 2021 meeting, a presentation will briefly review the material in this discussion item. PRAB will be asked for their input on 3 questions: 1) Does the PRAB agree with the process to examine revenue and expense levers/options to balance the 2022 budget submission? 2) Staff developed the parameters to guide the budget conversation over the next several months. Is there anything else you would like us to explore? 3) Is there any input on opportunities, challenges and recommendations? Are there any additional areas that should be a focus? 2 GFOA – Working Capital Targets for Enterprise Funds: https://www.gfoa.org/materials/working-capital-targets- for-enterprise-funds AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 10__ Moving forward there will be several months of PRAB engagement on the 2022 Budget Development including the opportunities, challenges and recommendations discussed. Below is an outline of what to expect over the coming months: March 2021: Surveying the Landscape & Looking Ahead In March, the department will provide a recap of the 2019 and 2020 actual revenues and expenses, the 2021 approved budget and look ahead with a 5-year financial outlook. Included in the budget conversation we will look at the use of each fund and fund health based on the variability in different revenue types. In association with this, the methodology behind the 2020 fee structure will be reviewed, including an overview of the historical and current levels of service for Parks & Recreation facilities, current facility entry fees rate structure, and facilities added since the 2019 budget updates. Finally, the PRAB will understand the role the General Fund has in supporting department operations. April 2021: Investment Scenarios In April, the department will review 2021 first quarter usage as the county transitioned from Level Orange to Level Yellow on the State COVID Recovery Dial and capacity and program usage was able to increase. The department will inform PRAB of the real time trends being observed and how this will impact the recovery anticipated in 202. Staff will discuss several options and levers the PRAB can consider to increase revenue, decrease expenses, or adjust programming levels to help achieve a balanced budget in 2022. The options discussed will include broad ranges of financial impact, and staff would like the PRAB to identify which options are worth conducting additional financial analysis on as the 2022 budget is developed. The PRAB will conduct a first touch of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to discuss the planned capital investments and asset management for 2022 through 2027. May 2021: 2022 Fee and/or Service Proposals In May, the department will present the financial impacts from the options and levers discussed in April and seek input on how revenues, expenses or service levels should be adjusted in 2022. While the PRAB’s role is advisory, the counsel is valuable, and the input is appreciated when reviewing the Parks and Recreation proposed budget with the Executive Budget Team, different boards and commissions and ultimately City Council. The PRAB will conduct a second touch of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to discuss the planned capital investments and asset management for 2022 through 2027. The Parks and Recreation budget submittal is due by early June for citywide review and synthesis. City Council review of the 2022 budget will begin in September and formal adoption by City Council is planned for October. Attachments: • 2021 Parks and Recreation Funds – Sources & Uses Chart Main1100 ‐ General Fund 2110 ‐ Lottery Fund 2180 ‐ .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund  2300 ‐ Recreation Activity Fund3300 ‐ Permanent Parks & Recreation Fund Desc.Governmental Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditurs neceassary to carry out basic governmental activities of the city which are not required to be accounted for in another fund. Special Revenue Fund accounts for State Conservation Trust Fund proceeds to be utilized for the acquisition, development, and maintenance of new conservation sites or for capital improvements or maintenance for recreational purposes on any public site. Special Revenue Fund accounts for earmarked sales tax authorized by the voters in 1995 for Parks & Recreationoperating and capital needs. Special Revenue/Quasi‐Entersprise Fund to account for fees and services related to the provision of recreation, reservoir and golf course services/programs.Capital Improvement Fund accounts for dedicated property tax for the acquisition of park land or permanent improvements of park and recreation facilities.Summary of Sources of Funds$4,057,219 $428,000 $8,119,584 $10,126,789 $3,625,061City wide fund comprised of:                                   • Sales Tax• Property Tax• Fees• Other taxes (accomodations, admission, etc.)• State of  Colorado distributes revenue to entities on a per capita basis • Parks & Recreation receives a portion of the City of Boulder's annual contribution (also to OSMP and PW‐Tributary Greenways). • Fund specific to Parks & Recreaion• Approved by voters in 1995 for a 20 year period was extended by voters with an approval of 85% through 2035.• Fund specific to Parks & Recreaton • Grants/donations, user and participation fees • Subsidy transfer provided by the General Fund• Fund specific to Parks & Recreation• The City of Boulder receives $.14 of every property tax $ collected in Boulder. Out of the $.14, Parks & Recreation receives $.01Summary of Uses of Funds$4,057,219 $428,000 $7,961,904 $9,625,921 $6,401,761Operation and Maintenance• General Park Maintenance & Mgmt.• Playground and  Shelter Maintenance• Horticulture, Turf and Irrigation Maint.• Pearl St. Mall and Boulder Creek Path• Ballfield Maintenance • Trash and Snow Removal• Forestry Administrative Support Services• Office of the Director• Business and Financial Mgmt• PRAB SupportCapital Improvements• Land Improvements• Park DevelopmentOperations and Maintenance• Horticulture, Turf and Irrigation Maint.• Ballfield Maintenance • Trash and Snow Removal• General Park Maintenance & Mgmt.• Forestry• Natural Lands• Valmont City ParkAdministrative Support Services• Community Partnerships• Volunteer Services• Special EventsRenovation and RefurbishmentCapital Improvements• Park DevelopmentCost AllocationRecreation Centers • North, East and South Recreation CentersRegional Facilities• Boulder Reservoir• Flatirons Golf Course                                                Programs• Gymnastics, Yoga, Pilates• Therapeutic Recreation & Youth Services Initiative• Wellness, Fitness and Weight Training• Camps• Childcare • Contracted programs                                Marketing                                                           Aquatics                                                                          • Spruce Pool and Scott Carpenter PoolAcquisition and Development• Acquisition of Park Land• Planning• Park Development/Construction• ConstructionRenovation and RefurbishmentCapital Improvements Program                                  Cost Allocation RestrictionsThe General Fund allocation was established to finance the basic functions of Parks and Recreation.  Note:  The General Fund Subsidy allocation dedicated for Recreation is provided through an annual transfer to the Recreation Activity Fund.Funding can be used for the acquisition, development, and maintenance of new conservation sites or for capital improvements or maintenance for recreational purposes on any public site.Primarily used for park maintenance, urban park refurbishment, renovation of facilities, pools, urban parks, historic/cultural facilities, civic center complex, development of all categories of parks, and new recreation facilities.Department manages all expenses, receives revenues from grants/donations, user and participation fees related to the provision of recreation, reservoir and golf course services/programs, and relies on a subsidy from the General Fund to support community benefit programming. Appropriations of the fund must be approved by the PRAB.  The fund shall not be used for any purpose other than for the acquisition of park land or permanent improvements of park and recreation facilities. Funding is permanent according to city charter.Parks & Recreation Funds ‐ 2021 Approved ‐ Sources: $27.4 Million / Uses: $29.5 Million* This chart is only updated annually for the 5 Boulder Parks & Recreation Department Funds. Any additional funds received in a budget year from other funding sources will be called out directly. An additional $1 million is budgeted in 2021 in the Capital Development Fund, but excluded from the chart as funding amount is variable by year and managed by another department. The $1 million budgeted is included in the total approved uses of $29.5 million in 2021. General Fund$4,057,219100%Business Services/Dept Admin$831,91220%Community Building & Partnership $37,1771%Urban Parks$2,628,98765%Forestry$559,14314%Colorado Lottery Fund$428,000100%Sales Tax$7,983,329 98%Interest$32,255<1%Valmont City Park$60,0001%Other Revenue$44,0001%Grants & Donations, $0, 0%Cost Allocation$564,3237%Urban Parks$2,220,96528%Admin$877,85111%Community Building & Partnership $511,0537%Valmont City Park$345,2094%R&R$150,0002% $0 0%CIP$2,165,00027%Planning & Ecological Services$1,127,50314%Golf$1,321,950 13%Reservoir1,135,000 11%Recreation Centers2,897,229 29%Recreation Programs1,215,707 12%Aquatics966,618 10%Sports972,481 10%Expand/YSI (Access and Inclusion)52,850 …Misc. Recreation Revenue6,000 <1%Fund Transfers1,558,954 15%Admin$1,194,62912%Golf$1,209,19513%Reservoir$1,088,34711%Recreation Centers$2,570,31727%Recreation Programs$1,197,72713%Aquatics$1,447,93715%Sports$313,5263%Expand/YSI (Access and Inclusion)$604,2446%Property Tax$3,588,58499%Interest$36,477<1%Other $00%Construction and Maint Mgt$517,4258%CIP$4,947,00077%Planning and Project Mgt$609,64210%Cost Allocation, $127,6942%R&R, $200,000, 3%CIP$428,000100%2/16/2021 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Parks and Recreation Department SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: February 22, 2021 A. Boulder Reservoir Hospitality Partnership Update This item provides an update on the partnership between the Dine and Dash group, operating the restaurant Driftwind, and Boulder Parks and Recreation at the Boulder Reservoir. Neighbor Relationship Building In January, the department provided an email update and invited neighbors to two virtual meetings, honoring that the neighbors have real concerns and that we intend to build trust and work together as good neighbors. In advance, BPR posted the commitments made about operations online, visible and available to all, along with an FAQ section. The intention with this effort is to demonstrate that these are not just things we are saying to quiet complaints- they are the standards we are setting for this first summer of operations. Parks and Recreation staff conducted two virtual neighborhood conversations on February 10th. The focus of these meetings was to honor, understand and address neighbor’s concerns about how our operations will impact their lives and about safety. During the virtual sessions, approximately 20 neighbors attended as well as City Council Members Rachel Friend (both sessions), Mary Young (a.m. only), and Adam Swetlik (p.m. only) along with PRAB vice-chair, Allison Fronzalia (p.m. only). BPR staff and the partner reiterated that we intend to deliver a safe, responsible partnership and are committed to being good neighbors. Staff committed to developing a Good Neighbor Agreement to address concerns and provide a framework for more regular communications and complaints. Driftwind Restaurant The Beverage Licensing Authority hearing was scheduled to review the liquor license application by Dine and Dash group for Driftwind restauraunt at the February 17, 2021 hearing. On Thursday, February 11, Dine and Dash decided to withdraw their liquor license application. The strategy to that point had been to do everything possible to address the neighbor’s concerns. It became increasingly clear as the hearing approached that the BLA would have had to choose between a neighborhood that wanted to maintain its quiet enjoyment and an operator that wanted to responsibly serve the community—and that those two things were being viewed as mutually exclusive. In the words of our partner, 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 We’ll hope that this is seen by the neighborhood as the gesture of good faith that it’s intended to be. We’re conceding to their concerns over a license being granted because, by our estimation, if we went in “for a fight” there were two possible outcomes: lose by winning, or lose by losing. We’re not interested in any fight really, but particularly one with those odds. - Josh Dinar Next Steps The decision to withdrawal the liquor license application necessitates an overhaul of the business plan for the hospitality Driftwind will provide, as well as a solid understanding of how their restaurant and event operations are influenced by the common consumption of alcohol currently allowed across the South Shore. Staff will work in close partnership with the attorneys, licensing, and our partners to support an updated operational plan that continues to balance augmenting the reservoir experience for visitors with the neighbors’ concerns about increased traffic and sound near their homes. Despite the work ahead, we are excited to focus this first year on building great experiences and the positive relationships that will allow us to fulfill the community vision created with this project. We have begun drafting the Good Neighbor Agreement that will spell out our communication commitments and a process to address input from the neighbors moving forward. Per a neighbor suggestion, we will circulate the agreement for comment and then host a virtual meeting to hear input on the agreement. Also, planned for warmer days and when there is water in the lake is a soundcheck– where we will announce the testing of various sound levels associated with the new partnership and test the impacts at various points. This sound check will be announced so that neighbors and/or city officials may participate. Our team will continue to support and work through the details of operating without a liquor license and provide updates as they are available. B. Safe and Welcoming Public Spaces The PRAB has expressed interest and concern about addressing the symptoms of homelessness in Boulder’s public spaces and specifically, across the urban park system. The intent of this item is to provide an update on citywide conversations about addressing encampments and ensuring Boulder’s public spaces are safe and welcoming for all. All conversations on this matter must include the recognition that the causes of homelessness are complex, and that the City of Boulder is investing considerable resources to addressing homelessness in the Boulder community. Discussing the symptoms of homelessness, such as encampments on public lands, without also discussing homelessness, both causes and solutions, is very challenging. For this item, the material is intended to focus on those matters within the PRAB’s purview. At the January 19, 2021 City Council meeting, a multi-disciplinary team developed information and delivered a presentation summarizing the conditions related to and impacts of encampments on public lands (City Council memo here). The materials for the meeting included various options to increase enforcement of the city’s camping ban, support efforts to ensure public spaces are safe and clean, and to enhance supportive services for individuals 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 experiencing homelessness. The conversation was robust and decision-making was deferred pending additional discussion. At the February 16, 2021 City Council meeting, the council discussed the scheduling and scoping of the follow-up conversation. The council agreed to discuss options that require additional resources and options for policy and/or service adjustments related to homelessness separately if needed to allow time for thoughtful discussion of these complicated and important topics. Follow-up conversations will be scheduled through the Council Agenda Committee (CAC) and are likely to occur in April 2021.