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01.06.21 BLC PacketCity of Boulder 2020 Library Commission Agenda Meeting date: Wednesday, Jan.6, 2021 Location: Zoom Meeting Meeting start time: 6 p.m. 1. Review Online Meeting Guidelines 2. Reminder: Commissioners please submit monthly volunteer hours in the chat or log them in Count Me In Boulder 3. Approval of agenda 4. Public comment 5. Consent agenda a. Approval of December 2, 2020 minutes 6. Discussion on Canyon Theater Rental Policy – Janet Michels, Senior Assistant City Attorney and James Brown, Risk Manager 7. Recap of 2020 library accomplishments and 2021 planning 8. Library Commission update a. Items from commission i. Ongoing outreach efforts ii. Outreach efforts to potential Commission applicants b. Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues (verbal) i. Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update (Sykes Wilson/Koenig) c. Update on emails and phone calls to Library Commission 9. Library Director’s report a. Update on library district discussion with City Council b.One Book One Boulder final report c. Update on 2020 Adjustment to Base budget requests d. Boulder Library Foundation 2021 grant requests e. Prospector service changes f. North Boulder Branch Library update g. Update on current library services 2021 Library Commissioners Juana Gomez Joel Koenig Jane Sykes Wilson Steven Frost Scott Steinbrecher 1 Library Commission Minutes December 2, 2020 Page 1 of 3 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES Name of Board/ Commission: Library Commission Date of Meeting: December 2, 2020 Contact information preparing summary: Celia Seaton Commission members present: Juana Gómez, Joel Koenig, Jane Sykes Wilson, Steven Frost, Scott Steinbrecher Commission members not present: Library staff present: David Farnan, Director of Library & Arts Celia Seaton, Administrative Specialist Aimee Schumm, eServices Manager Anne Ledford, Youth Services Manager City staff present: None Members of the public present: Joni Teter, Carson Block (Carson Block Consulting) Type of Meeting: Regular | Remote Agenda Item 1: Review of Online Meeting Guidelines [0:00:15 Audio min.] Agenda Item 2: Reminder: Commissioners please log monthly volunteer hours Count Me In Boulder [0:01:22 Audio min.] The Commission logged their service. Agenda Item 3: Approval of agenda [0:01:40 Audio min.] The meeting was called to order and Gómez asked if there were any changes to the agenda. Being none, there was a nod of approval from the commission for this agenda. Gómez noted that the latest draft of the commission’s annual letter to City Council can be found in the handouts. Agenda Item 4: Public comment [0:02:23 Audio min.] None. Agenda Item 5: Consent agenda [0:02:30 Audio min.] a. Approval of November 2020 Meeting Minutes: Koenig moved to approve these minutes, Frost seconded, and the motion was unanimously approved. Sykes Wilson abstained as she was not present at the November meeting. Agenda Item 6: Student One Program Update [0:03:47 Audio min.] Ledford, Youth Services Manager, updated the commission on the progress of the Student One Program (see relevant statistics in packet.) Briefly, Student One is the effort to increase library access to all Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) students within the county boundary by allowing student IDs to work as library database-only accounts. Goals mainly center around offering assistance with homework, enticing youth to the library, and eventually transitioning the students into creation of a full-fledged library account. This partnership is especially necessary at a time when many schools are finding their internal library funds and positions cut; school districts are increasingly reliant on outside groups, such as public libraries, to provide access to these databases. She welcomed questions. Gómez recommended a more apparent signifier on the website pointing to the portal link that specifically mentions Student One. She lauded the program’s efforts: “amazing numbers.” Sykes Wilson asked about a breakdown of demographics pertaining to age. Ledford explained that she in unable to provide those statistics as no birthdate is recorded in the registration. In response to Koenig, Ledford clarified that staff Gina Scioscia, instrumental in getting the program off the ground, continues to coordinate the Research Rendezvous. Ledford encouraged the commission to tout Student One when discussing library programs with the public. Commission thanked Ledford for her efforts and time spent updating the commission on this effort. 2 Library Commission Minutes December 2, 2020 Page 2 of 3 Agenda Item 7: Technology Strategic Plan [0:22:33 Audio min.] Schumm, eServices Manager, introduced Block to present the first Technology Strategic Plan for the Boulder Public Library (see packet.) Sykes Wilson wondered about the impetus for the Plan, and the reason one had not arisen until now. Schumm explained how the Library’s IT department has transformed over the past decade. While working collaboratively, the Library IT was always a separate structure and network from the City of Boulder’s IT. The two groups have worked to remove duplicated efforts. eServices (as the Library IT is now known) now primarily relies on City IT to support all Enterprise-related hardware and infrastructure; eServices can thus more closely focus on library-specific technology. Now that eServices has evolved to a stage with appropriate bandwidth, the Plan was born. Block: the Plan should provide a clear operational direction framework, “focused on high level strategic transformation and goals,” as well as a “tactical action section” including continual assessments. With gratitude, he referenced the collaborative process with the broad representation of library staff who formed a planning team. Inspired by findings from surveys of the BPL staff and focus groups, Block noticed a striking “cohesiveness” and united “dedication to customer services… connecting and making a difference in people’s lives.” eServices was found to be a very appreciated (and sometimes “stretched”) resource. COVID provided an opportunity to ensure that the plan would be responsive and adaptable over time and circumstance. Carnegie staff retooled from a proprietary system for cultural heritage to open source, freeing the items from any proprietary structures for a more sustainable archive. The pandemic has made technology essential for work and for many library programs. Block: “harnessing” technology will remain relevant even after the pandemic has passed – future operations will likely embrace some digital services designed in the pandemic (curbside pick-up, virtual meetings, etc.) The Plan explores possibility of district as well. Commission feedback was then welcomed. Gómez felt that the summary was “very general” – she would love more specifics. Block agreed to a finer delineation of programs and databases. Sykes Wilson noted the “unseen” advantages of technology which might permit Patron Services more time to assist patrons if aided by a technological process. Steinbrecher advised “toning down the tech jargon” in the Plan to make it more accessible for the average reader, perhaps adding imagery to enhance the message. Frost, in reviewing the findings, wondered whether BLDG61 is perhaps better suited under the Programs Events and Outreach as opposed to eServices. Staff agreed that this is a “very grey line” since both support technology in the community. A potential shift in the workgroup structure is currently under discussion. Gómez advocated outreach to the Latinx community. Spanish offerings are great but need looms large for greater technological literacy. Concerted outreach and education could help communities learn these tools. Block agreed with Gómez’s suggestion, digital inclusion is “an area ripe for partnership” between eServices and library staff. Schumm noted that the City Manager’s equity office provided beneficial feedback to this Plan. She referenced partnerships to provide grants to underserved communities between BLDG61 and “I Have a Dream” Foundation, closely partnering with schools in primarily Latinx communities to provide devices and connectivity, and many staff actively learning Spanish to assist in this divide. Steinbrecher spoke in support for the disability community – much technology is involved in those populations. He defers to Schumm to determine what tools might make the most sense for the Library to incorporate. Block expressed “delight” at the level of engagement evidenced by this commission. He is excited by the willingness and desire to relay this document to the public. Schumm and Block thanked commission for its thoughtful feedback; commission thanked them for their hard work bringing this Plan to fruition. Further input is welcomed. Agenda Item 8: Library Commission Update [1:20:43 Audio min.] a. Items from Commission i. Finalize annual letter to City Council about priorities – see handouts for draft version. Gómez will incorporate discussed adjustments for the final version. Frost made the motion to approve 3 Library Commission Minutes December 2, 2020 Page 3 of 3 APPROVED BY: ATTESTED: _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Board Chair Board Secretary _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Date Date the letter with its discussed amendments for transmission to City Council. Koenig seconded, and the motion was unanimously approved. ii. Ongoing outreach efforts – Steinbrecher had “a good conversation” with City Council Member Sam Weaver in the middle of November. Weaver impressed Steinbrecher as a “big supporter of the library,” though “concerned about move to library district.” Weaver seemed confused over the outcome of Library assets and why the commission came to the conclusion of a district solution. Weaver appeared “skeptical,” but Steinbrecher believes that given the right information he could be persuaded. Frost and Gómez remembered that City Council had already employed a consultant who presented at length to council in the past and answered questions abut such things as library assets. Sykes Wilson met with Council Members Brocket and Wallach. Wallach seemed to understand the thought process behind the need for independent, sustainable funding; they spoke at length about Boulder’s post-pandemic recovery. Wallach approved overall of the district idea and noted it may be mostly about “timing” at this point. Brockett advised advocating for the district to be on council’s 2021 work plan in the annual letter. Frost has a scheduled meeting with Council Member Friend but may join for an earlier conversation that Gómez had planned. Gómez plans to speak with Council Member Joseph next week. Koenig will be reaching out to Council Member Young. Frost plans to follow-up with Council Member Yates. Joni Teter and Gómez plan to soon start contacting Boulder County Commissioners. Gómez: fellow commissioners should encourage apt connections to apply for the Library Commission’s 2021 recruitment; she herself is actively “tapping” good candidates. b. Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues (verbal) i. Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update (Sykes Wilson/Koenig) – Koenig: last meeting saw approval of the budget, with no changes from the Library’s requested funding. c. Update on emails and phone calls to Library Commission Agenda Item 9: Library and Arts Director’s Report [1:59:35 Audio min.] a. North Boulder Branch Library – currently out to bid, final estimates came “well within” budget. b. Update on current library Services – see packet. Agenda Item 10: Adjournment [2:17:02 Audio min.] There being no further business to come before the commission at this time, the meeting was adjourned. Date, time, and location of next meeting: The next Library Commission meeting will be at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, through a virtual setting. 4 DATE: December 29, 2020 TO: Boulder Library Commission FROM: David Farnan, Library and Arts Director Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director SUBJECT: Second Review of Library Commission Discussion About the Canyon Theater and Gallery Rental Policy BACKGROUND: As part of the annual review of the library policies which are three years or older, the Library Commission began review of the Canyon Theater and Gallery Rental and Terms of Use Policy at the Jan. 8, 2020 meeting. Staff provided recommended edits to the policy for the commission’s consideration in the Jan. 8, 2020 meeting packet. The Library Commission’s discussion about the policy was recorded in the approved Jan. 8, 2020 meeting minutes. Staff provided follow up information and a revised draft of the policy in the Feb. 5, 2020 meeting packet. The Library Commission’s discussion about the policy was recorded in the approved Feb. 5, 2020 meeting minutes. The Library Commission held a first review of this policy discussion during the July 8, 2020 which is recorded in the minutes. The information provided in the July 8, 2020 meeting packet is also included in this memo. Library Commissioner Frost offered to consult an entertainment lawyer regarding typical insurance requirements for other public and private venues following the Oct. 7, 2020 Library Commission meeting. At last check, Commissioner Frost had not received a response from his legal contact. DECEMBER 29, 2020 UPDATE FROM LIBRARY STAFF: An ongoing staff funding reduction for positions that supported sponsorships and rentals of the Canyon Theater were part of the Library’s 2020 and 2021 operating budget cuts. The Programs, Events and Outreach team plans to remove the applications for sponsorship and rental of the Canyon Theater from the library website until the ongoing funding of the theater support staff is restored. Until that time, the library has staff capacity to hold Library presented programs in the Canyon Theater only. Sponsorships, rentals, or use by City of Boulder staff/departments cannot be supported by current library staffing levels. INFORMATION REQUESTED BY THE LIBRARY COMMISSION IN 2020: Programs, Events and Outreach Manager Jaime Kopke compiled summary information requested by the Library Commission about use of the Canyon Theater. During 2019, the Canyon Theater was used by the community in several capacities beyond library programs. • Six City of Boulder hosted events in which the rental fees were waived and staff time was charged to the hosting department. • Twelve rentals (some multi-day). The two largest rental events were film festivals – Boulder International Film Festival (BIFF) and the Flatirons Food and Film Festival. Both events had a sponsorship component, such as screenings of youth programs that were free and open to the public. Other rentals included a wedding, recitals and corporate events. Of these rentals, only BIFF provided liability insurance, though none was requested. 5 • Fifteen community events in which the library provided sponsorships. The rental fees were waived and the groups were charged for staff time only. These events were free and open to the public. Some of these events were multi-day. Examples include the Conference on World Affairs, the 90 Newbery Film Festival, a citizenship ceremony, partnerships with CU and community organizations such as the French Alliance. While less frequent, the library does sponsorship events organized by individuals. In general, sponsorships tend to originate more from grassroots community efforts with funding restrictions and may be negatively impacted by the cost of acquiring liability insurance. Impacts of an insurance requirement could be mitigated if the City offers an option to buy a single-use certificate under the City umbrella, or by providing direct links to approved event insurance providers within the application. If required, the rental and sponsorship applications will be revised to create a required field for uploading a copy of the insurance certificate as part of the application process. Applications would not be submitted until this step was completed by the applicant. If insurance is to be required for rentals, Kopke believes the impact would be relatively minor as the majority of rentals are related to larger organizations vs. individuals. Assistant City Attorney Janet Michaels and Risk Manager James Brown were scheduled to attend the April 1, 2020 Library Commission meeting to discuss the commission’s questions and concerns about the advice to require Canyon Theater renters to carry liability insurance. The April Library Commission meeting was cancelled due to the Coronavirus pandemic. Brown and Michaels provided the following information as a preliminary response to the commissioner’s questions. • What other City of Boulder programs or sites require the user to carry liability insurance? It is recommended that all other programs offering similar access/facility use have the same requirements. • When did the requirement begin or how long has it been in place? It has been Brown’s recommendation since he started working for the City at the end of 2016, he is unable to speak to the requirements prior. • Has the requirement for users to carry liability insurance to use City facilities resulted in any decrease in use? Michaels said departments sponsoring the City programs or sites will have to answer this question. Brown said he has not heard of any decrease in use. The recreation center allows use of rooms for private exercise classes. They are required to carry liability insurance and there has been no decrease in use. • Will City staff provide examples of the policies that cover those programs or sites above for the Library Commission’s review? Michaels said she doesn’t know if such policies are available. It is up to the entity requesting to use the space to obtain their own insurance. There could be dozens of vendors of this type of insurance, and each policy could vary slightly. Brown provided a copy of a special event overview, application, and policy used by a Tenant User Liability Insurance Program (TULIP) program (Attachment A - C). It is basic and shows the special event type of coverage the City requests. Most general liability policies would have the same type of coverage for rented facilities and are what the City requests. Because of the great variability in general liability policies Brown doesn’t have an example of a good generic form. 6 • Is it possible to ask users to sign a liability waiver instead of purchasing insurance to cover their use of the Canyon Theater? BLDG61 asks users to sign a risk and release form. Michaels said it is possible but may be challenging to implement. She asked: What would that look like? Who would get these forms from the participants, and how? Who will manage the paper? • The Commission requested library staff to research what other non-City facilities require for use or rental (e.g. Alfalfa’s community room). Michaels said that when the City uses non-city facilities for events (i.e., Boulder Theater for OSMP celebration), the City is usually required to obtain insurance. Brown said he is not aware of any non-City facility that does not require the City to provide proof of coverage. When the City uses the Avalon, JCC, Millennium Hotel, etc., it has been required to provide proof of coverage, regardless of how big/small our event is. • If the Boulder Library Foundation is willing, could it purchase an insurance policy that covers all uses of the Canyon Theater? As specific answer to this question was not provided. Brown said there is a possibility for the City to purchase the special event policy, though it sounds like that would be on a per occurrence basis. The City would not be able to add groups to the current policy as covered individuals as that runs contrary to the City’s position that it cannot add third parties as additionally insured (per the Colorado Constitution Article XI). QUESTIONS FOR THE LIBRARY COMMISSION: 1. What questions does the Library Commission have about this policy review? 2. Does the Library Commission wish to postpone a decision on updating this policy until staff funding is restored? 3. What does the Library Commission require of staff if it wishes to complete the update of this policy? 7 To: Boulder Library Commission From: BPL Leadership Team Date: December 29, 2020 Subject: Boulder Public Library 2020 Recap and 2021 Planning 2020 Recap The BPL staff showed tremendous adaptability to challenges and evolving needs, and a willingness to learn new processes and systems to serve the community during 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic. Staff members banded together, forming new inter-divisional teams, cultivated a culture of experimentation, in some cases overcame abrupt learning curves, and worked toward mastering new skills to meet these needs and challenges. Their resilience and commitment did not waiver, even as they shouldered more work, grieved the loss of some of their beloved colleagues to severe budget reductions, and as their workplace and community connections were interrupted by health and safety restrictions. Everyone responded rapidly to create new or improved pathways of access to library services during the state’s Stay-at-Home Order and supported community health with mask making, serving on the county call center and supporting the COVID Recovery Center. These pathways included creating an online temporary library account application process so patrons could access online resources; reallocating the materials budget and adapting collection development to increase downloadable resources; meeting the increased demand with the Ask A Librarian service; expanding the Home Delivery service; launching the new temporary Dial-A-Patron service to maintain connections with older adult patrons; obtaining grant monies to address the digital divide experienced by many of our patrons; and providing online research and by-appointment access to our patrons interested in local history. Staff’s efforts to process returns, make deliveries, distribute equipment and program materials, and many other tasks were supported by a group of dedicated volunteers. The transition of BPL’s popular and engaging programs such as, story times, Summer of Discovery, BLDG 61, BoulderReads, One Book One Boulder, and the Family Play Festival to online platforms emphasized staff’s ingenuity. Likewise, offerings for teen patrons such as teen chats and the First Annual Teen Summit revealed that online platforms could enhance inclusivity and increase participation from patrons in this age group. The staff continued a strong commitment to outreach this year, offering programs and services designed to increase connection with marginalized and/or underserved community members, and to support the community to address important societal issues related to systemic racism. BPL showed leadership within the City organization by launching its own Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion team, another inter-divisional team that guides the library’s efforts toward these foundational values. Staff’s focus was on accessibility -- from providing maker and activity kits, Wi-Fi hotspots and mobile devices for underserved families and older adults, to online program offerings in Spanish, closed captioning and American Sign Language. They reached out, and the community reached back with enormous gratitude! 8 This year was demanding on all levels, and the staff’s wholehearted generosity of spirit to serve was fundamental to providing the Boulder community with a variety of impactful and relevant programs and services during a time of crisis. This year has called for leadership and nimble, responsive decision making, and flexibility from the everyone. And despite overcoming some great obstacles, the staff continued to move several important library goals forward such as, the NoBo branch library project passing site review and beginning the bid process, installation of a new print and PC management system, completing BPL’s first technology strategic plan, providing mobile equipment, technology for outreach programs, and fully implementing a leading-edge content management system for the Carnegie archive. We’re immensely proud of the staff’s achievements in 2020 and so very grateful for their courage, and selfless dedication to the community! Coming up in 2021 While staff has yet to finalize the 2021 Library Work Plan, here is a sneak preview of some of what is being planned for 2021. Once the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have subsided, the staff will restore library programs and services to the level permitted by the current operating budget and strategize how to regain what was accomplished toward the master plan goals during the past few years, and then lost during the 2020 and 2021 budget reductions, such as: • Provide adequate resources to maintain high-quality core programs and services (including Patron Services, Materials Handling, Youth Services, Boulder Reads, BLDG61, Carnegie Library, and Program, Events, and Outreach staffing and Canyon Theater support). • Provide adequate resources for library collections (including Collection Development staffing). • Restore [Provide uniform] service levels at the Main Library and branch libraries [by increasing hours and program offerings] (including branch library staffing). • Restore [Expand] the library materials holds service for patrons (including Prospector and other interlibrary loan services). • Reinitiate the Carnegie Library for Local History strategic planning effort. • Conduct the Main Library North Building Renovation Feasibility Study. • Hire a Bilingual Youth Services Specialist *Actual goal language is in [..]. To “re-accomplish” most of the goals above will require restoration of personnel and non-personnel operating funding. Staff will follow the City’s budget process and guidelines to request this funding in coming years. Work on the north Boulder branch library will continue in 2021 and the George Reynolds Branch Library public spaces will receive an interior refresh and new floorplan. Staff will also develop job descriptions and hire for Library Security and Peer Navigator positions. Later in this meeting packet you can read about the ongoing and new programs and projects proposed by staff for Boulder 9 Library Foundation annual funding. With the Library Commission’s support, staff will also present information to City Council to further the discussion about library funding and governance. 10 Commission Memo Meeting Date: January 2021 – via Zoom Library Commission update a. Items from Commission i. Ongoing outreach efforts – report on contacts with Council ii. Outreach efforts to potential Commission applicants b. Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues (verbal) i. Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update (Sykes Wilson/Koenig) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Letters and emails to Commission Email exchanges: Schmaltz/Farnan/Gomez, Malenich/Farnan/Gomez, Fontenay/Gomez juana gomez <juanamargarita@yahoo.com> To:Dave Schmaltz,David Farnan Wed, Dec 30 at 1:54 pm Dear Mr. Schmaltz, Thank you for your ideas regarding Prospector and funding library programs. I, too, am a frequent user of Prospector for finding books beyond the stacks of our Boulder Public Library. There are many of us who understand and appreciate the great societal and intellectual value the library provides. We share your passion for more expansive access. After months of disappointments at the many cuts to our staff, collections, and programs, my heart sank when I learned that our subscription to Prospector would have to be temporarily suspended, too. The library staff and we, the library commissioners, grapple daily with the dire budget situation of our institution. This is only the latest symptom of an ongoing financial neglect on the part of the municipal administration. The budgeting model of the city results in the under funding of the library over and over again, as the city's commitments outpace its revenue sources. For the past three years we have been working alongside a grassroots group, the Library Champions, on ways to stabilize the library's budget. We have proposed that City Council detach the public library from municipal funding and instead create a library district. There are many examples around the state of library districts that are independently and sustainably funded. You may be interested in reading more about this in the Boulder Library Champions' web site. In this context, it seems that a GoFundMe campaign for a single program could be detrimental in some unintended ways. It would be unfortunate to create the appearance of adequate funding, or could lead to donor fatigue for larger requests. Too often the city administration hopes that charitable organizations such as the Library Foundation will make up the funding shortfalls. Though the Foundation contributes vigorously, it cannot support the library as a whole. The public library should not depend on charity because as a fundamental civic service, it should be sustainably funded by the public. Please reach out to me if you would like to discuss this further. 11 Best regards, Juana Gomez, Chairperson, Boulder Library Commission “Siempre imaginé que el Paraíso sería algún tipo de biblioteca.” “I have always imagined that Paradise would be a kind of library.” -Jorge Luis Borges On Tuesday, December 29, 2020, 1:09:49 PM MST, Farnan, David <farnand@boulderlibrary.org> wrote: Dear Mr. Schmaltz – Thanks again for the note. I appreciate your interest in restoring funding to the library and to Prospector. As to a GoFundMe campaign specifically for Prospector, I have learned to be judicious in what you ask the public funding for – because as a taxpayer funded entity – you cannot be perceived as constantly having your “hand out.” As I mentioned in the original email, restoring funding for opening buildings, rehiring staff and making the library collection budget whole is the library’s first priority. While I realize that Prospector was a great service and a great value for some of the library’s customers, it was a tiny portion of what we do and pales in comparison to interruption of library services to the Boulder community that closing 3 buildings and laying off 60+ people entails. Of course I am not going to dissuade you from beginning a GoFundMe campaign on your own. However, if you are proposing a GoFundMe campaign for $52,000 to refund Prospector, I need to say again that would not be the library’s first priority for the use of the money. I am cc’ing Library Commission Chairperson, Juana Gomez on this email in case she has other avenues to consider. I appreciate your support of the library, David David Farnan Library & Arts Director City of Boulder From: dave schmaltz <davezed13@hotmail.com> Sent: Tuesday, December 29, 2020 12:50 PM To: Farnan, David <FarnanD@boulderlibrary.org> Subject: Fw: Prospector ----- Original Message ----- From: dave schmaltz To: Farnan, David Sent: Friday, December 25, 2020 9:00 AM Subject: Re: Prospector I was only considering a GoFundMe campaign for Prospector, only. Would not that be possible? 12 ----- Original Message ----- From: Farnan, David To: dave schmaltz Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 12:52 PM Subject: Re: Prospector Dear Mr. Schmaltz - There are lots of things that might be appropriate for a GoFundMe campaign. As I explained in my email, Prospector is a highly valuable service. But in the overall scheme of things a GoFundMe campaign seems like only a stopgap for what is a significant [$1.6M] shortfall in the budget. I appreciate your interest. David From: dave schmaltz <davezed13@hotmail.com> Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 9:21 AM To: Farnan, David <FarnanD@boulderlibrary.org> Subject: Re: Prospector Dear Mr. Farnan, Thanks for getting back. Well, I didn't realize how many employees that were laid off, nor the size of the budget cuts, including closed library locations. I'm sorry to hear about all of it. It did occur to me that the 52K to restore Prospector could be raised with a GoFundMe campaign, no? Is there a reason this wouldn't be workable? Regards, Dave ----- Original Message ----- From: Farnan, David To: dave schmaltz Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 1:52 PM Subject: Re: Prospector Dear Mr. Schmaltz - Thank you for taking the time to write to me about your concerns. I couldn't agree with you more about the value of Prospector. And it is my sincere hope that library funding will be restored sometime in 2021 or 2022 and we can resume the service. But as it stands right now, the Boulder Public Library has had to cut $1.6 million, layoff 60+ employees, reduce our new book purchases by nearly $100 thousand, and close 3 library locations since the economic crisis brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic began. I realize that for some library patrons such as yourself, Prospector opens access to many more materials than are available in the Boulder Public Library and Flatirons Library Consortium. The Flatirons Library Consortium purchases Prospector 13 collectively and the cost to do so is around $52K. Boulder Public Library's share is approximately $16 thousand. Prospector is a valued service - not only because it expands access to materials, but also so that our staff can tell library patrons they can get anything they want from anywhere. I know that from a service point of view, that is priceless. However, Prospector also only represents a very small portion of our circulation [less than 1%] and costs significantly more than many other services the library offers. I assure you we did not cut the service without much consideration and multiple attempts to negotiate reduced pricing with Prospector. Most of our library vendors offered deep discounts to libraries at this time, as they realize that libraries are good customers and are going through significant financial difficulties right now. Unfortunately, Prospector was not able to make such an offer. It was only after all these considerations and others that we made the difficult decision to cut Prospector for 2021. I am more than happy to discuss this with you further, but as it stands - even as funds are partially or gradually restored - I am not sure it would be prudent of the library to spend so much on Prospector at the same time that we are having to let employees go and close branches. As a steward of taxpayer funding we need to examine all services to see what best serves the most members of our community as possible. I hope you understand that perspective. I assure you we will be back [with Prospector] when we recover from this current crisis and this unfortunate city-wide revenue shortfall and extensive reductions in the library budget. Sincerely, David Farnan Library & Arts Director From: dave schmaltz <davezed13@hotmail.com> Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 9:58 AM To: Farnan, David <FarnanD@boulderlibrary.org> Subject: Prospector External Sender Dear Mr. Farnan, I learned to today's (12/22) Boulder Daily Camera that Prospector is no longer a service provided by the Boulder Public Libarary. Please restore funding to Prospector. Prospector greatly enhances the basic, essential function of a library -- by providing greater access to a wider selection of books. What does Prospector cost Boulder Public on an annual basis? Please try to make cuts elsewhere to keep Prospector. Regards, Dave Schmaltz Boulder, CO ____________________________________________________________________________________ juana gomez <juanamargarita@yahoo.com> To: joelkoe44@gmail.com,amgibb@gmail.com,stevenefrost@gmail.com,John Malenich Cc: Farnan, David,Jennifer Phares Mon, Dec 28 at 10:28 AM Hello, Mr. Malenich, Thank you for your note and for being a user of Prospector. I, too, am in the 1% of Boulder Public Library patrons who uses Prospector regularly for all those far flung books that can be accessed and delivered to my neighborhood shelves. As an 14 architect, teacher of architecture, and general book nerd, I search for many a title that is well outside the mainstream. Prospector gives me access to old editions, recent publications, out-of-print tomes, obscure books in many languages, articles... But, alas, my heart is heavy with the temporary loss of Prospect. I look forward to a year or two from now when our library's finances allow us to resubscribe, reopen branches, rehire staff, reactivate our buildings. In the meantime, the BPL library commissioners along with the grass-roots Boulder Library Champions have been working on ways to stabilize the library's budget. If you are interested in finding out more, search for information in the Champions' web site. Best regards, Juana Gomez, Chairperson Boulder Public Library Commission From: Farnan, David <FarnanD@boulderlibrary.org> Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 12:50 PM To: John Malenich <john.malenich@comcast.net>; Juana Gomez <juana@lawrenceandgomez.com>; Joel Koenig <joelkoe44@gmail.com>; Alicia Gibb <amgibb@gmail.com>; Steven Frost <StevenEFrost@gmail.com> Cc: diane.lapierre@cityofloveland.org Subject: Re: Prospector Dear Mr. Malenich Thank you for taking the time to write to the Library Commission, Foundation Chair and chair of the Flatirons Library Consortium about your concerns. All members have received your email and may respond separately. This is a staff response. I couldn't agree with you more about the value of Prospector. And it is my sincere hope that library funding will be restored sometime in 2021 or 2022 and we can resume the service. But as it stands right now, the Boulder Public Library has had to cut $1.6 million, layoff 60+ employees, reduce our new book purchases by nearly $100 thousand, and close 3 library locations since the economic crisis brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic began. I realize that for some library patrons such as yourself, Prospector opens access to many more materials than are available in the Boulder Public Library and Flatirons Library Consortium. The Flatirons Library Consortium purchases Prospector collectively and the cost to do so is around $52K. Boulder Public Library's share is approximately $16 thousand. Prospector is a valued service - not only because it expands access to materials, but also so that our staff can tell library patrons they can get anything they want from anywhere. I know that from a service point of view, that is priceless. However, Prospector also only represents a very small portion of our circulation [less than 1%] and costs significantly more than many other services the library offers. I assure you we did not cut the service without much consideration and multiple attempts to negotiate reduced pricing with Prospector. Most of our library vendors offered deep discounts to libraries at this time, as they realize that libraries are good customers and are going through significant financial difficulties right now. Unfortunately, Prospector was not able to make such an offer. It was only after all these considerations and others that we made the difficult decision to cut Prospector for 2021. I am more than happy to discuss this with you further, but as it stands - even as funds are partially or gradually restored - I am not sure it would be prudent of the library to spend so much on Prospector at the same time that we are having to let employees go and close branches. As a steward of taxpayer funding we need to examine all services to see what best serves the most members of our community as possible. I hope you understand that perspective. I assure you we will be back [with Prospector] when we recover from this current crisis and this unfortunate city-wide revenue shortfall and extensive reductions in the library budget. Sincerely, 15 David Farnan Library & Arts Director On Thursday, December 24, 2020, 12:21:23 PM MST, John Malenich <john.malenich@comcast.net> wrote: Dear Library Commission Members: I recently discovered that Boulder Pubic [sic] Library has decided to no longer be a part of the statewide Prospector inter-library-loan system. I wanted to contact you to express my extreme disappointment with this poor decision. I understand that this was a decision made by the Flatirons Library Consortium, but as a member of the Consortium I would hope Boulder Public Library would have acted to intervene in this poor, short-sighted decision that prevents your patrons from having access to ten of thousands of titles not available within Consortium libraries. I would have also hoped the Consortium would have seen that cutting off access to tens of thousands of titles for its patrons is a poor approach. While I am aware that this decision was based on cost and statistics showing it is only 1.22% of overall circulation within the Consortium, I believe this decision was counter to the mission of both the Boulder Public Library and the Consortium to provide patrons with access to a full catalog of titles. It seems to me that these days both the Boulder Public Library and the Consortium are much more focused on being an Amazon or a Blockbuster Video than actually being a library that provides a full range of access to a wide range of titles and topics. It seems your focus heavily skews to new pop fiction titles and videos instead of being institutions that cover the full range of learning and intellectual pursuits covering a wide range of topics. In fact, many of the titles that one can only get through Prospector are titles that are more of the nature of specific or specialized works and non-fiction utilized by researchers and those seeking to educate themselves and expand their knowledge base. Its disappointing to see our libraries lose their position as champions of learning and all intellectual pursuits and interests and become so focused on popular culture like so much of the rest of our world. The mission of libraries in this age of Twitter and YouTube should be to provide something different, not just fall into the same cycle of focusing on what sells the most, gets the most clicks and gets the most "check outs." In addition, while I understand the budget impacts of the Covid pandemic, Prospector was simply the wrong place to make budget cuts since it affords patrons access to so many titles not available within the Consortium. Additionally, since Prospector was such a small portion of circulation, the overall cost of this program was relatively low compared to the massive value of the access it affords patrons. As a longtime supporter of the Boulder Public Library, poor decisions like this make me and my family question if we should continue to strongly support library funding by the City in the future as we have done in the past, repeatedly urging and writing our elected officials to provide additional funding. If Boulder Public Library continues to make such 16 poor decisions that cut patrons off from tens of thousands of titles that had been available to them for years and continues to lose sight of its mission by focusing heavily on pop culture, we simply do not believe the library should get additional funding and could not support a library tax district since the mission of the library seems to have become so overwhelming perverted to focus not on being a library, but instead just another pop culture outlet that caters only to what is popular at the expense of having a full catalog covering all areas. We already have plenty outlets for pop culture. I urge you to please stand for and offer your communities something different and one step in that direction would certainly be to reinstate Prospector access so that your patrons have access to a wide range of materials, not just the latest from the bestsellers' list. Sincerely, John Malenich Boulder, CO __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Blake Fontenay <bfontenay@prairiemountainmedia.com> To: Juana Gomez Mon, Dec 14 at 11:20 AM Hello, Juana. Thanks! I am back at work. After days of lying around or sitting around with nothing to do, it's nice to be back. Take care and have a great week! Blake On Sun, Dec 13, 2020 at 7:02 AM <juana@lawrenceandgomez.com> wrote: Hi, Blake, I am so glad to read this morning that you are recovering. What a journey to the edge of the abyss you had! You are back and writing again, yes? All the best, Juana Gomez ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 17 JANUARY 2021 LIBRARY DIRECTOR’S REPORT Update on library district discussion with City Council A staff team with members from the City Attorney’s Office, City Finance and the Library have tentatively scheduled a study session with City Council on February 23, 2020. Pending the Council Agenda Committee’s input, the team is planning a review of the following topics during the session: • Approaches to governing the library, including the current approach of it as a municipal library or if the council decides on a library district approach. • Approaches and procedures to create a library district. • Strategies to fund libraries, which may include the existing general fund and property tax, an additional dedicated municipal tax earmarked for library services, and funding the library through a library district and associated property tax. • Impacts to the existing budget and delivery of internal services The secondary objective of the study session will be to provide council with an opportunity to ask questions about the material presented, gather their associated requests for additional information, and request council’s direction on which way the city shall proceed in funding and governing the library. This new information may be presented during a future regular meeting during which a public hearing on this matter may take place. Tentative timing on that meeting is April 2021. One Book One Boulder final report Jaime Kopke, Programs, Events, and Outreach Manager, submitted the final report for the 2020 One Book One Boulder Program. It is Attachment A. Update on 2020 Adjustment to Base budget requests City of Boulder 2021 Library Budget Update and Library’s 2020 Second Adjustment to Base (ATB) Request Staff requested several routine adjustments for the second ATB for the 2020 budget totaling $707,325. These adjustments were approved by City Council and appropriated to the library’s 2020 operating and capital budgets accordingly to cover 2020 expenses and encumbrances. Grants (2019 BLF carry over, Warner Trust, Hot Spot program) $101,672 Revenue from Overdrive cost sharing $ 8,653 North Boulder branch library project $597,000 Boulder Library Foundation 2021 grant requests BPL’s grant requests to the Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) are shared with the Library Commission annually as an information item. The total grant request for 2021 is $246,000. This amount will fund several ongoing programs such as the Summer of Discover 2022, STEAM and BLDG61 and several new programs and projects listed below. Hotspot Data Program 18 Through this program, BPL will continue to offer free unlimited data plans through the end of the 2021 school year for the 275+ wireless hotspots that the BLF purchased in April 2020 at the outset of COVID- 19 pandemic. Staff will continue to pursue grants to supplement the BLF’s support for this program and is looking for ways to fund unlimited data plans for an additional ~ 140 hotspots and tablets that were purchased in November 2020 with CARES Act funding received by the City of Boulder. Xeriscape Pollinator Garden This project involves a replanting of the existing Japanese garden space outside the Main Library’s north building. The garden will become a demonstration of xeric pollinator gardening with only native plants. It will be certified as an Audubon Society Habitat Hero Garden and will demonstrate how local homeowners can save water (and money) while also providing vital habitat and forage for native fauna (namely birds). The project funding will cover garden design, plant purchases, installation, maintenance and educational signage. Winter Reading Challenge Launched in 2020, this new program offers another engagement point for patrons during the more isolated winter months. This project was funded in 2020 with remaining Summer of Discovery funds, but will require its own budget line moving forward. The goals of the Winter Reading Challenge are to foster a love of reading for readers of all ages and to promote internal library services such as staff picks and recommended reads. Challenge participation is offered through the Beanstack online platform or using a playing card at the library – there are no programs associated with this challenge. Funding supports the printing of program materials, marketing and prizes. Program Booklet Prior to library closure and city budget cuts, the printed program booklet was the main marketing channel for promoting for library programs. The booklet was available at all library facilities and distributed to points in the community. The booklet promoted all BLF funded library programs, offering a consolidated overview of the breadth of offerings across all age groups and interests. Pivoting to online programs, planning time is often shortened and faces more fluctuations. This project request is for the production of a condensed four-page booklet, which will share general information about groupings of offerings and will direct patrons to the online calendar for further details. Program staff believe strongly that we are missing a key element in helping people discover upcoming programs without this “one-stop shop” overview. This request replaces ongoing marketing funds that were cut from the city budget beginning in 2020. Funding will cover printing, community distribution and translation into Spanish for an online version. Teen Summit 2021 Write-Up for BLF We are so excited to start planning our 2nd annual 2021 Teen Summit! Based on survey feedback from the first summit, our theme next year will be climate justice. If it is safe for us to gather in person, this will be a zero-waste event. Our goals for the 2021 summit as follows: • Increase the number of teens that attend this year by 20 percent. • Read a book together on the theme of climate justice (the same, or related title, to the One Book One Boulder 2021 selection). • Cultivate meaningful conversations between our local teens and leaders and generate two to three sustainable action items. 19 Perhaps we can even hire the inspiring Swedish activist, Greta Thunberg, to speak with us; anything is possible! If you need some inspiration, or want to learn more about the importance of climate justice, here is A Message from the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. JLF Colorado 2021 As for all, 2020 was a year of great learning and ambiguity for JLF Colorado. After learning an onsite event was not possible after many months of uncertainty, JLF Colorado reinvented itself to offer an online experience focused on conversation and connection. The 2020 event offered eight provocative nights of ideas, performances and dialog, and included such heavy hitters as Yann Martel (“Life of Pi”), Emma Donaghue (“Room”), the Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi (CEO of The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at MIT), and Eric Cornell (winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics, a Professor Adjoint at the University of Colorado Boulder, and a Senior Scientist with NIST). 2020 also offered a wide range of authors and thinkers focused especially on climate change, racial equity, the Black Lives Matter movement, and indigenous issues. JLF Colorado continues to be one of the essential ways we connect residents with authors and thinkers from around the world, while fulfilling our mission of “Connecting people, ideas, and information to transform lives and strengthen our community.” As with One Book, JLF brings important issues to a shared table, where folks from many walks of life can connect with each other and a diverse range of ideas and information. 2021 Proposal: • Given the ongoing unknowns of the pandemic, JLF is looking at an all-virtual or hybrid version of an onsite/online JLF Colorado in 2021. • Given the deep connection and correlation between the One Book and Summer of Discovery audiences and themes, all three events series will be cross-promoted heavily in 2021-- with a special focus on promoting the contributions, generosity and positive community-impact of the Boulder Library Foundation. • In addition to promoting and sharing this rich event with our Boulder community through several communications/promotion avenues, BPL plans to conduct the school outreach that we were unable to offer in 2020 due to COVID-19 pandemic. While we can’t likely bring authors and thinkers into Boulder schools in-person in 2021, the online world has become the current destination for connection and learning. We’d like to make the most of this online need, as well as JLF’s newfound experience in producing online events, to connect BVSD and CU with JLF virtually before and during JLF Colorado 2021. • Similarly, if staff bandwidth allows, we would like to again produce some local programs to supplement and localize the global JLF experience. Prospector service changes In November, the Flatirons Library Consortium board voted to discontinue Prospector services for all member libraries. The costs of this service include: the annual service fee, courier transport charges by volume shipped, and Patron Services and Materials Handling staff time to process incoming and outgoing requests. The library, City Council and the Commission have received several letters of concern about the Flatirons Library Consortium’s withdraw from Prospector. A FAQ was prepared for staff to respond to patron questions about discontinuing the service. It is Attachment B. An article giving notice of this was published in the BPL newsletter on Dec. 9, 2020. 20 Below is the article: The Service will be discontinued starting Dec. 31, 2020 We are discontinuing the Prospector interlibrary loan service due to budget cuts and shortfalls stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. Dec. 11, 2020, is the last day to place holds through Prospector, Mobius and Springer eBooks. We will continue to fill holds through Dec. 31. Below is an example of a response to a message sent to City Council: Thank you for taking the time to write to Council about your concerns. All nine Council members have received your email and may respond separately. This is a staff response. I couldn't agree with you more about the value of Prospector. And it is my sincere hope that library funding will be restored sometime in 2021 or 2022 and we can resume the service. But as it stands right now, the Boulder Public Library has had to cut $1.6 million, layoff 60+ employees, reduce our new book purchases by nearly $100 thousand, and close 3 library locations since the economic crisis brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic began. I realize that for some library patrons such as yourself, Prospector opens access to many more materials than are available in the Boulder Public Library and Flatirons Library Consortium. The Flatirons Library Consortium purchases Prospector collectively and the cost to do so is around $52K. Boulder Public Library's share is approximately $16 thousand. Prospector is a valued service - not only because it expands access to materials, but also so that our staff can tell library patrons they can get anything they want from anywhere. I know that from a service point of view, that is priceless. However, Prospector also only represents a very small portion of our circulation [less than 1%] and costs significantly more than many other services the library offers. I assure you we did not cut the service without much consideration and multiple attempts to negotiate reduced pricing with Prospector. Most of our library vendors offered deep discounts to libraries at this time, as they realize that libraries are good customers and are going through significant financial difficulties right now. Unfortunately, Prospector was not able to make such an offer. It was only after all these considerations and others that we made the difficult decision to cut Prospector for 2021. I am more than happy to discuss this with you further, but as it stands - even as funds are partially or gradually restored - I am not sure it would be prudent of the library to spend so much on Prospector at the same time that we are having to let employees go and close branches. As a steward of taxpayer funding we need to examine all services to see what best serves the most members of our community as possible. I hope you understand that perspective. I assure you we will be back [with Prospector] when we recover from this current crisis and this unfortunate city-wide revenue shortfall and extensive reductions in the library budget. Sincerely, David Farnan Library & Arts Director 21 North Boulder branch library update There was a minor delay with final review of the technical documents by Planning and Development Services. Issuance of the Request for Bids was delayed until January 2021. Update on current library services • No changes to service levels have been made in the past month. • The first week of the Winter Reading Challenge shows more than 600 sign ups, mostly adults! • After receiving several patron comments in past months, staff has been working hard to maintain an adequate selection of materials on the Main Library Juvenile Staff Picks Display! Laura Hankins, Collection Development Manager, reports that are now enough items assigned to the display to keep it full for browsing. More than 1000 items are assigned to that location as of now and more will be assigned there if needed. 22 Overview The 2020 One Book One Boulder series featured the book, “So You Want to Talk About Race” by Ijeoma Oluo. The program series ran from late July through early November, 2020. The goal of the One Book One Boulder series was to bring Boulder together through the shared experience of reading and having dialogue around the same book. Online Transition When planning began for the 2020 One Book, One Boulder series, the general assumption was that program offerings would take place in person. In early March 2020, plans were underway for an in-person program launch in early summer. The arrival of the pandemic forced staff to re- examine the program in its entirety and re-imagine its design and implementation. After pausing planning due to immediate library operation adjustments - including the physical closure of the buildings, a move to a remote work environment, and staff furloughs and/or layoffs, the library programs team reconvened planning in early June 2020. Staff pivoted quickly to learn new platforms for online program delivery and began to create new happenings that would offer meaning and connection in the virtual world. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 23 1. Racismo y Movimientos Antirracistas en América Latina: Diálogos en Comunidad panel in Spanish. Overall, the shift to online offerings had a number of positive impacts. These included expanding the reach of potential audience, allowing for elements of accessibility such as closed captioning and Spanish translation to be easily embedded, and making content accessible at any time (i.e. expanding the after-life of a program). A variety of programs were offered, which allowed for scaffolded levels of participation that may not occur at an in-person happening. Participants could not only join interactive sessions, they could also comment or engage in chats, post thoughts/ideas prior to and after programs, or be a passive viewer/participant. Having the final author event take place virtually also created cost savings by eliminating travel costs, event set-up/rental expenses, and reducing the author’s speaking fee. Circulation The Foundation generously purchased 200 physical copies of the book prior to the pandemic, in anticipation of doing an in-person giveaway at program launch. After the transition to an online offering, it was decided the best use of those copies would be to add them to the library’s collection to expand the resource to as many patrons as possible. This purchase allowed hold numbers for the physical book to stay low during the duration of the program. The library purchased additional ebook copies and a simultaneous use license for the audiobook, allowing for unlimited check outs and no holds on the latter. At 1,512 check outs, audiobooks were by far the most popular form of accessing the title. As part of a promotion related to evaluation (see section below) the Foundation purchased 100 copies of the ebook, which were given away to survey respondents - not related to library collections. Circulation Statistics: May 1 – November 5, 2020 • Physical books = 538 checkouts • Book in a bag kit = 8 books in each set, two sets total (3 and 2 checkouts x 8 copies =40) 40 books checked out • Physical audiobook: 17 checkouts, 6 copies Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 24 • OverDrive audiobook: 1521 checkouts (Simultaneous access copy added at OBOB launch allowed patrons on demand access) OverDrive eBook: 156 checkouts 27 copies purchased, simultaneous use not available • Hoopla audiobook: 274 checkouts (eBook not in Hoopla; simultaneous use, but patron limited by 4 titles per month and budget cap) Total = 2,546 check outs Programs The heart of the One Book One Boulder series were the program offerings. Envisioned as a way to bring people together around the collective experience of reading and discussing the same book, programs were the centerpiece for activating dialogue and inspiring action around the topic of racial equity. In planning programs, the team had a goal of designing offerings that would reach community members of all ages and interests - creating the opportunity for a “family dinner moment” where everyone had had an opportunity to engage with the content. Programs were intentionally offered in a variety of program formats, from intimate Zoom workshops and broader community book discussions, to performances and Storytimes. Attendance in One Book One Boulder programs (live and playbacks combined) equaled 4,823 participants. A full listing of programs, with audience and format are listed in Appendix A. 2. Left: Janet Damon leading a Storytime. Right: Online book discussion with Congressman Joe Neguse and Boulder City Council member Junie Joseph. Hosted by Stephen Brackett. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 25 3. Spirit of Grace a capella choir performing during MOTUS Theater's JustUs: Stories from the Frontlines of the Criminal Justice System Despite a very condensed planning timeline, library staff were intentional in reaching out to a diverse representation of community presenters to lead programs. Almost all One Book One Boulder programs were created in collaboration with, and led by, BIPOC presenters. Representation, and creating a platform for all voices, were cornerstones of planning. The planning team also took care in designing program norms for civil dialogue which were shared at the start of every One Book One Boulder program. In total over twenty programs took place from late July through mid-November 2020. The capstone program was a live virtual author talk with the author Ijeoma Oluo. Over 1,100 people participated in the live program, streamed to both Facebook and YouTube. The event featured a talk by the author as well as moderated community Q&A. During the program, 386 chat messages were shared. The program has had over 800 views after the event. Accessibility was an important feature of this offering. The program was available with Spanish translation (live in Facebook), had embedded ASL interpreters and has since had the recording translated into Spanish. Marketing, Communications and Outreach Marketing and communications for the One Book One Boulder series was truly a team effort between the Foundation and library staff. With limited dedicated staff resources, the two combined energies to maximize reach and budget. Tactics for paid marketing included an ad campaign in the Daily Camera, radio ads on KGNU, a month-long ad in Spotify and the distribution of printed materials. Expenses for all of the above can be seen in Appendix B: Budget. The library posted banners at the entrances of open facilities and also utilized the captive audience of holds carryout packages to distribute Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 26 English/Spanish program bookmarks and invitational postcards for the program kickoff in July. The Spotify campaign was a new tactic for the library, having tried it during Summer of Discovery with success. A 30 second ad ran to targeted demographics of Spotify users from October 5-November 5. While mainly an auditory plug, the ad also had an image with a click through to the author talk registration. In one month, the ad received 72,924 impressions with 73 click-throughs for a.10% CTR. It is unknown how many users heard the ad and went to the library site independently. A CTR of .10% is considered slightly higher than advertising industry standards. The library and Foundation utilized standard communications tactics for the One Book One Boulder program. These methods included multiple press releases (resulting in several interviews), inclusion in library and Foundation e-newsletters, email invitations, inclusion in broader city communications, partner promotion and a social media campaign. A note of distinction is that staff began to experiment with new ways of utilizing social media to create increased engagement. Tactics included having program presenters create original content for library channels, designing more interactive posts with Q&A and video, taking polls, and giveaways. The social media giveaways (a package of five books – two winners in Facebook and Instagram each) drew high responses. There were over fifty comments/entries and numerous shares/engagement points. Outreach was limited in capacity by pandemic related restrictions and most outreach was in the form of smaller, personal initiatives. At the beginning of the program, posters were made in English and Spanish and given out to the business community and posted around town. Sixty copies of the book were held for outreach and partner distribution. Around twenty of these copies were given to local teens, others were sent to program presenters and twenty were distributed to the community in the form of social media giveaways. Some grassroots outreach was done by city staff members to community connectors. Personalized outreach was done to the CU community through an expanded partnership with the University. This included listings in CU newsletters and posters placed in all residential facilities. The University also has selected “So You Want to Talk About Race” as the campus One Read book, which will occur in the Spring of 2021. Library and University staff had regular meeting throughout the series and will continue to meet into 2021 to ensure resources developed as part of the library’s series can be utilized for the campus One Read program. In future years, with an expanded planning window, further emphasis will be given to creating outreach partnerships with local organizations. Evaluation Early on in the revised program planning window, the library and Foundation agreed on the critical need for a robust evaluation element. As the first year of the program, it was important to collect baseline data for future years and capture quality feedback to be used in future promotions and donor solicitations. Due to limited staff experience and capacity, a professional evaluation team from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science was hired to design and implement evaluation for One Book One Boulder. A complete evaluation report can be found in Appendix C. Staff will be using this document to guide decision making and ideation for the 2021 program. Lessons and Plans for 2021 The One Book One Boulder series gave staff a concrete and empowering project to work on during a time of major changes and disruptions. Staff went above and beyond creating a robust Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 27 suite of program offerings and services. As seen in the evaluation, feedback for this breadth of programs was extremely positive. Looking ahead, the team will focus on incorporating a variety of formats for programs in 2021, though the number of programs will decrease. Throughout this series the library faced both staffing cuts and shifts in work duties. With these impacts likely lasting deep into 2021, the team will adjust accordingly. Looking ahead, and drawing from the evaluation report, the team will also focus on: 1) Increasing grassroots partnerships in the form of activating book clubs and community organizations. In 2020 there was some evidence of community networks embracing the program and staff will work to intentionally grow this area in 2021. Hopefully some challenges related to the pandemic will have past and small in-person gatherings can be possible again by fall (or held outdoors). 2) Bringing a more localized lens into programs. The topic of racial equity is part of a national and a local conversation. The evaluation report showed that one area to strengthen is having dialogue specific to local issues, i.e. Boulder zoning laws, housing etc. People were looking for tangible next steps they could take on a community level. 3) Continue offering a hybrid suite of programs. While staff hope to be able to offer some in-person offerings by next fall, the program will continue to offer some programs online. As noted above, there are many advantages to online offerings and the final author talk will remain a virtual event. Staff will also continue to offer a variety of program formats, hopefully with the addition of elements such as an exhibition in the Canyon Gallery. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 28 Appendix A: Program Offerings Program Title Date Audience Focus Type Format Live Attendance Playback Attendance (as of 12/23) OBOB Kickoff Event 7/29 Adults Presentation/ performance Streamyard 194 289 OBOB Kickoff event (en español) recorded in Spanish after production 8/19 posted Adults Presentation/ performance YouTube NA 33 Her Flowers: Anti-racist Workshop for Female- Identifying Teens 8/14 Teens Workshop Zoom 4 NA "So You Want To Talk About Race" with Congressman Neguse, Junie Joseph, and Stephen Brackett 8/17 Adults Book discussion Streamyard 350 275 Anti-oppression 101 with Assétou Xango 9/1 Adults Workshop Zoom 15 NA One Book One Boulder All Ages Storytime 9/8 Children Storytime YouTube 9 79 "So You Want to Talk About Race" with Junie Joseph, Mary Young, and Stephen Brackett 9/11 Adults Book discussion Streamyard 138 134 Talking About Race with Children: Picture Books as Conversation Starters 9/16 Adults Workshop Zoom, posted to YouTube 21 84 Stories from our Undocumented Neighbors with Motus Theater’s ‘UndocuMonologues’ 9/17 Adults Performance Partner YouTube broadcast 103 86 One Book One Boulder Storytime with Janet Damon: Roots of Rap 9/19 Children Storytime Streamyard 12 98 Conversations with the Self with Assétou Xango 9/24 Adults Workshop Zoom 29 NA Special Guest and Author Tiffany Jewell: The History We Carry With Us 9/30 Teens Workshop Zoom 9 NA Special Guest Author Tiffany Jewell: This Book is Anti- Racist 10/3 Tweens Workshop Zoom 4 NA Conversations in Community with Assétou Xango 10/6 Adults Workshop Zoom 25 NA Racismo y movimientos antirracistas en América Latina, diálogos en comunidad 10/12 Adults (presented in Spanish) Presentation and panel Streamyard 74 124 Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 29 Body, Trauma, Scarcity with Assétou Xango 10/13 Adults Workshop Zoom 13 NA Stories from the Frontlines of the Criminal Justice System with Motus Theater’s ‘JustUs’ 10/15 Adults Performance Partner YouTube broadcast 113 77 BILINGUAL: Sus Flores para Madres E hijas/ Her Flowers for Mothers and Daughters 10/24 Teens Workshop Zoom 4 NA A Deeper Dive into Examining Questions from "So You Want to Talk About Race" with Nikki McCord 10/27 Adults Workshop Streamyard 57 125 The Liberation Soundtrack: "So You Want to Talk About Race" with CU Boulder 10/29 Adults Book discussion/ performance Streamyard 80 156 Author Talk with Ijeoma Oluo 11/5 Adults Author Talk and Q&A Streamyard 1143 820 Storytime with Stephen Brackett 11/14 posted Children Storytime YouTube recording NA 46 Total 2397 2426 Program attendance total (live and playbacks combined): 4823 Notes on Statistics:  Format is the production platform. In some instances Zoom events were recorded and archived and other times they were not for privacy purposes. A Streamyard program means it was broadcast to YouTube and Facebook simultaneously and is automatically archived and available for later viewing.  Live attendance is the combined total of the unique viewers in all production platforms.  Recorded attendance is measured as the total number of views for the calendar year. Note that this report was generated 12/23/20 and results in a partial look at final reported statistics. Recorded attendance is the total number of YouTube views, and Facebook views greater than one minute.  Live and playback attendance statistics are separate counts and do not overlap. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 30 Appendix B: Budget The 2020 budget line for One Book One Boulder was $20,000. The top table shows how those funds were spent. Table 2 shows additional funds that were spent from other BLF and city sources to cover program expenses. Moving forward the Foundation request for 2021 was increased to reflect actual program needs. The total expenses in 2020 were $35,401. Table 1: One Book One Boulder Budget Line Expenses Item Cost Kick-off event Assetou Xango fee $1,500.00 Programs Stephen Brackett fee ($500/per program) $1,500.00 CU Student event ($500/per; 3 students) $1,500.00 Nikki McCord fee $500.00 Assetou Xango fee (four workshops @ $500) $2,000.00 Author event 11/5 Ijeoma Oluo speaker fee $8,000.00 Assetou Xango fee $500.00 Collections support - extra copies for BiBs $254.75 Overdrive SU license $650.00 Evaluation Evaluation DMNS (another $3500 to come directly from BLF) $3,500.00 Total Spent $19,904.75 Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 31 Table 2: One Book One Boulder Expenses and Budgets Used Item Cost Budget Used Staff Workshops Assetou Xango fee (two staff discussion sessions $500/workshop) $1,000 Prof Development Programs MOTUS: Undocumonologues $3,000 MainPrg MOTUS: JustUs $3,000 MainPrg Spanish Language panel $1,545 MainPrg Teen and Tween Workshops by Tiffany Jewell $2,000 Youth and Teen Teen Workshop for Female- Identifying Teens $200 Teen Teen Workshop for Spanish speaking mothers and daughters $300 Teen Parents/Caregiver Workshop $350 Youth Storytime Stephen Brackett $80 Youth and Teen Marketing ($4021) KGNU ads $250 Marketing Print materials $2,055 Marketing Banners $375 Marketing Spotify subscription $11 Marketing Spotify ad total $1,000 Marketing Mailing social media giveaways $30 Marketing Estimate of social media boosts $300 Marketing TOTAL $15,496 Appendix C: See attached report from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 32 2020 ONE BOOK ONE BOULDER FINDINGS FROM THE FIRST ANNUAL ONE BOOK, ONE BOULDER SERIES ON SO YOU WANT TO TALK ABOUT RACE Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 33 2|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 METHODOLOGY In July 2020, the Boulder Public Library and the Boulder Library Foundation partnered with the Community Research & Engagement Strategies team at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science to assess the impacts of the Library’s first annual One Book, One Boulder series. The selection for 2020 was So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo. This study was designed with a three method approach to create a complete picture of the participant experience as well as assess any attitudinal or behavioral changes participants reported based on the content of the series. Two surveys were conducted –one that assessed visitor experience with various programs in the series and a second assessed the impact of the book itself. Both surveys looked at respondent demographics, plans to participate in the series, awareness of the Boulder Library Foundation, and perceptions of racism. The book survey also explored how So You Want to Talk About Race impacted understanding of systemic racism, particularly in the Boulder community and preparedness to address racism at the local level. The program survey tracked similar learnings and also examined participant experience with the format of each event. Both surveys were first sent in mid -August and remained open until the end of the series. They were closed on November 16 th. Simultaneously, a small group of 9 people were asked to participate in the series at a deeper level by participating in 3 programs and reading or listening to the book. Group members completed video diaries after each event – specifically looking at how the programs impacted their understanding of systemic racism and their preparedness to tackle some of these issues. A focus group was conducted with participants to further discuss their experience with the series. This additional, deep qualitative information helps give life and context to the quantitative and qualitative findings of both surveys. The group began their participation on August 21st and the final focus group was held on November 14th. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 34 3|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 KEY FINDINGS Between August and November 2020, 587 community members provided at least a partial response to surveys that were used to gain general insights from a broad group of participants and 9 people participated in focus groups and video diaries aimed at investigating the deeper, personal impacts of the program. This feedback combined creates a complete picture of the experience of One Book, One Boulder participants. Aligned with the goals of this series, most respondents (80%) indicated that they decided to participate in the series for personal growth and just over half (55%) also wanted to learn tools to engage in conversations around systemic racism. The program achieved these outcomes –with most respondents reporting that they felt better prepared to have conversations about racial equity (73%), that they learned new skills or tools (72%), that they better understood where to look for resources around racial equity (64%), and knew more about what actions they can take to advance equity (63%). Overall, participants had a positive experience with the series and are excited to participate again in the future. Participants are well connected with the Boulder Public Library. Most participants heard about the series through a library communication (71%) including newsletters, social media, postcards, and through the website. This shows great potential for a new audience of donors that is actively engaged with the library, but is not currently supporting the Boulder Library Foundation. The library had a profound impact on it’s community by sponsoring this series at an organizational level. The series as a whole created a deeper understanding of systemic racism in Boulder and inspired people to take action in their community around this topic. In the words of one community member, “I was given permission not to feel shame, but to educate myself and plan what I can do in the future to break down barriers.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 35 4|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 TABLE OF CONTENTS 05 In July 2020, the Boulder Public Library and the Boulder Library Foundation partnered with the Community Research & Engagement Strategies team at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science to assess the impacts of the Library’s first annual One Book, One Boulder series. 587 community members provided at least a partial response to the surveys associated with the series and 9 people participated in video diaries and a small group discussion. The surveys were fielded between August and November 2020 and response counts by survey collector can be found in Appendix A. 11 36 39 49PagePagePagePagePage Motivation & Participation Impacts & Takeaways Boulder Library Foundation Respondent demographics Appendices & Sources Within this report click here to come back to the Table of Contents Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 36 MOTIVATIONS & PARTICIPATION Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 37 6|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 MOTIVATION FOR PARTICIPATION Is there a specific reason you decided to participate in One Book, One Boulder? (Select all that apply) (n=556) Respondents could select all that apply so percentages sum to greater than 100%. When asked why they decided to participate in One Book, One Boulder, most respondents (80%) selected personal growth and just over half (55%) also wanted to learn tools to engage in conversations around systemic racism. 9% 11% 25% 31% 55% 80% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% Another reason (please describe) I am participating with a group of friends or family members Professional growth or development I've been meaning to read/listen to the selected book, So You Want to Talk About Race I want to learn language and tools to engage in a local or national conversation around systemic racism Personal growth or development Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 38 7|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PARTICIPATION IN ONE BOOK ONE BOULDER How are you planning to participate in the One Book, One Boulder series? (Select all that apply) (n=567)Respondents could select all that apply so percentages sum to greater than 100%. Respondents were asked how they plan to participate in the One Book, One Boulder series.Just over one third of respondents were participating in library programs related to the series and 1 in 4 were reading So You Want to Talk About Race on their own. Many of those who selected “other” described a specific event they were hosting, their work or school was hosting, or they were attending out in the community. Some respondents also wrote in that they were not aware of the program and weren’t sure how they would participate at this time. 5% 7% 12% 18% 27% 36% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% I have not participated/am not planning to participate in One Book, One Boulder I participated/am participating in events hosted by friends or family members related to the series Other I read/am reading or listened/am listening to the book with a group of friends and family I read/am reading or listened/am listening to the book on my own I participated/am participating in library programs related to the series Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 39 8|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PARTICIPATION IN PROGRAMS How many other One Book, One Boulder programs have you participated in? Respondents who completed surveys after events they attended were asked if they had attended other events in the series. Looking at this data through the lens of only “First Time Participants,” the new audiences vs repeat program participants at each event can be measured. Many events in the series had higher first time participation. There were three events where more than half of respondents were repeat program attendees –A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord, Picture Books as Conversation Starters, and the Teen Event. 40% 43% 56% 62% 73% 75% 79% 100% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% One Book One Boulder Teen Event Picture Books as Conversation Starters A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord MOTUS Theatre Events Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Kick Off "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder n 2 113 12 66 13 27 7 5 1 Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 40 9|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 ONE BOOK ONE BOULDER MARKETING How did you hear about One Book, One Boulder? (n=562) Respondents from all surveys completed a question asking how they heard about One Book, One Boulder. Nearly half of respondents indicated they heard about the series from the Library newsletter. Those who elected to write in a response also often noted an email from the Library. Other things that respondents wrote in included hearing about the series from work or school, on the radio, from an email from an event partner/speaker, social media ads or posts, or an email from another community organization. 3% 3% 5% 5% 11% 12% 16% 45% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% Daily Camera Boulder Library Foundation website or social media Boulder Public Library social media channel I received a postcard/bookmark from the library It was recommended to me Other (please describe) Boulder Public Library website Boulder Public Library newsletter Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 41 10|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 IJEOMA OLUO AUTHOR TALK MARKETING How did you hear about this book talk with Ijeoma Oluo? (n=24) Respondents from a dedicated survey sent after the Author Talk with Ijeoma Oluo completed a question asking how they heard about that event specifically, Eight of the 24 respondents elected to write in a response. Responses were similar to the write ins on the previous question about the series with two people coming from Facebook, four hearing from their work or school, one who found it during some online book research, and one who heard from another community organization, the Boulder Arts Alliance. 4% 4% 4% 8% 13% 13% 21% 33% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% Boulder Library Foundation website or social media Boulder Public Library social media channel Spotify Daily Camera Boulder Public Library website It was recommended to me Boulder Public Library newsletter Other (please describe) Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 42 IMPACTS & TAKEAWAYS Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 43 12|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PRIOR UNDERSTANDING OF RACISM The One Book, One Boulder selection for 2020 is So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo. This book discusses issues of systemic racism in American society. When thinking about the topic of systemic racism specifically, which of these statements best describes you currently. (n=476, this question on allyship was only asked of white participants) To get a sense of where participants were in their current understanding of systemic racism prior to participating in One Book, One Boulder, we asked them to select an option from the list below or self-describe their experience. When presented, “allyship” was defined as the process of building relationships based on trust, consistency, and accountability with marginalized individuals and/or groups of people and "anti-racism" as the active practice of opposing racism and promoting racial tolerance. One in three respondents selected that they had begun to take action in their every day lives based on their understanding of systemic racism and an additional third of respondents had thought about how systemic racism applies to their life. 2% 3% 6% 26% 31% 33% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% I am new to the topic of systemic racism Other (please describe) I have fully integrated allyship and antiracist practices into my everyday life I am aware of and understand that society privileges some people over others through rules, regulations, institutions, and social systems I understand systemic racism and have thought about how it applies to my life and the people I associate with I understand systemic racism and have begun to take action where I see it in my everyday life Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 44 13|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PROGRAM & BOOK LEARNINGS Please react to the following statements on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After attending this program, I feel like I... (Program Survey) Please react to the following statements on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After reading this book, I feel like I... (Book Survey) Respondents to both the book survey and program survey (n=332) were asked to rate three statements about their feelings after attending their program or finishing the book on a scale of Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree. Nearly 3 in 4 respondents felt better prepared to have conversations about racial equity after attending their program. Nearly 2 in 3 respondents understood where to look for resources around racial equity and knew more about what actions they can take to advance equity. A breakdown of each statement by survey collector is shown on the following pages (page 13-17.) 37% 35% 28% 50% 42% 57% 13% 22% 15% 63% 64% 72% know more about what steps/actions I can take to advance racial equity understand where and how to find information/resources to learn more about racial equity issues have gained tools and language, as well as a better understanding of how to be an ally to Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) in my community. COMBINEDLess than Agree Agree Strongly Agree After attending this program/reading this book, I feel like I... 37% 35% 28% 27% 50% 42% 57% 54% 13% 22% 15% 19% 63% 64% 72% 73% know more about what steps/actions I can take to advance racial equity understand where and how to find information/resources to learn more about racial equity issues have gained tools and language, as well as a better understanding of how to be an ally to Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) in my community. am better prepared to have open dialogue about race and racial equity issues Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 45 14|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 DIALOGUES ABOUT EQUITY Please react to the following statements on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After attending this program/reading this book, I feel like I...am better prepared to have open dialogue about race and racial equity issues Overall, 73% agree or strongly agree that after reading the book or attending a program, they are better prepared for open dialogue about race and racial equity.Those who completed the book survey reported levels of agreement with this statement that were slightly lower than the average (70%). PROGRAM & BOOK LEARNINGS BY SURVEY COLLECTOR Very Important Extremely Important 20% 50% 45% 48% 43% 64% 75% 62% 54% 40% 10% 25% 22% 29% 16% 17% 31% 19% 60% 60% 70% 70% 72% 80% 92% 93% 100% 100% 73% 5 68 85 27 7 112 12 13 1 2 332 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%120% Picture Books as Conversation Starters One Book One Boulder Kick Off Book Survey MOTUS Theatre Events A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Teen Event The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder ALL RESPONDENTS Agree Strongly Agree COMBINED n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 46 15|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PREPARED FOR ALLYSHIP Please react to the following statement on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After attending this program/reading this book, I feel like I have gained tools and language, as well as a better understanding of how to be an ally to Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) in my community. Overall, 72% agree or strongly agree that after reading the book or attending a program, they have gained tools, language, and a better understanding of how to be an ally to BIPOC in their community.Those who completed the book survey reported the same level of agreement with this statement (73%). The teen event is missing from this chart due to a lack of responses. Very Important Extremely Important 47% 40% 50% 55% 62% 67% 63% 69% 57% 7% 20% 17% 18% 15% 11% 17% 15% 54% 60% 67% 73% 77% 78% 80% 100% 100% 72% 58 5 6 77 94 9 24 13 1 287 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%120% One Book One Boulder Kick Off Picture Books as Conversation Starters A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Book Survey "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young MOTUS Theatre Events Anti Oppression 101 The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder ALL RESPONDENTS Agree Strongly Agree COMBINED n PROGRAM & BOOK LEARNINGS BY SURVEY COLLECTOR Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 47 16|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 WHERE TO FIND RESOURCES Please react to the following statements on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After attending this program/reading this book, I feel like I...understand where and how to find information/resources to learn more about racial equity issues Overall, 64% agree or strongly agree that after reading the book or attending a program, they know where and how to find information or resources about racial equity.Those who completed the book survey reported less agreement with this statement (57%). PROGRAM & BOOK LEARNINGS BY SURVEY COLLECTOR Very Important Extremely Important 37% 14% 35% 40% 58% 50% 41% 54% 50% 42% 10% 43% 22% 20% 8% 24% 37% 38% 22% 47% 57% 57% 60% 66% 74% 78% 92% 100% 100% 64% 68 7 85 5 12 112 27 13 1 2 332 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%120% One Book One Boulder Kick Off A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Book Survey Picture Books as Conversation Starters "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo MOTUS Theatre Events Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Teen Event The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder ALL RESPONDENTS Agree Strongly Agree COMBINED n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 48 17|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 ACTIONS RELATED TO EQUITY Please react to the following statements on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After attending this program/reading the book, I feel like I...know more about what steps/actions I can take to advance racial equity Overall, 63% agree or strongly agree that after reading the book or attending a program, they know more about what actions they can take to advance racial equity.Those who completed the book survey reported levels of agreement with this statement that were slightly higher than the average (67%). PROGRAM & BOOK LEARNINGS BY SURVEY COLLECTOR Very Important Extremely Important 0% 49% 29% 54% 40% 46% 38% 48% 75% 50% 50% 6% 29% 6% 20% 21% 31% 22% 13% 50% 55% 58% 60% 60% 67% 69% 70% 75% 100% 63% 2 68 7 112 5 84 13 27 12 1 331 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%120% The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder One Book One Boulder Kick Off A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo Picture Books as Conversation Starters Book Survey Anti Oppression 101 MOTUS Theatre Events "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young One Book One Boulder Teen Event ALL RESPONDENTS Agree Strongly Agree COMBINED n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 49 18|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PROGRAM LEARNINGS Please react to the following statements on a scale of strongly disagree to strongly agree. After attending this program, I feel like I... understand more about how systemic racism manifests in Boulder and what is being done on a community level to advance racial equity Those who responded to the program survey only were asked to rate their level of agreement with one additional statement related to their community. Just under half of all program participants felt that their experience helped them understand more about how racism manifests in Boulder and what’s being done on a community level to advance racial equity. Very Important Extremely Important 0% 0% 8% 34% 33% 0% 50% 48% 33% 0% 14% 23% 7% 10% 50% 8% 22% 11% 0% 14% 31% 41% 43% 50% 58% 70% 100% 44% 5 7 13 67 110 2 12 27 1 244 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%120% Picture Books as Conversation Starters A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Kick Off "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young MOTUS Theatre Events One Book One Boulder Teen Event ALL RESPONDENTS Agree Strongly Agree COMBINED n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 50 19|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 OVERALL PROGRAM EXPERIENCE Please rate your overall experience at this One Book, One Boulder program: Program participants were asked to describe their experience using the Overall Experience Rating. The majority of program respondents (76%) that attended programs rated their experience at the program as Excellent or Outstanding. 47% 43% 20% 17% 17% 12% 8% 25% 37% 43% 44% 75% 38% 31% 50% 100% 42% 16% 14% 80% 39% 8% 50% 62% 50% 0% 34% 53% 57% 80% 83% 83% 88% 93% 100% 100% 76% One Book One Boulder Kick Off A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Picture Books as Conversation Starters "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Oluo "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young MOTUS Theatre Events Anti Oppression 101 The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder One Book One Boulder Teen Event ALL RESPONDENTS ExcellentLess than Excellent Outstanding COMBINED n 247 2 1 13 26 12 113 5 7 68 Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 51 20|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 IN THEIR OWN WORDS –BOOK SURVEY Those who had finished reading So You Want to Talk About Race at the time they took the Book Survey were asked to reflect on their experience in Boulder and the barriers to BIPOC people in their community. Responses included many of the systemic issues discussed in the book including lack of representation, the school to prison pipeline, microaggressions, access, home prices, neighborhood segregation, hiring policies or culture, lack of awareness or action around privilege, lack of diversity, among other issues. Reflecting on how the book selection relates to your experience in Boulder, please respond to the following prompt: In my own community today, I feel that the major barriers to success for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BlPOC) are...(Open-ended comments) “Our implicit bias, our unwillingness to face our collective history, and our unwillingness to give up our privilege. We need to be tellers of truth and willing to acknowledge our ugly history.” “School to prison pipeline -especially for those with disabilities who experience trauma from restraint and seclusion at school. Microaggressions and the prevalent idea that this area "is not diverse." Also denial that there is any racism, even if BIPOC have experienced it first hand.” “Hiring practices within local businesses, segregation of housing, Opportunities for higher education at a reasonable cost.“ “Income and education inequalities. People of color often have been systematically put into areas of high poverty and low performing schools. These schools do not have the resources they need to stop the poverty cycle. I'd like to learn more about it.” “1. Unawareness that a problem even exists 2. Lack of understanding of systemic injustice 3. Difficulty in moving out of my comfort zone of beliefs and biases.” “People are unwilling to admit their own biases and therefore they do not fully understand that they are a part of the problem regarding racial inequity. And, they must also come to realize that they absolutely are a part of the solution!!” “Our neighborhoods are segregated. The open space/green belt was such a marvelous idea for preserving natural lands around Boulder, but it perpetuated a city that did not have equal housing opportunities. While much work has been done to transform our community, there is so much more to do. There are significant inequities in education and employment opportunities that need to be acknowledged and addressed.” “Representation, opportunities, feeling welcome/ successful & supported in such a predominantly white, affluent area.” “Lack of empathy and understanding Financial disparity Fear of police/safety issues.“ Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 52 21|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 “Contacting the school board about equity in education.” –One Book,One Boulder Kick Off participant “Journaling for self-reflection about my own internalized racism.” -Anti Oppression 101 participant “How to tell people in your life that talking about race openly will make you feel safer rather than the opposite.” –So You Want To Talk About Race with Ijeoma Oluo participant “Participate in public testimony on local bills.” –MOTUS Theatre Events participant “Find strength in your identities and assume responsibility for them in this moment.” –So You Want to Talk About Race with Junie Joseph and Mary Young participant “Role playing to prepare for dealing with racism” –A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord participant “Just looking at and discussing illustrations can open up conversations about race.” –Picture Books as Conversation Starters participant IN THEIR OWN WORDS – PROGRAM SURVEY Survey participants were asked to describe three new ideas or tools they took away after participating in their program. Of the 263 program participants, 163 people wrote in at least one new thought or tool. Responses varied from concrete actions, examples of which can be seen on this page, as well as more general revelations, examples of which can be seen on the next page. A consistent theme of creating awareness and how that leads to action can be seen across the responses. Please describe up to three new ideas or tools that you learned in this program or workshop. (Open-ended comments) (n=163) Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 53 22|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 IN THEIR OWN WORDS – PROGRAM SURVEY Survey participants were asked to describe three new ideas or tools they took away after participating in their program. Of the 263 program participants, 163 people wrote in at least one new thought or tool. Responses varied from concrete actions, examples of which can be on the previous page, as well as more general revelations, examples of which can be seen on this page. A consistent theme of creating awareness and how that leads to action can be seen across the responses. Please describe up to three new ideas or tools that you learned in this program or workshop. (Open-ended comments) (n=163) “How hard it is to be BIPOC in liberal communities like Boulder.” –So You Want To Talk About Race with Ijeoma Oluo participant “Not so much about how to help, but rather what kind of access is required.”–So You Want to Talk About Race with Junie Joseph and Mary Young participant “Focus on changing institutions, not trying to change hearts or minds.” –A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord participant “BIPOC people need more support at CU.” The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder participant “It is important to talk about race with our young children. Instead of hoping our children won't notice different skin colors, we should instead welcome opportunities to teach our children to honor and appreciate the richness of experience we bring collectively through our diversity. We also want our children to be compassionate, empathic and vocal upstanders to any instances of injustice, versus pretending we don't see it happening.” –Picture Books as Conversation Starters participant Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 54 23|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 VIDEO DIARY PARTICIPANTS To provide a deep qualitative lens to this research, the team recruited nine Boulder County community members to participate in the series on a deeper level. The recruitment process entailed completing a survey with basic demographic information and once selected, they received a copy of the book, So You Want to Talk About Race. They completed five video diaries during their participation and then joined a 90 minute focus group on November 13th or 14th. Participants were compensated $100 in the form of a gift card to Downtown Boulder. The five video diaries were used to assess three things –motivations for participating in One Book, One Boulder, program experience, and finally, their experience with the book. Responses to these diaries were also used to inform and craft the final focus group questions. The findings of this deep, qualitative research is detailed on the following pages by themes that came up in the focus groups, the video diaries, or both. They also reinforce some of the themes present in the open ended responses to both the program and book surveys. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 55 24|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 MOTIVATIONS FOR PARTICIPATING IN ONE BOOK ONE BOULDER Exploring Systemic Racism | A major driver for participants was having the opportunity explore this topic and how it impacts their community and their lives. “I signed up for the one book one Boulder series because I'm very concerned about the racism the overt and covert racism that affects the society in this country. I believe that I need to participate constructively and trying to find remedies and play a part to reduce the racism in Boulder and in the country, I believe it's a pandemic in the country.” “I seek out opportunities to talk about race and it's difficult to find forums to do this in Boulder because this series is government-sanctioned through the Boulder Public Library in the city of Boulder I wanted to support it and tell my friends who might not otherwise engage in these conversations to join me.” Building Community | Participants mentioned the desire to dig into this subject with others. “I was craving a community of people with whom to have this conversation and then I just happen to stumble across the one book one Boulder initiative and wow to be able to have these shared conversations with people in my own community to be able to listen and learn from each other people who have a passion and a desire for our community to thrive and to heal.” “So I signed up for this series because I was interested in having a place to be able to share some dialogue with other folks in my community. I know that sometimes reading or learning on your own can be really isolating and you don't have the chance to really think or discuss some of what you're learning and you can learn so much more when you have the opportunity to get their voices and other input and so that was really appealing to me.” Personal Growth | Participants wanted to have the hard conversations and find tools to do the work. “I would like to be able to discuss racism more constructively with them and hopefully discover measures that I can take and ideas that I can teach my children and my grandchild that will help to alleviate the racism in the United States.” “Sadly, I have to say I have been astounded and mortified by what I learned in regard to racism. I have always prided myself on deeply held values related to equity and inclusiveness and so was astonished by how much I had to learn. I actually felt shame.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 56 25|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 ONE BOOK ONE BOULDER COMPARED TO OTHER EXPERIENCES Time for Reflection | Participants in this series were instructed to respond to a few questions via video diary after each program. That time for reflection allowed them to process what they read and learned. The full text of the questions can be found in Appendix C. “The questions that were asked really makes it feel like, “Ok this is the action I’m going to carry forward.” Or “Look at all these new tools I have in my toolkit.” “It forced me to slow down a little bit and be thoughtful about what I was reading instead of taking in the words and then just skipping right on to the next whatever it was.” “The reflection questions made me leave with more than I think I would have.” Supplemental Programming | Many community members expressed appreciation for the programs offered –including the wide variety of options. “Definitely the programs I attended –and especially the program I attended that was managed by Assetou Xango with her writing exercise had a strong impact on me. I’ve never been asked to do work like that.” “I felt like if I read this on my own, it would have very much in isolation, and so being able to hear perspectives from other folks as I was reading, even if they weren’t necessarily directly tied to the book, was really interesting because it just offered additional perspectives.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 57 26|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 ONE BOOK ONE BOULDER COMPARED TO OTHER EXPERIENCES (CONTINUED) Reading Experience | Some participants were divided on whether they would like to read the book on their own or in a group. Going forward, a future One Book, One Boulder series might include book clubs that embrace small group discussion. “By having to read it on my own it was more work and as a result I had time to sleep on these topics without trying to think about them so much. And I think going line by line or chapter by chapter, we’re more prone to intellectualize things and chat chat chat about them where I really appreciated that stillness and space.” It was fun to take it a step beyond the library and discuss the book with a group of Boulder Rotarians.” The participant described a scenario of a self -identified conservative person in the group speaking out to say that they do not believe there is racism in the US in 2021. She described having the opportunity to discuss in an open-minded way as a valuable experience. “I was interested to hear the experiences of [other group members] because I didn’t know anyone else who was reading the book. So I had a very different experience and felt kind of like I was out on my own and it was supposed to be this city-wide thing, but I just didn’t see any of that happening outside of the chats. So facilitating, helping people find a book club if they want to talk about it with other people.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 58 27|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 OVERALL EXPERIENCE WITH THE SERIES New Knowledge and Experiences | Participants felt that through the program they were able to gain knowledge and have new experiences. “I have done things that I would not have done with the people leading the discussion that I would not had discuss things with. I think that is the most important thing for me” Community Connection | Participants shared their views about the Boulder community and how the program provided an opportunity to get to know the Boulder community. “I just think that institutional support of One Book One Boulder was a powerful spark in igniting these conversations among a very white community that fashions itself as being liberal, but I don’t think on the whole is very literate on what it means to be white and seeing themselves in the story of race.” “This was interesting to me because being someone new to the community probably some of the conversations I had with folks in this program wouldn’t have been conversations that I would had just started up with my new neighbor, wouldn’t had been the first place to start probably. So to me it was kind of a neat way to get involve in the community with the pandemic ongoing and with me being pretty new in this city. So I find that community connection piece very interesting and my view of Boulder sort of it is still a bit from the outside.” Building Community | Participants felt COVID prevented some opportunities to build community, but found ways to incorporate what they learned into other parts of their life. “I think I love the mission and I think it was really hard to experience it this time since I didn’t know anyone in the community who was reading it.” “I don’t necessarily find it community building. Perhaps because of the online virtual format.” “I think is hard to evaluate in the current situation. There is less community…. You are not interacting with people outside of your little network that you might be talking to anyway and they are people that you are sort of comfortable with and usually they often have their own values similar to you so it’s limiting…” “I could move it into other spheres in my life so I found that it helped me foster and develop more community around it.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 59 28|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 VIEWS ON SYSTEMIC RACISM IN BOULDER COUNTY Illusion of “Progressiveness” | Many in Boulder have the perception that they live in a liberal, inclusive and progressive community, however systemic racism is prominent. “She was from Seattle and Boulder reminded her of Seattle and that was where a lot of the collective gas lighting was happening in these places that look like oh it's so great everyone is educated and we all recycle and we all vote a certain way, I think she said, and then she was like, but we want to make sure we maintain our rosy statistics and as a result all of these people are falling through the cracks and that was very eye opening…” “I sort of came to the Boulder community quiet naively thinking this is a liberal community and the experience of racism is lacking in our community and I think the program has demonstrated that that is not the case.” Wealthy, White, and Educated | Many of the participants recognized that Boulder’s community is mainly wealthy, white and educated people who have privileged from systemic racism their entire lives. “That's the whole problem right, if you deconstruct white supremacy, you deconstruct the wealth that is associated with it. You deconstruct racism you deconstruct white supremacy you know and Boulder is a bunch of doctors, a bunch of rich, wealthy, affluent educated people that have been privileged their whole life and based on the hard work on the back of minorities.” “What I did know about Boulder is it was wealthy and white. So this program made me reflect on what do I know about Boulder and what don't I know about Boulder, like why. I was looking at some of the census data and confirming it is a white city in comparison statistically sort of across the US. Why is that and what factors go into that.” Needing to Face Hard Truths | Participants found that many in the Boulder community need to face difficult realities of systemic racism being present in their community by diving deeper on specific issues such as housing. “I thought there was a lot of opportunity for diving deeper on specific issues in Boulder whether it's zoning or the fact that our middle schools, if you look at our middle school statistics like they are incredibly segregated so that would've been interesting to look at.” “I mean, I really was surprised how little the conversations were centered on issues in Boulder beyond some of the speakers of color talking about how sometimes they feel like they stick out. But I feel like there's a lot of opportunity for more there.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 60 29|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PERSONAL VIEWS OF AND FEELINGS ON SYSTEMIC RACISM Reflections on Whiteness and Privilege | Particularly in the video diaries, many respondents spent time reflecting on their own privilege and prejudices. “This summer really sparked outrage in me and my family and I participated in a black lives matter protest march in Denver this summer and that felt empowering, that felt like I was using my outrage in a productive way, but I also I think this summer really and over the past few years have really realized that I have a lack of friends that are people of color and I grew up in a very white community in rural Illinois, and I recognize that lack of diversity in my life and I want to dive deeper into my own prejudices and the example that I'm setting for my children.” “Sadly, I have to say I have been astounded and mortified by what I learned in regard to racism. I have always prided myself on deeply held values related to equity and inclusiveness and so was astonished by how much I had to learn. I actually felt shame.” Emotional Response | This series elicited strong emotional responses from participants. “I feel almost addicted to truth-telling now.” “I was given permission not to feel shame, but to educate myself and plan what I can do in the future to break down barriers.” “I felt a lot of outrage at myself for being so ignorant, for allowing myself to be so ignorant all these years. “I feel hope for the future because of all the young people who are going to make a difference in the world.” Personal Action | Participants expressed the desire to turn their feelings into actions. “Our actions are going to be one small action after the other.” “I'm talking to the wrong people about racism, instead of talking to people of color, I need to be talking to White people about racism.” “I'm going to change the dialogue completely. And I'm very apprehensive about it, but I'm going to do it and see what happens.” “Fight the feeling that it's too much, that there is too much, but turn towards the thoughts that this is important.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 61 30|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PATHS FORWARD Small Actionable Steps | Having a list of small actionable steps one can do daily or weekly is what participants found to be very helpful in making a path forward towards real change. “Chapter 17 is wonderful because it lists a number of things ordinary people can do in their communities to combat systemic racism.” “I think sometimes taking it to actionable steps, like so maybe it's like what can I do for 1 hour a week, me, to start driving towards change.” City Government Involvement | Participants mentioned more diverse representation in city government, plus more regulations from city government directly addressing systemic racism would help move the path forward towards change. “I've been a manager, actually a business owner in the private sector and they do not address systemic racism unless they are required to do it by some type of public regulation in most cases.“ “I think more representation by the BIPOC people in city council, in positions of leadership, in positions of private and public leadership…But does Boulder want that, does Boulder want those kind of leaders? Very opinionated, educated BIPOC people, does Boulder want that?” Wealth Distribution | Addressing wealth and income distribution in the Boulder community head on can help on the path forward. “That companies have to have affirmative action programs in place that not only effect hiring, but also effect internal promotion and salary policies.” “It's a whole system rooted in racism and wealth. Racism is part of the equation to get to that wealth. How do we strip Boulder of it's wealth?” “I believe a lot of the emphasis to correct some of the problems caused by systemic racism are related to the distribution of wealth and income. And I think somehow we need to figure out a way to address that systematically, like we impose racism systematically. “ Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 62 31|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PATHS FORWARD (CONTINUED) White People Doing the Work | Participants recognized and embraced the call to action from the book that white people need to be doing the work in their communities to dismantle systemic racism. “I strongly believe that it is the obligation of the white community to dismantle the culture and institutions that perpetuate racism.” “And I think if everyone does that, while at the same time having the conversation with your community, I think, Ijeoma, the duty lies with white people to have these conversations. in their community to lead the charge because they have the voice that can amplify, but that's what I'm trying to do.” Leveraging Power | The fact that the Boulder Public Library encouraged and sanctioned the reading of this book felt powerful to community members and they leveraged that into action. “Actions to carry forward…I did notice that my son’s school is doing anti-racist book group discussions which they are starting next week and you get to pick one of four books and I’m curious, I have a strong feeling that people were talking about this and probably impacted that, so *thumbs up*.” “I feel like because this was sanctioned at an institutional level like One Book, One Boulder, using the library had a lot more power than I think I have individually over asking my friends to engage in this work. One of the reasons my [all-white women book club] was willing to read this book and engage with some of the programming is because it was sanctioned at an institutional level.” “I’ve been taking Spanish and I have a Culture Spanish Class with a wonderful teacher and I asked that we all listen to the Spanish talk with professors from all over Latin America and one from Haiti. And I feel like they were open to that I think partially because it was sanctioned through the Boulder Public Library.” “We have a book club in Boulder Rotary that I co-chair and we used as a launching point for So You Want to Talk About Race, we used the institutional sponsorship by the Boulder Public Library in addition to Rotary International to read this book for our Boulder book club.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 63 32|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 IMPACT ON THEIR ROLE IN THE COMMUNITY Engage in Conversations | Participants feel motivated and better prepared to engage in conversations about racism with individuals in the community and in their personal relationships. “Now I know that I need to be working with the dominant group to change attitudes instead of trying to have conversations with minorities. I need to have conversations with minorities because they are my friends, but I do not need to talk to them about race. I need to be talking to white people about race.” “I just want to be able to engage in conversations with them (family members) when difficult stuff comes up, rather than just keeping my mouth shut, but to engage in an intelligent conversation.” Personal Development | Participants are inspired to continue to seek opportunities for their individual growth and to gain more knowledge about the issues highlighted in the program. “For example, in my own Instagram feed, I’m like they are mostly white people in my feed so I tried to reach out and I’ve learned so much and found out about so many cool events by following all these other people. That to me as led to a lot of growth internally which I hope I can project externally.” “I definitely devoted more time to more proactively reading books about racism and working specially with my older daughter who is 9 on reading kids biographies about leaders of color and watching some documentaries. That has been a very rewarding experience to have my child at an age now where I can have some of those conversations with her and she is very interested in it.” Using Their Power | Participants expressed a desire to use their power in community spaces to address the issues highlighted in the program. “Through my church I have been advice to speak truth to power and I think that means to show up at the school board meetings and participating in local political organizations to make sure that we include People of Color in the activities that we promote and that is where I can have an effect in my opinion.” “On the institutional level, in Boulder, I’m extremely committed to speak about these issues in every place I hold power. I think power is what this is all about, and the maintenance of power. I’m trying to push these issues in my son’s middle school, the boards I seat on, really in any institution where I’m able to navigate in and where People of Color are just not present currently and I’m doing that in multiple ways.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 64 33|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 IMPACT ON THEIR ROLE IN THE COMMUNITY (CONTINUED) Small Actions | Some participants see value in small tangible actions that can have a significant impact and create change. “Professionally, I also started attending more learnings around DEI where I can hopefully work with more consulting clients and not necessarily take on those projects, but it’s been helpful to think about it in terms of how can I incorporate this work into every project that I do, not necessarily focus on DEI work.” Create Connections | A participant shared a desired to reconnect with the BIPOC community, connect individuals and create more allies. “I have a lot of non-BIPOC friends. This past summer, I just kind of felt the need to bunch together with my Latina sisters or indigenous communities here to re-energized, just listen and talk. It is easy to get complicit and it is easy to just be western culture all the time, especially when I was pregnant and I had a new baby. This has recharge me to like -you better keep your culture vibrant and you better keep it for your sons and for just people in general, shared what you know, share how you have been raised and bring it out-. I think of myself as a bridge and love celebrating all my friends that are form different countries and connecting them with other white folks and white friends, creating more allies and more friendships” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 65 34|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 DIRECTION FOR NEXT YEAR Future Topics to Explore | Participants are eager to participate again next year, should the program continue, and offered some suggestions around the framing of next year’s topic. “I think it would be good to explore some other topics and I liked this because you explored a topic that I try to disconnect from. And it’s not because I feel that I can discriminate against people, it’s because I just don’t want to deal with it. I think for me some of the topics that would be good to explore would be homelessness, economic deprivation, and I think particularly things that involve marginalization due to mental health issues and health issues in general. Those topics kind of give me the mental “heeby jeebies” and I like getting involved in a program where I am challenged to be present and work through it.” “I am concerned that without a structured place to engage on these issues that things fall back –because our set up to perpetuate racism…This type of work is really what I feel like needs to be done on an ongoing basis.” “I would like it to be a book centered on a topic that is of importance to the community…I don’t even think it would need to be non-fiction.” “Having the institutional support behind something like this is that you validate the need to discuss those issues and if you just pick some sort of…easy fiction or something that everyone reads and can be entertained by is that really serving the purpose of having this sort of intuitional backing of saying we should be discussing these issues.” Building Community | Similar to what was expressed about participants overall experience, participants are eager to connect –both virtually and in person. “If we are ever out of quarantine again… I love participating in different things in the community through these zoom programs but something where we need to spread it to 5 people in some way or something to just get more people involved.” “I could see in a post pandemic world, this kind of thing might be more in person and obviously I would welcome that, I think that would be great, but I also at the same time think that there’s something really nice about being able to participate on Zoom for some of these as someone who is occasionally like signing off something from work minutes before a program that I probably wouldn’t have left my house for on another day or wouldn’t have been able to make… I would love to see online options or other ways of participating stay. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 66 35|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 DIRECTION FOR NEXT YEAR (CONTINUED) Online vs In Person | Panel participants were split on whether they would like the programming to remain online or move to in-person in a post-pandemic world. These findings suggest a hybrid program for the future might work the best. “I could see in a post pandemic world, this kind of thing might be more in person and obviously I would welcome that, I think that would be great, but I also at the same time think that there’s something really nice about being able to participate on Zoom for some of these as someone who is occasionally like signing off something from work minutes before a program that I probably wouldn’t have left my house for on another day or wouldn’t have been able to make… I would love to see online options or other ways of participating stay. “The use of electronics to communicate is something that I’ve gotten comfortable with since last March and I appreciated that the variety of programs and my ability to participate was increased by Zoom. I don’t think I would have been as enthusiastic of a participant without it. So you should have an electronic component.” “I think there’s only so much you can do given the current situation where everything has to be digital and I don’t know about everyone else, but there were a few times where it’s like, you’ve been in Zoom or WebEx for 5 hours during the day and you have to login to some other thing and you might not be as engaged as if it were in person or even if it was digital but in your normal life, you weren’t doing everything digitally then that would have changed things quite a lot.” “Very simply, the ability to participate online has benefits in that it can reach a wider audience, but I think there is some loss in not having those live events and certainly would love to see that re-integrated when that’s feasible.” Variety of program formats | Outside of the conversation between online or in-person events, participants also expressed their appreciation for the amount and the variety of options presented. “Multiple formats. Being able to incorporate folks doing all sorts of exercises and there was music and there was monologues, and there was theatre, and there was presentations, and there was interactive pieces, and discussion pieces… having all of those formats was also really nice. I would love to see that stay through any future programs or future topics.” “The overwhelming amount of options, I wish I had attended more and look forward to seeing if I can try to find any on YouTube to watch the recordings.” Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 67 BOULDER LIBRARY FOUNDATION Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 68 37|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 BOULDER LIBRARY FOUNDATION AWARENESS In addition to questions related to demographics and experience with both the programs and the book, two questions were asked about the Boulder Library Foundation to assess participant awareness and any previous philanthropy with the Foundation. The first question was phrased to give background around the foundation and then assess awareness: Separate from the Boulder Public Library, The Boulder Library Foundation has been bringing the greater Boulder community together to ensure that our Library can continue to develop impactful and life -changing programs since 1974. In addition to funding 90% of the Library's programs, cultural experiences, and special initiatives, the Foundation also leads the fundraising efforts for the expansion of the Library by funding new branches like NoBo. Prior to taking this survey, had you heard of the Boulder Library Foundation? Of the 559 respondents, 56% had heard of the Foundation. A second question was asked about past philanthropy and those results are detailed on the subsequent page in this section. A series of questions related to past philanthropy and website/social media use were also added to the final event survey and to the final wave of the book survey. Due to low response rate, results are not included in this report. However, the questions are catalogued in Appendix B for use as part of future surveys done by the Foundation. Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 69 38|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 PAST PHILANTHROPY Have you ever made a donation to the Boulder Library Foundation? Of the 312 respondents who were aware of the foundation and answered this follow up question, 3 in 4 have not made a gift to the Boulder Library Foundation and 8% had donated in the last year. This shows great potential for a new audience of donors that is actively engaged with library programming, but is not currently supporting the Foundation. 4% 11% 8% 77% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% Yes, more than 3 years ago Yes, 1-3 years ago Yes, in the last 12 months No, I have not donated Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 70 RESPONDENT DEMOGRAPHICS Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 71 40|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 AGE OF RESPONDENTS What is your Age? Nearly one-third (31%) of respondents were 45 years old or younger. According to the 2019 population estimates from the US Census Bureau, 15% of the population was 65 years and over, compared to 26% of respondents. 100% 50% 31% 4% 3% 4% \ 31% 23% 18% 7% 8% 20% 19% 50% 18% 23% 16% 23% 14% 3% 18% 17% 50% 15% 18% 18% 19% 15% 43% 14% 18% 33% 8% 13% 14% 23% 31% 14% 20% 15% 15% 17% 20% 23% 23% 29% 33% 19% 7% 7% 11% 7% 7% 2 6 2 13 324 116 74 13 7 30 587 One Book One Boulder Teen Event Picture Books as Conversation Starters The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder Anti Oppression 101 Book Survey "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo One Book One Boulder Kick Off "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord MOTUS Theatre Events ALL RESPONDENTS Under 18 26-35 36-45 46-55 56-65 66-75 76+n 45 years and younger 46 years and older Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 72 41|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 0% 0% 0% 6% 4% 8% 0% 0% 3% 0% 4% 0% 14% 0% 7% 6% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 6% 0% 14% 33% 15% 15% 15% 9% 0% 0% 0% 13% 50% 0% 0% 10% 5% 15% 1% 0% 0% 0% 7% 50% 29% 0% 10% 11% 8% 11% 15% 7% 0% 10% 50% 57% 67% 68% 68% 69% 79% 85% 90% 100% 71% 2 7 6 313 114 13 70 13 30 2 570 One Book One Boulder Teen Event A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Picture Books as Conversation Starters Book Survey "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young One Book One Boulder Kick Off Anti Oppression 101 MOTUS Theatre Events The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder ALL RESPONDENTS AGE OF CHILDREN CURRENTLY LIVING AT HOME If you have children or teenagers in your household, are they in: (Select all that apply) Respondents could select all that apply so percentages sum to greater than 100%. Overall, just under 30% of respondents said that they had no children or teenagers currently living at home. According to the US Census Bureau, the average number of persons per households in Boulder County in 2019 was 2.46. The number of persons under 5 was 4.3% and persons under 18 was 19%. Not yet in school Pre-school- Kindergarten Elementary- Grade school Middle school High school No children or teens at home n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 73 42|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 GEOGRAPHIC RESIDENCE What is your Zip Code? 86% of respondents who gave their zip code live in Boulder County. 45% 50% 80%80%83%88%91% 100%100%100% 86% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 74 43|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME What is your annual household income? (Includes you AND those you live with) *Respondents who selected ‘Prefer not to answer’ are excluded from analysis. 47% of those who responded reported an annual household income of $100,000 or higher. The median household income of Boulder County from 2014-2018 was $78,642. Those from the teen event did not report a household income, so that event is not included in this analysis. 50% 7% 8% 22% 23% 3% 7% 8% 14% 26% 8% 10% 9% 10% 13% 15% 4% 14% 11% 12% 26% 15% 18% 14% 23% 22% 36% 50% 24% 19% 19% 26% 29% 30% 32% 36% 50% 23% 50% 13% 14% 4% 29% 8% 13% 12% 14% 15% 14% 8% 9% 19% 12% 2 274 59 23 7 13 101 11 6 496 The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder Book Survey One Book One Boulder Kick Off MOTUS Theatre Events A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Anti Oppression 101 "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young Picture Books as Conversation Starters ALL RESPONDENTS <$25K $25K - $44,999 $45K - $64,999 $65K - $99,999 $100K - $149,999 $150K - $199,999 >$200K n Less than $100,000 $100,000 or More Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 75 44|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 HIGHEST EDUCATION COMPLETED What is the highest level of education you have completed? *Respondents who selected ‘Prefer not to answer’ are excluded from analysis. Overall, 95% of respondents had completed a college or technical degree or higher level of education. According to the US Census Bureau, in Boulder County between 2014-2018, 61% of adults over the age of 25 had a Bachelor’s degree or higher level of education. 100% 31% 50% 4% 4% 2% 3% 4% 31% 62% 40% 43% 35% 32% 13% 17% 34% 38% 38% 50% 56% 57% 61% 66% 84% 83% 61% 2 13 13 2 73 7 317 116 30 6 579 One Book One Boulder Teen Event Anti Oppression 101 "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder One Book One Boulder Kick Off A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord Book Survey "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo MOTUS Theatre Events Picture Books as Conversation Starters ALL RESPONDENTS < High school High school/GED Some college or Tech ed.College/Tech Degree Post-grad degree n High school/GED/Some College or Tech ed. College/Technical Education/ Post-Grad Completed Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 76 45|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 50% 77% 86% 88% 90% 91% 91% 100% 100% 100% 90% 0% 0% 0% 8% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% 4% 0% 8% 14% 8% 0% 3% 6% 0% 0% 0% 5% 50% 8% 0% 3% 7% 3% 2% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 8% 0% 1% 0% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 1% 2 13 7 115 29 69 300 13 1 6 555 The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo MOTUS Theatre Events One Book One Boulder Kick Off Book Survey Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Teen Event Picture Books as Conversation Starters ALL RESPONDENTS RACE OR ETHNIC BACKGROUND What is your racial or ethnic background? (Select all that apply) *Respondents who selected ‘Prefer not to answer’ are excluded from analysis Respondents could select all that apply so percentages sum to greater than 100%. 90% of respondents identified as White or Caucasian. According to 2019 estimates from the US Census Bureau, 77% of persons in Boulder County were White, not Hispanic or Latino. White/ Caucasian Latino/a/x Hispanic Chicano Latin American African African American Black American Indian Native American Alaskan Native Asian Asian American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander Filipino n Middle Eastern Arab American Arab Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 77 46|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 NEED FOR ACCOMMODATION Would accommodations in any of the following categories benefit anyone in your household? (select all that apply) Respondents could select all that apply so percentages sum to greater than 100%. Respondents noted if accommodations in any of the following areas would benefit them or someone in their household. Overall, 80% of respondents said no accommodations were needed.6% said they or someone in their household would benefit from accommodations for patrons with compromised immune systems. 60% 62% 67% 70% 82% 82% 86% 92% 100% 100% 80% 20% 8% 0% 20% 7% 3% 6% 8% 0% 0% 7% 0% 15% 17% 10% 7% 6% 3% 0% 0% 0% 6% 0% 8% 17% 3% 3% 4% 5% 0% 0% 0% 4% 0% 0% 17% 10% 3% 3% 2% 0% 0% 0% 3% 20% 8% 0% 7% 2% 1% 4% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 17% 3% 2% 0% 3% 8% 0% 0% 2% 0% 0% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 2% 0% 8% 0% 0% 1% 6% 3% 0% 0% 0% 2% 5 13 6 30 303 70 111 12 2 2 554 Picture Books as Conversation Starters "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord MOTUS Theatre Events Book Survey One Book One Boulder Kick Off "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Teen Event The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder ALL RESPONDENTS None of these Compromised immune systemHearing Physical/ Mobility Autism SpectrumVisual Intellectual Develop- mental Dementia/ Memory loss n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 78 47|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 50% 67% 83% 85% 86% 88% 90% 93% 100% 100% 85% 50% 17% 15% 15% 14% 11% 3% 7% 0% 0% 12% 0% 17% 2% 0% 0% 1% 7% 0% 0% 0% 2% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 2 13 7 115 29 69 300 13 1 6 555 The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo MOTUS Theatre Events One Book One Boulder Kick Off Book Survey Anti Oppression 101 One Book One Boulder Teen Event Picture Books as Conversation Starters ALL RESPONDENTS GENDER IDENTITY How do you identify? (Select all that apply) *Respondents who selected ‘Prefer not to answer’ are excluded from analysis. Respondents could select all that apply so percentages sum to greater than 100%. 85% of respondents identified as women. According to 2019 estimates from the US Census Bureau, 50% of persons in Boulder County were female. Woman Man TransgenderNon-Binary n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 79 48|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 4% 12% 14% 17% 24% 38% 50% 50% 62% 15% 4 69 294 7 114 29 13 2 2 13 547 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100% Picture Books as Conversation Starters One Book One Boulder Kick Off Book Survey A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord "SYWTAR" with Ijeoma Uluo MOTUS Theatre Events "SYWTAR" with Junie Joseph and Mary Young One Book One Boulder Teen Event The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder Anti Oppression 101 ALL RESPONDENTS LGBTQ+ COMMUNITY AFFILIATION Are you a member of the LGBTQ+ community? *Respondents who selected ‘Prefer not to answer’ are excluded from analysis. 15% of respondents overall said that they identified as a part of the LGBTQ+ community. n Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 80 APPENDICES & SOURCES Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 81 50|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 APPENDIX A Counts of survey respondents by survey collector. Survey Collector Total Responses Received Share of Total Book Survey 324 55% "So You Want to Talk About Race" with Ijeoma Oluo 116 20% One Book One Boulder Kick Off 76 13% MOTUS Theatre Events 30 5% Anti-Oppression 101 13 2% “So You Want to Talk About Race" with Council Members Junie Joseph and Mary Young 13 2% A Deeper Dive with Nikki McCord 7 1% Picture Books as Conversation Starters 6 1% One Book One Boulder Teen Event 2 <1% The Liberation Soundtrack with CU Boulder 2 <1% Grand Total 587 100% Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 82 51|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 APPENDIX B Why do you donate to the Boulder Library Foundation? (Select all that apply) __To support 90% of the Boulder Public Library programs __To support special initiatives like the HALO fund and WiFi Hotspot Program __In memory of a loved one __To support library expansion by funding new branches like NoBo __Another reason not listed Do you feel like your gift is making an impact? __Yes __No __I’m not sure Survey questions for the Boulder Library Foundation. These questions were asked of those who were aware of the Boulder Library Foundation and had made a donation in the past. *This question was asked of those who were aware of the Foundation regardless of their past donation response. How do you prefer to donate? (Select all that apply) __Online via the website __Main-in via remittance envelopes __Social media via donate buttons __Another method not listed *When was the last time you visited our website or social media? __Within the last month __In the last 3 months __In the last 6 months __Longer than 6 months ago __I haven’t visited Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 83 52|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 APPENDIX C Introductory Video Diary Tell us about what inspired you to sign up for the One Book,One Boulder series. Tell us about your personal understanding or experience with systemic racism. Tell us about your experiences with and perceptions about racial equity and/or racial justice in Boulder. Tell us about your experiences and perceptions with racial inequity and/or racial injustice in Boulder. Video Diary Questions Program Video Diary Tell me about new skills, tools, or information you learned in this program. Tell me about how what you heard or discussed in this program made you reflect on your own personal understanding of or experience with racial inequity or systemic racism. Tell me about how what you heard or discussed in this program caused you to reflect on your understanding of or experience with racial inequity or systemic racism in the Boulder community. How did the format of this program impact your experience? Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 84 53|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 APPENDIX C Final Video Diary Tell us about your key takeaways from reading or listening to So You Want to Talk About Race. Tell us about how reading this book expanded your personal understanding or experience with systemic racism. Tell us about how reading this book impacted your perceptions of systemic racism or racial injustice in the Boulder community. Reflecting on your experience with this whole series -the book and the programs -share with us one story about how your participation in this series impacted your behavior (started a journal, read more books, shared resources with others, started conversations, etc.). Video Diary Questions (Continued) Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 85 54|One Book One Boulder Denver Museum of Nature & Science © 2020 SOURCES Cover Image: Boulder Library Foundation Website, https://boulderlibraryfoundation.org/2019/08/19/the -future-of-the-library/ Boulder County Demographic Information: US Census Bureau, https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/bouldercountycolorado/PST 045219 Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 86 “By participating in the One Book, One Boulder program I got to immediately dive into deep discussions about race, equity, and diversity with community members I had never met… Particularly during the isolating time of COVID, it was nice to have a way to connect with others in the community around such an important topic.” Community Member Attachment A. 2020 One Book One Boulder Report 87 1 Summary & FAQ: Discontinuation of Prospector Interlibrary Loan November, 2020 Summary Boulder Public Library and the other member libraries of the Flatirons Library Consortium (FLC) are discontinuing participation in the Prospector interlibrary loan service due to budget cuts and shortfalls stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. December 11, 2020 is the last day to place holds through Prospector, Mobius and Springer eBooks at Boulder Public Library and other FLC libraries. We will continue to fill holds through December 31, 2020. All holds that do not arrive by December 31, 2020 will be canceled and unfulfilled starting January 1, 2021. We hope to reinstate this service in future years as the economy recovers and local library budgets are restored. Boulder Public Library and the FLC member libraries continue to offer a deep collection of physical and digital items and resources at boulderlibrary.org. Many Colorado libraries offer direct access to their collections to all Colorado residents through the Colorado Virtual Library’s Colorado Libraries Collaborate program. What is the timeline for this change? Can I still order through Prospector before it is discontinued? December 11: Last day for holds to be placed on Prospector items. After December 11, the option to place a hold in the Prospector catalog will be removed. December 11-31: We will continue to fulfill existing interlibrary loan holds. January 1: All unfulfilled interlibrary loan holds will be canceled. What if my Prospector hold isn’t filled by January 1? It will be canceled, due to the discontinuation of the Prospector service. What will happen to the Prospector items I already have checked out? The due date will remain the same and items will be returned to their home library when you return them. Why are you no longer participating in Prospector? This decision was based on: •Analysis of our member library payments to Prospector and the necessity to reduce overall expenditures due to budget cuts. •The relatively low number of items requested through Prospector in comparison to the high volume of materials we are able to provide our communities through the Flat Irons Library Consortium. •The ability of customers to directly access libraries across the state using the Colorado Libraries Collaborate program. •In 2019, Prospector accounted for just 1.22% of the FLC’s total circulation of 5.4 million items. We will continue to carefully monitor our budgets and the costs associated with Prospector and hope that as the economy recovers, we are able to return to our previous level of service. When will you return to Prospector? We do not have a date at this time but are carefully monitoring our budgets and the costs associated with Prospector. We hope that as the economy recovers, we are able to return to our previous level of service. Attachment B. FAQ Prospector 88 2 Is Mobius also canceled? And on the same timetable for cancelling non-filled holds? Yes, Mobius is a part of Prospector and will be canceled along with it. The timetable for non-filled holds will be the same. Are Springer eBooks also canceled? Yes, these eBooks are also a part of Prospector and will no longer be available to FLC patrons. Can we still accept and receive courtesy returns from other Prospector libraries like High Plains, Jeffco, and Denver or our local schools, etc.? Yes, Boulder Public Library will continue to offer this service through the statewide library courier. Will Prospector bills remain on patron accounts? Yes, outstanding Prospector billed items or long overdue items will remain on patron accounts until the item is paid for or returned. Further questions? Please contact us. Attachment B. FAQ Prospector 89