Loading...
12.21.20 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., December 21, 2020 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Raj Seymour (Chair) Allison Fronzaglia (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV.CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A.Approval of Minutes from Retreat November 16, 2020 B.Approval of Minutes from November 23, 2020 C.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.ITEMS FOR ACTION (6:20) A.Flatirons Golf Course Concessionaire Amendment VI.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (6:35) A.Ecological Services Update B.Master Plan Update C.2020 and 2021 Operating Budget Update D.2021 Golf Course Fees VII.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:15) A.PRAB Retreat Follow Up B.Board Equity Trainings C.PRAB Final Letter to City Council (for reference) D.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. VIII.NEXT BOARD MEETING: 6:00 p.m., January 25, 2021 IX.ADJOURN PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared December 16, 2020) JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL PRAB Jan. 25: •Master Plan Research & Trends System Snapshots (di) •BPR 2020 Annual Report and BPR 2021 Workplan (md) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) Feb. 22: •EAB Update (md) •Encampments Strategy Update (d/i) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) March 22: •2020 Year End financial review (md) •2022 Budget Strategy (md) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •PRAB new member orientation (mb) •Departing Board Members (mb) April 26: •Board appointments (p) •Election of officers (p) •2022 Budget Strategy: o Scenario Planning o 2022-2027 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) •New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb)Department Events and Items of Interest •Jan. 5: South Boulder Creek Flood Mitigation (cc) •Jan. 12: Board Presentations (cc) •Jan. 19: Encampments Policy (cc) •Master Plan Engagements will be posted here (e) •Feb. 2: Policy Agenda (cc) •March 4, 9, 11: Board Applicant Interviews (cc) •March 16: Board Appointments (cc) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention. Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to be a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in-depth analysis. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring as much in- depth analysis. ------------------ City Council Item (cc) Other Boards and Commissions (obc) Community Engagement (e) CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: November 16, 2020 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Ali Rhodes, Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Study Session/Retreat Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 5:01 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. PRAB Members “Get to Know You” Each PRAB member shared information about themselves and their passion for PRAB. Board Communication – Communications from the Department The board requested more information on “future board items” that included more context for the potential impact of upcoming discussions. Board Communication – Letter to council The board shared their responses to the questions from Council and designated Seymour and Unger to draft the letter for review at the November 23 meeting. PRAB Board Roles - Email communications Fronzaglia led this discussion related to coordinating board responses to community member emails and will bring a final version of guidelines to a future meeting. Adjourn Motion to postpone discussion of Board and Commission Comparison and Onboarding. Motion by Seymore. Second by Winer. The motion passed 7-0. The meeting was adjourned at 7:36 p.m. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: November 23, 2020 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Tina Briggs, Tom Buzbee, Stacy Cole, Regina Elsner, Morgan Gardener, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffmann, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Chris Passarelli, Matt Pilger, Ali Rhodes Guests Present: Becky Zimmermann and Amanda Jeter from Design Workshop Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:04 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Winer. Second by Unger. Motion passed 7-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Andrew Trees, golf course user and course pass holder, requested that annual passes not be limited in 2021. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from October 26, 2020 Motion to approve the minutes from October 26, 2020 as presented. Motion by Fronzaglia. Second by Brock. The motion passed 7-0. B. Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. • Shared enthusiasm for Snow Much Fun activities. • Appreciated review of the drive-in movie night. • Is it okay for board members to use their personal NextDoor accounts to share information about the curbside collection of tree debris? • How does the number of volunteer hours compare to previous years? • Will there be other drive-in movies? • Is it possible to increase the number of showings of each movie for better cost recovery from drive-in events? • Will more information about Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) be presented to PRAB in 2021? Agenda Item 5: Items for Discussion and Information A. Master Plan Update: Preparation for City Council Study Session Elsner and Amanda Jeter from Design Workshop presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Will BPR partner with schools to collect feedback from students? • Will PRAB get to hear directly from the high school students involved? • Is it possible to use social media for engagement? • Will BPR limit the amount of print media used given limited resources? • Will BPR use neighborhood associations for engagement? • Will the master plan incorporate lessons learned from the pandemic? • Will BPR look at peer cities of comparable size and budget? • How will BPR work with other departments within the city on this master plan? • Are people from other departments engaged in developing the content of the BPR master plan or is the interdepartmental group focused on general best practices? • Recommend that BPR involve other departments in developing the content of the master plan, especially regarding the topic of climate change. • Recommended that the two new themes, Equity and Resilience, be integrated into the existing six master plan themes. • Recommended that the two new themes appear in addition to the six existing themes to emphasize their importance. • Recommended combining Equity with the existing theme of Building Community and combining Resilience with the existing theme of Organizational Readiness. • Whether combined or added as new themes, recommended using the terms Equity and Resilience to show their importance and make sure they are addressed. • Stated that adding more themes, for a total of 8 key themes, could be overwhelming. • How will equity be applied to communities and individuals in this plan? • Appreciated bringing these two themes to the forefront, whether they are added or combined. B. Flatirons Golf Concessionaire Munro presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • What criteria is used when renewing instead of canceling a concessionaire contract? • Could BPR contract with food trucks or others for special events at the Golf Course? • Since this was an amendment, was there a Request for Proposal (RFP) process? C. 2021 Flatirons Golf Course Fees Munro presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • If everyone who had a pass in 2020 renews, will new customers have a chance to purchase passes? • Is it equitable that folks get to renew, rather than having a lottery system for passes with all new and old customers? • Why does the early season rate for juniors increase by $4 compared other $1 or $2 increases for other groups? What was the methodology for fee adjustments? • In 2021, will staff adjust fees if the number of people allowed on the course at one time changes? D. Reservoir Operations and Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) Update Cole and Elsner presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • For those that violate ANS rules, how expensive are the tickets they receive? • What happened to the person who tampered with their tag this summer? • Shared surprise about the high number of people wading and swimming on the north shore and concern about risks of wading with dogs. Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department Motion to postpone Ecological Services Update and 2020 and 2021 Operating Budget to the December meeting. Motion by Yugar. Second by Winer. The motion passed 7-0. Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A. PRAB Recruitment The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Recommended simplifying question 2 to specifically ask how limited resources should be distributed to different user groups. • Recommended simplifying question 3 to ask about the goals and key themes in the Master Plan more broadly. • PRAB delegated incorporation of final edits to staff. Staff will then submit a final recruitment document to the Clerk’s office on Nov. 24. B. PRAB Retreat Follow-up: Annual Letter to City Council Seymour and Unger presented this item to the Board. The Board suggested the following edits: Homelessness: • Requested greater emphasis on issues regarding homelessness. • Requested emphasis on the importance of safety in parks. • Requested addition of language indicating that community members feel they are not able to use certain parks due to increased homelessness and what the City has done to address this issue is not enough. • Conditions of parks related to homelessness seems to be getting worse. • Thefts are also a concern. • Does not make sense to mention thefts as they are not necessarily connected to homelessness and do not happen exclusively in parks. • How does the human relations commission recommend responding to homelessness? Did they recommend that the city stop removing encampments or that the city allow encampments on open space? • In addition to community members who feel unsafe using certain parks, encampments are also unsafe for those living in the park. • Community members with lower income may not be able to access private clubs for recreation, so they may be more negatively impacted if they feel unable to use a park in their neighborhood. • There are a variety of ways to address homelessness, though some solutions do not work. Resilience: • Requested adding the climate crisis as a top concern. • Suggested that the letter focus on the concerns already listed. • Will East Boulder Community Center be used as an emergency shelter if needed due to a disaster? • Agreed to add the Master Plan and its specific focus on resilience as part of things that PRAB is looking forward to in 2021. PRAB delegated preparation of the final letter to Unger and Seymour. They will then submit the letter in advance of the Dec. 18 deadline. C. PRAB Community Engagement Updates Fronzaglia will finalize the resident response email guidelines for the December meeting. Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, December 21, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 9:05 p.m. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: December 21, 2020 A. Approval of Minutes from Retreat November 16, 2020 B. Approval of Minutes from November 23, 2020 C. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Multiple Resource Preservation Plan: In October 2020, consultants and staff completed project Phase One, Background Data and Research, and began work on Phases Two (Inventory of Existing Condition) and Three (Historic Context Development and Resource Evaluation). Fieldwork associated with Phase Two and Three completed investigations at the following resources: Glen Huntington Bandshell; Boyd Smelter Archaeological Site; Downtown Boulder Pearl Street Pedestrian Mall; Harbeck-Bergheim House; Fire Station No 02; Chautauqua; Platt Farmhouse; and Roney House. Final deliverables for Phase Two include an Existing Condition Assessment Plan to help inform asset management, operations and maintenance, and repair and replacement decision making. Phase Three will include a Context Statement Review for each resource on its historic integrity, with inclusion of written descriptions, graphic representations and maps identifying important site features. Information from each document will dovetail into major portions of the final Multiple Resource Preservation Plan. Staff continues scheduling engagement with targeted stakeholder outreach occurring Q1-Q3 2021, and broader community touch points scheduled as they align with public participation for the Master Plan Update. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • East Boulder Community Park Restroom: The 2020 Capital Improvement Program provides funding for the design and construction of a new exterior restroom facility at East Boulder Community Park. A restroom was originally planned as part of the 2009 Master Plan for the park, but due to limited funding, was not included in the major 2010- 2011 project that included the construction of the multi-use, synthetic turf athletic fields and dog park. The new restroom will provide much needed services for athletic field users, and users of the tennis and handball courts, dog park, and playground. Installation of the restroom is currently projected for the late spring of 2021. However, the installation of utilities to service the restroom may begin in the winter of 2021. Any construction will be planned to minimize impacts to athletic field programming and general park use. Future updates will be provided as the construction schedule is finalized. • Valmont City Park Skate and Pump Track Design: To address the need for skating and biking in Boulder, the Parks and Recreation Department will be constructing new skate and bike features at Valmont City Park. PRAB has been updated and involved in this initiative throughout the year as the project has had to start and stop relative to budget constraints and COVID requirements. The last touch with PRAB on this project was in June under “matters from the department” when staff realized the need to pause due to COVID-19 response and uncertainty in the budget. More information can be found here. Consistent with the current department Master Plan, a goal of this project is to create flexible and multi-use wheel play features (skate and bike) that accommodate a variety of skill levels and abilities while also ensuring innovative design ideas that provide features that aren’t found in nearby parks. The concept plan was developed through a robust community outreach effort. The engagement included an online survey and comment period, meetings with local stake- holder groups, feedback from Parks’ staff, and discussions with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB). The new pump track consists of a series of undulating asphalt trails. Two wood bike ramps are also part of the design. The skate park incorporates a needed skate park facility. The skate park facility consists of a series of concrete formed bowls, rails, and other features. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Another main goal of the project will be to renovate the existing gravel Valmont Road parking lot to address on-going maintenance issues. The heavily used lot provides critical access to the adjacent dog parks, southern bike trail system, events, and the multi-use path system that cuts through the park. The parking lot will be redesigned to provide a more safe, efficient pedestrian and vehicular flow. The redesign will also lessen maintenance needs for the lot that often require shut-down while it is re-graded. Skate Park (top) and Pump Track Design (bottom) Planning and permitting for the project are currently underway. Final permits are currently expected in the winter of 2021, with construction starting in the spring and ready for the summer season. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design o Master Plan Update (See Matters from the Department Item) Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, are under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Asphalt Trails Ramps Turf 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Construction activities continue for the renovation of the Chautauqua Park playground. Over the past month, the city’s Parks Construction team and contractors have continued with the installation of the new playground features and site furnishings. Last month the frame for the exciting new climbing structure was installed and the contractors began sculpting and painting the play element. The completion of the playground renovation has been delayed to several weather events, but major construction activities are expected to be completed within the next month. Some elements, such as tree planting and irrigation renovation, will need push into the spring to take advantage of warmer conditions. Once complete, the new playground will consist of new playground equipment and surfacing to meet ADA accessibility standards and safety guidelines and requirements, a new sand play area, additional new nature play features, and seating and climbing boulders that are integrated into the overall playground design. The preferred concept plan was unanimously approved by PRAB in December of 2019. General information and construction updates can be found here, on the Chautauqua Playground Renovation project website. Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Ecological Services Update- See Matters from the Department item; o Visitor Management; o Urban Wildlife Management; o Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration; o Natural Lands Volunteer Programs; o Natural Lands Maintenance; and o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination and site maintenance. C. Operations Update COVID-19 The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus.   • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery Team: The citywide efforts to address the challenges of the pandemic will continue into 2021 to support ongoing response and recovery needs. The city-wide teams while be adapting their structure to align with emerging needs like vaccine distribution and also in recognition of the long-term nature of the response and recovery.. • Recreation Programs and Facilities: Currently operating services have been modified in schedule, format, or capacity to align with Level Red in the state’s COVID-19 dial framework, including Recreation Center capacity limited to 10%. For the most recent information on services available, the department regularly updates the Status at a Glance found on this webpage. Recreation Programs and Facilities • Winter Programming: Registration for winter programming is underway. All programming continues to be designed to scale in relation to health and safety restrictions. For the most recent information on services available, the department regularly updates the Status at a Glance found on this webpage, and new winter activities are highlighted in this special, online only version of the Winter Parks and Recreation Guide. • Recreation Centers: All three recreation centers are currently open to the public on a limited reservation only basis. Staff continue to review usage and all other existing data to inform operating decisions on a biweekly basis. Since utilizing the current reservation system for entries beginning in June, 4,647 financial aid free entries and 7,989 third party entries from Silver Sneakers and Silver and Fit have been logged out of the total 49,122 facility entries (as of November 30). • Health and Wellness: Program Coordinator, Kate Houlik Doering, is featured in the most recent edition of Be Well Saturdays from Boulder Community Health. The topic 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 from Kate highlights building strength with squats and the importance of leg strength for everyday activities Communication via NextDoor Following a discussion about the NextDoor website as a potential medium for community communications, staff offers this information about the city’s use of the online platform. The city utilizes NextDoor, a social network for neighborhoods, as a tool to reach and engage residents through communication targeted to specific parts of the city. While the primary purpose of NextDoor is for neighbors to communicate with one another, the platform also offers local governments and public agencies the opportunity to share information with NextDoor participants as well. As a public agency, the city’s ability to participate in NextDoor is limited. Unless a staff member happens to live in a particular neighborhood and is signed up on NextDoor, city staff cannot see exchanges that occur within any particular neighborhood. The city can, however, post info citywide or to specific neighborhoods or parts of town. If residents interact with the city by commenting on one of the city’s posts, the city’s communications team can respond and attempt to initiate a dialogue. It has become clear in recent months that many NextDoor users are unaware of these limitations. The city is planning to step up regular reminders so that NextDoor participants understand these constraints. Our communications team recognizes that it can be damaging to public trust for people to be having a robust conversation about the city and feel like their comments or needs are being ignored. In partnership with the city’s Neighborhood Liaison, Brenda Ritenour, several communications and engagement team members recently convened a meeting of NextDoor leads (residents who set up NextDoor accounts for their neighborhoods and serve as a quasi-moderator of the group) to discuss ways to partner better. The leads were very receptive to the idea of flagging a city staff member when conversations are occurring in their neighborhood spaces that might benefit from a city response. The city has offered to either respond to the neighborhood directly by initiating a new post, or the lead could copy and paste the response from city staff in his/her own feed. In evaluating the use of NextDoor, it may be helpful to know that the city tries to balance the need to communicate with residents with the risk of bombarding community members with unsolicited information. As such, communications colleagues generally follow these guidelines: • Remember that NextDoor’s greatest power rests with place-based communication around neighborhood-specific issues. Most users have signed onto the platform for this, and we should respect its central purpose. • Share no more than one citywide post a day; however, multiple posts can be shared with individual or small groups of neighborhoods in a day, if necessary. • Share no more than two or three posts a week with any individual neighborhood; public health and safety posts take priority. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 The city also recognizes that NextDoor communications are only received by those participating in the forum and are not representative of the entire community. PRAB members are welcome to post information as individuals or copy from city communications to post in NextDoor. They can also elevate messages to city staff if they believe the dialogue needs further response or official city attention. If you have any additional questions about the city’s use of this platform, please feel free to reach out to Sarah Huntley, director of Communications and Engagement, directly at huntleys@bouldercolorado.gov. Pool Operations: Algae and Winterization Summary This update provides some information about algae in the water and summarizes BPR’s approach to winterization of its outdoor pools at Scott Carpenter and Spruce. Algae in Pools Algae is a water-borne plant and needs sunlight, humidity, nitrogen, and phosphorus to thrive. Water and sunlight are always in high supply at an outdoor pool, nitrogen and phosphorus can be introduced through organic matter. For example, in the autumn and after a wind event in October, leave fall off of tress and into the pool. BPR makes every attempt to address the organic material through labor practices (vacuuming and hand-sweeping the pool) and through water chemistry management. Public pools in Colorado are required to maintain certain water chemistry to promote safe swimming. That water chemistry is tested every two hours that pools are open, and the levels of chlorine documented and kept in a log. Our pool systems monitor a qualitative measure called Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP) to determine when chlorine is added. This is important because oxidation is the process where chlorine bonds to organic molecules and oxidize them into the atmosphere, removing them from the pool. The higher the ORP, the cleaner and safer the water is. Any ORP of 650 or higher indicates nearly instantaneous oxidation of organic molecules. As ORP ratings and chlorine levels stayed at safe levels this fall, staff did not take more drastic measures (such as “shocking”, or super chlorinating, the pool with a high level of chlorine as this process requires a facility closure of 24-28 hours) and instead addressed with more rigorous pool vacuuming and hand scrubbing. “In most cases, algae is not harmful,” says the National Swimming Pool Foundation in the “Pool & Spa Operators Handbook”, regarded as the national certifying authority on pool operations (p.81). The two outdoor pools the City of Boulder manages are lined in plaster and where it would not impact leisure features, water is left in them through the winter to maintain the plaster. While residual chlorine levels are maintained throughout the winter, the pools are not open to swimmers while the water is not circulating, heated or treated. The pool is drained and a complete cleaning performed in preparation for reopening in the spring. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 The City of Boulder Aquatics team is staffed by professionals who are Certified Pool Operators and Aquatic Facility Operators – both national certifications which require training and a test to achieve the certification. These certifications are augmented by decades of experience, including managing aquatic facilities at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. In short, they are well qualified to ensure the city’s pools are operated in a manner that safely provides swimming for our community members and well maintained to protect the city’s investments in its pools. AGENDA ITEM #___V-A___PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: December 21, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to approve Flatirons Golf Course Concessionaire Agreement PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director Stephanie Munro, Recreation Regional Facility Manager Tom Buzbee, Flatirons Golf Course Facility Supervisor EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item seeks the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB) review and approval of an amendment to the March 6, 2016 contract between the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation department (BPR) and the Flatirons Golf Course concessionaire, facilitating continued food and beverage offerings for golf course visitors.    This amendment extends the relationship beyond the 3 year plus 2 one-year amendments, thereby requiring PRAB approval, and would:     • Allow for uninterrupted concession services provision through the 2022 golf season to coincide with future site facility improvements: and    • Approve a two- year lease agreement with Three Worn Keys LLC at Flatirons Golf Course. By this Amendment to the March 3rd, 2016 contract for concessions services, the parties agree to extend the term of the contract through October 31, 2022. Any extension beyond this date would be on a month to month basis until the new clubhouse facility is open, but under no circumstances no later than December 31, 2022. The agreement continues existing services provided at Flatirons Golf Course by the concessionaire, which operates under the name SandWedge Grill.   BACKGROUND: The legacy of the Flatirons Golf Course began in 1914 at Chautauqua Park with a nine-hole track including sand greens. Originally commissioned by the Boulder Country Club, the original Flatirons Golf Course was located at 28th and Iris.  In 1933, as partially funded by President Roosevelt’s WPA (Works Progress Administration) program, the club relocated to the 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder.  The department has operated Flatirons Golf Course as the City of Boulder’s only municipally owned and operated public golf course since 1986. During the last 82 years, the course has been known as: AGENDA ITEM #___V-A___PAGE___2____ • Boulder Municipal Sports Center (1938-39) • Boulder Golf Club (1939-45) • Country Club Golf Course (1945-56) • Boulder Country Club (1956-65) University Country Club (1965-70) • Flatirons Country Club / Boulder Municipal Golf Course (1970-86) • Flatirons Golf Course (1986-Present) Flatirons Golf Course offers the opportunity for all community members to participate in the sport of golf as a more affordable option than traditional private golf clubs. The golf course is characterized by beautiful mountain views, with mostly flat layout with only a few subtle, but interesting, elevation changes. As an accessory use, course visitors have enjoyed on-site concessions for many years.  Prior provision included access to an informal snack location (hereinafter, the “ Grill”) and to the site’s Events Center, a building severely damaged by the 2013 flood and thereafter decommissioned.  In 2016, the contracted Grill concessions vendor decided to end its operation at the location, and the department sought an interim vendor to ensure continued customer access for food and beverages for that season.  Three Worn Keys LLC, a Colorado-based food and beverage concession services entity (“Contractor”), whom was the current concessionaire at the Boulder Reservoir expressed interest in the opportunity.  Flatirons Golf Course was added to the 4th amendment of the existing contract with Three Worn Keys on April 30th, 2018. Subsequent contracting with the city allowed the Contractor to pursue and be awarded transfer of the prior vendor’s site-based alcohol licensure at Flatirons.  Since that time, the Contractor has provided an array of affordably priced food and beverage offerings to visitors and has complied with all requirements of the contract and their business and alcohol licensures. The menu includes a variety of breakfast and lunch sit down and grab and go entries and other services provided include a mobile snack and beverage cart that provides on-course hospitality to golfers.  In 2018, the department completed interim capital improvements on-site, enhancing Flatirons Grill for course visitors until long-term improvements could be achieved as outlined with the decision to decommission the events center. ANALYSIS: Staff presented a discussion item to PRAB at the November meeting. The PRAB’s feedback was supportive of the amendment and there are no alterations of the Three Worn Keys LLC 7th amendment agreement which will continue existing services provided at Flatirons Golf Course. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests the PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to Approve the Flatirons Golf Course Concessionaire Agreement. AGENDA ITEM #___V-A___PAGE___3____ NEXT STEPS: Upon final approval, the contract will be executed, and staff will monitor the vendor to ensure compliance with all terms and performance measures. ATTACHMENTS Attachment A PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve an Amendment to the Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve an Amendment to the Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course Attachment B Three Worn Keys Amendment Attachment C Original Concession Contract Attachment A - PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018 AGENDA ITEM #___VI-B___PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 23, 2018 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve an Amendment to the Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course PRESENTERS: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Alison Rhodes, Deputy Director, Parks and Recreation Margo Josephs, Manager of Community Outreach and Partnerships Keith Williams, Regional Facilities Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item seeks the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB) review and considered approval of an amendment to the March 6, 2016 contract between the department and the Flatirons Golf Course existing concessionaire facilitating continued food and beverage offerings for golf course visitors. The term of this amendment extends the relationship beyond one-year, thereby requiring PRAB approval, and would: • Allow for uninterrupted concession services provision through the 2019 golf season to coincide with the department’s continued planning for future site improvements; and • Allow the existing concessionaire, Three Worn Keys LLC, to pursue a timely renewal application of their current alcohol licensure at this facility. BACKGROUND: Originally commissioned by the Boulder Country Club, the original Flatirons Golf Course was located at 28th and Iris. In 1933, as partially funded by then-President Roosevelt’s WPA (Works Progress Administration) program, the club relocated to the 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 location. The department has operated Flatirons Golf Course as the City of Boulder’s only municipally-owned and operated public golf course since 1986. As an ancillary use, course visitors have enjoyed on-site concessions for many years. Prior provision included access to an informal snack location (hereinafter, the “Grill”) Attachment A - PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018 AGENDA ITEM #___VI-B___PAGE___2____ and to the site’s Events Center, a building severely damaged by the 2013 flood and thereafter decommissioned. In 2016, the department’s contracted Grill concessions vendor decided to end its operation at the location, and the department sought an interim vendor to ensure continued customer access for food and beverages for that season. Three Worn Keys LLC, a Colorado-based food and beverage concession services entity (“Contractor”), expressed interest in the opportunity. Subsequent contracting with the City allowed the Contractor to pursue and be awarded transfer of the prior vendor’s site- based alcohol licensure in 2016. Since that time, the Contractor has provided an array of affordably-priced food and beverage offerings to visitors and has complied with all requirements of the contract and their business and alcohol licensures. In 2018, the department completed interim capital improvements on-site, enhancing Flatirons Grill for course visitors. The Contractor has expressed interest in continued operation of a concession on the premises, and a good faith negotiation has concluded in the presentation of the attached Amendment to Contract for Concession Services (Attachment A). COUNCIL FILTER IMPACTS Environmental: Under the proposed amendment, the Contractor would align with City Zero Waste practices. OTHER IMPACTS: Fiscal: The agreement proposes monthly rent payments made by the Contractor for the duration of the 17-month term extension period which amount includes utility-related expenses. Staff time: Existing staff will manage all aspects of this License Agreement’s City responsibilities. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to approve the Amendment to Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course dated March 6th, 2016 and authorize the City Manager to make minor amendments prior to or during the term of this agreement in order to ensure that the concession is managed in a manner that is consistent with applicable laws and the policies and regulations of the City of Boulder. NEXT STEPS: Staff will consider the PRAB and public’s feedback and make any necessary revisions to the proposed agreement. If approved, staff will present the amendment for City Manager approval and continue operations with the Contractor as codified. Consideration of a Attachment A - PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018 AGENDA ITEM #___VI-B___PAGE___3____ long-term concession arrangement will be considered concurrently with future capital enhancements in 2019. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A: Amendment to Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course dated March 6, 2016. Attachment B - Three Worn Keys Amendment K:\CAFO\Amendment form 2009-.doc September 2009 1 SEVENTH AMENDMENT TO MARCH 3, 2016 CONTRACT FOR CONCESSION SERVICES This Seventh Amendment is made as of the ___ day of ______________, 20__, by and between the City of Boulder, Colorado, a Colorado home rule city (the “City”), and Three Worn Keys, LLC, d/b/a The Wheel and the Whisk, a Colorado limited liability company (the “Concessionaire”). The City and Concessionaire may hereinafter be referred to individually as a “Party” or collectively as the “Parties.” A. The City and Concessionaire entered into a Contract dated March 3, 2016, for food and beverage concession services at the Boulder Reservoir , located at 5565 51st Street, Boulder, Colorado 80301, and amended by the 4th Amendment on April 30, 2018 to include the Flatirons Golf Course, a municipally-owned and operated public golf course located at 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder Colorado 80303. The Parties wish to exclude services to Boulder Reservoir but continue with service at Flatirons Golf Course. B. The Parties wish to extend the Contract term and continue the promises and obligations of the Parties as follows: NOW THEREFORE, in consideration of the promises and obligations set forth below, the Parties agree to amend the Contract as follows: 1. Section I, number 1, “Premises,” of the Contract is amended to read as follows: The Premises covered by this Contract is the Flatirons Golf Course. (“Premises”) 2. Section II, number 21, “Licenses,” of the Contract is amended to , read as follows: Concessionaire shall obtain, at its expense, any and all licenses necessary for the operation of the Concession, including, without limitation, a City of Boulder food service establishment license as provided by Chapter 4-9, B.R.C. 1981. Concessionaire shall maintain all required and satisfactory inspections, permits and licenses for the operation of a food and beverage concession ancillary to the City’s public golf course operation. 3. Paragraph 3 of the 5th amendment to the Contract is revised to read as follows: Concessionaire agrees that it will provide the City at least 90 days’ advanced notice in writing of any decision to terminate services under this Contract and will notify the City in writing not later than July 31, 2021 of any intention with regard to any renewal option of this Contract. In the event that this Contract is terminated by either Party for any reason, Concessionaire agrees to work with the City in good faith to effectuate transfer of then-current alcohol licensure applicable to this property. Attachment B - Three Worn Keys Amendment K:\CAFO\Amendment form 2009-.doc September 2009 2 4. By this 7th Amendment, the Parties agree to extend the term of the Contract through October 31, 2022. Any extension beyond this date will be on a month to month basis until the new clubhouse facility is open, but under no circumstances no later than December 31, 2022. A certificate of insurance shall be provided to the City evidencing coverage for the extended term of the Contract. 5. Except as amended herein, the Contract shall remain in full force and effect. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties to this Seventh Amendment have caused it to be executed by their authorized officers as of the day and year above first written. This Seventh Amendment may be executed in counterparts, each of which shall be deemed an original, but all of which together shall constitute one and the same instrument. [SIGNATURE PAGE FOLLOWS] CONCESSIONAIRE By: __________________________________ Title: _________________________________ CITY OF BOULDER _______________________________________ City Manager ATTEST: _____________________________ City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: ______________________________ City Attorney’s Office CONTRACT FOR CONCESSION SERVICES THIS CONTRACT is made this 3rd day of March, 2016 by and between the City of Boulder, Colorado, a Colorado home rule city ("the City"), and Three Work Keys, LLC DBA The Wheel & Whisk, (the "Concessionaire"). BACKGROUND A. The City operates the recreation area known as; Boulder Reservoir, 5565 51st Street, Boulder Co,80301;and B. The City desires to have food and beverage service available to the general public using Boulder Reservoir, during normal operating hours; and C. Concessionaire submitted the lowest and best quote for said services and agrees to perform the Services as set forth in this Contract. NOW, THEREFORE, the City and the Concessionaire covenant and agree as follows: I. DEFINITIONS As used in this Contract, the following terms have the meanings specified below: 1. Premises. The Premises covered by this Contract are Boulder Reservoir ("Premises"). 2. Gross Receipts. Gross Receipts are the total amount of income in cash or credit received by the Concessionaire from all business done on the Premises or under this Contract. Sales tax receipts are not income within the meaning of this definition. 3. Notice. Whenever Notice is required by this Contract, it shall be in writing. Notice may be given to the Concessionaire by mail. Notice may also be given to the Concessionaire by delivering it to any officer of the Concessionaire or by delivery to such person's office during normal business hours. Notice may be given to the City by mailing it to Reservoir Manager, City of Boulder Parks and Recreation, PO Box 791, Boulder, Colorado 80306, or by delivering it to the Reservoir Manager or by delivering it during normal business hours to such person's office. Notice by mail shall be deemed delivered on the third calendar day after the day on which it is deposited, postage paid, in the United States mail. II. CONCESSIONAIRE OBLIGATIONS 4. Duties. Concessionaire shall undertake the duties and responsibilities described in this Contract. It is agreed that the request for bids and the Concessionaire's proposal are hereby made a part of this Contract, and each of the parties agrees to carry out and perform all of the provisions of said documents. In the event of conflicts or inconsistencies between this Contract 1 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract and its exhibits or attachments, such conflicts or inconsistencies shall be resolved by reference to the documents in the following order of priority: a. The Contract; b. The Concessionaire's proposal. 5. Use of Premises. The Premises are to be used to provide food services to Boulder Reservoir users and visitors. Concessionaire acknowledges that the City may allow food providers, such as food trucks, to provide food services at any of the Premises during the term of this Contract. 6. Equipment. The Concessionaire shall provide all equipment and storage necessary to deliver the food products and services in a clean, attractive, and efficient manner. All equipment and inventory must vacate Premises 30 days after last scheduled event, unless noted in the renewal of an additional year of service is signed. Concessionaire will provide gas. 7. Food. The Concessionaire shall prepare or provide soft drinks, sports drink, water, sandwiches, confections, and sundry similar items for sale from the concession area in sufficient quantities to meet the demand. 8. Food Quality. The Concessionaire shall offer for sale only products from reputable preparers, processors, and manufacturers and shall remove from sale any items which fail to meet generally accepted quality standards or the health standards of the City, Boulder County, or the State of Colorado. 9. Ingredients Marked. The Concessionaire shall insure that all packaged food items clearly display on the package the contents and list the ingredients contained therein. 10. Cash Register. The Concessionaire shall install a mechanical or electronic cash register system and shall activate the same at the conclusion of each and every sale and shall make the resultant register record available to the City for audit purposes. 11. Sanitation. The Concessionaire shall maintain the concession area in a clean and hygienic condition and shall keep them free of litter and trash. This obligation shall include, without limitation, periodically throughout the day and at the end of the day picking up cups, plates, utensils, \-\Tapping materials, unconsumed food or drink, and other food related materials left in Concession Area by patrons and policing the concession area for such materials, so that patrons are never presented with a messy, cluttered, or unsanitary area in which to sit and consume food purchased from the Concessionaire. The City shall provide a sufficient number of trash containers within the Premises and shall empty them as needed. Trash from within the concession stand, such as packing boxes, shall be deposited in the receptacles dumpsters provided by the City. Concessionaire will make reasonable efforts to recycle. 12. Zero Waste. The Concessionaire shall ensure that all products for use at the Boulder Reservoir comply with the City's zero waste guidelines and align with on-site disposal options. 2 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract Concessionaire agrees to comply with the those guidelines. The City's zero waste guidelines are found at the attached Exhibit A. 13. Products. a. The City reserves the right to approve the products offered for sale by the Concessionaire, if the City disapproves of a particular item; it may require in writing that the Concessionaire stop selling that item. The City in writing must first approve changes to the approved list of items to be sold. b. The Concessionaire will sell no tobacco products, malt, vinous, or spirituous liquor, or fermented malt beverages on the Premises. c. No drink items shall be sold in glass bottles or glasses. Paper or plastic cups/bottles or metal cans may be used. d. Other Items for sale, must be prior approved by Reservoir Manager. e. Concession Hours of Operation. 10:00 AM-6:00 PM, 7 days a week 14. Fees. The Concessionaire shall pay the City the following fees: Boulder Reservoir: The Concessionaire shall pay the City Five Percent (5%) on all revenues received within the City of Boulder Reservoir Regional Park. The Concessionaire will pay the City by the 15th of the following month. 15. Interest: If the Concessionaire defaults by failing to pay the above fees and costs on time, it shall, at the time it finally does pay the City, also pay interest on such amount at 0.049315% per day from date due to date paid, compounded annually . 3 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 16. Concessionaire Emplovees. The Concessionaire is an independent contractor and not an employee of the City. Employees of the Concessionaire are not employees of the City . Persons working for the Concessionaire on the Premises shall be neat and clean at all times and shall wear some distinctive article of apparel which identifies them as Concessionaire employees. They shall be courteous to all guests and patrons of the Premises. Employees shall not use improper language, consume alcoholic beverages, behave in a boisterous manner, or engage in any horseplay, immoral, disreputable, or unbecoming or otherwise illegal or objectionable conduct or activities while on the Premises or within the ball fields. 17. Accessibility. The Concessionaire shall insure that all services are at all times conveniently accessible to persons with disabilities. But the Concessionaire will not be required to bear the cost of any modifications for this purpose to the Premises as initially provided by the City. 18. Statements and Records. a. Statements. With its percentage fee payment, when such is due, the Concessionaire shall mail to the City a semi-annual statement showing all Gross Receipts using a form provided by the City and approved by the City. The Concessionaire shall include with the statement and exact copy of the sales tax reports which it has filed, and which it is preparing to file, with the City Department of Finance and Record, Sales Tax Division. b. Books and Records. Concessionaire shall keep a set of books and records showing all of the receipts and disbursements concerning business conducted pursuant to this Contract. Such books shall be available for inspection by the City at all reasonable times, and the Concessionaire shall submit such books and records to the City for audit at such times and places as the City may reasonably direct. Such books and records shall be maintained by the Concessionaire in accordance with generally accepted accounting procedures. If the City determines that the books and records are not kept in such a manner, the City may require the Concessionaire, and the Concessionaire agrees to, maintain such books and records under the supervision of a certified public accountant. Such accountant shall attest to the accuracy of the books and records and shall be retained and paid at the expense of the Concessionaire. 4 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 19. Nondiscrimination Requirements. Pursuant to Section 12-1-15, B.R.C. 1981, the Concessionaire shall not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because ofrace, creed, color, national original, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, ancestry, mental or physical disability, or age, except where such is a bona fide occupational qualification. The Concessionaire shall not discriminate against any customer on the Premises on the basis of any of the above-described characteristics. 20. Taxes. The Concessionaire shall obtain all necessary sales tax licenses, including a City of Boulder sales tax license, and shall collect and remit all applicable sales and use taxes, including the City of Boulder sales tax, in accordance with law. The Concessionaire shall pay all City of Boulder sales or use taxes due on the equipment used on the Premises. 21. Licenses. Concessionaire shall obtain, at its expense, any and all licenses necessary for the operation of the Concession, including, without limitation, a City of Boulder food service establishment license as provided by Chapter 4-9, B.R.C. 1981. 22. Signs and Advertising. The Concessionaire will not place any sign or other advertising on the exterior of the concession structure, in the Concession Area, or on other City property, without prior approval by the City's Reservoir Manager. Such approval shall not be unreasonably withheld. Concessionaire will provide the City with a menu and company logo for website informational needs and advertisements. 23. Keys to Concession Areas. The Concessionaire may lock doors to those portions of the Concession Areas in which it stores food or equipment with locks of its choosing, but in such case it shall provide the City with one key for each such lock so that City employees may readily enter such areas in the event of fire, flooding, for inspection, or for any other proper purpose. 24. Subcontractors. Concessionaire may subcontract out the services described in this Contract, upon notice and approval of said subcontractor by the City. No agreement between the contractor and a subcontractor shall in any way affect this Contract between the City and the Concessionaire. The Concessionaire shall require each subcontractor to sign an agreement in which the subcontractor agrees to be bound by all applicable terms and conditions of the Contract for the benefit of the City. The Concessionaire shall be fully responsible for all acts and omissions of its subcontractors and of persons and organizations directly or indirectly employed by them and of persons and organizations for whose acts any of them may be liable to the same extent that the contractor is responsible for the acts and omissions of persons directly employed by the contractor. Nothing in the Contract nor in the City's acceptance of a subcontractor, shall create any contractual relationship between the City and any subcontractor or other person or organization having a direct contract with the contractor, nor shall it create any obligation on the part of the city to pay or to see to the payment of any moneys due any subcontractor or other person or organization. 5 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 25. III. CITY RESPON SIBILITIES The City will provide a location for Concessions equipment storage on the Premises. 26. The City will provide electrical utilities and dumpster fees to the concession area and will pay for all charges for the use thereof. 27 . The City will provide Concessionaire with a schedule of special events. 28. The City will provide Concessionaire with a list of event coordinators for the opportunity to provide concession services to groups hosting special events. IV. TERtv1 29. Term of Contract. Unless sooner terminated, this Contract ends December 31, 2016. The City reserves the right to extend the Contract for up to four (4) additional one-year terms as mutually agreeable by both parties in writing with conditions remaining constant. Contract renewals shall be in writing and signed by both parties. 30. Termination. The City may, at any time, tenninate this Contract, in whole or in part, for its own convenience. Additionally, the City may terminate this Contract upon failure of the Concessionaire to provide adequate service to the public, or upon failure of the Concessionaire to comply with any of the provisions or conditions of this Contract, including without limitation the timely payment of all fees due under this Contract, as follows: a. If the Concessionaire is in breach of any provision or condition of this Contract, the City may serve Notice upon it specifying such defaults with reasonable particularity. After receipt of a notice of breach, the Concessionaire shall continue to prov ide services under the Contract, and shall not remove any inventory or equipment from the Premises. The Concessionaire shall hav e t\venty-one (21) days to cure such breach. If the breach is not cured within the twenty-one (21) days, the City may terminate this Contract, upon written notice to Concessionaire specifying the date of termination. b. In the event of contract termination, the Concessionaire shall vacate the Premises and may, after payment to the City of all sums, including damages, due and payable to the City under the terms of the Contract, remove its inventory and equipment from the Premises. If payment is not received by the City, the City reserves the right to lock the Premises and hold inventory and/or equipment until satisfactory payment is received. If satisfactory payment is not received within twenty-one (21) days from the date of the 6 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract contract termination, the City reserves the right to sell the Concessionaire's inventory and/or equipment. V. INSURANCE AND INDEMNITY 31. Insurance. Concessionaire, or its subcontractors, agree to procure and maintain in force during the term of this Contract, at its own cost, the following minimum coverages: A. Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability B. 1. State of Colorado: Statutory General Liability 1. General Aggregate Limit: ii. Bodily Injury & Property Damage:0 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 Coverage provided should be at least as broad as found in Insurance Services Office (ISO) form CG000I. C. Insurance shall: 1. Provide primary coverage; 11. Include the City of Boulder and its officials and employees as additional insureds as their interest may appear (except for Worker's Compensation and Professional Liability). Additional insured endorsement should be at least as broad as ISO form CG20 IO for General Liability coverage and similar forms for auto liability; 111. Issue from a company licensed to do business in Colorado having an AM Best rating of at least A-VI; and 1v. Be procured and maintained in full force and effect for duration of work. D. Certificates oflnsurance shall be forwarded to Purchasing. Certificate Holder shall be: City of Boulder, 1777 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80306. E. Within seven days after receiving insurer's notice of cancellation or reduction in coverage, Concessionaire, or its insurance broker, shall notify the City. In either such case, Concessionaire shall promptly obtain and submit proof of substitute insurance complying with the City's insurance requirements. 32. Indemnification. The Concessionaire agrees to indemnify and save harmless the City against any and all damages to property or injuries to or death of any person or persons arising from its performance of this Contract, including property and employees or agents of the City and shall defend, indemnify and save harmless the City from any and all claims, demands, suits, actions or proceedings of any kind or nature, including, without limitation, Worker's Compensation claims, of or by anyone whomsoever in any way resulting from or arising out of the Concessionaire's operations in connection with this Contract, including operations of subcontractors and acts or omissions of employees or agents of the Concessionaire or its sub contractor. 7 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 33. No \Vaiver of the Colorado Governmental Immunitv Act. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Contract, to the contrary, no term or condition of this Contract shall be construed or interpreted as a waiver, express or implied, of any of the immunities, rights, benefits, protection, or other provisions of the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act, Section 24-10-101 et seq., C.R.S., as now or hereafter amended. The parties understand and agree that liability for claims for injuries to persons or property arising out of negligence of the City, its departments, institutions, agencies, boards , officials and employees, is controlled and limited by the provisions of Section 24-10-101 et seq., C.R.S., as now or hereafter amended. 34. Protection of Persons and Propertv. The Concessionaire shall take all reasonable safety precautions and provide all reasonable protection to prevent damage, injury, or loss to all employees on the Premises, all customers on the Premises, and all other persons or property which may be injured or damaged on the Premises or otherwise in the course of the performance of this Contract. VI. GENERAL CONDITIONS 35. No Third Party Beneficiarv. This Contract is not intended to create any right in and for the public or any member thereof, or any other third party, or to authorize anyone not a party to the Contract to maintain a suit pursuant to the terms or provisions of the Contract. The duties, obligations, and responsibilities of the parties to the Contract, with respect to third parties, shall remain as imposed by law. 36. Independent Contractor. The relationship between the Concessionaire and the City is that of an independent contractor. The Concessionaire shall supply all personnel, equipment, materials and supplies at its own expense, except as specifically set forth herein. The Concessionaire shall not be deemed to be, nor shall it represent itself as, an employee, partner, or joint venturer of the City. No employee or officer of the City shall supervise the Concessionaire. The Concessionaire is not entitled to worker's compensation benefits and is obligated to directly pay federal and state income tax on money earned under this Contract. 37. Severability. To the extent that the Contract may be executed and performance of the parties' obligation may be accomplished within the intent of the Contract, the terms of the Contract are severable, and should any term or provision of the Contract be declared invalid or become inoperative for any reason, such invalidity or failure shall not affect the validity of any other contract term or provision. 38. Waiver. The waiver of any breach of a term, provision or requirement of this Contract, shall not be construed or deemed as waiver of any subsequent breach of such term, provision or requirement, or of any other term, provision or requirement. 39. Compliance with Laws. This Contract shall be subject to the provisions of the Charter, Municipal Code and ordinances of the City of Boulder. At all times during the performance of the Contract, the Concessionaire shall strictly adhere to all applicable federal, state, and City laws. The term "laws," as used in this Contract, includes, without limitation, all federal, state, county, and City statutes, ordinances, codes, charters, laws, rules, and regulations. 8 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 40. Choice of Law. In all litigation arising out of this Contract, the statutory and common law of the state of Colorado shall be controlling. The parties further agree that the only proper venue shall be in District Court in and for the county of Boulder, Colorado. 41. Assignment. No rights or duties which arise under the terms of this Contract, or by operation of law by virtue of any term or provision of this Contract, may be assigned by the Concessionaire without the express written consent of the City, which it may withhold in its discretion. 42. Prohibitions on Public Contracts for Services. The Concessionaire certifies that the Concessionaire shall comply with the provisions of Section 8-17.5-101 et seq., C.R.S. The Concessionaire shall not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien to perform work under this Contract or enter into a contract with a subcontractor that fails to certify to the Concessionaire that the subcontractor shall not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien to perform work under this contract. The Concessionaire represents, warrants, and agrees: (i) that it has confirmed the employment eligibility of all employees who are newly hired for employment to perform work under this contract through participation in either the E-Verify or the Department Program; (ii) that the Concessionaire is prohibited from using either the E-Verify Program or the Department Program procedures to undertake pre-employment screening of job applicants, while the public contract for services is being performed; and (iii) if the Concessionaire obtains actual knowledge that a subcontractor performing work under the public contract for services knowingly employs or contracts with an illegal alien, the Concessionaire shall be required to: a. Notify the subcontractor and the contracting state agency or political subdivision within three (3) days that the Concessionaire has actual knowledge that the subcontractor is employing or contracting with an illegal alien; and b. Terminate the subcontract with the subcontractor if within three (3) days of receiving the notice required pursuant to Section 8-17 .5-102(2)(b )(Ill)(A) the subcontractor does not stop employing or contracting with the illegal alien; except that the Concessionaire shall not terminate the contract with the subcontractor if during such three days the subcontractor provides information to establish that the subcontractor has not knowingly employed or contracted with an illegal alien. The Concessionaire further agrees that it shall comply with all reasonable requests made in the course of an investigation under Section 8-17.5-102(5), C.R.S., by the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. If the Concessionaire fails to comply with any requirement of this provision or Section 8-17.5-1011., C.R.S., the City may terminate this contract for breach, and the Concessionaire shall be liable for actual and consequential damages to the City. 43. Authority. Whenever any term or provision of this Contract gives discretion to the City to do any act, give any notice, or make any decision, such may be done, unless otherwise specified, by the Boulder Director of Parks and Recreation. Any action which may be taken by the Boulder Director of Parks and Recreation, may also be taken by the Boulder City Manager. 9 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract The Concessionaire may designate in writing to the City those persons with authority to act on its behalf with respect to this Contract. 44. No Multiple Fiscal Year Obligations. Nothing herein shall constitute a multiple fiscal year obligation pursuant to Colorado Constitution, Article X, Section 20. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Contract, the City's obligations under this Contract are subject to annual appropriation by the City Council of the City. Any failure of a City Council annually to appropriate adequate monies to finance the City 's obligations under this Contract, shall terminate this Contract at such time as such then-existing appropriations are to be depleted. Notice shall be given promptly to the Contractor, of any failure to appropriate such adequate monies. 45. Authority. Contractor warrants that the individual executing this Contract is properly authorized to bind the Contractor to this Contract. (SIGNATURE PAGE FOLLOWS) 10 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract STATEOFCOWRADO ) ) ss. COUNTY OF BOULDER ) The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me, a notary public, this ~ day of J'llkRC.\-t 20JL by 1~011/H\5 WARrJ,KE .as {) vN£r Witness my hand and official seal. My commission expires: f /-2-° /'J--1) 'Z{) ALBERT BOGGS Ill NOTARY PUBLIC STATE OF COLORADO NOTARY ID 20164002183 MY COMMISSION EXPIRES 01/2012020 ATTEST: ~ APPROVED AS TO FORM: City Attorney's Office EXHIBITS: Exhibit A: City of Boulder Zero Waste Guidelines 11 CITY OF BOULDER (Jc--,_ s ~ City Manage~ Attachment C - Original Concession Contract A EXHIBIT A Cily of Boulder ~ LEAD Lal Enmmiental Actmllilisial Ccnnuitr f'lllming &Sullnlilily Zero Waste Materials Agreement Guidelines to Containers and Service Ware Acceptable All paper containers including plates, bowls, cups, etc. Waxed paper products are acceptable, as long as you can scratch the wax coating off with your fingernail. Nothing can have a plastic lining. #2 and #5 plastic tubs and cups (compostable paper, potato starch or com starch preferred) :An '9th~~-1:1_1,m:i~~r~_'.§fk1~~t!¢. ~ups {eveff~Jn:~n d¢1~ ~~p~) _ -------,_ :;~11 :otner,numtiers"of narrow;neck"inlast'c ·. ·-Narrow-neck plastic containers (#s 1, 2 & 5 contai~er~: -· · · ··· , -· ··· --··•-P. --_J - only) Potato or cornstarch lfds Potato starch or com starch cutlery (spoons, forks, knives, straws) . .J , •• I ,.. _ . ..,_ .. ) fllastic'!:stra\Yf~-· Wooden stir-sticks, chopsticks, toothpicks and skewers Waxed paper products ·-. ~ ---.. Aluminum foil and cans Glass bottles and jars Paper mflk cartons and drink boxes Paper napkins and paper towels • Please note that you will be asked to remove any non-recyclable or non-compostable items from your site for the duration of the event. 3-18-2013 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract EXHIBIT A ~ City of Boulder ~ Zero Waste Materials Agreement LEAD Ensure that all vendors at your event are on board with your Zero Waste efforts! LuElll-1111.11:tbtlMiln Connui\y~•~ Vendors .ire required to hand out only recyclable or compostable products. Here are some ideas that can help you achieve this goal: -Offer finger foods to use fewer utensils. -Consider replacfng plastic bowls (for serving chili and soups) with bread bowls and using cones for ke cream. • Paper napkins are compostable and can replace bulkJer plates. -Do not use Styrofoam® or plastic (recyclable plastic bottles are OK). Please use the recyclable or compostable alternatives listed above • .. Compostable materials can be purchased easily and locally (see below.) Sources for Compostabla Sarvfceware: Eco-Products (Boulderi CO) Green Logic (Ft. Collfns, CO} ~ WWW,i?CQIJ[Qd!Jcis,'-Dm 303-449-1876 (Qgir:,aet,!comP.Q5tab~·lablewate.btml 970-484- 1740 Hard Copy Solutions (Longmont, CO) World Centric (Palo Alto, CA) www,barckopy.onlioe.com 303-772-2902 www.worldcentdc.org/biolinde><JJ.tm 650-739- 0699 All Things Renewable (Denver, CO) Nature Friendly Products (Beachwood, OH} www,alltbingsreaewable.cam 303-307-www,nfptQ,c12mlpmductSthtmJ 1-800-321-4804 x 1317 105 We look forward to work1ing wfth you to make this a successful Zero Waste Event. If you have questions regarding Zero Waste, contact Kelle Boumansour at 303•441-1940 or boumanss2Uds@ba.1.l1.der-'O.lttr.ad0..goy. 3-111-2013 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract To Whom It May Concern, 2/12/2016 I am writing this proposal in response to a request made to me regarding the Concession Stand at the Boulder Reservoir. Having met with Skyler Beck and Stacy Cole on location and having discussed some of the past and possible future operations, I believe my company has the skills and experience to make the most out of this opportunity. While we believe this year will present many challenges, we feel that there is money to be made and a positive future to build towards. 1. Services & Operations Our goal for the concession stand is to provide delicious food and great service, to utilize onsite and online marketing to drive traffic and sales, and to set a positive trajectory for the future of food service at the reservoir. There are several key components to achieving these goals, including a solid operations plan, a consistent and well liked menu, .and an updated social media and marketing plan. We also want to show the additional services we can provide with our two mobile units and extensive catering capabilities. By using all of our available resources, we hope to help create an environment that will make a great experience for visitors and bring them back to the reservoir year after year. Our plan for a menu is to keep things tasty, simple, and affordable. The menu will have popular snack bar type items hamburgers, hot dogs, sandwiches, kids items, French fries, and salads. We will also sell beverages, chips, candy, and ice cream. We may also offer some breakfast items if we find there is a demand in the earlier hours of service. We will have to add a deep fryer for the French fries, and we are looking into leasing a soft serve ice cream machine as well. We would want to implement these changes immediately in order to have them ready for the beginning of the season. We feel that just the addition of these two items alone will help increase traffic to the stand. Please see attached menu for details. We would also ask that there would be no other food or beverage available onsite, including vending machines, unless we were operating the vending machines. With all of the special events that occur each year, we think it is a great opportunity to utilize our two mobile units and our catering company to give the event coordinators an easier experience with their search for a food vendor. When these groups book the reservoir, we would like to have the first right of refusal. If there is an occasion when our company was not available, we would be able to assist the event coordinator with finding another option, as we know most of the mobile vendors and caterers in the area. This should be a nice service for the groups that are looking to book the reservoir, as I know finding food vendors can be a real hassle. Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 2. Work Experience My name is Tom Warnke and I am the owner of Three Worn Keys, LLC. I have been working in food service since I was 16 years old, and one of my first jobs was actually working concessions at The Garden State Arts Center in New Jersey. For three summers I ran the food kiosks, and from there I moved on to the restaurant business. For the next 20 or so years I worked in many establishments, starting as a dish washer and working my way up through every position, eventually becoming General Manager for two local Boulder restaurants in 2008. In 2012, I left the GM position and opened my first food truck, The Wheel & Whisk. This year, I purchased a second mobile kitchen which I am in the process of getting licensed. We also have a growing catering business which specializes in everything from corporate breakfasts to weddings. Due to our significant growth, this summer I was able to bring on a full time operational business partner, Jaime Martinez, who has lived and worked in Boulder most of his life. Born in Mexico and moving to the US when he was 12, Jaime has been working in restaurants and food service for over 20 years. He was the executive chef at the same restaurants where I was GM, and has worked as a chef in some of the best establishments in town. In addition to his 20 years in the restaurant biz, he has executed hundreds of weddings and other high end events. With many years of management experience, he has the skills necessary to take on many roles in my organization, and his leadership and involvement will be crucial to the success of our operation. 3. Aesthetic Improvements & Additional Equipment and Investments While we believe the stand could use some significant updates, because this is only a one year agreement, I am not looking to invest much money towards improvements. With unknown past sales and an unknown future, we have to be very careful how much money we invest into it this year. As stated in the menu section, we are looking at adding a deep fryer for French fries and a soft serve ice cream machine, which we will probably lease. We would also like to put on a fresh coat of paint, and add some potted plants to the outside area. 4. Staffing & Hours Without having any historical numbers, staffing is going to be a little bit of a work in progress. Our goal would be to have at least two people on site at all times, which would allow us to have one person working the cash register and one person cooking and preparing food. Jaime and I will each work several shifts per week and take on most of the managerial duties. We will also hire one assistant manager and several other part time employees. It will be important to stay active in the staffing levels, as we need to achieve a certain level of service but much be conscious of cost. This dilemma is not unique to this operation, every food establishment deals Attachment C - Original Concession Contract with the same issue. We feel confident that our experience will allow us to navigate these difficulties and produce the right balance of service and cost control. As far as uniforms, we would like them to wear matching T-Shirts with the Boulder Reservoir Insignia, and with khaki pants or shorts. We will also provide aprons to help keep them looking clean and ready for service. Hats will also be required, as well as gloves when handling food. Our normal operating hours will be 10:00-6:00, 7 days a week. When there is a special event of any kind, we plan to open earlier and serve light breakfast and coffee to give the participants an extra option and to capture some extra revenue. We will only close due to weather. S. Social Media and Marketing For all the years I've lived in Boulder I didn't even know there was a concession stand at the reservoir. In order to get the word out to the general public, we must create a social media platform that has local and regional reach. By developing a webpage, facebook, and twitter feed, and linking all ofthese through the city of Boulder's already existing platform, we should be able to reach significant numbers of locals and tourists before they decide to come down to the reservoir. This is key because then they may decide not to pack their own lunch and instead will make the conscious decision to eat at the concession stand instead. We also want to increase onsite marketing, in the form of signage around the entire reservoir property, bright signs near the entrance of the stand, and a menu handed out to visitors when they enter the gate . I'm not sure what has been done in previous years, but there needs to be clear indicators pointing guests to the concession stand. This can be simply achieved with minimal cost, as long as the reservoir is okay with some increased signage. 6. Business Insurance I have been in contact with my current business insurance provider and he says he will probably be able to provide coverage under my existing policy. I currently have Liberty Mutual for general liability, property damage, and worker's comp. Conclusion Our company has been steadily growing over the last 3 years, and we think this opportunity would be a good fit with our existing profile. While it is difficult to predict exactly how this summer will unfold, we believe that our skills and experience give us a great chance to make it work. We have lived and worked in Boulder for many years, and giving back and being part of the community is an important thing for us. With this opportunity, we would be able to not only grow our business, but also be a part ofthe iconic Boulder Reservoir . Thank you very much for the consideration. Attachment C - Original Concession Contract Boulder Reservoir Concession Stand Menu Taylor Ham, Egg & Cheese Sandwich -$7 .00 Taylor pork roll, cheddar, fried egg, salt, pepper, ketchup Pico Quesadilla -$7.00 add chicken -$2 pico de gallo, cheddar jack cheese, flour tortilla, sour cream Cheesesteak Sandwich -$9.00 marinated sirloin, grilled onions, cheddar cheese, hogie Hummus Wrap -$7.00 hummus, cucumbers, tomatoes, onions, lettuce, olives, flour tortilla Buffalo Chicken Wrap -$8.00 grilled chicken, buffalo sauce, ranch, lettuce, onion Cheeseburger -$8.00 cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo, mustard, ketchup Mixed Green Salad -$6.00 mixed greens, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, balsamic vinaigrette Chicken Tenders w/ French Fries -$7 .00 Kids Hot Dog -$4.00 all beef hot dog, bun Kids Quesadilla -$4.00 flour tortilla, cheese French Fries -$2.50 Chips & Candy -$2.00 Ice Cream -$3.00 Beverages -Fountain Soda, Bottle Water -$1.50 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract Phone: (303)441-1880 Fax: (303)441-4241 AE~RD 9 CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE I DA TE (MM/DD/YYYY) 08/26/2015 THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MA TIER OF INFORMATION ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. THIS CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AFFIRMATIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AMEND, EXTEND OR ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES BELOW. THIS CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT BETWEEN THE ISSUING INSURER(S), AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE OR PRODUCER, AND THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. IMPORTANT: If the certificate holder is an ADDITIONAL INSURED, the policy(ies) must be endorsed. If SUBROGATION IS WAIVED, subject to the terms and conditions of the policy, certain policies may require an endorsement. A statement on this certificate does not confer rights to the certificate holder in lieu of such endorsement(s). PRODUCER CONTACT Terri M Hauk NAME: Long's Insurance Agency,lnc m£JN~o-~..+,-(720)684-6012 I FAX (A/C Nol: (720)684-6052 7800 Miller Dr. Unit C E-MAIL Terri@Longslnsurance.com Frederick, CO 80504 ADDRESS: INSURER!Sl AFFORDING COVERAGE NAIC# License #: 252724 Libertv Mutual 24082 INSURER A: INSURED INSURERB: The Wheel and Whisk INSURERC: 3824 Northbrook Dr INSURERD: Boulder, CO 80304 INSURERE: INSURERF: COVERAGES CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 00000000-0 REVISION NUMBER: 3 THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOT\I\IITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT, TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS, EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. INSR ADDLSUBR 1r,,z,M%Mffv, r~TJvWYI LIMITS LTR T1'PE OF INSURANCE •••en lwun POLICY NUMBER A X ! COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY BLS55528182 04/26/2015 04/26/2016 EACH OCCURRENCE $ 1000000 ro CLAIMS-MADE [i] OCCUR DAMAGE TO RENTED 300 000 PREMISES iEa occurrence\ $ f----i MED EXP (Any one person) $ 15 000 '_j PERSONAL &ADV INJURY $ 1 000.000 GEN'L AGGREGATE LIMIT APPLIES PER: GENERAL AGGREGATE $ 2 000.000 ~POLICY Of~ Owe PRODUCTS -COMP/OP AGG $ 2 000,000 OTHER: $ A AUTOMOBILE LIABILIT1' BAS55528182 04/26/2015 04/26/2016 COMBINED SINGLE LIMIT $ 500.000 /Ea accident) - ANY AUTO BODILY INJURY (Per person) $ -ALL OWNED X SCHEDULED BODILYINJURY(Peraccidanl) $ -AUTOS ~ ~~1~J\o\NED HIRED AUTOS AUTOS rp~~~gd,:nt~AMAGE $ >--- $ UMBRELLA LIAB H OCCUR EACH OCCURRENCE $ ~ EXCESSLIAB CLAIMS-MADE AGGREGATE $ DED I I RETENTION$ $ A WORKERS COMPENSATION XWS55528182 04/26/2015 04/26/2016 XI ~ffTUTE I I OTH- AND EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY ER Y/N 100,000 ANY PROPRIETOR/PARTNER/EXECUTIVE □ N/A E.L. EACH ACCIDENT $ OFFICER/MEMBER EXCLUDED? 100,000 (Mandatory in NH) E.L. DISEASE-EA EMPLOYEE $ If yes, dascMbe under DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS below E.L. DISEASE-POLICY LIMIT $ 500,000 DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS/LOCATIONS/ VEHICLES (ACORD 101, Additional Remarks Schedule, may be attached if more space is required) The City of Boulder and all of it's employees are listed as additional insured's wth regards to general liability. CERTIFICATE HOLDER City of Boulder PO Box 791 1739 Broadway 3rd Fl Boulder, CO 80306 ACORD 25 (2014/01) CANCELLATION SHOULD ANY OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION DATE THEREOF, NOTICE WILL BE DELIVERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH TliE POLICY PROVISIONS. AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE MH © 1988-2014 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved. The ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD Printed by TMH on August 26, 2015 at 04:11PM Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: December 21, 2020 A. Ecological Services Update NOTE: This is repeated from the November 2020 packet, with the addition of information about two successful grants that were awarded since the previous meeting. Within the Planning and Ecological Services division, the Natural Lands team is responsible for natural resource management throughout the BPR system, including managing approximately 1,200 undeveloped acres out of the total BPR parkland of 1,800 acres. This includes vegetation and wildlife management on most BPR properties, as well as visitor management on natural areas, including the North Shore of Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake (site of the vast majority of BPR’s natural lands). These areas support native wildlife and plant species in urban ecosystems. The four primary components of the Natural Lands program are: • Integrative Pest Management and Restoration, • Wildlife Management, • Visitor Management and • Natural Lands Maintenance. The work within these components is largely driven by federal, state, and local regulations. A multi-faceted approach to land management ensures that balance is achieved between natural resource conservation and provision of recreational opportunities. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration Every year, a focus of the Natural Lands team during the summer growing months is the suppression and eradication of noxious weeds. The State of Colorado classifies noxious weeds by an A, B, and C designation based on the possibility of eradiation, infestation size and ability to manage. List A species, such as purple loosestrife and myrtle spurge, and List B(e) species, such as common teasel and Canadian thistle are the primary focus for the Photo 1. Purple loosestrife at Boulder Reservoir 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Natural Lands team. Given reduced capacity and resources in 2020, chemical and mechanical controls have been more broadly used as they tend to be the most timely and cost-effective methods for ensuring compliance with State of Colorado Weed Law. The team performs control across the 565 acres of land infested with these listed species. In addition to noxious weeds, the Natural Lands crew monitors and controls a variety of invasive tree species such as Russian olive, salt cedar, green ash, crack willow, and Siberian elm. In partnership with the Construction team, boot brush kiosks were recently completed and installed at the Coot Lake and 55th Street trailheads to educate visitors about noxious weeds. This work was supported by a small grant from the Colorado State Department of Agriculture. Following effective suppression or eradication of listed weed species or land disturbance from construction, restoration is often necessary to ensure returning vegetation supports native ecosystems. In 2019 and 2020, the Natural Lands team has collaborated with various departments on the restoration of the corridors for the Carter Lake pipeline near the Boulder Reservoir and the Goose Creek pipeline near Valmont City Park, as well as after the installation of solar arrays near the Reservoir. Other examples of restoration collaboration include on-going restoration on the North Shore of the Reservoir and other areas of the Reservoir as required as part of Northern Water’s maintenance project. The Natural Lands team frequently collaborates with staff from other city departments, including OSMP, Planning (i.e., City IPM Coordinator) and Greenways, to increase effectiveness and efficiency of vegetation management issues that extend beyond BPR boundaries. In 2020, some of those efforts have included working to get a new herbicide (Esplanade) on the city’s approved pesticide list, as well as on-going efforts to update the city-wide IPM manual with best practices that cross departments. Aquatic Nuisance Species In 2004, New Zealand mudsnails (NZMS) were first documented in Boulder by OSMP staff in portions of Boulder Creek. Since then, the Natural Lands team conducts annual surveys to detect the presence or absence of (NZMS) within the waterways of BPR properties. The department has 20 priority sites which are monitored each year in August or September and 16 secondary sites which are monitored every three years as resources allow. These annual surveys have confirmed the presence of NZMS in three BPR areas: Fourmile Canyon Creek north of the Pleasant View soccer fields (confirmed in 2016), Elmer’s Two-mile Park (confirmed in 2019), and the waters of East Palo Park (confirmed in 2020). In 2020, OSMP staff confirmed the presence of NZMS in a reach of South Boulder Creek, near East Boulder Community Park. The Natural Lands team is in ongoing conversations with OSMP staff to collaborate on management efforts to reduce the spread of NZMS from the creek to surrounding water bodies, including nearby constructed wetlands on BPR property and the ponds at East Boulder Community Park. Potential management efforts could include additional exclusion fencing around non-infested waters to prevent spread and additional signage to inform visitors of actions they can take to prevent the spread of ANS. The key to ANS management is prevention of an infestation from the onset. Once an infestation has occurred, it is critical to enact management efforts to prevent further spread of the population. To reduce the potential for spread of ANS due to necessary and critical work of the Photo 2. New Zealand mudsnails found at Elmer’s Two Mile Park in 2019 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 department or other city departments, the Natural Lands team has developed a protocol for working in areas known to have an infestation based on state and national guidelines. This protocol includes guidelines for monitoring, equipment decontamination and other management actions. The protocol has been shared with and is utilized by other departments as part of a city- wide effort to protect Boulder’s water bodies from ANS. Wildlife Management Wildlife management conducted by the Natural Lands team covers the entire spectrum of species, including birds, mammals, and reptiles and amphibians. Some species monitored on BPR properties include species of conservation concern, as designated by federal, state, and local authorities. These species of conservation concern include the Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse (a federally Threatened species), Northern leopard frog (a state-listed species of conservation concern), and the Northern harrier (a Boulder County designated species of conservation concern). Monitoring techniques utilized include direct observation surveys, wildlife cameras and acoustic meters. Prairie dogs The Natural Lands team is primarily responsible for the management of prairie dogs throughout the BPR system. This includes both areas meant for long term conservation of prairie dog populations, as well as maintaining prairie dog free areas. The Natural Lands team actively manages several areas as prairie dog free, such as the Stazio ballfields and Foothills Community Park. For most prairie dog free areas, management includes maintaining barriers to exclude prairie dogs from moving in, as well as relocating individuals that have moved into the exclusion areas. Most relocation in these cases is done utilizing passive methods such as closing burrow entrances in exclusion areas. Occasionally active relocation includes flushing individuals from a burrow and returning them to the active colony area. In 2020, the Natural Lands team has spent more time than usual moving prairie dogs out of these exclusion areas. One potential reason could be the decrease in use of these areas by sporting and other events. Human use tends to drive away the prairie dogs, but there has been less of that this year. In 2020, Natural Lands staff has been collaborating with OSMP to actively relocate prairie dogs that have appeared at Foothills Community Park. Several years ago, the colony at Foothills was relocated to OSMP property south of the city and annual management includes monitoring to ensure the entire area stays prairie dog free. Because there are no designated areas for prairie dogs to exist at Foothills, the prairie dogs to be relocated this year will also end up at OSMP property in the southern grasslands. Active relocation such as this involves significant collaboration to ensure best practices are being followed, such as dusting the colony for fleas and inoculating the colony to prevent spreading plague. Other best practices include closing inactive burrows to concentrate flushing and trapping activities, as well as having artificial burrows available at the receiving site in which to place the relocated individuals. These practices help increase the probability of successfully relocating individuals to new areas. Per the recommendations of the Prairie Dog Working Group from 2019, the second annual community meeting focused on city-wide prairie dog management was held virtually on December 14th at 5:30 p.m., hosted by OSMP. For more information and links to the presentations, visit the OSMP Prairie Dog Conservation and Management webpage. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Other species The Natural Lands team also spends a significant amount of time on non-prairie dog wildlife management. This includes amphibian and reptile monitoring, jackrabbit and badger surveys, Preble’s meadow jumping mouse surveys, acoustic monitoring, wildlife camera research, breeding bird surveys, wildlife observation monitoring, and wildlife closure protection. Time spent on these tasks continues to increase as novel observations (i.e., known Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse on OSMP property adjacent to East Boulder) require BPR staff follow-up to understand what is occurring on BPR property to make informed management recommendations. Four properties surrounding the Boulder Reservoir are actively managed to protect state or locally listed birds of conservation concern, including Northern harrier, burrowing owl, American bittern and osprey. Seasonal closures around known nesting areas of these four species increase the probability of success for nesting and ensure the species future in the Boulder area. In addition to the four bird species of concern, Northern leopard frogs, which are a Tier 1 Colorado State Species of Special Concern, were first discovered on BPR property in 2013 at the East Boulder Community Park wetlands. Today, efforts to locate leopard frogs have expanded to annual amphibian surveys at 11 park properties as well as habitat improvement projects such as removing dense patches of cattails to improve breeding habitat. Given limited resources, staff also utilizes a song meter to passively record wetland areas in hopes of detecting Northern leopard frog calls and other amphibian species. In 2019, staff began monitoring another Tier 1 State of Colorado Species of Concern and a federally-listed Threatened species, the Preble’s meadow jumping mouse, by implementing a survey method using track plates. This novel method for surveying allows the Natural Lands team to survey for rodent populations without having to handle individuals and risk capture mortalities, which is critical given their federal listing status. General wildlife observation surveys occur on all natural areas as well as jackrabbit and badger tracking surveys around Boulder Reservoir and Area III when snow conditions allow. Wildlife cameras have been deployed throughout the system since 2014 to monitor wildlife species. Over 90,000 photos from 24 unique locations on 13 park sites have been processed. Cameras have captured 48 unique species, including five species of concern, such as Northern harrier. In 2020, the Colorado Bat Society did independent surveying at Thunderbird Lake at Admiral Arleigh A. Burke Park. That surveying indicated a wide diversity of bats utilizing the area, including the tri-colored bat. The tri-colored bat is one of the smallest bats in North America and is most commonly found in the eastern United States. Due to habitat loss, impacts from wind turbines and White-nose syndrome, the tri-colored bat is currently under consideration for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Photo 3. Tiger salamander offspring at Area III 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Visitor Management: Volunteer Programs The Natural Lands teams oversees two long-term citizen science programs that utilize volunteers to gather data on wildlife species. These are the Birds of Special Concern program at the Boulder Reservoir and Prairie Dog Counts, running 16 and 20 years, respectively. Despite a delayed start to the volunteer season, 18 Birds of Special Concern volunteers provided 280 hours of time recording observations of nesting behavior out at the Reservoir. Northern harriers set a record in 2020, fledging five young from a single nest near Dry Creek. Three osprey fledged from the nesting platform also near Dry Creek. In 2020, eight Prairie Dog Count volunteers assisted with nine total days of counts in June, July and August, increasing staff’s time by 111 hours. These counts provided data that helped determine that most of the colonies around the Reservoir saw some decline in numbers this year, but nothing of major concern. A formal report generated by a consultant will be provided to PRAB over the winter months that summarizes all data gathered and makes some management recommendations to support visitor management and to make habitat recommendations. Normally, staff spends several days providing outreach and education opportunities at the North Shore and Coot Lake during the summer months. In 2020, those duties were performed by the new Natural Lands Outreach volunteers as staff’s time was prioritized elsewhere. This program recruited five volunteers that completed 27 shifts for a total of 66 hours. These volunteers observed visitor behaviors to be able to report immediate issues to Reservoir staff and engaged visitors in conversations. These conversations provided visitors information about a variety of topics including ANS, wildlife closures, water use and rules, and COVID-19 safety on the trails. The Natural Lands Team and Volunteer Services looks forward to continuing this program over the winter and into 2021 as one way to best expand staff’s limited capacity. The Natural Lands team is happy to announce a successful application to Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) to support two weeks of service from the Mile High Youth Corps in 2021. The project is focused on land management issues on the North Shore of the Boulder Reservoir and will occur between June and November of 2021. Natural Lands Maintenance: Thunderbird Lake at Admiral Arleigh A. Burke Park Natural Lands staff manage Thunderbird Lake for multiple purposes including habitat, water storage and recreation. In 2007, the community prompted BPR staff to increase management activities at this site and to evaluate options for better maintaining open water. Consultants were hired and of the options identified, it was decided to pursue a pilot program where potable water was dechlorinated and added to the lake. To preserve open water, aeration units were also installed and maintained annually alongside weed removal and annual vegetation clearing of maintenance corridors into the lake. Since then, contractors are hired annually to perform water quality testing and to add microbes to enhance water quality and decrease algal blooms. Photo 4. Photo courtesy of Peter Ridgeway. Northern harrier driving away coyote at Boulder Reservoir. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Moreover, Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff have provided electro-shock to remove thousands of introduced goldfish/koi and to stock predatory fish for those not captured. Groundwater monitoring wells and an onsite staff gauge/water level reader also provide ongoing monitoring of water levels at the surface and subsurface groundwater. Staff have worked with consultants annually since 2007 to track conditions and identify options for maintaining or increasing water supply. Most recently, a 2016-2019 Adaptive Management Plan established management goals including to maintain an open area of the lake (targeted at 0.9-1 acre in size) and to maintain the diversity of wetland and native plant communities around the lake. These goals allow the park to continue to provide several wetland ecosystems services or functions including shoreline stabilization, food chain support, groundwater discharge/recharge, water quality and recreation. Throughout this adaptive management timeframe, staff and the community have observed declining water levels, increase in vegetation and an overall reduction in the lake water surface area. In response, staff directed the consultant team to prepare a summary report and outline clear options and alternatives that the department can review and determine the best approach to the managing the lake given all the variables. This report found that the size of the combined open water and mud flat areas decreased by 0.08 acres, from 1.11 acres in 2016 to 1.03 acres in 2019, or a rate of approximately -0.3 ft per year. New climate data suggest this is likely related to increasing temperatures causing increased evaporation, and this trend is expected to continue. The native plant community types have remained the same. However, the relative distribution of community types has shifted with drier habitat types of riparian and transition/upland vegetation encroaching on emergent wetland areas. Based on the climate data and lake observations, the plant community transitions are expected to continue. Throughout the next few months and prior to next spring, staff will be reviewing the recommended strategies and determining the key management activities to support the lake. This information will be shared with PRAB and the community on an ongoing basis. B. Master Plan Update City Council Study Session A study session was held with City Council on December 8, 2020. Staff presented the project approach and engagement plan, key themes from 2014, and brief overview and approach to equity and resilience. Overall, council was supportive of the process and approach as presented and indicated that equity and resilience are appropriate topics for additional evaluation. A special thanks to PRAB Chair Seymour and PRAB member Winer for participating in the study session. The first section of the presentation focused on the project approach and public engagement plan. Council was asked specifically if they support the process and overall engagement plan, as well as if they had any specific input on the proposed engagement methods or areas for refinement should capacity and/or resources become constrained. Council members expressed that both the overall process and engagement plan are in alignment with their expectations. They particularly appreciated the focus on underserved populations. Council members struggled with identifying any engagement methods to drop if resources and/or capacity become limited, and noted if that occurs, the department should identify suggestions to approach council for feedback. The second section of the presentation focused on the key themes from the 2014 Master Plan, how they were developed originally, and a summary of the work staff has identified for this Master Plan Update related to each theme. Council was asked if they agree that the key themes 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 from 2014 are still relevant and should be the starting point for the Master Plan Update. Council members noted several items for consideration, including considering residents, non-residents and unhoused individuals as stakeholders and beneficiaries of the department. Council members echoed PRAB’s input to increase cross-departmental coordination to ensure city-wide issues such as equity, resilience and homelessness are treated in a holistic approach. The final section of the presentation focused on the new topics of equity and resilience and specifically how those relate to parks and recreation. Council was asked for input on these two topics, as well as to identify any additional focus areas staff may have missed. Council concurred that equity and resilience are appropriate areas of focus for the Master Plan Update. Specifically, council requested that the department examine the subtleties of equitable access and ensuring that the facilities provided are appropriately serving the surrounding community, as well as how future capital developments, such as at Valmont City Park and the Planning Reserve, might address some of these equity and resilience issues. Several council members noted the need to update the city-wide Sustainability Framework to include these two issues, equity and resilience, in a consistent manner throughout the city’s work. White Paper Charette On Tuesday, December 15th, staff came together for a three-hour facilitated conversation focused on identifying specific accomplishments and areas for improvement related to the existing and new white papers. The charette was kicked off with keynote speakers from Vancouver, San Diego and Denver discussing their lessons learned from incorporating equity into their parks and recreation master plans and everyday work. Breakout sessions then focused on conversations about asset management, recreation programs and services, resilience and equity. Staff identified specific accomplishments, areas for improvement, information or data gaps, areas for greatest impact, and big ideas for each of these topics. The results of the charette will directly inform the development of the System Overview Snapshot that will be developed in January. That snapshot will be shared with PRAB within Q1 of next year. PRAB Feedback Preferences Staff noted that the November 23, 2020, PRAB meeting ran longer than normal due to discussion regarding the Master Plan Update. Staff values PRAB’s input and direction for this important project and the PRAB’s engagement will be critical for success throughout the project. In addition to working with the Chair and Vice Chair to balance discussion items in any given month, there are two alternatives to explore: 1) the potential for longer regular business meetings when there is significant discussion necessary for the Master Plan, or 2) scheduling special study sessions with PRAB outside the regular business meeting for those discussions. The board’s input on preferred methods will help inform how the PRAB’s input is scheduled moving forward. Next Steps After the first of the year, staff will be gearing up for the first engagement window in late- January, into February. Staff will seek PRAB feedback in the System Overview Snapshot and provide an update and the technical content portion of the project moves into the Needs Assessment phase. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 C. 2020 and 2021 Operating Budget Update This item was originally prepared for the November 23, 2020 meeting. There have been no significant changes to the written report; however, the Business Services team will present updated financial information on 2020 revenues, expenses, and usage trends at the December 21, 2020 meeting. Background Throughout the course of 2020, the department has worked with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB), the Finance Department, the city’s Executive Budget Team, and BPR’s staff to monitor and adjust the 2020 operating budget while also developing the 2021 operating budget. The 2021 Recommended Budget was approved by City Council on Tuesday, October 20, 2020. In developing the budget, every department was faced with difficult decisions based on declining revenue levels attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic, for an overall estimated 16% reduction in sales and use taxes. The City Manager’s Message described the difficulties in developing the 2021 budget, “This reality has required every department in the city to reconsider the programs and services it offers. In many instances, departments have had to do more with less, develop new systems and protocols and find creative ways to meet the community’s needs in a time when resources are declining. There will be continuing service level impacts, and it is important that we be transparent about these.” The total 2021 BPR operating budget submission is $29.6 million, with approximately $2.6 million in significant operating budget reductions, an 8.8% decrease from the 2020 original budget. The department adapted to challenges encountered by the pandemic in 2020’s operations. Adjustments include decreased recreational offerings based on the public health limitations, decreased participation levels in many recreation activities, decreased staffing levels and declines in revenues. The department has responded to each shift and phase of the pandemic in a way that is responsible to participants and staff, while being financial stewards of public funds and reducing corresponding expenses accordingly. The PRAB has been informed of these decisions at multiple touch points throughout the year, including: • April 27, 2020 – Parks and Recreation Department Response to COVID-10 and Financial Impacts Update • May 11, 2020 – Ad Hoc Meeting – Recreation Recovery Feasibility • May 27, 2020 – Financial Strategy: 2020 Budget Reductions, 2021 Operating Budget Development, 2021-26 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) • June 22, 2020 – Matters from the Department – 2021 Operating Budget; Public Hearing and Consideration of Motions Approving the 2021 Expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and 2021-2026 Park and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Fund • August 24, 2020 – Public Hearing and Approval of Revised 2021-26 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) • September 30, 2020 – Matters from the Department – Operating Budget Update The department’s Business Services team has conducted bi-monthly analysis of all revenue and expenses which is reviewed by the department’s leadership team and used to make real-time adjustments in operations. The revised 2020 budget assumed revenues declines in three areas: the General Fund was decreased 11% based on declines in sales tax and other revenue sources, the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund was decreased 14% based on declines in sales tax, and the Recreation 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Activity Fund was decreased 36% based on declines in user fees paid by users of recreation programs. As a result, expenses were decreased: 14% in the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, 32% in the Recreation Activity Fund. In March 2021, the department will report back to the PRAB on the year-end actual revenue and expenses across the department. The following summary of activity between May and September of 2019 and 2020 demonstrates the significant impacts of the pandemic: May to September 2019 Actual 2020 Actual Change 2019 to 2020 % Change 2019 to 2020 Earned Revenue $4.6M $1.8M $(2.8)M -61% Registered Program Offerings 890 275 (615) -69% Registered Participants 7,200 2,010 (5,190) -72% Average Daily Usage - NBRC 485 75 (410) -85% Non-Standard Staffing Hours (Memorial Day to Labor Day) 86,514 23,477 (63,607) -72% Rounds of Golf Played 26,457 31,958 5,501 21% Table 1: BPR Statistics May to September 2019-2020 2021 Operating Budget In April 2020, during the beginning of the pandemic, the department began to prepare the 2021 proposed budget based on guidance from the Finance Department and the city’s Executive Budget Team. Revenue assumptions were developed in consultation with economists from CU Boulder for sales tax dependent funds, while department staff identified anticipated impacts to participation for revenue in the department’s Recreation Activity Fund. The approved 2021 budget is based on the best knowledge and assumptions of a recovery during the timeframe of April to June 2020. The department’s 2021 budget proposal responds to the Finance Department’s request for prioritizing a decreased budget that also adheres to the department’s 2014 Master Plan fiscally constrained planning scenario. New for this process, the department utilized the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience definitions to categorize services and the city’s Rapid Response Racial Equity instrument, which allowed the department to fund 100% of Essential services and more significantly reduce those that fall into Helpful or Amenity categories. The department developed a balanced 2021 budget through decreased staffing levels and decreased operating costs, which correspond to the anticipated participation levels. A total of 19.5 standard positions were reduced from 2020 original staffing levels through attrition, holding vacancies, and layoffs. Over half of these positions are at the management level to minimize the impact customers and residents see in services. Additional reductions were made to non-standard seasonal employment throughout 2021 based on decreased levels of operations. The strategies proposed to achieve a balanced budget are instrumental to the department’s efforts to support the mission of promoting community health and well-being through the provision of high-quality parks, facilities, and 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 programs. Building on all of the previous items and conversations with the board regarding budgeting amidst the pandemic, he board is provided this information to update the board on the outlook of department finances, and ensure the board is aware of the impacts included in the 2021 approved budget. Service Level Impacts The 2021 operating budget maintains funding for services that ensure the safety of park properties, including moving, playground maintenance, hazardous tree removal, waste management, graffiti ordinance compliance and mitigating the impacts of illegal encampments in public spaces. Service levels reduced in the 2021 budget related to park operations, forestry and natural lands include those that enhance the visual experience of visiting a park, proactive maintenance, and preventative work related to the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation in Boulder. Examples include: • Reduced materials and labor to perform the cultural practices (such as topdressing, aeration, and weeding) that support healthy turf without the use of pesticides and allow for rapid repairs, resulting in delays in restroom and lighting repairs. • Reduced the contract with Boulder County Sheriff’s Office for the jail inmate work crew and BridgeHouse Ready to Work; these crews typically perform weeding, mulch distribution, and vandalism repair across the system. • Reduced funding for small equipment transitions to electric equipment, resulting in longer life cycles of current gas-powered pieces and potentially increased maintenance on older equipment. Re-planting fewer trees then what is needed to meet target goals for maintaining current urban canopy throughout the city, the target set in the 2019 Urban Forest Strategic Plan. • Minimal EAB or tree-related outreach, continuing lower-cost methods such as news releases, notifications (letters/doorhangers), and website. • Canceled the annual Tree Sale and Tree Giveaway. • Increased rotational pruning (which makes trees stronger, healthier and more resilient to storm, freeze and snow damage) to 15 years for street trees (previously 10 years) and 9 years for park trees (previously 8 years). The Urban Forest Strategic Plan sets standard at 8 years for both based upon industry recommendations. • Eliminated contracts for EAB tree removals, now performed by in-house crew and reducing capacity for preventative parks pruning rotation as Ash removals are a higher priority. Recreation services also were evaluated using the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience Categories when developing the 2021 operating budget, and funding focused on those that are Important. For Helpful and Amenity services, services are offered only where fees support due to limited funding. The Rapid Response Racial Equity instrument allowed staff to prioritize the restoration of services for low-income youth and those with disabilities, while maintaining and even expanding Financial Aid support for other services. Programs are provided virtually, in-person in small groups, and by reservation or registration only (no drop-in services available anywhere in the system). Fees have been adjusted to reflect full costs for adults, with means-based free access available via the Health Equity Fund-ed Recquity program, General Fund supported Financial Aid and age-based discounts available for youth and seniors. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Additional services will be added throughout 2021 as public health guidelines allow and as community interest and business models indicate positive feasibility. Recreation service reductions in 2021, assume continued public health limitations and decreased demand from patrons: • Drop-in visitation at recreation facilities and pools, including drop-in fitness and yoga, leisure swimming, and gymnasium access; • Significantly reduced portfolio of registered courses in every area with an emphasis on providing those programs with the most community benefit (per the PRAB accepted Recreation Priority Index); • Capacity limits on the swim beach, picnics, and special events at the Boulder Reservoir; and • 50% reduction in Health Equity Funded grants (to allow for HHS Funding of critical community needs) impacted service to underserved populations (in addition to limits in participations based on COVID) Next Steps As mentioned previously, the 2021 operating budget was developed from April to June 2020, when the department used assumptions based on information known at that time to develop the operating budget. The department is monitoring whether these assumptions were accurate in all funds, and particularly in the RAF as it is a department managed quasi-enterprise fund dependent on user fees. An initial review of the 2020 peak season (Memorial Day to Labor Day) indicates that outdoor activities such as reservoir visitation, park usage, rounds of golf and outdoor pools had higher levels of participation than a typical season, while indoor usage such as recreation center visitation, registered programs and camps had lower usage than a typical season. This data will help update the budget with more accurate predictions for 2021 and to make informed decisions about a potential mid-year budget adjustment in 2021. At the March PRAB meeting, the department will share 2020 year-end results by fund and the department as a whole, and will identify any proposed adjustments to the 2021 operating budget based on increases or decreases in revenues and anticipated levels of programming in 2021. D. 2021 Golf Course Fees At the November 2020 business meeting, staff presented proposed adjustment to 2021 green fees at Flatirons Golf course. Staff also shared initial recommendations on the 2020 Annual Pass pilot program. The intent of this item is to provide an update to the board and follow up on some of the board’s input. 2021 Golf Green Fees As discussed at the November business meeting, PRAB Nov Discussion Item 2021 Golf Course Fees , golf course expenses continue to rise and 2020 brought expense increases due to increased and enhanced sanitation and cleaning practices to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. In addition, in 2021 the city’s custodial contractor will assume responsibility for provision of these services. As such, staff proposed increases to green fees – including the annual passes to ensure these expenses are covered by user fees and not tax subsidies. As a follow-up, note that the comparison chart shared in November compared the proposed 2021 Flatirons fees with current 2020 market rates. This chart will be updated as other courses publish 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 2021 fees. The board also asked questions about the junior fee increases. While staff intended to address a disproportionate discount, across the BPR system youth benefit from a 40% discount off adult fees in alignment with the master plan focus on Youth Engagement and Activity. As such, those disproportionate fee increases were adjusted down from $19 for 9-holes to $16 (see Attachment A). 2021 Annual Pass At the November 2019 business meeting, staff shared a pilot annual pass program with the PRAB. The annual passes were designed as new program to generate loyalty and support for the golf course, and also intended to be a trial program at Flatirons to optimize usage and bring new players to the facility. Market analysis indicated that golf as an industry was offering deals to boost participation numbers and revenues; golf interest across the country was sagging and facilities were struggling financially. The pass was priced at a very competitive, low rate to generate interest and to allow us to understand interest and usage impacts on operations. A review of the trial program included analyzing course availability, market, and budget. Staff presented initial recommendations at the November 2020 PRAB meeting after initial analysis indicated that the annual passholders booked ~30% of tee times in October and November. In a typical golf market this would not be a challenge, however, the pandemic completely altered the conditions under which the pilot annual pass program was proposed. Regularly, the course was not available to non-passholders (during peak season, ~300 people/day can golf, this time of year it is ~100 and there are 257 passholders). We saw a significant jump in student passes when CU moved to virtual classes. The proposed cap was an attempt to strike a balance and allow for non- passholder community play. The PRAB’s concerns about fairness and access with limiting annual passes are understood. Staff intend to do more research on annual pass programs and access at municipal golf courses as part of the business planning with the new facility. The annual pass program will continue in its pilot phase (to honor current commitments), with no additional passes sold until more research can be completed and updated recommendations can be developed and discussed with the PRAB. This pause will also allow for the extenuating circumstances causing increased demand to wane. Meanwhile, Flatirons offers golf participants other options to access the course: • Pay the applicable green fee; • Purchase a Value Card which allows for reduced rate play: Adult $599 and Senior $499 for the pass which then provides play at a significant discount ($7 for 9 holes and $10 for 18 holes); or • Purchase a renewable Punch Card that allows convenience and a slightly reduced rate Pass Type Ages 2020 Price 2020 # Sold 2021 Price Adult 18 to 59 $999 67 $1,199 Senior 60 and older $899 44 $999 Student With ID $499 83 $599 Junior 15 to 17 $399 46 $449 Junior Up to 14 $299 17 $349 Total 257 Attachment A 2021 Fee and Pass Recommendation Attachment A- 2021 Fee and Pass Recommendations 1/1/2019 3/10/2019 2019 2019 1/1/2020 2/28/2020 2020 2020 2021 2021 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole MON-THURS ADULT $21 $34 MON-THURS ADULT $24 $36 $26 $38 FRI-SUN ADULT $23 $36 FRI-SUN ADULT $26 $41 $28 $43 MON-THURS SENIOR $20 $31 MON-THURS SEN-MIL-STUD $20 $31 $22 $33 FRI-SUN SENIOR $20 $34 FRI-SUN SEN-MIL-STUD $22 $35 $24 $37 MON-THURS JUNIOR $15 $25 MON-THURS JUNIOR $19 $16 $25 $19 $27 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $15 $25 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $19 $16 $25 $19 $27 3/11/2019 12/31/2019 2019 2019 3/1/2020 12/30/2020 2020 2020 2021 2021 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole MON-THURS ADULT 24$ $36 MON-THURS ADULT $25 $38 $27 $40 FRI-SUN ADULT 26$ $41 FRI-SUN ADULT $27 $43 $29 $45 MON-THURS SENIOR 20$ $31 MON-THURS SEN-MIL-STUD $20 $33 $22 $35 FRI-SUN SENIOR 22$ $35 FRI-SUN SEN-MIL-STUD $23 $39 $25 $41 MON-THURS JUNIOR 15$ $25 MON-THURS JUNIOR $21 $31 $21 $31 FRI-SUN JUNIOR 15$ $25 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $21 $31 $21 $31 11/1/2019 12/31/2019 1/1/2021 2/28/2021 2020 2020 2021 2021 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole MON-THURS ADULT $21 $34 MON-THURS ADULT $24 $36 $26 $38 FRI-SUN ADULT $23 $36 FRI-SUN ADULT $26 $41 $28 $43 MON-THURS SENIOR $19 $30 MON-THURS SENIOR $20 $31 $22 $33 FRI-SUN SENIOR $20 $34 FRI-SUN SENIOR $22 $35 $24 $37 MON-THURS JUNIOR $15 $25 MON-THURS JUNIOR $18 $28 $19 $27 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $15 $25 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $18 $28 $19 $27 OFF SEASON DATES: 2019 2020 2021 EARLY SEASON DATES: REGULAR SEASON DATES: 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: December 21, 2020 A. PRAB Retreat Follow-up 1. Onboarding and Farewell of PRAB Members 2. Resident Response Email Guidelines 3. Boards and Commissions Roles Comparison (see table) Staff prepared this item as a follow-up to the PRAB’s 2020 retreat, and the discussion related to how the PRAB can best support Parks and Recreation in Boulder, City Charter offers guidance and regulations that clarify the roles and responsibilities of the board. Comparing the PRAB’s duties and limitations to the other boards also provides greater context and the intent of this item is to provide information to support the board’s conversation. The main responsibilities of PRAB as outlined in the charter are to make recommendations to council about the disposal of park land, expenditures from the permanent parks and recreation fund, the annual department budget and licenses or permits granted on parks land. PRAB may submit other related recommendation to council or make requests of staff as outlined in the PRAB handbook (page 15). According to the charter, the PRAB shall not perform any “administrative functions” The Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT), the Transportation Advisory Board (TAB) and the Library Commission each also provide recommendations to council and respective department regarding their subject area but vary in their designated responsibilities and focuses. These boards differ from PRAB in the specific operational and programmatic duties assigned to them. For example, the charter outlines that OSBT also advises council about uses of open space land, the open space program and policy. Both the TAB’s and the Library Commission’s responsibilities include advising on operational matters. TAB also supports the department by reviewing Environmental Assessments and working on individual Neighborhood Traffic Mitigation Projects. The Library Commission is charged with reviewing the annual report and supporting donations and grant work. This table summarizes the responsibilities of PRAB, OSBT, TAB and the Library Commission as defined in the Charter and Municipal Code. For more information, see the links to corresponding sections of the City Charter and Municipal Code. The City Charter information on the department of Parks and Recreation and establishment of the PRAB can also be found in the PRAB handbook. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 B. Bias and Microaggression Trainings for PRAB Members The City of Boulder is offering optional Bias and Microaggression training for board members in the first quarter of 2021. This eight-hour training would be offered in two evening sessions to accommodate volunteer schedules. Staff is seeking PRAB’s input on combining with OSBT for these sessions. If PRAB members are interested, a poll will be sent to determine the best time. C. PRAB Final Letter to City Council A copy of the final letter is attached here for reference. This letter was submitted on Dec. 2, 2020. D. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) PRAB Welcome & Farwell Committee Dec. 21, 2021 Greetings Alli, Chuck, Jason, Pamela, Raj, Tara, Please review the attached doc titled “PRAB Reference Calendar” and consider the following questions: 1) Do we want to make the swag either a t-shirt of baseball cap? 2) Would we like me (Mary) to contact other Boards to see what their mentoring entails? 3) Please each fill out the blanks in this template and email them to MSBoulderPRAB@yahoo.com Here’s a template and an example bio: Mary Scott lives in the Table Mesa neighborhood, moved to Boulder from Santa Fe, NM in 2003 and works primarily as a Nurse Practitioner with Boulder Community Health. _______lives in the _________neighborhood, moved to Boulder _______ and works as a _________ with _________. 4) How would we like Farewell to occur? You can email me your ideas. Thanks! Mary Scott Dear Name, A warm welcome to the City of Boulder PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD! We hope this welcome packet will help to start a foundation for your five years of service and ease the transition to your new position. We, your fellow Board Members and City of Boulder Parks & Recreation Staff, are eager to meet and work with you! Your staff liaison is Charlotte O’Donnell, the Administrative Specialist in the Director’s Office. She can be reached at: PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov or 303-413-7223. She will be the best point of contact for your questions. As you will learn in the Board & Commission orientation, we do not use “reply all” or group email chains to ensure that public business is conducted publicly; rather, the staff liaison can be a common point of contact. Your fellow board members are: (in order of term end date) Allison Fronzaglia allifronzaglia@gmail.com April 2018 - March 2021 Raj Seymour rseymour35@gmail.com April 2017 - March 2022 Mary Scott msboulderprab@yahoo.com April 2018 - March 2023 Pamela Yugar tapatiochick@gmail.com 626-407-7144 April 2018 - March 2023 Charles Brock Charles.a.brock@comcast.net 303-887-2523 April 2019 - March 2024 Jason Unger junger29@yahoo.com April 2020 - March 2025 Tara Winer tara.winer@gmail.com 609-707-8385 April 2020 - March 2025 We look foward to connecting with each of you; please reach out at your convenience. As you will find, we all have different approaches to PRAB, and know that you will bring your own. Several guiding questions we might consider to support our first conversation: What moved us to apply to PRAB? How would we describe the role of a PRAB member? We also are currently setting up a PRAB mentor process, which we will discuss at your first PRAB meeting. Our meetings are generally held on the fourth Monday of each month. Due to the pandemic the PRAB meetings will be held on Zoom until further notice. Your first PRAB meeting will be on Monday, April 26. Please pay attention to your calendar appointments from PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov which will include a link to access the virtual meetings. We look forward to resuming in-person meetings, typically held in Council Chambers. There will be months in which we start early, with a tour of a park or facility, and some months we will meet in different locations. Dinner will be provided once we resume in person meetings; please notify the staff liaison about any dietary restrictions so that our meals can be inclusive. Parks and Recreation is a large department serving the needs of the people and the environment in our city. As you begin to acquaint yourself with all of the services provided, please feel free to ask questions and explore resources like the Parks and Recreation website as well as the PRAB website. Our community outreach toolkit will help you navigate upcoming meetings and potential communications from community members. Being on a board will often require reviewing somewhat large volumes of information. Foundational materials for PRAB include the PRAB Handbook and the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. As we begin working on the Master Plan update, please familiarize yourself with this document as quickly as possible as it will be very helpful for you feeling included in the issues that will be discussed in the coming years. Parks and Recreation has excellent social media accounts (this page has the various platform information as well as email lists to which you can subscribe). You are invited to follow the accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as BPR’s official philanthropic partner, the Play Boulder Foundation, to learn more about events and the work of Parks and Recreation. We look forward to collaborating with you, soon! PRAB *Finished bios would be inserted here* PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR 2021 Date / Time Event / Task Location Details Mondays, 6pm Attend PRAB Meetings Various, Details will be emailed in advance and posted online here. • Location changes, so please check your email each month. • For in-person meetings, dinner is provided from 5:30- 5:55pm. • PRAB meetings will run from 6-7:30pm (meetings may go as late as 9pm depending agenda). • Remaining PRAB meetings for 2021 are as follows: • April 26, 20201 • May 22, 2021 • June 28, 2021 • July 26, 2021 • August 23, 2021 • September 27, 2021 • October 25, 2021 • November 22, 2021 • December 27, 2021 Spring 2021 Self- orientation • Meet fellow board members individually. • Meet with your board mentor. • Submit your bio to be distributed to fellow PRAB members and PR staff. • Please familiarize yourself with the following resources: • City of Boulder Website • Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Website • Parks and Recreation Master Plan • 5-year Progress Report • PRAB Handbook • PRAB community outreach toolkit • Parks and Recreation social media accounts Summer 2021 Meet with City Staff TBD Please reach out to the following City Staff to arrange meetings. Contact information can be found here. • Jeff Hailey, Planning, Design & Community Engagement Manager • Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager • Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager • Megan Lohmann, Recreation Manager • Dennis Warrington, Park Operations and Assets Manager • Bryan Beary, Community Partnerships & Outreach Manager PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR (continued) Date / Time Event / Task Location Details TBD Attend Welcome party Council Chambers Mingle with incoming and outgoing Board and Commission members and City Council Members TBD Attend Orientation with City Clerk and Attorney TBD • Meet with City Attorney and various other officials regarding your duties and obligations as a Board Member • Required for your tenure on PRAB TBD Meet with Director of Parks and Recreation TBD • Please check email for contact from Charlotte O'Donnell, your liaison between PRAB and the Parks and Recreation City Staff • Time to be arranged to answer questions that you and the Department may have for each other: Please bring your questions to this meeting! • Staff will order your meeting name plate, t-shirt or baseball cap and official name badge for events and note any dietary restrictions. Monday, April 26, 2021, 6pm Attend your first PRAB meeting TBD • Please review the agenda and meeting packet emailed to you in advance of the meeting. • PRAB meetings will run from 6-8:00pm (may go as late as 9:30 pm depending agenda). May 2021 Tour Sites TBD • Please check email and listen for discussion at your meetings for dates for this tour of select locations • Opportunity for new and sitting board/commission members to take a tour of select sites of interest associated with the work that you will do on this board Autumn 2021 TBD Attend the PRAB Retreat TBD • Members volunteer to begin annual letter to Council • Board annual check-in • Year-end review by City Staff Ongoing Participate in Additional Opportunities TBD Examples include: joint board meetings with other boards and commissions, new committee work and attendance at Parks and Recreation community engagement and masterplan engagement events, email categories for responses to citizen messages and inquiries. PRAB’s Resident Response Plan At the 2020 Annual Retreat, the PRAB created a Resident Response Plan (RRP) to simplify the process for responding to resident emails and to ensure that resident’s questions and concerns are being adequately addressed. These five categories represent BPR department divisions. PRAB member(s) have been assigned to each category and will be responsible for resident responses related to those topics. Category assignments can be reevaluated annually in April as part of the PRAB’s onboarding and offboarding procedures. Planning and Ecological Services (Natural Lands, Forestry, Environmental Issues, Wildlife): Mary Scott Park Operations (Parks, Sports Fields, Pearl Street Mall, Civic Center): Jason Unger Regional Facilities (Reservoir, Valmont, Golf): Alli Fronzaglia Recreation (Rec Centers, Programming, Pools): Charles Brock, Mary Scott as backup Community Building, Community Engagement, Events, and Volunteerism : Pamela Yugar Staff support: Charlotte O’Donnell (Charlotte can pull in additional staff as needed) Additional PRAB support: Raj Seymour Emails sent to PRAB@bouldercolorado.gov generate this automated response: “Thank you for emailing the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. All seven members of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board have received your message, and you might hear from one of them individually. All emails sent toPRAB@bouldercolorado.gov are public record.” When responding to resident emails: • Keep in mind that you are responding as an individual member of PRAB. Your response does not represent the entire PRAB. • As a member of PRAB, you are still welcome to respond to any resident emails, including those that fall into other categories. • Please CC Charlotte O’Donnell on all resident responses. City Board Resident Response Plan Feedback Question: When it comes to responding to resident emails, does your board have an established system or do board members simply reply as needed or as they see fit? Cannabis Licensing Advisory Board (Ashley Rheingold): CLAB does not receive regular emails. This is a newly established board that is still defining their mission along with practices and procedures. Board members respond to emails individually as they wish. Environmental Advisory Board (Susan Peterson): EAB only receives emails sporadically. Board members respond to emails individually as they wish. Housing Advisory Board (Judy Nogg): HAB receives emails regularly. They have an automated response in place and then board members are encouraged to respond as individuals. Many board members follow up with personal acknowledgements and additional conversation. Open Space Board of Trustees (Karen Hollweg): OSBT receives many emails. Emails sent to OSBT often require staff input and they may be contentious in nature. Board members do not always share the same views and prefer to respond to each email individually. Most board members will respond in some way to most emails. Transportation Advisory Board (Mark McIntyre): TAB receives emails regularly. Board members reply individually as they wish. Staff frequently responds and board members may add additional responses or continue the conversation. Having an established system with assigned categories feels like too much pressure possibly. Summary: Of the 5 boards contacted, none had an established system for responding to resident emails. Those whose boards receive emails regularly were very interested in the idea and asked for follow-up regarding what PRAB may implement. The possibility of contentious issues along with the individual makeup of the board are factors in whether such a system would be effective and supported by the entire board. Board and Commision Functions Outlined as outlined by City Charter and Municipal Code City Charter Municipal Code Disposal and Acquisitions Capital Expenditures Contracts Annual Department Budget Policy Other Operations Capital Expenditures Other PRAB Link Link x x x x -Protection of Maintenance of Park Lands *See approves -As Requested OSBT Link Link x x x x x -Uses of Open Space Land -Open Space Program *See approves -As Requested -Review/Monitor/Propose Changes to BVCP -Implement BVCP Open Space Goals -Insure Open Space Purposes in Municipal Code TAB Link (Only in Code, Not Charter) x x x -All Transportation Environmental Assessments -Neighborhood Traffic Mitigation Projects -As Requested -Review/ Monitor/Propose Changes to BVCP -Tracking of Transportation Master Plan Goals Library Link Link x x x -Director's Annual Report -Assists with Master Plan -Use of Gifts or Donations to Library -Encourages Grants or Gifts to Library -Represents Library to Community PRAB = Parks and Recreation Advisory Board OSBT = Open Space Board of Trustees TAB = Transportation Advisory Board Library = Library Commission BVCP = Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Function Outlined in Makes Recommendations to Council AboutApproves Other Responsibilities in Charter/Code Makes Recommendations to Department About December 2, 2020 Dear Members of the Boulder City Council, Thank you for the opportunity for the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) to provide our thoughts on the positive and negative aspects of the current year, and recommendations for the coming year. 2020 has brought unprecedented challenges and difficulties, but our community has responded in equally unprecedented ways. In discussing what has made our board “happy” this year, we are in awe of the resilience of the Boulder Parks and Recreation Department (BPR), the hard work of the dedicated staff, and their ability to adapt to the constantly-changing dynamic with COVID-19. At the outset of the pandemic, BPR - along with other city partners - worked to quickly establish the COVID Recovery Center to provide shelter and help address the urgent needs of our community. As recreation needs changed and had to adapt to state and local health guidance, the department responded with creative solutions to help more Boulder residents access and enjoy recreation opportunities. When the weather warmed, and the demand for safe and socially-distanced outdoor sports increased, BPR adjusted hours, staffing and developed new and expanded schedules. And when an early-September snow storm hit Boulder, resulting in damaged and downed trees across the city, BPR coordinated a significant effort across several departments to clean up the damage. Specifically, PRAB wanted to highlight a few examples of how BPR adapted to these unique circumstances. The Boulder Reservoir saw a notable increase in both small watercraft and motor boats and the BPR made changes to the schedule and number of permits to accommodate as many groups and community members as possible. Another example of BPR’s adaptability during COVID was in response to the increased demand for swimming. BPR staff worked with PRAB to amend the hours, availability, and scheduling for the city’s two outdoor pools. In addition to opening up the spectacular new Scott Carpenter Pool facility in the midst of a pandemic, BPR was also able to extend the swim season well into the fall to accommodate more swimmers. PRAB heard from countless community members grateful for the time and effort that went into creating these new recreation opportunities. While we can all rightfully celebrate how well the city and BPR responded to the challenge of COVID, much of this year made us “sad.” As the Council knows, the changing fiscal situation and resulting budget cuts have disproportionately impacted Boulder’s Parks and Recreation Department. From staff reductions to programming cuts, this has been a challenging year for BPR. While PRAB understands the budget realities, we are hopeful that the Council can help ensure that BPR can continue to maintain and provide beautiful, safe, and clean places for Boulder residents and visitors to enjoy. Another urgent issue that concerns PRAB is the ongoing challenge and difficulty - made more so by COVID-19 - in addressing the un-housed, and the impact on our city’s parks and outdoor space, in particular. While we have been briefed on the work that the City Council has done around these issues, PRAB wanted to highlight our concern about the increase in the number of community members who are reluctant to visit some of our parks or facilities, in part because of this issue. PRAB has identified three specific concerns as they relate to Boulder parks arising from the un-housed and encampments situation: 1) hazards to public health and safety (needles, human waste, glass); 2) cleanliness and environmental values (trash, degraded streamsides); and 3) physical safety (assault, threatening behavior). While we recognize that this issue is extremely complex and challenging, and that the city's approach will take a sustained effort to make progress, it is clear from the input we have received that the current conditions are not acceptable to a broad swath of the community. In short, allowing unregulated camping on public park property is not a policy PRAB can support. In the coming year, PRAB hopes to better understand these challenges and stands willing to work with partners across the community to help find solutions. While we anticipate many of these challenges will continue into next year, and beyond, there are a number of things that PRAB looks forward to in 2021. As with so many, we are looking forward to a time when the board can reconnect with the public, and have the public reconnect with each other at our many parks, recreation centers, and other BPR facilities. PRAB also hopes to properly celebrate two recently-completed projects - the Scott Carpenter Pool and the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Center. These two facilities, a result of significant community investment, input, and vision, will be incredible resources for Boulder residents and visitors for years to come. We are also looking forward to continuing work on the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, particularly on the issue of resilience - whether in dealing with an unexpected public health challenge or in adapting to long-term environmental challenges such as climate change. COVID-19, among other challenges in 2020, has forced our community to make difficult choices. In this letter, we attempted to highlight some of the work BPR undertook to creatively adapt and respond to the disruptions caused by this situation, as well as some of the problems that have been exacerbated. PRAB is also hopeful that many of the changes made to accommodate the pandemic - new approaches to recreation, schedule flexibility, innovative programming - can carry on well past this current environment. Again, thank you for this opportunity to share our concerns and suggestions. We look forward to assisting your work, in any way possible, to help ensure that all Boulder residents can enjoy our incredible parks and recreation opportunities. Sincerely, Members of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Raj Seymour (Chair) Allison Fronzaglia (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar