Loading...
11.23.20 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., November 23, 2020 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Raj Seymour (Chair) Allison Fronzaglia (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV.CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A.Approval of Minutes from October 26, 2020 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:20) A.Master Plan Update: Preparation for Council Study Session B.Golf Course Concessionaire: Sandwedge Amendment C.2021 Golf Course Fees D.Reservoir Operations and ANS Update VI.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (7:20) A.Ecological Services Update B.2020 and 2021 Operating Budget Update VII.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:30) A.PRAB Recruitment Materials B.PRAB Retreat Follow Up – Letter to Council C.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. VIII.NEXT BOARD MEETING: 6:00 p.m., December 21, 2020 IX.ADJOURN PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared November 18, 2020) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to become a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth presentation and discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item. January 27, 2020 • BPR 2020 Workplan (md) • Boulder Reservoir restaurant lease (a) • BPR and Climate Initiatives (md) • Valmont Programming Contracts (d/i) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (d/i) • Civic Park Art Donation (d/i) (allow 1 hr/per Jeff) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) February 24, 2020 • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Chautauqua Sustainability & Resilience Strategy (md) • Volunteer Program (c) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (di) • Civic Park Art Donation (a) • Valmont Programming Contracts (a) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (a) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (d/i) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) March 30, 2020 • Scott Carpenter Concession (d/i) • Pottery Lab (d/i) • 2021 Budget Strategy & Review 2020 Actuals (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB new member orientation (mb) • Departing Board Members (mb) April 27, 2020 • Board appointments (p) • Election of officers (p) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (a) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (a) • COVID Update (d/i) o Operations Adjustments and Impacts o 2020 Financial Overview • 2021 Budget Strategy: o Scenario Planning o 2021-2026 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) • New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (md) May 27, 2020 • Financial Strategy (d/i) o 2020 reductions o 2021 proposed operating w/ service levels o 2021-26 CIP (2nd touch) • PLAY Boulder Access Campaign (md) • COVID Recovery (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 22, 2020 • 2021-26 CIP (a) • 2021 Operating Budget (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB Email List and Guidelines (mb) • PRAB Committee (mb) • Valmont Enhancement (md) July 27, 2020 * No business; meeting canceled August 24, 2020 • Possible CIP Revision (a/i) • Homelessness Strategy (d/i) • Design Standards (md) • Racial Equity (md) • 9th Street Waldorf School Vacancy (md) • Public Art update (md) • PRAB Retreat Planning (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) September 30, 2020 • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (d/i) • Master Plan Kick Off (md) • Operating Budget Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) October 26, 2020 • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (a) • 2021 Boulder Reservoir Operations Adjustment • Capital Project Update (md) • PLAY Update (mb) • PRAB Retreat Agenda (mb) • Guidance for Annual Letter to Council (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) November 23, 2020 • Master Plan Update: Preparation for Council Study Session (d/i) • Golf Course Concessionaire 7th amendment (d/i) • 2021 Golf Fees (d/i) • Reservoir Operations and ANS Update (d/i) • Ecological Services (md) • Budget Update (md) • PRAB Recruitment (mb) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) December 21, 2020 • Flatirons GC Concession amendment (a) • Master Plan Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: October 26, 2020 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Tina Briggs, Stacy Cole, Lena Dow, Regina Elsner, Jeff Haley, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffmann, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Chris Passarelli, Ali Rhodes, Dennis Warrington Guests Present: Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:04 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Yugar. Second by Brock. Motion passed 7-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Jeff Kenney, power boat user at Boulder Reservoir, spoke about against extension of no-wake hours at Boulder Reservoir and encouraged BPR to look for solutions for all users like opening at 5 a.m. Veronika Platzer, rowing coach for several local organizations, spoke in favor of more no- wake hours in the early mornings during the 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. time frame. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from September 30, 2020 Motion to approve the minutes from September 30, 2020 as presented. Motion by Fronzaglia. Second by Brock. The motion passed 7-0. B. Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. • How many tickets were available for the Halloween drive-in movie? • Does BPR plan to host more drive-in movies? • Support for more drive-in movies. • Appreciation for the curbside collection of tree debris. • How are the employees impacted by the COVID outbreak doing? • What lessons have been learned from that outbreak? • Request to discuss mask protocols with staff. Agenda Item 5: Items for Action A. Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Briggs presented this item to the Board. The Board reiterated support for this project and had no further questions. There being no one who wanted to speak, the public hearing was closed. Motion to approve the Flatirons Golf Course Concept Plan. Motion by Seymore. Second by Scott. Motion passed 7-0. Agenda Item 6: Items for Discussion and Information A. 2021 Boulder Reservoir Operations Adjustments Munro presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • What percentage of the lake is reserved for the no-wake zone? • There are often waves in the no-wake zones created by power boats in the wake zone. • What is the expected revenue from the flank seasons? What is the staffing cost during the flank seasons? • Is the price for the weekday permit different than the cost for a full week smallcraft permit? • Will the cost of power boat permits change since access passes will be sold separately? • Why is staff recommending opening at 7:00 a.m. instead of 5:00 a.m.? • What changes would those rowing groups see in 2021 for usage at 5:00 a.m.? What is the lake rental option? • Support for the increase in no-wake hours. • To separate wake and no-wake users, would BPR consider opening 3 days/week for one group and 4 days/week for the other? • When will the 2012 boulder Reservoir master plan be updated? • Long-term, what is the trajectory of powerboat use at the Reservoir - do staff anticipate a day when powerboats will not be allowed? Would BPR consider only allowing no- wake use in the future? • Power boats also serve community members and makes the Reservoir unique to other nearby lakes. Aquatic Nuisance Species protocol is one of the strictest in the state. • While meeting BPR cost recovery goals, would like to see minimal rental fees for rowers and other user groups that may rent the lake at early morning times. Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Department A. Capital Project Update Haley presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • What will the budget for improvements at the North Boulder Park include? • Will updates at North Boulder Park involve the adult exercise equipment? • What happens to playground equipment after it is removed? • Suggested expansion or update or adult equipment. Agenda Item 8: Matters from the Board A. PLAY Update Fronzaglia and Yugar presented this item to the Board. B. PRAB Retreat Agenda Review Yugar and Winer, the retreat committee, lead this discussion with the board. C. Guidance for Annual Letter to City Council Seymour presented this item to the Board. D. PRAB Community Engagement Updates Members of the PRAB participated in the following outreach activities over the course of the last month: • Engaged with staff about Wasteless parks and responded to related posts on NextDoor Agenda Item 9: The PRAB Retreat will be held at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 16 (via video conference). The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, November 23, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 10: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 8:40 p.m. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: November 23, 2020 A. Approval of Minutes from October 26, 2020 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Valmont City Park Skate Park and Pump Track Design o East Boulder Community Park Restroom Design o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design o Master Plan Update (Discussion Item) o Multiple Resource Preservation Plan Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Construction activities continue for the renovation of the Chautauqua Park playground. Over the past month, the city’s Parks Construction team and contractors have completed layout and grading and started on initial installation of the new playground features. The frame for what will be the new climbing structure has been constructed and set. Other playground features have arrived at the site and will be installed in the coming weeks. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 The playground renovation is expected to be completed within the next month depending on weather and material availability. The following impacts can be still be anticipated: o The playground will be closed. o Pedestrian and bike paths between Sumac Dr. and 12th St. will be closed. Detours will be posted. o Contractors will take reasonable measures to prevent dirt and other particles from discharging beyond the work zone; however, visitors can anticipate construction noise and limited airborne dust. o There will be intermittent times of increased construction traffic as materials are delivered or removed from the site. o Construction hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., unless otherwise noticed. Once complete, the new playground will consist of new playground equipment and surfacing to meet ADA accessibility standards and safety guidelines and requirements, a new sand play area, additional new nature play features, and seating and climbing boulders that are integrated into the overall playground design. The preferred concept plan was unanimously approved by PRAB in December of 2019. General information and construction updates can be found here, on the Chautauqua Playground Renovation project website. • Construction Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Chautauqua Park Playground Renovation Forestry Staff and contractors continue to focus on completing the branch curbside collection and city- wide clean up after the September snowstorm. While many factors have contributed to the project taking much longer than anticipated, the work is nearly complete. There are only two areas within the city that remain to be cleaned up and will likely be complete around Thanksgiving. These areas are within Martin Acres and areas southwest of Table Mesa and 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Broadway. Current estimates are that this project will have collected approximately 50,000 cubic yards of material while the most recent similar storm in 2016 only collected 25,696 cubic yards. The current focus of the work is to complete the pick-up along all remaining city streets and chipping of the debris to be hauled off for compost and recycling. Below are some representative photos of the work that is occurring to demonstrate the magnitude of debris. More information can always be accessed by visiting the webpage here. Natural Lands The following projects, focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment, are currently being managed by the Urban Resources staff: • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Ecological Services Update (Matters from the Department) C. Operations Update COVID-19 The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus.   • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery Team:  Staff have been working to adjust and respond to changes in the state’s COVID-19 dial framework, which have largely related 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 to stricter capacity restrictions for facilities, services and other activities including events and fitness activities. The restrictions with the greatest impact to current operations would be in the ‘Purple – Extreme Risk’ level, where operation of Recreation Centers and Events would be suspended, and programming could only occur virtually or in limited numbers outdoors. • Recreation Programs and Facilities: South Boulder Recreation Center re-opened on November 2nd on a limited reservation basis for adults and youth ages 12+ for fitness, swimming and more. Info on activities, what staff are doing to promote safe recreation, and how to reserve can be found online. For the most recent information on services available, the department regularly updates the Status at a Glance found on this webpage. • BPR COVID-19 Cases Update: The outbreak in Park Operations has been resolved, with all employees returned to work. Across the city, there are active positive cases of COVID-19 in the workforce including in Parks and Recreation. The citywide Recovery team is updating many of the workplace guidance based upon lessons learned and increased levels of risk, including exposure guidelines, communication protocols, and workplace protocols. Community Access • Halloween Drive-In Movie (2020): The department hosted a drive-in movie at the Flatirons Golf Course on Friday, October 30, 2020. The event offered two (sold-out) sessions to maximize community access. Staff estimate to have served over 400 people throughout the evening. Survey results showed that 94% of attendees had a “excellent/good” overall experience and 91% would attend another drive-in movie. 95% of attendees felt “excellent” concerning their satisfaction with comfort and public health safety measures at the event. Staff will continue to identify future opportunities to build upon this successful event. • Snow Much Fun (2020 – 2021): Boulder Parks and Recreation and Downtown Boulder have partnered to create a self-guided holiday lighting tour perfect for the entire family. Snow Much Fun will feature 11 dazzling light displays throughout the district illuminated from November 22, 2020 through January 10, 2021. New for 2020, lights will showcase “55 Degrees” by Adam Kuby. The event modifications resulted in a cost reduction of over $40,000 while the partnership with Downtown Boulder provide a larger and more inclusive footprint. Sponsors include Homelight, the Daily Camera, Capital One Café, and TEBO Properties, which help with cost recovery and promotional efforts. • Volunteer Services: The Volunteer Services team recently concluded several programs resulting in over 2,500 hours of service. Programs included an inaugural Park and Tree Champs Program, Prairie Dog Monitors, Adoption Programs, Birds of Special Concern, 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Player Services (Flatirons Golf Course) and miscellaneous One-Day Projects. In partnership with the Boulder International Film Festival and the citywide Volunteer Cooperative, in September the department hosted a citywide Volunteer Appreciation Drive-in Movie at the Boulder Municipal Airport on September with over 200 volunteers in attendance. Boulder Reservoir 2021 Operational Adjustments follow-up: Using the GPS marked buoys that are officially located on the city’s GIS map, staff mapped the Boulder Reservoir to calculate the surface area of the Wake and No Wake areas of the reservoir. Based upon September 2019 water levels (when the buoys were last marked), the Wake area is ~65% and the No Wake area is ~34% of the surface. Note that the water levels fluctuate throughout the year; in July and at peak water levels the No Wake area is bigger. Staff will continue to monitor the buoy placement for opportunities to expand the No Wake area while maintaining space for larger power boats to safely maneuver. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: November 23, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Master Plan Update: Preparation for Council Study Session PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design & Community Engagement Manager Regina Elsner, Parks Planner Tina Briggs, Parks Planner Morgan Gardner, Associate Planner Becky Zimmermann, Principal-in-Charge, Design Workshop Amanda Jeter, Project Manager, Design Workshop EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Since the project kick-off in September with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB), staff and the consultant team have been hard at work in the research and trends phase of the Master Plan Update. Progress to date includes an evaluation of previous research and development of the public engagement plan for the project. The purpose of this item is to review these outcomes, to seek feedback and support from PRAB on the comprehensive community engagement plan and to gather input on how key topics should be addressed within the Master Plan. This memo is categorized in the following topics: • Background information summarizing the project approach • Analysis of: o Public Engagement Plan o Research and Trends Progress o Previous and Concurrent Plan Review o White Paper Background o White Paper Updates: Preliminary Status Report o New White Paper Topics  Topic 1: Resiliency for Parks and Recreation Departments  Topic 2: Current Practices in Weaving Equity into Urban Parks and Recreation Service Delivery AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 2__ PRAB’s overall role in this process is to shape the master plan process and policy to ensure that the community’s needs for its parks and recreation system are being delivered in alignment with the values outlined. Success will be measured by the board’s recommendation of the plan for acceptance by City Council. Figure 1 indicates where we are at in the process and where we are headed. Figure 1: BPR Master Plan Update Process as of November 2020 BACKGROUND: PRAB has already been engaged several times for the Master Plan Update. At the December 2019 meeting, PRAB provided input on the overall approach for the update to ensure alignment between staff and PRAB. In April 2020, staff shared an update with the PRAB given COVID-19 impacts on timing and budget. Following successful contract negotiation, PRAB participated in the project kick-off during the September 2020 meeting. At this meeting, PRAB reviewed an updated schedule and high-level overview of the public engagement approach. Project Approach As a reminder from previous PRAB engagement with the project, the Master Plan Update is broken into five phases. The list below provides a high-level description of the milestone, deliverables or meetings for each phase that will result in a final Master Plan and also provides an update as to what has been completed to date: Phase 1: Project Initiation and Kick-off  Kick-off Meetings to confirm project critical success factors, schedule and risk management  Draft Public Engagement Plan outlining the four engagement windows and that is included in more detail in this packet – In Progress AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 3__  Formation and meetings with BPR staff Management Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) and Working Technical Advisory Group (WTAG)  November 23 PRAB Meeting – In Progress  December 8 City Council Study Session – In Progress  Development of master plan graphic themes, templates and table of contents – In Progress  Informational video to support community engagement – In Progress Phase 2: Research and Trends  Update of 2012-14 White Papers that provide information, research and best practices to inform the update – In Progress  Past Planning Efforts Review to pull out key takeaways and cross-reference planning efforts since the 2014 master plan to white paper topics – In Progress  December 15 White Paper Charette with BPR staff and consultant team to identify research gaps and prioritize content to inform the current state snapshot – In Progress  Four stakeholder focus groups in 2021 to uncover on-the-ground trends, challenges and opportunities  System overview snapshot to provide graphic, high-level overview of the current state of BPR parks and recreation facilities. Phase 3: Needs Assessment  Review and update of BPR facilities inventory and assessment  Gap analysis updates to the per capita level of service tables for 2020 and future population projection point  New gap analysis map or analysis around equity  Supply and demand trends memo and maps  Statistically valid survey with Spanish version as well as open participation link  Benchmark update of 2014 study  Scenario planning and draft strategy matrix Phase 4: Implementation Plan  Draft implementation plan  Draft plan on a page that highlights big moves of master plan  Financial overview and funding strategies memo Phase 5: Master Plan Acceptance  Master Plan Draft #1 (word document)  Master Plan Draft #2 (graphic, PDF document)  Master Plan Draft #3 (PDF for online and stakeholder review)  Master Plan Final Document AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 4__ Research and Trends: Review the 2014 Master Plan Key Themes As a reminder, the goal of the current process is to prepare a comprehensive update to the 2014 Master Plan. The 2014 Master Plan identified six key themes developed through extensive public engagement. The key themes form the basis for the actions and decision- making of the department since the plan’s acceptance. These key themes are: • Community Health and Wellness Parks provide measurable health benefits, from encouraging direct contact with nature and a cleaner environment, to opportunities for physical activity and social interaction. This theme emphasizes the community’s desire for BPR to focus on public health and wellness through parks, facilities and programs, emphasizing the important role parks and recreation services can continue to play in keeping Boulder a healthy and vibrant community. • Taking Care of What We Have Prioritizing the maintenance of existing facilities and parks was a consistent message during the 2014 Master Plan from the public and civic leaders. This theme focuses on the need to ensure the long-term viability of the park and recreation system through comprehensive asset management practices. This captures a broad spectrum of work ranging from daily operations to ongoing preventative maintenance to the large capital projects that are completed each year as part of the Capital Improvement Program. • Financial Sustainability Balancing multiple and increasing demands from the public within existing resources is a challenge, recognizing the limits to public funding and the need to focus on core services. Boulder parks are a source of positive economic benefits, enhancing property values, increasing municipal revenue and attracting homebuyers, a quality workforce, and retirees. Financial Sustainability efforts ensure BPR considers the total cost of facility ownership and service delivery in resource allocation and fee setting. • Building Community and Relationships Building community engagement and cultural activities through outreach programs and initiatives are an important component of building strong neighborhoods and making social connections. Parks and recreation programs build social capital, promote a healthy community and address social and cultural inequities recognizing that environmental, economic and social sustainability are built upon full community involvement. • Youth Engagement and Activity Youth are a priority for the community and there is a strong need to actively engage youth with parks, facilities and programs that are place-based. Parks offer children AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 5__ the daily benefits of direct experience with nature, engage children in experiential learning through play and shared experiences, and provide a resource for closing the opportunity gap to drive children’s participation in community development, citizenship and democratic processes. • Organizational Readiness Shifts in the management of modern public park and recreational facilities require new staff capabilities with an emphasis on service delivery methods. As a department, it is critical to create more business management practices leveraging the use of new technologies, data driven decision-making and collaborative decision-making tools to allow for a response to changes over time. These six key themes have formed the strategic framework and foundation for the department’s work over the past six years. A key outcome of the first public engagement window will be confirmation of these themes and updating the framework for the Master Plan. ANALYSIS: 1. Public Engagement Plan A critical component of the Master Plan Update is public engagement. The importance of public involvement in the decision-making process is a priority for the City of Boulder; more information about the City’s commitment to public engagement can be found on the Engagement 101 webpage. The engagement plan should compel the public to be active in the development of the recommendations and priorities which should progress into support of the approval, and ultimately the implementation of the plan allowing the department to effectively deliver community oriented park and recreation opportunities. Overall, the public process must be equitable, open, and collaborative to build trust community-wide. The process needs to be documented carefully to secure support for, and acceptance of, the Master Plan by city management, advisory groups, City Council, department staff, as well as the diverse user groups of the community. COVID-19, the current pandemic, has heavily influenced the engagement to include a much higher level of online engagement than would traditionally be planned. We are Parks and Recreation and being out in the community is part of our heart and soul, however, the safety of our community members and staff is the highest priority. This approach is supported by the 2018 ACS data (conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau) which shows that 96% of Boulder’s population have a computer and 90% have broadband internet. Great care will be taken to safely reach populations that are most likely to have limited access. As the pandemic evolves, tactics may include more in-person engagement (as public health orders allow). AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 6__ Staff and consultants will remain flexible to address any additional opportunities and needs that may arise throughout the process. In these unprecedented times, staff may be using new engagement strategies that are unproven and may need additional time or to pivot midstream as the effectiveness is evaluated. Below is a brief description of each of the four engagement windows planned as part of the Master Plan Update, more detailed information can be found in Attachment A. This description includes the anticipated timing of each window, as well as the desired goals, objectives and outcomes the project team hopes to achieve within each window. To support the objectives and outcomes, the technical content that feeds into or is informed by each engagement window is specifically identified. Within each engagement window, there is a set of base tactics staff will utilize to reach members of the Boulder community and other interested members of the public. These base tactics will be used throughout all the engagement windows and have been commonly used as community engagement during previous planning projects. A full description of all the planned engagement tactics is included in Attachment A. The base tactics include: • Web Page • Be Heard Boulder • Neighborhood Liaison Community Chats • Social Media • Print Material • Standard Media Material • Coordination with Other Departments • Canvas Existing BPR Events • Video Presentations • Faith-Based Organizations • PRAB Updates and Meetings • City Council IPs and Meetings Engagement Window #1: Share a Foundation of Information and Inquiry Engagement window #1 will occur in early 2021 with the goal to develop interest and awareness of the project. The System Overview Snapshot developed as a part of Phase 2: Research and Trends will present a foundation of information for the community. An information video will be developed to encourage participation and draw the community into the project. Some outcomes from this engagement window include a baseline list of interested community members, an established strong interested stakeholder base, confirmed key themes and focus areas for update from 2014 plan, as well as a confirmed approach to equity, sustainability, and resiliency. Engagement Window #2: Identify and Evaluate Options Engagement window #2 is anticipated to occur in March-April 2021 to better understand community needs and desires. During this needs assessment, a statistically valid survey AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 7__ will collect quantitative data from a wide cross-section of the community, not just facility or program users. Micro-engagements with partner organizations during this window are intended to gain a deeper understanding of specific community needs. For example, staff is working with the Youth Opportunities Advisory Board (YOAB) and Growing Up Boulder (GUB) to implement targeted youth outreach throughout the spring school semester. Outcomes from this engagement window include an expanded contact list of interested community members, results from the statistically-valid survey partnered with data from an open community survey, as well as direct feedback on youth needs as it relates to BPR programs and facilities. Engagement Window #3: Developing Recommendations Engagement Window #3 will occur throughout the summer and early fall 2021 and comprise of two components. First, summer activities will seek to keep the community engaged and active with the project. Next, fall engagement activities will focus on reviewing high-level recommendations and the prioritization of those recommendations to ensure they are representative of the community’s needs and desires. This window will generate the maximum reach and support for the project, ensuring that the community and stakeholders support the plan for adoption in future project phases. During this engagement window, staff will be sharing with the community how their feedback and input in previous windows directly influenced the recommendations and prioritization. Engagement Window #4: Making and Communicating Decisions Engagement Window #4 is anticipated in early 2022 to present the draft master plan to the community as a final check-in for any discrepancies or major misses. It is expected that due to the extensive previous engagement, there will be documentable community support for this plan following this engagement window. 2. Research & Trends Progress Previous and Concurrent Plan Review The current phase of the project includes reviewing existing plans, researching the status and updating the key themes, and integrating new trends and topics into the project. To begin, one of the key outcomes of the 2014 master plan was to perform subsequent, more detailed planning around several aspects of the department ranging from facilities to organization and processes. The planning team has reviewed the following efforts completed since the 2014 Master Plan to document progress, fill in information gaps from the previous plan and identify areas of alignment and synthesis. The plans and processes are reviewed in the following categories: High Level Synthesis for Master Plan Update • 2014 BPR Master Plan o This is the basis for the plan update and includes department mission, vision and key themes that will carry forward into 2020- AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 8__ 2022 update. Will inform the master plan update table of contents. In conjunction with this plan, the Boulder Parks and Rec 5-year Progress Report 2014-2019 has been reviewed to confirm plan accomplishments. • 2015 General Maintenance and Management Plan (GMMP) o Establishes maintenance standards for public spaces, includes analysis of staffing levels and recommendations for efficient operations. Informs the Phase 3 Needs Assessment and BPR asset management. • 2012 Service Delivery Framework and Recreation Priority Index o Outlines the department’s process for managing recreation programs, including establishing costs and setting fees. Incorporate into recreation program recommendations and Financial Strategies. • 2018 Asset Management Program (AMP) o BPR’s process for managing the Total Cost for Ownership of assets. Incorporate into initiatives and strategies. Focused Level of Synthesis for Specific Areas of Master Plan Update • 2015 Boulder Aquatic Feasibility Study o Provides condition assessment for pools, community needs for aquatics and concepts for pool enhancement that will be synthesized into recreation facility needs assessment. • Athletic Field Study o Provides supply and demand analysis for athletic fields that will be considered in the needs assessment, level of service analysis and possible recommendations and strategies. • 2010 Recreation Programs & Facilities Plan o Recommendations for management of recreation facilities and programs. Low level of synthesis for master plan update as most content replaced by Service Delivery Framework and Recreation Priority Index. • 2016 Facilities Strategic Plan o Condition assessment for recreation centers and other facilities that will be considered during the recreation facility needs assessment. • 2018 Urban Forest Strategic Plan o Recommendations for planning, managing, protecting and engaging to serve the urban forest needs of the community. Incorporate policy recommendations into initiatives and strategies. Reference Information for Technical Analysis to Inform Master Plan Update • Asset Management Reports from Beehive AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 9__ • BVSD Joint Use Agreement • Contracted Programs Agreements • Parks and Recreation Guides • Design Standards Manual (DSM) • 2016-2026 BPR Capital Investment Strategic Plan Citywide Planning Context-Lower Level of Synthesis for Master Plan Update • 2019 OSMP Master Plan • 2019 Transportation Master Plan • 2018 Sustainability and Resilience Framework • 2010 (2020 Update Scheduled) Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan • City of Boulder Homelessness Strategy White Paper Background This phase of the planning process provides the opportunity for staff and the consultant team to review relevant past plans and the work the Parks & Recreation department has completed since 2014, along with the series of white papers that were completed as part of the 2014 plan. A white paper is a report consolidating complex information to help readers understand an issue, solve a problem or make a decision. During the last master plan effort, Indiana University in collaboration with BBC Research and Consulting prepared topical reports and technical analysis to inform the plan around the following topics: 1. Asset Management 2. Benchmark Analysis 3. Community Survey 4. Financial Sustainability 5. Planning Area Overview 6. Recreation Programs & Services 7. Related Planning Documents 8. Trends Key findings from these white papers provided the bedrock of analysis for the 2014 master plan. The current consultant team is reviewing these 2012 white papers and assessing the status, key issues that have emerged since 2012, opportunities for refinement and trends for consideration in updating the white paper content. Their assessment will inform a work session in December 2020 to evaluate: • Successes; • Areas for improvement or inspiration from national best practices; • Information gaps; and AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 10__ • How to incorporate city-wide strategy on trends and topics into the master plan themes (e.g., equity, sustainability, impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic). In addition to the existing white papers, new white papers on best practices for addressing equity and climate resilience in parks and recreation departments will be developed. The research and trends content will culminate in the first window of public engagement in early 2021. The community will review a graphically-compelling System Overview Snapshot (OSMP Example snapshots) that highlights the current state of the department and outlines the gaps and needs intended to be addressed during the remainder of the Master Plan process. This in turn will inform the Phase 3: Needs Assessment work that will include a statistically-valid survey (followed by an open invitation, online public survey), facility assessments, level of service and gap analysis, supply and demand analysis, benchmark study update and scenario planning. White Paper Updates: Preliminary Status Report The team has reviewed the white papers, the table below provides a snapshot of white paper topics, status of update process and their relationship to planning work conducted since 2014. Following the table is a summary of each topic, presented in the order in which they build on one another as part of the analysis. More information on the current analysis can be found in Attachment B. Key questions are identified for several of these white paper topics. A PRAB study session in the first quarter of 2021 is proposed to dive deeper into these questions. White Paper Topic Status Previous Plans to be Included in Update (List of Acronyms in Attachment E) 1) Planning Area Overview Update ongoing BVCP, Community Profile 2) Related Planning Documents Update ongoing BVCP, OSMP Master Plan, Transportation Master Plan, Sustainability and Resilience Framework 3) Community Survey To be updated in Phase 3 4) Trends Update ongoing BVCP, Community Profile 5) Benchmark Analysis To be updated in Phase 3 6) Financial Sustainability Update ongoing Capital Investment Strategic Plan, CIP 7) Recreation Programs & Services Update ongoing Service Delivery Framework, RPI, BVSD JUA, Contracted Programs, Recreation Programs & Facilities Plan AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 11__ White Paper Topic Status Previous Plans to be Included in Update (List of Acronyms in Attachment E) 8) Asset Management Update ongoing AMP, GMMP, DSM, UFSP, Capital Investment Strategic Plan, Aquatics Study, Athletic Field Study, Facilities Strategic Plan 1) Planning Area Overview This paper presents information on Boulder’s setting and history that is still relevant for the 2020-2022 master plan update. Areas for update include statistics on current demographics and the BPR department inventory overview. In conjunction with the 2020 Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) Update, the project team will need to confirm any refinements to the planning areas defined below: • Area I: Land within the City of Boulder, provided with city urban services (US Census definition of "City of Boulder"). • Area II: Unincorporated land in Boulder County, planned for annexation and provision of urban services within the 15-year planning period of the BVCP. • Area III: Unincorporated land in Boulder County outside the Service Area, not expected to annex within the 15-year planning period of the BVCP. Additionally, as part of the Phase 3 Needs Assessment, the statistically valid-survey methods and sample size and composition will need to be confirmed for the 2021 survey. Oversampling of specific groups will be critical to ensure representative results. Determining which groups to oversample will be influenced by this overview. 2) Related Planning Documents This white paper provides an overview of plans dating from 2012 and earlier that influenced the last master plan including the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. Since that time new plans have been identified and reviewed. Please see the previous plan review section earlier in this packet for an overview of those recent plans and how they will be incorporated into the current update. 3) Community Survey The community survey white paper summarized and reported the results of the statistically valid survey administered as part of the process. A similar survey is included in the Master Plan Update as part of Phase 3: Needs Assessment, which will begin after the first of the year. The intention is to utilize many of the same questions for the survey for this process to be able to compare community responses from 2012 to 2021. A few additional questions will be added to address current issues and dig into topics of most concern to the community today. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 12__ 4) Trends A key finding from this white paper is that BPR is considered one provider in a larger system that includes public, private and non-profit entities in the Boulder community. Opportunities for refinement of this paper include updating key demographic facts and social trends relevant to Boulder today including the desire for greater community connection, understanding current practices in urban parks response to people experiencing homelessness, accommodating aging populations, welcoming underserved populations more equitably, addressing social epidemics with recreation trends (e.g., inactive youth, obesity rates), facility management with an increased emphasis on environmental stewardship and resilience in the face of impacts of climate change and pandemics (e.g., COVID-19). Additional trends identified in 2020 by NRPA that could influence the master plan include: • Technology o Video surveillance in parks o Drones in parks o Esports at rec centers • Health o Climate change impacts: new parks will be designed to mitigate heat island effects o Recreation centers as community wellness hubs • Other Trends o Adult “recess” o Micromobility devices in parks o Barkless dog parks o Human composting in parks 5) Benchmark Analysis The benchmark analysis white paper used 12 key, predominantly quantitative benchmarks to compare BPR against 11 organizations identified as similar to Boulder and/or as high- performing agencies. An update to the benchmark white paper will be conducted as part of Phase 3 Needs Assessment. Key questions to be considered throughout the process related to this topic include: • How can the previous benchmarks be adjusted to better reflect equity metrics (discussed later in the packet)? • Are the previously considered benchmarks still accurate and reflective of the community’s priorities? 6) Financial Sustainability AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 13__ Even before COVID-19, financial sustainability is a key focus for BPR, borne out as a key theme on its own from the 2014 Master Plan. As funding sources contract, it becomes ever more important to understand how best to balance increasing demand with existing resources. Financial sustainability drives two additional areas of focus for BPR: asset management and recreation service delivery. Conversations in Phase 3: Needs Assessment and Phase 4: Implementation Plan will ensure alignment between the prioritized strategies for meeting the community’s needs with the City’s budget framework and funding scenarios. Key questions to be considered throughout the process related to this topic include: • What are the core services desired by the community? And how will the department continue to fund those core services into the future? • What does cost recovery, subsidization and fund management look like in the coming years, based on recovery from COVID-19? • Is it acceptable to use revenues from one program to support another? • How can the city meet its mission of serving all citizens equitably by implementing fees that may exclude residents experiencing financial hardship? 7) Recreation Programs and Services Recreation programs and services are core to BPR and tied to each of the six themes, particularly Community Health and Wellness and Financial Sustainability. Since the 2014 Master Plan, BPR has ensured that recreation services are first, intentionally planned, delivered and evaluated to impact community health and wellness; and second, ensuring the community subsidies are directed towards programs that provide community benefit. BPR developed the Recreation Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index to ensure programs are aligned with the Master Plan, and appropriately managed throughout their life cycle. Key questions to be considered to this topic and financial sustainability include: • How much does a program or service benefit directly an individual participant versus the community? • Is it acceptable to use revenues from one program to support another? • What is BPR’s role within the community, as it relates to providing programs and services also available within the private sector? • How can the city meet its mission of serving all citizens equitably by implementing fees that may exclude residents experiencing financial hardship? • How can the department create more streamlined and unified reporting methodology for contracted programs and services? 8) Asset Management AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 14__ Asset management is the foundation of the key theme “Taking Care of What We Have”. In 2012, the department identified asset management as a critical need and gap to be addressed within the Master Plan. Since the 2014 adoption of the Master Plan, the department has successfully completed multiple planning efforts to support overall asset management. These planning efforts include: Asset Management Program (AMP), General Management and Maintenance Plan (GMMP), Design Standards Manual (DSM), and the BPR Capital Investment Strategic Plan 2016-2026. Key questions to be considered throughout the process related to this topic include: • How does the department and community define the importance of an asset or facility? • What additional data is needed about the department’s assets to make asset management truly data-driven? • How will equity and racial indicators influence asset management? New White Paper Topics: Resilience and Equity for Parks and Recreation Departments Throughout the planning and initiation phase of the project, the project team asked for staff and PRAB input on new topics and trends that may need to be explored as part of the current update process. From that exercise, two key focus areas were identified for additional white paper development: Resilience and Equity. These topics will be explored below and integrated into the overall update. Topic 1: Resilience for Parks and Recreation Departments What is Resilience? Resilience is the capacity to prepare and plan for disruptions, to recover from shocks and stresses, and to adapt and grow from those experiences. This definition has been adopted by many organizations like American Planning Association (APA), American Institute of Architects (AIA), American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), and Urban Land Institute (ULI). Resilience is becoming an increasingly important issue as climate change and weather events continue to worsen. Parks and public spaces should be prepared for these extreme events and their long-term impacts. By creating resilient places there can be other economic and social benefits as well. Resilience Planning in Boulder 1. Department Initiatives a. In 2014, the City of Boulder was selected to participate in the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cites initiative. The project aims to support cities that have experienced natural disasters in exploring and developing strategies around sudden and long-term issues, such as flood, wildfire, disease outbreak, and drought. As a first step in this process, the City (along with Growing Up Boulder and the Youth Services Initiative) sought to AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 15__ understand people’s perceptions of resilience in Boulder. The Youth Services Initiative, a program of Boulder’s Parks and Recreation Department that serves youth from Boulder’s public housing sites, was involved as a pilot group for this project. Activities like mural making, photovoice, and others helped youth explore the values of their city which they determined to be parks and open space, and healthy lifestyles, among others. More information on this initiative can be reviewed here. b. The Urban Forest Strategic Plan (2018) is a comprehensive assessment of and 20-year plan for the Boulder urban tree canopy. In 2013, Boulder had approximately 16% urban canopy but due to invasive pests and climate stressors, this is expected to decrease. This plan provides a framework to reach Boulder’s goal of restoring and maintaining the urban canopy and includes long term adaptive management goals to improve and preserve the health, value, and benefits of the urban canopy. This plan is organized around the urban canopy today, the urban canopy of the future, and how to get from one to the other. c. BPR has also begun updating irrigation systems, following organic turf management practices, and implementing a zero-waste program in all parks. As part of the Climate Leaders Program, the City is also training leaders from Parks and Recreation in the science of climate change so that everyday decisions across the organization can be informed by a consistent foundation of knowledge and understanding. d. Facility Resilience: As the broader consultant team starts work in 2021 on the needs assessment and facilities assessment, an important question to explore is how can BPR facilities be more resilient to climate change and uncertain future events? 2. Alignment with City Policy: a. Boulder’s Climate Commitment helps align departmental goals around greenhouse gas emissions, non-electric vehicles, and natural gas use. BPR has begun to reduce fuel use and exhaust emissions by phasing in electric vehicles and equipment. b. The City Resilience Framework (CRF) provides a lens to understand the complexity of cities and the drivers that contribute to their resilience, and a common language that enables cities to share knowledge and experiences. The framework is built on four essential dimensions of urban resilience: Leadership & Strategy, Health & Wellbeing, Economy & Society, and Infrastructure & Environment. Each dimension contains three “drivers,” which reflect the actions cities can take to improve their resilience which include growing and protecting natural assets – like the urban forest or parks and open space. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 16__ National Trends and Best Practices in Resilience As climate change worsens, resilience becomes more important to public spaces and parks. By creating resilient places, communities can benefit from various other benefits too. Parks play a huge role in building climate resilience, and therefore parks and recreation departments are on the front lines of climate change. Climate change can have impacts to the natural, built, and human environment (Mariposa Master Plan). These impacts include, but are not limited to, the following: • Natural o Increase in temperatures o Decrease in snowpack o Reduction in carbon storage o Reduction in soil moisture • Built o Stress on local water, stormwater, and flood/drainage management o Interruption of utilities and transportation o Property damage and loss • Human o Increase of asthma and other diseases o Decrease in quality of mental health To mitigate these impacts, resilient parks integrate approaches like living shorelines, wetland habitats, greenways, and adaptive recreational amenities. When these places are developed it is also necessary to address the need to increase the park departments’ capacity and budget accordingly to properly maintain and care for these spaces over the long term. While money seems to flow freely for capital improvements, funding for maintenance and operations is often less tangible and less appealing. Therefore, in order for parks and recreation departments to act and prioritize climate resilience as part of their mission largely depends on the availability of resources; creative funding approaches to maintenance, operations, and programming; and the willingness of leaders to prioritize and include parks in resilience conversations. (NRPA Magazine, 2019, What Constitutes a Resilient Park) Not only environmentally resilient, parks can also address social resilience by creating neighborhood gathering places and opportunities for diverse community members to interact, prior to and after a disaster. Community resilience considers environmental resiliency and cultural resiliency. Cultural resilience can also be wrapped into physical space, especially parks by achieving these four goals (Kofi Boone): 1. Build a sense of community that brings all people together as stewards 2. Create places where everyone belongs and that have opportunities for shared experiences among all AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 17__ 3. Increase access to nature and create environmentally friendly places easily reached by walking, biking or transit 4. Encourage additional investments in neighborhoods New White Paper Topic 2: Current Practices in Weaving Equity into Urban Parks and Recreation Service Delivery Since the founding of the first parks in North America, city administrations have searched for ways to connect people to nature and wellness. At times, parks and recreation have been provided to some communities at the expense of historically underserved groups. For example, while New York's Central Park provided 19th century-urban youth opportunities for nourishment (fresh milk) at the park’s dairy, its founding also displaced over 1,600 residents of Seneca Village, a predominantly African American and immigrant community (Central Park Conservancy 2018). While improvements to parks and recreation opportunities in a community improve the quality of life, they can also lead to increases in property values and contribute to gentrification, or displacement of current inhabitants as the cost of living becomes unaffordable. The movement to provide more equity in parks and recreation has increased over the last decade with North American cities and national organizations like National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), the City Parks Alliance (CPA), American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), American Planning Association (APA) and the Trust for Public Land (TPL) supporting measures to increase equity in parks and recreation. An example is NRPA’s pillar of equity that calls for colleagues to “ensure all people have fair and just access to the benefits of high-quality, local parks and recreation” (NRPA 2020). In the last decade, cities including Boston, Minneapolis, San Francisco, San Diego, Denver and Vancouver, B.C. have implemented equity in citywide frameworks and/or specific measures as part of their parks and recreation system master plans. The master plan update for the Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) Department coincides with an inflection point for its industry and for the nation and communities in the wake recent incidents that highlight systematic discrimination, racial profiling and historic barriers to equity for people of color: • The murders of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other people of color; • The March 1, 2019 Zayd Atkinson incident in Boulder, CO; • The 2017 Boulder Community Perceptions Assessment and 2019 Boulder Community Survey results showing a lower level of confidence by people of color in equitable police and emergency services; and AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 18__ • National findings that racial and ethnic minority groups are being disproportionally impacted by the COVID-19 disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus (Centers for Disease Control 2020). Street Wise mural on Boulder’s Dairy Arts Center by LMNOPI highlighting perspective of Native American women and girls. (Anderson 2019) Defining Equity and Equality Equality and equity need to be defined and understood as separate ideas: • In parks and recreation literature, equality is often defined as all people receiving an equal amount of investment in the quantity and quality of parks and recreation programs, amenities and services. This assumes that all people in a community start from an equal footing. Equity is described as “ensuring everyone receives the appropriate investment for where they are” (NRPA 2020). As the graphic below from NRPA illustrates, each person is starting with different needs and some communities “need more investment because they have been historically underserved” (NRPA 2020). • NRPA also provides a working definition of Equitable Park and Recreation Access that is useful for this master plan update effort and ties into resiliency as well: o The just and fair quantity, proximity and connections to quality parks and green space, recreation facilities, as well as programs that are safe, inclusive, culturally relevant and welcoming to everyone. When people have just and fair access, our health and social wellbeing improve, and our communities can protect and better recover from environmental, social and economic challenges (NRPA 2020). AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 19__ Equity Work in Boulder, Colorado Building on years of work to support equity in the community, in 2018 the city committed to comprehensively addressing systemic racism and has worked on understanding equity issues in Boulder in collaboration with the Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE). The city launched the Racial Equity Work to focus first on racial equity with the understanding that the framework and tools can be used to addressed other marginalized groups. Current focus areas for this work include training, tools, inventories and research and strategy and planning. The following work within the focus areas can influence the current BPR master plan update: Training Initial training session worked on identifying what is racism and implicit bias. The second training focused on how to implement the city’s Racial Equity Instrument Tool described in more detail below. Tools The Racial Equity Instrument has been developed to improve city operations by viewing and planning projects through a racial equity lens. It establishes a process and set of questions to guide the development, implementation and evaluation of policies, programs, practices, procedures and budget issues to advance racial equity. Inventory and Research The City of Boulder Racial Equity Work team lists the following accomplishments to date: • Launched employee resource—central location for data sources when staff use the Racial Equity Instrument. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 20__ • Inventoried all city plans relating to racial equity to assist in forming Racial Equity Plan. • Inventoried existing equity efforts across the city to share across the organization, align resources, build capacity and inform the racial equity plan. • Researched council resolutions, policies and commitments from other GARE communities (City of Boulder 2020). Strategy and Planning An early outcome this focus area includes the 2020 City of Boulder Racial Equity Plan Outline. This outline expresses four goals that can influence staff participation, lenses for analysis and community engagement involvement: • Goal 1: Everybody gets it. The city will normalize and operationalize understanding of institutional and structural racism among people who work for or represent the City of Boulder, including city staff, City Council, Boards and Commissions, and ongoing program volunteers. • Goal 2: Justly do it. The city will take action to end racial disparities in city services. • Goal 3: Community Commitment. The city will strengthen partnerships and collaborate with community members and organizations that demonstrate a commitment to ending racism. • Goal 4: Power to all people. The city will build and maintain trust, expanding the influence of community members of color through inclusive and responsive engagement. • Goal 5: Representation matters. The city will eliminate barriers and create opportunities to build a diverse workforce across the depth and breadth of local government including elected officials, boards, commissions and working groups. Equity in System-Wide Parks and Recreation Master Plans Equity work in parks and recreation is complex and each city must define the process and outcomes that are meaningful to their communities. To help sort the possible processes and potential metrics for equity, the planning team recommends using the NRPA-created guidance on creating equity-based system master plans as a starting point. This will help BPR in future efforts in its long-term goal of accreditation as well as offer a framework for evaluating the well-established BPR master plan framework. The table below provides a synopsis of NRPA master plan components, how the 2014 effort met those components and an overview of how an equity lens could refine the current update. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 21__ NRPA Master Plan Components How the 2014 BPR Master Plan Met NRPA Components Possible Steps to Apply Equity Lens to 2020-2020 BPR Master Plan Update 1. Internal Assessment  BPR established mission and vision  Community and stakeholder approval of plan  Use Boulder’s Equity Instrument Tool to refine the master plan update engagement process and plan deliverables 2. Community Engagement  Plan informed by statistically-valid survey and community outreach  Identify windows of engagement for public to provide input  Ensure that under- represented groups can participate in decision- making 3. Resources & Data Collection  Completed needs assessment that included community input, benchmarking, recreation demand trends, level of service analysis  Update the previous needs assessment as part of Phase 3 work  Work with Staff, PRAB and City Council to define potential and appropriate metrics for equity that are applicable and feasible to BPR 4. Implementation  2014 Plan established fiscally constrained, action and vision plan alternatives and priorities  Since the Master Plan’s adoption in 2014, the department has either completed or otherwise started 92% of the specific initiatives identified and backlog repairs have been reduced 60%.  Continue to use scenario planning in master plan  Identify areas in each scenario that are priorities for racial equity implementation that are specific and feasible for BPR to achieve Examples of System-Wide Metrics Diving into component 3, resource and data collection, NRPA categorizes equity metrics into three broad buckets: 1) system-wide metrics 2) distribution metrics 3) population and outcome indicators. System-wide metrics are high-level and provide a system overview that is beneficial for benchmarking against other cities or national average. System-wide AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 22__ metrics include park acres per capita or number of people living within ½ mile to a park, for example. Distribution metrics are more nuanced and look at quality or spending for targeted neighborhoods, park or population demographics. Examples of distribution metrics include park acres per 1,000 residents by neighborhood or demographic unit or distribution of amenities compared to desired amenities. Population and outcome indicators track population outcomes, risk areas or areas of historic inequity to help guide distribution of resources. Attachment C provides a sample of these metrics to consider as part of the Master Plan Update. How could racial equity work influence the BPR Master Plan? Racial equity is already influencing the work of the Master Plan update. Staff acknowledges that not only is addressing equity an outcome of the Master Plan, meaning how will a focus on equity influence the department’s work and decision-making for the next five to seven years, but that the process of updating the plan itself must be equitable. To ensure an equitable process, staff is working through the Racial Equity Instrument discussed previously to utilize that equity lens for the project. Equity considerations also weigh heavily on the discussions of the public engagement for this project. Staff is working to ensure that engagement tactics are culturally relevant and that efforts are being made to hear from all segments of the community. Equity as an outcome of the Master Plan Update will require multiple conversations with staff, PRAB, City Council and the community to ensure BPR is getting it right. In other words, is equity its own key theme for the Master Plan Update or does equity weave into all the work of the department, threading through the existing key themes? Case Studies in Equity Metrics Numerous communities across the country and even internationally have begun the work of incorporating equity measures into their parks and recreation system. Attachment D includes case studies of equity in three cities: Vancouver, BC, New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA. Vancouver, British Columbia has utilized several geospatial data sources to identify equity initiative zones that highlight traditionally underserved areas to focus on for future investment. New York, NY created equity initiative zones that also include 20 years of spending data to highlight geographic areas of discrepancy in investments by the department. San Francisco, CA became the first city in the United States to have every resident be within a 10-minute walk to a park. Parks in San Francisco that are within a five- minute walk of equity zones are priorities for investment and are monitored yearly to track progress. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 23__ QUESTIONS FOR PRAB: Engagement Plan 1. The draft engagement plan outlines the process, objectives and outcomes anticipated for each engagement window.Does PRAB agree the plan allows staff to hear from a broad cross section of the community throughout the project? Should staff consider additional objectives or outcomes in the engagement windows? Simply put, does PRAB agree we are geared up to hear from everyone? 2. Digging a little deeper into the engagement plan and the list of tactics and venues that will be used for engagement, are there other engagement tactics that are missing from the list? Of the engagement tactics listed, which do you feel are most effective or highest priority versus less likely to be successful or should be replaced? In other words, if capacity becomes limited, what tactics should be the focus? White Paper Topics 3. Regarding the existing white papers, are there any initial lessons learned or take away from PRAB in terms of key focus areas such as asset management, financial, etc. that staff should know about? Has the team missed anything or should any of the topics be prioritized or considered differently in the current context of the department? 4. Similarly, related to the two new white paper topics, resilience, and equity, does the PRAB agree that these are stand-alone topics, or should they be overlayed into all the themes and white paper topics. Since these are such current topics, it would be helpful to hear an example from PRAB. 5. Regarding equity, are there any key take-aways from the system-wide metrics or the three case studies that really relate or ring true here in Boulder? AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 24__ Attachment A: Public Engagement Plan Each engagement window description below also includes some tactic highlights for unique opportunities staff intends to utilize to either engage specific community groups or gather specific information. These are being utilized in addition to the base tactics described in the memo narrative previously. Engagement Window #1: Share a Foundation of Information and Inquiry Timeline: Jan-Feb 2021 Engagement Goals: Inform (public), Consult (stakeholders) See Appendix B for Stakeholder Mapping Objective: This engagement window will focus on developing interest and awareness of the project. Staff will present a foundation of information for the community to develop common understanding of current mission and vision of the department, outcomes since the 2014 plan and agree on future opportunities and challenges that will be explored in the current planning process. • Informs the public and stakeholders of the master plan objectives, collects contact information for interested community members and provides an opportunity to verify existing community values or define new interests. • Consults with stakeholders to understand the current opportunities and challenges for their interest groups. • Integrates equity tools and practices to confirm a broad cross section of the community is engaged. • Ensures a common understanding and alignment of BPR mission and vision as well as role within the community (i.e. BPR versus OSMP versus private providers, etc.). This includes the resource availability to BPR (funding). Technical Content: • 2014 Master Plan Accomplishments • Project Management Plan • System Overview Snapshot • Information Video Tactic Highlights for Engagement Window #1: • Anecdotal Values Survey: Staff and consultants will develop content to verify community values and define emerging interests as they relate to BPR. The anecdotal survey will be targeted to the broad community to develop a high-level understanding of the community while providing an interactive opportunity to build awareness of the project. Consider adding a drawing prize to help created additional interest. Traditionally, packs of family day passes are used as an incentive to take the survey and promote use of BPR facilities. Email addresses are collected to develop a base to build on. • Mask Design Project: Mask design project to educate and develop interest in the project using art as the tool. The project would use the mask design guidelines to develop an understanding of urban parks and AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 25__ recreation. Community members can submit designs of parks and recreation amenities and we can open a voting period follow by a winner that we use to print promotional face masks. This is a promotion in early development with the opportunity to co-design with staff and stakeholders to refine details. Ultimately, it is simply an opportunity to have some playful positive outreach in the early stages of the project. It is also an opportunity to build interest with staff as we build up to micro- engagement with more substance. • Micro-Engagements: This is intended to get front line staff to become part of the process and to reach out to their customers and reach community members where they are. This will require additional effort to make sure staff is informed and comfortable with the project and process. It will also require additional materials that may need to be tailored to the type of discussions they may have. It will require ongoing training and material development for each engagement window. The micro- engagement strategies will build as the needs of the project are defined in each window. Staff manage this part of the engagement while working closely with the consultants to align engagement as the process progresses. • Community Connector Outreach: Codesign upcoming engagement process to be more culturally appropriate. The engagement plan for the master plan update will be reviewed with community connectors. Staff will share a project overview, timeline and public engagement plan with the connectors to develop recommendations for adjustments and additional needs for engagement, building equity into the entire process. • Virtual Stakeholder Meetings: Virtual stakeholder meetings will occur throughout the first 3 engagement windows. Four stakeholder meetings are planned in the first window. The MTAG will define the stakeholders and staff will work with the consultants to build the approach based on the information available and feedback needed for that window. The meetings are intended to be more intimate discussions with smaller groups of community members on specific issues, needs or recommendation and priority development. It provides an opportunity for staff and the community members to better understand each other, the needs of that stakeholder group alongside other groups and the transparent discussion of financial limitations, which leads to priority development. • Growing Up Boulder (GUB): Growing up Boulder has committed to partnering on the master plan update. They will develop a plan by the end of 2020 to plan for 2021. The Spring semester will be used to work with local educators to complete a child-focused assessment to get the perspective of children. Questions are meant to assess the child friendliness of the community, specifically focused on how they play within the community. The fall semester will be a follow up to look at how we used the information and discuss priorities. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 26__ • Youth Opportunities Advisory Board (YOAB) Action Team: YOAB is interested in participating in the master plan update. Staff will engage the whole group on the first Friday of the month (Dec. 4). Staff anticipates that at least 1 action team will opt in to support the project. Action teams typically meet on Monday evenings from 5-7 p.m. Staff will be available to guide the project through May 2021. A final presentation of the youth engagement will be presented by YOAB at the May PRAB meeting. Staff will plan a follow-up in the fall of 2021 with YOAB to share final draft recommendations, how they relate to the presentation provided in the Spring and request any comments. A Friday presentation and discussion session should be sufficient for this follow-up. Outcomes: • Anecdotal Values Survey • Categorized Community Comments, including examples of lived experiences • Summarized Stakeholder Meeting Notes • Base E-mail list of interested community members • Record data for reached interested, participating, and engaged community members • Establish strong interested stakeholder base • Confirm Key Themes and focus areas for update from 2014 plan • Confirm approach to equity, sustainability, and resiliency • Ensure alignment with concurrent MRPP process for engagement Engagement Window #2: Identify and Evaluate Options Timeline: Mar-Apr 2021 Engagement Goals: Inform and Consult (public) & Collaborate (stakeholders) Objective: This engagement window will focus on collecting and evaluating feedback from the community using anecdotal and statistically valid methods to better understand the community needs and desires. • Informs and consults with the public to help define and prioritize existing and emerging values and opportunities. • Collaborates with core stakeholders to prioritize opportunities within the values framework. • Determines the community’s shared vision for BPR and the park, facility, program and service needs that BPR should focus on given resource limitations. (prioritization) Technical Content: • Needs Assessment • Scenario Development (fiscal scenarios) Tactic Highlights (base and highlighted tactics from previous window will continue in addition to the following): • Micro-Engagement: Staff will continue to emulate some of the successful tactics used in the Open Space and Mountain Parks Master AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 27__ Plan. The tactics included the use of staff and partner relationships to build understanding of the project and to utilize the relationships for a deeper reach into the community. Growing Up Boulder, El Centro Amistad and other similar organizations will be included as part of the efforts to reach into the community. • Community Connector Outreach: Continue to build on the co-design of public engagement. Follow through by committing resources that are responsive to a more culturally diverse process. • Virtual Stakeholder Meetings: Four stakeholder meetings are planned in the second window. The MTAG will define the stakeholders and staff will work with the consultants to build the approach based on the information available and feedback needed for that window. • Virtual Open House: It is envisioned that a station/board-based approach will be used to gather input regarding research validation and workshop planning. Multiple stations/boards, staffed with department staff or consultant team members if in person or in Zoom rooms, will be set up to facilitate focused input on specific topics and to allow for small group interaction. Public comment will be recorded and integrated into the overall public engagement findings. Specific objectives for the second engagement window would be to: o Present findings from research conducted to date, including mission/vision reviews, the organizational assessment, facility inventory, program inventory, financial analysis, stakeholder interviews, public survey, and other public engagement findings. o Gather input regarding each of the research topics mentioned above to confirm and validate findings. o Gather input regarding the format and content of the public issues workshop / summit to be conducted in the fall. Outcomes: • Statistically Valid Survey Results and Evaluation o Online Community Survey with same questions available after statistically valid window • Anecdotal Counterpart to statistically valid survey results • Categorized Community Comments o Examples of lived experience in relation to building recommendations • Summarized Stakeholder Meeting Notes o Understand the current conversations among stakeholders regarding needs and wants and develop recommendations • Increased base E-mail list of interested community members • Finalizing youth feedback from YOAB and preparing to report back directly to PRAB • Ensure alignment with concurrent MRPP process for engagement AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 28__ Engagement Window #3: Developing Recommendations Timeline: May-Oct 2021 Engagement Goals: Inform and Consult (public), Collaborate (stakeholders) Objective: This engagement window will focus on reviewing the high-level recommendations and prioritization to garner support for the plan and to verify it is representative of the community. • Informs and consults the public to verify that their voice was heard and demonstrated in the work. • Collaborates with stakeholders to understand if we are on the right track with recommendations and priorities within the broader landscape of other stakeholders and budget limitations. • Ensure alignment among decision makers (PRAB/Council), the community and what the research analysis indicates. • Integration of equity analysis and instrument in outlining recommendations. Technical Content: • Financial Overview • Implementation Plan • Recommendation Priority Chart Tactic Highlights (base and highlighted tactics from previous window will continue in addition to the following): • Virtual Community Workshop: A major, comprehensive public workshop to allow for public participation in the identification of problems, issues and concerns related to the Boulder park and recreation system, and correspondingly, creating potential solutions for the issues. This will be an opportunity to review the status of the plan, reflect upon initial public engagement findings, identify other issues and opportunities, and start to develop strategic action items. The summit will utilize world cafe approach with problem/issue identification held as one component and solution creation held as separate component. Results of the summit would be presented in a written summary statement of issues, with corresponding proposed solutions. • Virtual Stakeholder Meetings: Six stakeholder meetings are planned in the third window. The MTAG will define the stakeholders and staff will work with the consultants to build the approach based on the information available and feedback needed for that window. Outcomes: • Support of recommendations and priorities by the community • Maximum reach and support, not trying to engage new people after this point • Develop an understanding of how engagement influenced decision- making • Youth engagement outcomes from YOAB • Integration with MRPP process and recommendations AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 29__ Engagement Break: Master Plan Development Timeline: Nov-Dec 2021 Engagement Goals: Low level updates as needed while staff and consultants work on Master Plan Development, Refinement of Graphics and Charts, Consideration for Holidays, City Council Study Session Tactics: • Virtual City Council Study Session Engagement Window #4: Making and Communicating Decisions Timeline: Jan-Mar 2022 Engagement Goals: Inform and Consult (public and stakeholders) Objective: This engagement window will focus presentation of the draft plans highlighting values and recommendations to guide the next 5-10 years. • Informs the public and stakeholder about how their participation influenced the recommendations and prioritization. Final check-in for any discrepancies or major misses. • Consults with public and stakeholders for final feedback on the draft plan prior to request for final approval from PRAB and City Council. Technical Content: • Final Master Plan DRAFT • Interactive Map Tactic Highlights (base and highlighted tactics from previous window will continue in addition to the following): • Participant and Stakeholder Follow Up: Close the feedback loop with participants and stakeholders to share how their voice was used in the decision-making process • Celebration: This will vary widely based on where the City is in relation to the pandemic. Ideally this would be an in-person appreciation for the support if the master plan update and a kick-off to the implementation. Outcomes: • Demonstrated community support of Master Plan draft Stakeholder Mapping Stakeholders are identifiable groups or persons that have an interest in the department and can either affect or be affected by the work of the department. Below is an analysis of the currently identified stakeholders and a summary of their level of engagement (i.e., Inform, Consult, Involve, Collaborate, Empower). Level of Engagement for Stakeholders Inform Consult Involve Collaborate Empower General Public Interested Public Key Stakeholders Implementers Decision- makers AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 30__ General Public (users and non- users) Interested General Public (users and non- users) Non-users Other city departments Facility users Program attendees Youth and Teens Older adults Persons with disabilities Non-English speakers Organized user groups Community and Program partners PLAY Boulder Foundation BPR staff BPR leadership PRAB Planning Board City Council Base Engagement Tactics Web Page: BPR staff will keep the public informed and updated about the Master Plan throughout the process using a project web page on the City website. Regular monthly updates will occur throughout the project. Updates will generally coincide with regular monthly updates to PRAB. An e-mail reminder will go out to the community each time the web page is updated, but no more than twice per month. From the time of launch and throughout the project, the site will contain: • General information about the park and recreation master planning process. • A project timeline and information about major milestones • Information about the consultant team • Information about how to participate in the public engagement process As the project progresses, the website will be updated and expanded to include: • Emerging trends for other research being conducted as part of the planning process. • Information about and findings from specific public engagement events and activities • A portal to access the community survey • Results from the community survey Be Heard Boulder: Be Heard Boulder is the City of Boulder's online engagement platform. This site will be linked to the project web page and used for active community engagement. Most of the static information will remain on the project web page while Be Heard Boulder will be used for the interactive engagement activities. We know better decisions are made when our community provides input and we want to make that easy, fun and interesting. The AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 31__ community will be able to contribute ideas, ask questions, take surveys, use interactive mapping resources, etc. The main page of Be Heard Boulder contains the tiles directing the community to many of the high-profile citywide projects. This is a great opportunity to cross-promote community engagement across departments. Neighborhood Liaison Community Chats: Brenda Ritenour, Boulder’s neighborhood liaison, holds office hours out in the community to discuss the subjects most important to the community by meeting them where they are at. Staff can join the liaison during the scheduled chat as a part of the conversation. An example of an upcoming chat is on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 3 to 5 p.m.: Amante Coffee, 4580 Broadway. This is an additional opportunity to reach non-users. Social Media: As part of an overall effort to make the public engagement process as open and transparent as possible, the staff core team will develop content and use social media to communicate with followers. Social media must fit in the calendar with other efforts in the organization. It may also be put on hold at any time for pandemic-related messaging. Staff will consider paying for services that target certain demographic groups. Print Material: Print material will be designed and utilized as a standards part of the outreach. The material will mainly be used as project and engagement notification. The messages will be more static and intended to direct the community to the latest digital information and/or engagement activity. • Posters – laminated posters for indoor facilities and rec centers. Project notification and lead to digital content. Change message and posters each engagement period. • Corrugated plastic yard signs – placed at busiest parks near entrances. Project notification and lead to digital content. Use for the through engagement window 1 and 2. • Banners - on locations seen from a distance • Sandwich boards - in managed locations such as rec centers. Occasional use as new engagement activities are available. In house print can be used in good weather • Handouts - for staff to promote digital content and interest Standard Media Materials: Utilize existing avenues of media to include messaging about the master plan update. • Eblast – regularly goes out to approx. 40,000 community members. Short update and link should be in every e-blast • Forestry Door Hangar – staple business card sized handout to every door hangar throughout the process • Recreation Guide – place an article in every rec guide throughout the process. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 32__ • Utility Bill insert – place a 1-page advertisement in the utility bill cycle. It goes to every household in the City. Requires coordination from PW. Reserve space and plan for 1 in first and third quarter of 2021. Coordinate with Other Departments: Several City departments have regular newsletters or other media opportunities. Coordinate with Library and OSMP for inclusion in their outreach. Timing and space will be dependent. Check in with the citywide public engagement team to support cross- promotion of engagement efforts or plan combined meetings if appropriate based on location or subject. Canvas Existing BPR events: Plan for materials and staff presence at existing planned BPR events. Example: As events like the Halloween Drive-in are planned, coordination of material handout and staffing should be planned along with it based on the timing. No events are currently on the calendar. Work closely with the event coordinator on upcoming opportunities. Video Presentations: The first video presentation is simply a kick-off of the project. It should be an overview of the project, timeline, why they should care and how they can participate. Can be a series of videos targeting 3-5 minutes each. The second and third video can be a recording of the virtual meeting and workshop, or the most compelling parts in series of 3-5 minutes each. Consider text narration that can be translated. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 33__ Attachment B: Key Analysis of 2014 White Papers Benchmark Analysis The benchmark analysis white paper used 12 key, predominantly quantitative benchmarks to compare BPR against 11 organizations identified as similar to Boulder and/or as high- performing agencies. Benchmark communities include: • Local o Broomfield, CO o Foothills Parks and Recreation District, CO o Fort Collins, CO o South Suburban Parks and Recreation District, CO o Westminster, CO • National o Ann Arbor, MI o Asheville, NC o Bend, OR o Berkeley, CA o Bloomington, IN o Naperville Parks and Recreation District, IL o Tempe, AZ The 2012 benchmark study documented the following indicators for Boulder and the comparison cities, selected as accepted levels of service measures and/or success indicators in the industry: 1. Form of organization (e.g., municipal department or special district) 2. Status of NRPA Gold Medal Award and CAPRA accreditation 3. Agency staffing (full-time, non-full time with recreation, maintenance and other crosstabulations) 4. Urban parkland acres per resident 5. Urban parkland acres as percentage of total service area 6. Key facilities (playgrounds, baseball fields, softball fields, multi-use fields, skate parks, dog parks, outdoor swimming pools, indoor swimming pools and recreation centers) 7. Debt service 8. Agency cost recovery 9. Agency spending per resident 10. Provision of in-house competitive programs 11. Partnerships with public health organizations and schools 12. Volunteerism AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 34__ In 2012, BPR utilized the framework within the Trust for Public Land’s (TPL) ParkScore index. Though Boulder is not one of the 100 largest U.S. cities, this is a valuable framework to measure park access and quality in the BPR system. Recreation Programs and Services Recreation programs and services are core to BPR and tied to each the six themes, particularly Community Health and Wellness and Financial Sustainability. Since the 2014 Master Plan, BPR has ensured that recreation services are first, intentionally planned, delivered and evaluated to impact community health and wellness; and second, ensuring the community subsidies are directed towards programs that provide community benefit. BPR developed the Recreation Service Delivery Model and Recreation Priority Index to ensure programs are aligned with the Master Plan, and appropriately managed throughout their life cycle. The first phase of work, completed in 2014, focused on developing staff mastery of the tools used to support more intentional service delivery and fee setting, through the Recreation Service Delivery Model and the Recreation Priority Index. Beginning in 2015, staff regularly evaluate programs according to the specifications outlined in the Service Delivery Model to ensure alignment with the master plan. The Recreation Priority Index (RPI), developed with the PRAB’s input, provides an objective methodology to categorize services based upon the degree of benefit they provide to the community. By categorizing services and understanding the cost, the department can ensure that general fund subsidies are focused on community priorities as expressed in the Master Plan. With the support of the PRAB, staff targeted service adjustments to exclusive programming. In some areas, phased fee increases ensured finite tax subsidy is not supporting programs that benefit the individual. In other areas, the Service Delivery Model indicated facilitated rather than direct delivery would better align with the Master Plan. Programs such as pottery, dance, competitive gymnastics, and some summer camps were out-sourced to community partners, allowing BPR to focus resources on recreation level and community-benefit programming. Refinement opportunities for this topic include: • Updated inventory and assessment (part of Phase 3: Needs Assessment) • Capture of current inventory of all recreation service providers in Boulder • Review of key areas to assess gaps in analysis for diversity of offerings, extend of overlap (or gap) among providers, partnership networks, barriers to access, programming categorization and impacts of COVID-19 pandemic Asset Management Asset management is the foundation of the key theme “Taking Care of What We Have”. In 2012, the department identified asset management as a critical need and gap to be AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 35__ addressed within the Master Plan. Since the 2014 adoption of the Master Plan, the department has successfully completed multiple planning efforts to support overall asset management. These planning efforts include: Asset Management Program (AMP), General Management and Maintenance Plan (GMMP), Design Standards Manual (DSM), and the BPR Capital Investment Strategic Plan 2016-2026. Together these documents examine existing assets to determine repair and replacement in a methodical and data-driven approach. Since the 2014 Master Plan, the department, as well as other city departments has implemented the use of an asset management software called Beehive. Beehive contains an accurate inventory and mapping of most of the department’s stationary assets, including but not limited to fences, benches, irrigation infrastructure, playgrounds, trees, and paths. Use of this software between other city departments ensures consistency across departments, as well as providing opportunities for collaboration and efficiency in managing city assets. Beehive also tracks work completed on city assets, such as inspections or repairs. The Asset Management Program (AMP) developed by BPR identifies two criteria that helps inform decisions about assets, condition and criticality. Condition scores indicate where the asset is in its lifecycle, new or nearing the age of replacement. When partnered with criticality though, a priority for repair and replacement becomes ever more apparent. Criticality is a score indicating how important that particular asset is to the community and the park in which it exists. While condition assessment is an objective measure, criticality can be much more subjective. Discussions as part of the Master Plan Update can help the department finalize a methodology for determining criticality that makes sense for the community. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 36__ Attachment C: Examples of System-wide Metrics A selection of examples of potential metrics adapted from NRPA and North American cities and best practices are provided below to start the conversation for the BPR update (NRPA 2020): 1. System-Wide Metrics (high-level, system overview - applicable for benchmarking against other cities or national averages) a. Park acres, trail miles, recreation facilities per capita (1,000 to 10,000 residents citywide) b. Building area per capita c. Park access-how many people live within a ½ mile walk to a park or 10- minute walk to park i. Recent methods have also pushed for a ¼ mile or 5-minute walk to park as more appropriate for senior citizens, people with strollers or people with physical disabilities. Cities like Vancouver are also calculating the walk not just by shortest route, but safest crossings, etc. d. Variety of park and facility amenities e. Quality and condition of park amenities i. Facility Condition Index (FCI) f. Overall park/facility/program use g. Operating expenditure per capita h. Revenue per capita (ROI for paid services, facilities, events) 2. Distribution Metrics (more nuanced, looking at quality and spending for targeted neighborhoods, park or population demographics) a. Park acres per 1,000 residents by neighborhood or demographic unit b. Distribution of amenities compared to desired amenities (needs assessment) c. Gap analysis d. Distribution of asset ratings, quality assessment i. Mapping Facility Condition Index (FCI) rating by neighborhood or other demographic unit ii. Mapping quantity of deferred maintenance by neighborhood or demographic unit e. Average number of users per park/facility f. Operating expenditures used per park in maintenance and programming g. User satisfaction surveys 3. Population & Outcome Indicators (tracks population outcomes, risk areas or areas of historic inequity to help guide distribution of resources) a. Identifying Underserved Communities i. Socioeconomic data-race, ethnicity, income, age and gender ii. Anecdotal gathered histories of displacement or discrimination b. Environmental Justice i. Rate of chronic disease-asthma AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 37__ ii. Climate risks-flooding, heat islands, tree canopy iii. Safety-traffic fatalities and incidence, crime statistics iv. Proximity to environmental hazards v. Proximity to pollution vi. Proximity to rails, highways and industrial uses vii. Access to nature viii. Access to parks and open space ix. Access to transportation x. Access to public realm xi. Access to public process xii. Equity of public expenditure xiii. Displacement and gentrification xiv. Inclusion and measures of tolerance c. Connectivity i. Percentage of complete streets ii. Miles of multipurpose trails iii. % of parks with multi-modal access iv. Access indicators-density, car ownership, age, public transportation d. Access to Nature i. Access distance/time to natural areas ii. % of residents who participate in nature-based programs iii. % of residents/children who spend time in nature each week iv. % of schools, daycares, senior centers that abut parks and natural areas e. Sports Tourism i. % use of facilities by residents ii. % use of facilities by visitors iii. Cost per resident user iv. Cost per visitor user f. Aging population i. Multi-modal / transit access to facilities for seniors ii. % of senior participants iii. % of multigenerational programs iv. % of programs that promote wellness v. % of volunteer / paid work opportunities for seniors g. Social Inclusion i. % of population accessing social services through city facilities ii. % of operating expenditures for social services iii. % of population living below poverty line iv. % of ESL community v. % of First Nations community vi. User satisfaction level with facilities and services vii. % of population that feel invested and engaged in community viii. Diversity Index AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 38__ ix. % and location of population accessing reduced fee programming or low-income support services In 2012, BPR utilized the framework within the Trust for Public Land’s (TPL) ParkScore index. Though Boulder is not one of the 100 largest U.S. cities, this is a valuable framework to measure park access and quality in the BPR system. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 39__ Attachment D: Equity Case Studies VanPlay, Vancouver, B.C.: Equity Initiative Zones Excerpt from "Outdoor Environments for People: Considering Human Factors in Landscape Design. By Eubanks Owens (University of California, Davis), Professor Jayoung Koo (University of Kentucky), and Yiwei Huang (Purdue University) During the 2018 TalkVancouver survey phase, 92% of respondents supported the goal of “prioritizing the delivery of resources where they are needed most (Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation 2019).” The Board of Parks and Recreation also heard from community members and stakeholders that they did not understand why some projects received higher priorities in money relocations (Howard & Culberston 2020). Thus, the first strategy addressed was Equity, using the Initiative Zones equity tool. Historically, planners used a two-dimensional distance mapping to regulate park development (for example, in the 1928 Plan for Vancouver, the metric for the urban park was one park per square mile). However, this metric was flawed due to different neighborhood density as well as landform variations. VanPlay’s new strategy uses geospatial data to identify underserved areas where increased investment in parks should be targeted/ VanPlay utilizes three indicators to determine the Initiative Zones (Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation 2019): 1) park access gaps - areas with low access to park space, 2) demand for low-barrier recreation - areas with a higher demand for low-barrier recreation services, and 3) urban forest canopy gaps areas of city where urban forests are less robust. Overlaying the three indicators together, the Initiative Zones maps highlight historically underserved areas where the Parks and Recreation Board can set priorities on allocating programs and resources geographically. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 40__ New York, NY: Framework for an Equitable Future In 2014, the city of New York and the Department of Parks and Recreation created a framework for implementing a set of nine immediate steps and long-term initiatives to make the city parks more equitable. A unique aspect of this plan is the capture of capital investment mapped on locations over two decades (see map below). The framework states foundation for good park development is a threefold focus on partnerships, capital investment and programming and maintenance. The framework also created community park initiative zones based on metrics of poverty, population density and growth that are priority areas for investment, maintenance and park improvements. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 41__ San Francisco, CA: Equity Initiative Zones In 2017, San Francisco become the first U.S. where all residents live within a 10-minue walk to a park. The parks department is also one of the early organizations to implement equity measures to guide the prioritization of resources and work. San Francisco's pathway to equity began with a proposition charter that mandated the department develop a set of equity metrics to establish a baseline of services for low-income neighborhoods that equitably aligns with services provided citywide. The P+R department utilized the statewide tool from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to identify equity zones. The population characteristics included age (youth and seniors), asthma, low birth weight, low education, linguistic isolation, poverty and unemployment. Parks within a five-minute walk of equity zones are priorities for investment and are monitored yearly against the AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 42__ citywide average to track progress. An example of this monitoring and the metrics tracked is shown below. AGENDA ITEM V-A_ PAGE 43__ Attachment E: List of Acronyms Acronym Full Title ACS American Community Survey AIA American Institute of Architects AMP Asset Management Plan APA American Planning Association ASLA American Society of Landscape Architects BPR Boulder Parks and Recreation Department BVCP Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan BVSD Boulder Valley School District CAPRA Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies CIP Capital Investment Plan CPA City Parks Alliance CRF City Resilience Framework DSM Design Standards Manual GARE Government Alliance on Race and Equity GMMP General Maintenance and Management Plan GUB Growing Up Boulder IP Information Packet JUA Joint Use Agreement MTAG Management Technical Advisory Group NRPA National Recreation and Park Association OSMP Open Space and Mountain Parks PRAB Parks and Recreation Advisory Board RPI Recreation Priority Index TPL Trust for Public Land UFSP Urban Forest Strategic Plan ULI Urban Land Institute WTAG Working Technical Advisory Group YOAB Youth Opportunities Advisory Board AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: November 23, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Flatirons Golf Course Concessionaire Agreement PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director Stephanie Munro, Recreation Regional Facility Manager Tom Buzbee, Flatirons Golf Course Facility Supervisor EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item seeks the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB) review and approval of an amendment to the March 6, 2016 contract between the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation department (BPR) and the Flatirons Golf Course concessionaire, facilitating continued food and beverage offerings for golf course visitors. This amendment extends the relationship beyond the 3 year plus 2 one-year amendments, thereby requiring PRAB approval, and would: • Allow for uninterrupted concession services provision through the 2022 golf season to coincide with future site facility improvements; and • Approve a two- year lease agreement with Three Worn Keys LLC at Flatirons Golf Course. By this Amendment to the March 3rd, 2016 contract for concessions services, the parties agree to extend the term of the contract through October 31, 2022. Any extension beyond this date would be on a month to month basis until the new clubhouse facility is open, but under no circumstances no later than December 31, 2022. The agreement continues existing services provided at Flatirons Golf Course by the concessionaire, which operates the space under the name SandWedge Grill. BACKGROUND: The legacy of the Flatirons Golf Course began in 1914 at Chautauqua Park with a nine- hole track including sand greens. Originally commissioned by the Boulder Country Club, the original Flatirons Golf Course was located at 28th and Iris. In 1933, as partially funded by President Roosevelt’s WPA (Works Progress Administration) program, the club relocated to the 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder. The department has operated Flatirons Golf Course as the City of Boulder’s only municipally owned and operated public golf course since 1986. AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 2__ During the last 82 years, the course has been known as: • Boulder Municipal Sports Center (1938-39) • Boulder Golf Club (1939-45) • Country Club Golf Course (1945-56) • Boulder Country Club (1956-65) University Country Club (1965-70) • Flatirons Country Club / Boulder Municipal Golf Course (1970-86) • Flatirons Golf Course (1986-Present) Flatirons Golf Course offers the opportunity for all community members to participate in the sport of golf as a more affordable option than traditional private golf clubs. The golf course is characterized by beautiful mountain views, with mostly flat layout with only a few subtle, but interesting, elevation changes. As an accessory use, course visitors have enjoyed on-site concessions for many years. Prior provision included access to an informal snack location (hereinafter, the “ Grill”) and to the site’s Events Center, a building severely damaged by the 2013 flood and thereafter decommissioned. In 2016, the contracted Grill concessions vendor decided to end its operation at the location, and the department sought an interim vendor to ensure continued customer access for food and beverages for that season. Three Worn Keys LLC, a Colorado-based food and beverage concession services entity (“Contractor”), whom was the current concessionaire at the Boulder Reservoir expressed interest in the opportunity. Flatirons Golf Course was added to the 4th amendment of the existing contract with Three Worn Keys on April 30th, 2018. Subsequent contracting with the city allowed the Contractor to pursue and be awarded transfer of the prior vendor’s site-based alcohol licensure at Flatirons. Since that time, the Contractor has provided an array of affordably-priced food and beverage offerings to visitors and has complied with all requirements of the contract and their business and alcohol licensures. The menu includes a variety of breakfast and lunch sit down and grab and go entries and other services provided include a mobile snack and beverage cart that provides on-course hospitality to golfers. In 2018, the department completed interim capital improvements on-site, enhancing Flatirons Grill for course visitors until long-term improvements could be achieved as outlined with the decision to decommission the events center. ANALYSIS: The City and Concessionaire entered into a Contract dated March 3, 2016, for food and beverage concession services at the Boulder Reservoir, and amended by the 4th Amendment on April 30, 2018 to include the Flatirons Golf Course. The amendment excludes services at the Boulder Reservoir but continues with service at Flatirons Golf Course. The 2021 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) includes the development of a new facility at Flatirons Golf Course, which will include replacing the existing grill space. The plan is to complete the new facility by late fall/winter 2022 (see Figure 1). Deconstruction of the AGENDA ITEM V-B_ PAGE 3__ existing building will be coordinated to reduce the gap in service as much as possible and have that occur during low-season. The department anticipates issuing a Request for Proposal (RFP) to identify the most appropriate hospitality partner for the new space, and that process will occur parallel to construction. The department is seeking approval of the extended agreement based on the Flatirons Golf Course Facility Construction project timeline Figure 1: Flatirons Facility Replacement Timeline NEXT STEPS: Staff will consider the PRAB’s feedback for the final amendment language, which is scheduled for approval at the December business meeting. Upon final approval, the contract will be executed and staff will monitor the vendor to ensure compliance with all terms and performance measures. ATTACHMENTS Attachment A PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve an Amendment to the Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve an Amendment to the Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course Attachment B Three Worn Keys Amendment Attachment C Original Concession Contract Attachment A - PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018 AGENDA ITEM #___VI-B___PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 23, 2018 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve an Amendment to the Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course PRESENTERS: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Alison Rhodes, Deputy Director, Parks and Recreation Margo Josephs, Manager of Community Outreach and Partnerships Keith Williams, Regional Facilities Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item seeks the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB) review and considered approval of an amendment to the March 6, 2016 contract between the department and the Flatirons Golf Course existing concessionaire facilitating continued food and beverage offerings for golf course visitors. The term of this amendment extends the relationship beyond one-year, thereby requiring PRAB approval, and would: • Allow for uninterrupted concession services provision through the 2019 golf season to coincide with the department’s continued planning for future site improvements; and • Allow the existing concessionaire, Three Worn Keys LLC, to pursue a timely renewal application of their current alcohol licensure at this facility. BACKGROUND: Originally commissioned by the Boulder Country Club, the original Flatirons Golf Course was located at 28th and Iris. In 1933, as partially funded by then-President Roosevelt’s WPA (Works Progress Administration) program, the club relocated to the 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 location. The department has operated Flatirons Golf Course as the City of Boulder’s only municipally-owned and operated public golf course since 1986. As an ancillary use, course visitors have enjoyed on-site concessions for many years. Prior provision included access to an informal snack location (hereinafter, the “Grill”) Attachment A - PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018 AGENDA ITEM #___VI-B___PAGE___2____ and to the site’s Events Center, a building severely damaged by the 2013 flood and thereafter decommissioned. In 2016, the department’s contracted Grill concessions vendor decided to end its operation at the location, and the department sought an interim vendor to ensure continued customer access for food and beverages for that season. Three Worn Keys LLC, a Colorado-based food and beverage concession services entity (“Contractor”), expressed interest in the opportunity. Subsequent contracting with the City allowed the Contractor to pursue and be awarded transfer of the prior vendor’s site- based alcohol licensure in 2016. Since that time, the Contractor has provided an array of affordably-priced food and beverage offerings to visitors and has complied with all requirements of the contract and their business and alcohol licensures. In 2018, the department completed interim capital improvements on-site, enhancing Flatirons Grill for course visitors. The Contractor has expressed interest in continued operation of a concession on the premises, and a good faith negotiation has concluded in the presentation of the attached Amendment to Contract for Concession Services (Attachment A). COUNCIL FILTER IMPACTS Environmental: Under the proposed amendment, the Contractor would align with City Zero Waste practices. OTHER IMPACTS: Fiscal: The agreement proposes monthly rent payments made by the Contractor for the duration of the 17-month term extension period which amount includes utility-related expenses. Staff time: Existing staff will manage all aspects of this License Agreement’s City responsibilities. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to approve the Amendment to Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course dated March 6th, 2016 and authorize the City Manager to make minor amendments prior to or during the term of this agreement in order to ensure that the concession is managed in a manner that is consistent with applicable laws and the policies and regulations of the City of Boulder. NEXT STEPS: Staff will consider the PRAB and public’s feedback and make any necessary revisions to the proposed agreement. If approved, staff will present the amendment for City Manager approval and continue operations with the Contractor as codified. Consideration of a Attachment A - PRAB Action Item April 23, 2018 AGENDA ITEM #___VI-B___PAGE___3____ long-term concession arrangement will be considered concurrently with future capital enhancements in 2019. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A: Amendment to Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course dated March 6, 2016. Attachment B - Three Worn Keys Amendment K:\CAFO\Amendment form 2009-.doc September 2009 1 SEVENTH AMENDMENT TO MARCH 3, 2016 CONTRACT FOR CONCESSION SERVICES This Seventh Amendment is made as of the ___ day of ______________, 20__, by and between the City of Boulder, Colorado, a Colorado home rule city (the “City”), and Three Worn Keys, LLC, d/b/a The Wheel and the Whisk, a Colorado limited liability company (the “Concessionaire”). The City and Concessionaire may hereinafter be referred to individually as a “Party” or collectively as the “Parties.” A. The City and Concessionaire entered into a Contract dated March 3, 2016, for food and beverage concession services at the Boulder Reservoir , located at 5565 51st Street, Boulder, Colorado 80301, and amended by the 4th Amendment on April 30, 2018 to include the Flatirons Golf Course, a municipally-owned and operated public golf course located at 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder Colorado 80303. The Parties wish to exclude services to Boulder Reservoir but continue with service at Flatirons Golf Course. B. The Parties wish to extend the Contract term and continue the promises and obligations of the Parties as follows: NOW THEREFORE, in consideration of the promises and obligations set forth below, the Parties agree to amend the Contract as follows: 1. Section I, number 1, “Premises,” of the Contract is amended to read as follows: The Premises covered by this Contract is the Flatirons Golf Course. (“Premises”) 2. Section II, number 21, “Licenses,” of the Contract is amended to , read as follows: Concessionaire shall obtain, at its expense, any and all licenses necessary for the operation of the Concession, including, without limitation, a City of Boulder food service establishment license as provided by Chapter 4-9, B.R.C. 1981. Concessionaire shall maintain all required and satisfactory inspections, permits and licenses for the operation of a food and beverage concession ancillary to the City’s public golf course operation. 3. Paragraph 3 of the 5th amendment to the Contract is revised to read as follows: Concessionaire agrees that it will provide the City at least 90 days’ advanced notice in writing of any decision to terminate services under this Contract and will notify the City in writing not later than July 31, 2021 of any intention with regard to any renewal option of this Contract. In the event that this Contract is terminated by either Party for any reason, Concessionaire agrees to work with the City in good faith to effectuate transfer of then-current alcohol licensure applicable to this property. Attachment B - Three Worn Keys Amendment K:\CAFO\Amendment form 2009-.doc September 2009 2 4. By this 7th Amendment, the Parties agree to extend the term of the Contract through October 31, 2022. Any extension beyond this date will be on a month to month basis until the new clubhouse facility is open, but under no circumstances no later than December 31, 2022. A certificate of insurance shall be provided to the City evidencing coverage for the extended term of the Contract. 5. Except as amended herein, the Contract shall remain in full force and effect. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties to this Seventh Amendment have caused it to be executed by their authorized officers as of the day and year above first written. This Seventh Amendment may be executed in counterparts, each of which shall be deemed an original, but all of which together shall constitute one and the same instrument. [SIGNATURE PAGE FOLLOWS] CONCESSIONAIRE By: __________________________________ Title: _________________________________ CITY OF BOULDER _______________________________________ City Manager ATTEST: _____________________________ City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: ______________________________ City Attorney’s Office CONTRACT FOR CONCESSION SERVICES THIS CONTRACT is made this 3rd day of March, 2016 by and between the City of Boulder, Colorado, a Colorado home rule city ("the City"), and Three Work Keys, LLC DBA The Wheel & Whisk, (the "Concessionaire"). BACKGROUND A. The City operates the recreation area known as; Boulder Reservoir, 5565 51st Street, Boulder Co,80301;and B. The City desires to have food and beverage service available to the general public using Boulder Reservoir, during normal operating hours; and C. Concessionaire submitted the lowest and best quote for said services and agrees to perform the Services as set forth in this Contract. NOW, THEREFORE, the City and the Concessionaire covenant and agree as follows: I. DEFINITIONS As used in this Contract, the following terms have the meanings specified below: 1. Premises. The Premises covered by this Contract are Boulder Reservoir ("Premises"). 2. Gross Receipts. Gross Receipts are the total amount of income in cash or credit received by the Concessionaire from all business done on the Premises or under this Contract. Sales tax receipts are not income within the meaning of this definition. 3. Notice. Whenever Notice is required by this Contract, it shall be in writing. Notice may be given to the Concessionaire by mail. Notice may also be given to the Concessionaire by delivering it to any officer of the Concessionaire or by delivery to such person's office during normal business hours. Notice may be given to the City by mailing it to Reservoir Manager, City of Boulder Parks and Recreation, PO Box 791, Boulder, Colorado 80306, or by delivering it to the Reservoir Manager or by delivering it during normal business hours to such person's office. Notice by mail shall be deemed delivered on the third calendar day after the day on which it is deposited, postage paid, in the United States mail. II. CONCESSIONAIRE OBLIGATIONS 4. Duties. Concessionaire shall undertake the duties and responsibilities described in this Contract. It is agreed that the request for bids and the Concessionaire's proposal are hereby made a part of this Contract, and each of the parties agrees to carry out and perform all of the provisions of said documents. In the event of conflicts or inconsistencies between this Contract 1 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract and its exhibits or attachments, such conflicts or inconsistencies shall be resolved by reference to the documents in the following order of priority: a. The Contract; b. The Concessionaire's proposal. 5. Use of Premises. The Premises are to be used to provide food services to Boulder Reservoir users and visitors. Concessionaire acknowledges that the City may allow food providers, such as food trucks, to provide food services at any of the Premises during the term of this Contract. 6. Equipment. The Concessionaire shall provide all equipment and storage necessary to deliver the food products and services in a clean, attractive, and efficient manner. All equipment and inventory must vacate Premises 30 days after last scheduled event, unless noted in the renewal of an additional year of service is signed. Concessionaire will provide gas. 7. Food. The Concessionaire shall prepare or provide soft drinks, sports drink, water, sandwiches, confections, and sundry similar items for sale from the concession area in sufficient quantities to meet the demand. 8. Food Quality. The Concessionaire shall offer for sale only products from reputable preparers, processors, and manufacturers and shall remove from sale any items which fail to meet generally accepted quality standards or the health standards of the City, Boulder County, or the State of Colorado. 9. Ingredients Marked. The Concessionaire shall insure that all packaged food items clearly display on the package the contents and list the ingredients contained therein. 10. Cash Register. The Concessionaire shall install a mechanical or electronic cash register system and shall activate the same at the conclusion of each and every sale and shall make the resultant register record available to the City for audit purposes. 11. Sanitation. The Concessionaire shall maintain the concession area in a clean and hygienic condition and shall keep them free of litter and trash. This obligation shall include, without limitation, periodically throughout the day and at the end of the day picking up cups, plates, utensils, \-\Tapping materials, unconsumed food or drink, and other food related materials left in Concession Area by patrons and policing the concession area for such materials, so that patrons are never presented with a messy, cluttered, or unsanitary area in which to sit and consume food purchased from the Concessionaire. The City shall provide a sufficient number of trash containers within the Premises and shall empty them as needed. Trash from within the concession stand, such as packing boxes, shall be deposited in the receptacles dumpsters provided by the City. Concessionaire will make reasonable efforts to recycle. 12. Zero Waste. The Concessionaire shall ensure that all products for use at the Boulder Reservoir comply with the City's zero waste guidelines and align with on-site disposal options. 2 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract Concessionaire agrees to comply with the those guidelines. The City's zero waste guidelines are found at the attached Exhibit A. 13. Products. a. The City reserves the right to approve the products offered for sale by the Concessionaire, if the City disapproves of a particular item; it may require in writing that the Concessionaire stop selling that item. The City in writing must first approve changes to the approved list of items to be sold. b. The Concessionaire will sell no tobacco products, malt, vinous, or spirituous liquor, or fermented malt beverages on the Premises. c. No drink items shall be sold in glass bottles or glasses. Paper or plastic cups/bottles or metal cans may be used. d. Other Items for sale, must be prior approved by Reservoir Manager. e. Concession Hours of Operation. 10:00 AM-6:00 PM, 7 days a week 14. Fees. The Concessionaire shall pay the City the following fees: Boulder Reservoir: The Concessionaire shall pay the City Five Percent (5%) on all revenues received within the City of Boulder Reservoir Regional Park. The Concessionaire will pay the City by the 15th of the following month. 15. Interest: If the Concessionaire defaults by failing to pay the above fees and costs on time, it shall, at the time it finally does pay the City, also pay interest on such amount at 0.049315% per day from date due to date paid, compounded annually . 3 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 16. Concessionaire Emplovees. The Concessionaire is an independent contractor and not an employee of the City. Employees of the Concessionaire are not employees of the City . Persons working for the Concessionaire on the Premises shall be neat and clean at all times and shall wear some distinctive article of apparel which identifies them as Concessionaire employees. They shall be courteous to all guests and patrons of the Premises. Employees shall not use improper language, consume alcoholic beverages, behave in a boisterous manner, or engage in any horseplay, immoral, disreputable, or unbecoming or otherwise illegal or objectionable conduct or activities while on the Premises or within the ball fields. 17. Accessibility. The Concessionaire shall insure that all services are at all times conveniently accessible to persons with disabilities. But the Concessionaire will not be required to bear the cost of any modifications for this purpose to the Premises as initially provided by the City. 18. Statements and Records. a. Statements. With its percentage fee payment, when such is due, the Concessionaire shall mail to the City a semi-annual statement showing all Gross Receipts using a form provided by the City and approved by the City. The Concessionaire shall include with the statement and exact copy of the sales tax reports which it has filed, and which it is preparing to file, with the City Department of Finance and Record, Sales Tax Division. b. Books and Records. Concessionaire shall keep a set of books and records showing all of the receipts and disbursements concerning business conducted pursuant to this Contract. Such books shall be available for inspection by the City at all reasonable times, and the Concessionaire shall submit such books and records to the City for audit at such times and places as the City may reasonably direct. Such books and records shall be maintained by the Concessionaire in accordance with generally accepted accounting procedures. If the City determines that the books and records are not kept in such a manner, the City may require the Concessionaire, and the Concessionaire agrees to, maintain such books and records under the supervision of a certified public accountant. Such accountant shall attest to the accuracy of the books and records and shall be retained and paid at the expense of the Concessionaire. 4 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 19. Nondiscrimination Requirements. Pursuant to Section 12-1-15, B.R.C. 1981, the Concessionaire shall not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because ofrace, creed, color, national original, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, ancestry, mental or physical disability, or age, except where such is a bona fide occupational qualification. The Concessionaire shall not discriminate against any customer on the Premises on the basis of any of the above-described characteristics. 20. Taxes. The Concessionaire shall obtain all necessary sales tax licenses, including a City of Boulder sales tax license, and shall collect and remit all applicable sales and use taxes, including the City of Boulder sales tax, in accordance with law. The Concessionaire shall pay all City of Boulder sales or use taxes due on the equipment used on the Premises. 21. Licenses. Concessionaire shall obtain, at its expense, any and all licenses necessary for the operation of the Concession, including, without limitation, a City of Boulder food service establishment license as provided by Chapter 4-9, B.R.C. 1981. 22. Signs and Advertising. The Concessionaire will not place any sign or other advertising on the exterior of the concession structure, in the Concession Area, or on other City property, without prior approval by the City's Reservoir Manager. Such approval shall not be unreasonably withheld. Concessionaire will provide the City with a menu and company logo for website informational needs and advertisements. 23. Keys to Concession Areas. The Concessionaire may lock doors to those portions of the Concession Areas in which it stores food or equipment with locks of its choosing, but in such case it shall provide the City with one key for each such lock so that City employees may readily enter such areas in the event of fire, flooding, for inspection, or for any other proper purpose. 24. Subcontractors. Concessionaire may subcontract out the services described in this Contract, upon notice and approval of said subcontractor by the City. No agreement between the contractor and a subcontractor shall in any way affect this Contract between the City and the Concessionaire. The Concessionaire shall require each subcontractor to sign an agreement in which the subcontractor agrees to be bound by all applicable terms and conditions of the Contract for the benefit of the City. The Concessionaire shall be fully responsible for all acts and omissions of its subcontractors and of persons and organizations directly or indirectly employed by them and of persons and organizations for whose acts any of them may be liable to the same extent that the contractor is responsible for the acts and omissions of persons directly employed by the contractor. Nothing in the Contract nor in the City's acceptance of a subcontractor, shall create any contractual relationship between the City and any subcontractor or other person or organization having a direct contract with the contractor, nor shall it create any obligation on the part of the city to pay or to see to the payment of any moneys due any subcontractor or other person or organization. 5 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 25. III. CITY RESPON SIBILITIES The City will provide a location for Concessions equipment storage on the Premises. 26. The City will provide electrical utilities and dumpster fees to the concession area and will pay for all charges for the use thereof. 27 . The City will provide Concessionaire with a schedule of special events. 28. The City will provide Concessionaire with a list of event coordinators for the opportunity to provide concession services to groups hosting special events. IV. TERtv1 29. Term of Contract. Unless sooner terminated, this Contract ends December 31, 2016. The City reserves the right to extend the Contract for up to four (4) additional one-year terms as mutually agreeable by both parties in writing with conditions remaining constant. Contract renewals shall be in writing and signed by both parties. 30. Termination. The City may, at any time, tenninate this Contract, in whole or in part, for its own convenience. Additionally, the City may terminate this Contract upon failure of the Concessionaire to provide adequate service to the public, or upon failure of the Concessionaire to comply with any of the provisions or conditions of this Contract, including without limitation the timely payment of all fees due under this Contract, as follows: a. If the Concessionaire is in breach of any provision or condition of this Contract, the City may serve Notice upon it specifying such defaults with reasonable particularity. After receipt of a notice of breach, the Concessionaire shall continue to prov ide services under the Contract, and shall not remove any inventory or equipment from the Premises. The Concessionaire shall hav e t\venty-one (21) days to cure such breach. If the breach is not cured within the twenty-one (21) days, the City may terminate this Contract, upon written notice to Concessionaire specifying the date of termination. b. In the event of contract termination, the Concessionaire shall vacate the Premises and may, after payment to the City of all sums, including damages, due and payable to the City under the terms of the Contract, remove its inventory and equipment from the Premises. If payment is not received by the City, the City reserves the right to lock the Premises and hold inventory and/or equipment until satisfactory payment is received. If satisfactory payment is not received within twenty-one (21) days from the date of the 6 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract contract termination, the City reserves the right to sell the Concessionaire's inventory and/or equipment. V. INSURANCE AND INDEMNITY 31. Insurance. Concessionaire, or its subcontractors, agree to procure and maintain in force during the term of this Contract, at its own cost, the following minimum coverages: A. Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability B. 1. State of Colorado: Statutory General Liability 1. General Aggregate Limit: ii. Bodily Injury & Property Damage:0 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 Coverage provided should be at least as broad as found in Insurance Services Office (ISO) form CG000I. C. Insurance shall: 1. Provide primary coverage; 11. Include the City of Boulder and its officials and employees as additional insureds as their interest may appear (except for Worker's Compensation and Professional Liability). Additional insured endorsement should be at least as broad as ISO form CG20 IO for General Liability coverage and similar forms for auto liability; 111. Issue from a company licensed to do business in Colorado having an AM Best rating of at least A-VI; and 1v. Be procured and maintained in full force and effect for duration of work. D. Certificates oflnsurance shall be forwarded to Purchasing. Certificate Holder shall be: City of Boulder, 1777 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80306. E. Within seven days after receiving insurer's notice of cancellation or reduction in coverage, Concessionaire, or its insurance broker, shall notify the City. In either such case, Concessionaire shall promptly obtain and submit proof of substitute insurance complying with the City's insurance requirements. 32. Indemnification. The Concessionaire agrees to indemnify and save harmless the City against any and all damages to property or injuries to or death of any person or persons arising from its performance of this Contract, including property and employees or agents of the City and shall defend, indemnify and save harmless the City from any and all claims, demands, suits, actions or proceedings of any kind or nature, including, without limitation, Worker's Compensation claims, of or by anyone whomsoever in any way resulting from or arising out of the Concessionaire's operations in connection with this Contract, including operations of subcontractors and acts or omissions of employees or agents of the Concessionaire or its sub contractor. 7 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 33. No \Vaiver of the Colorado Governmental Immunitv Act. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Contract, to the contrary, no term or condition of this Contract shall be construed or interpreted as a waiver, express or implied, of any of the immunities, rights, benefits, protection, or other provisions of the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act, Section 24-10-101 et seq., C.R.S., as now or hereafter amended. The parties understand and agree that liability for claims for injuries to persons or property arising out of negligence of the City, its departments, institutions, agencies, boards , officials and employees, is controlled and limited by the provisions of Section 24-10-101 et seq., C.R.S., as now or hereafter amended. 34. Protection of Persons and Propertv. The Concessionaire shall take all reasonable safety precautions and provide all reasonable protection to prevent damage, injury, or loss to all employees on the Premises, all customers on the Premises, and all other persons or property which may be injured or damaged on the Premises or otherwise in the course of the performance of this Contract. VI. GENERAL CONDITIONS 35. No Third Party Beneficiarv. This Contract is not intended to create any right in and for the public or any member thereof, or any other third party, or to authorize anyone not a party to the Contract to maintain a suit pursuant to the terms or provisions of the Contract. The duties, obligations, and responsibilities of the parties to the Contract, with respect to third parties, shall remain as imposed by law. 36. Independent Contractor. The relationship between the Concessionaire and the City is that of an independent contractor. The Concessionaire shall supply all personnel, equipment, materials and supplies at its own expense, except as specifically set forth herein. The Concessionaire shall not be deemed to be, nor shall it represent itself as, an employee, partner, or joint venturer of the City. No employee or officer of the City shall supervise the Concessionaire. The Concessionaire is not entitled to worker's compensation benefits and is obligated to directly pay federal and state income tax on money earned under this Contract. 37. Severability. To the extent that the Contract may be executed and performance of the parties' obligation may be accomplished within the intent of the Contract, the terms of the Contract are severable, and should any term or provision of the Contract be declared invalid or become inoperative for any reason, such invalidity or failure shall not affect the validity of any other contract term or provision. 38. Waiver. The waiver of any breach of a term, provision or requirement of this Contract, shall not be construed or deemed as waiver of any subsequent breach of such term, provision or requirement, or of any other term, provision or requirement. 39. Compliance with Laws. This Contract shall be subject to the provisions of the Charter, Municipal Code and ordinances of the City of Boulder. At all times during the performance of the Contract, the Concessionaire shall strictly adhere to all applicable federal, state, and City laws. The term "laws," as used in this Contract, includes, without limitation, all federal, state, county, and City statutes, ordinances, codes, charters, laws, rules, and regulations. 8 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 40. Choice of Law. In all litigation arising out of this Contract, the statutory and common law of the state of Colorado shall be controlling. The parties further agree that the only proper venue shall be in District Court in and for the county of Boulder, Colorado. 41. Assignment. No rights or duties which arise under the terms of this Contract, or by operation of law by virtue of any term or provision of this Contract, may be assigned by the Concessionaire without the express written consent of the City, which it may withhold in its discretion. 42. Prohibitions on Public Contracts for Services. The Concessionaire certifies that the Concessionaire shall comply with the provisions of Section 8-17.5-101 et seq., C.R.S. The Concessionaire shall not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien to perform work under this Contract or enter into a contract with a subcontractor that fails to certify to the Concessionaire that the subcontractor shall not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien to perform work under this contract. The Concessionaire represents, warrants, and agrees: (i) that it has confirmed the employment eligibility of all employees who are newly hired for employment to perform work under this contract through participation in either the E-Verify or the Department Program; (ii) that the Concessionaire is prohibited from using either the E-Verify Program or the Department Program procedures to undertake pre-employment screening of job applicants, while the public contract for services is being performed; and (iii) if the Concessionaire obtains actual knowledge that a subcontractor performing work under the public contract for services knowingly employs or contracts with an illegal alien, the Concessionaire shall be required to: a. Notify the subcontractor and the contracting state agency or political subdivision within three (3) days that the Concessionaire has actual knowledge that the subcontractor is employing or contracting with an illegal alien; and b. Terminate the subcontract with the subcontractor if within three (3) days of receiving the notice required pursuant to Section 8-17 .5-102(2)(b )(Ill)(A) the subcontractor does not stop employing or contracting with the illegal alien; except that the Concessionaire shall not terminate the contract with the subcontractor if during such three days the subcontractor provides information to establish that the subcontractor has not knowingly employed or contracted with an illegal alien. The Concessionaire further agrees that it shall comply with all reasonable requests made in the course of an investigation under Section 8-17.5-102(5), C.R.S., by the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. If the Concessionaire fails to comply with any requirement of this provision or Section 8-17.5-1011., C.R.S., the City may terminate this contract for breach, and the Concessionaire shall be liable for actual and consequential damages to the City. 43. Authority. Whenever any term or provision of this Contract gives discretion to the City to do any act, give any notice, or make any decision, such may be done, unless otherwise specified, by the Boulder Director of Parks and Recreation. Any action which may be taken by the Boulder Director of Parks and Recreation, may also be taken by the Boulder City Manager. 9 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract The Concessionaire may designate in writing to the City those persons with authority to act on its behalf with respect to this Contract. 44. No Multiple Fiscal Year Obligations. Nothing herein shall constitute a multiple fiscal year obligation pursuant to Colorado Constitution, Article X, Section 20. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Contract, the City's obligations under this Contract are subject to annual appropriation by the City Council of the City. Any failure of a City Council annually to appropriate adequate monies to finance the City 's obligations under this Contract, shall terminate this Contract at such time as such then-existing appropriations are to be depleted. Notice shall be given promptly to the Contractor, of any failure to appropriate such adequate monies. 45. Authority. Contractor warrants that the individual executing this Contract is properly authorized to bind the Contractor to this Contract. (SIGNATURE PAGE FOLLOWS) 10 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract STATEOFCOWRADO ) ) ss. COUNTY OF BOULDER ) The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me, a notary public, this ~ day of J'llkRC.\-t 20JL by 1~011/H\5 WARrJ,KE .as {) vN£r Witness my hand and official seal. My commission expires: f /-2-° /'J--1) 'Z{) ALBERT BOGGS Ill NOTARY PUBLIC STATE OF COLORADO NOTARY ID 20164002183 MY COMMISSION EXPIRES 01/2012020 ATTEST: ~ APPROVED AS TO FORM: City Attorney's Office EXHIBITS: Exhibit A: City of Boulder Zero Waste Guidelines 11 CITY OF BOULDER (Jc--,_ s ~ City Manage~ Attachment C - Original Concession Contract A EXHIBIT A Cily of Boulder ~ LEAD Lal Enmmiental Actmllilisial Ccnnuitr f'lllming &Sullnlilily Zero Waste Materials Agreement Guidelines to Containers and Service Ware Acceptable All paper containers including plates, bowls, cups, etc. Waxed paper products are acceptable, as long as you can scratch the wax coating off with your fingernail. Nothing can have a plastic lining. #2 and #5 plastic tubs and cups (compostable paper, potato starch or com starch preferred) :An '9th~~-1:1_1,m:i~~r~_'.§fk1~~t!¢. ~ups {eveff~Jn:~n d¢1~ ~~p~) _ -------,_ :;~11 :otner,numtiers"of narrow;neck"inlast'c ·. ·-Narrow-neck plastic containers (#s 1, 2 & 5 contai~er~: -· · · ··· , -· ··· --··•-P. --_J - only) Potato or cornstarch lfds Potato starch or com starch cutlery (spoons, forks, knives, straws) . .J , •• I ,.. _ . ..,_ .. ) fllastic'!:stra\Yf~-· Wooden stir-sticks, chopsticks, toothpicks and skewers Waxed paper products ·-. ~ ---.. Aluminum foil and cans Glass bottles and jars Paper mflk cartons and drink boxes Paper napkins and paper towels • Please note that you will be asked to remove any non-recyclable or non-compostable items from your site for the duration of the event. 3-18-2013 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract EXHIBIT A ~ City of Boulder ~ Zero Waste Materials Agreement LEAD Ensure that all vendors at your event are on board with your Zero Waste efforts! LuElll-1111.11:tbtlMiln Connui\y~•~ Vendors .ire required to hand out only recyclable or compostable products. Here are some ideas that can help you achieve this goal: -Offer finger foods to use fewer utensils. -Consider replacfng plastic bowls (for serving chili and soups) with bread bowls and using cones for ke cream. • Paper napkins are compostable and can replace bulkJer plates. -Do not use Styrofoam® or plastic (recyclable plastic bottles are OK). Please use the recyclable or compostable alternatives listed above • .. Compostable materials can be purchased easily and locally (see below.) Sources for Compostabla Sarvfceware: Eco-Products (Boulderi CO) Green Logic (Ft. Collfns, CO} ~ WWW,i?CQIJ[Qd!Jcis,'-Dm 303-449-1876 (Qgir:,aet,!comP.Q5tab~·lablewate.btml 970-484- 1740 Hard Copy Solutions (Longmont, CO) World Centric (Palo Alto, CA) www,barckopy.onlioe.com 303-772-2902 www.worldcentdc.org/biolinde><JJ.tm 650-739- 0699 All Things Renewable (Denver, CO) Nature Friendly Products (Beachwood, OH} www,alltbingsreaewable.cam 303-307-www,nfptQ,c12mlpmductSthtmJ 1-800-321-4804 x 1317 105 We look forward to work1ing wfth you to make this a successful Zero Waste Event. If you have questions regarding Zero Waste, contact Kelle Boumansour at 303•441-1940 or boumanss2Uds@ba.1.l1.der-'O.lttr.ad0..goy. 3-111-2013 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract To Whom It May Concern, 2/12/2016 I am writing this proposal in response to a request made to me regarding the Concession Stand at the Boulder Reservoir. Having met with Skyler Beck and Stacy Cole on location and having discussed some of the past and possible future operations, I believe my company has the skills and experience to make the most out of this opportunity. While we believe this year will present many challenges, we feel that there is money to be made and a positive future to build towards. 1. Services & Operations Our goal for the concession stand is to provide delicious food and great service, to utilize onsite and online marketing to drive traffic and sales, and to set a positive trajectory for the future of food service at the reservoir. There are several key components to achieving these goals, including a solid operations plan, a consistent and well liked menu, .and an updated social media and marketing plan. We also want to show the additional services we can provide with our two mobile units and extensive catering capabilities. By using all of our available resources, we hope to help create an environment that will make a great experience for visitors and bring them back to the reservoir year after year. Our plan for a menu is to keep things tasty, simple, and affordable. The menu will have popular snack bar type items hamburgers, hot dogs, sandwiches, kids items, French fries, and salads. We will also sell beverages, chips, candy, and ice cream. We may also offer some breakfast items if we find there is a demand in the earlier hours of service. We will have to add a deep fryer for the French fries, and we are looking into leasing a soft serve ice cream machine as well. We would want to implement these changes immediately in order to have them ready for the beginning of the season. We feel that just the addition of these two items alone will help increase traffic to the stand. Please see attached menu for details. We would also ask that there would be no other food or beverage available onsite, including vending machines, unless we were operating the vending machines. With all of the special events that occur each year, we think it is a great opportunity to utilize our two mobile units and our catering company to give the event coordinators an easier experience with their search for a food vendor. When these groups book the reservoir, we would like to have the first right of refusal. If there is an occasion when our company was not available, we would be able to assist the event coordinator with finding another option, as we know most of the mobile vendors and caterers in the area. This should be a nice service for the groups that are looking to book the reservoir, as I know finding food vendors can be a real hassle. Attachment C - Original Concession Contract 2. Work Experience My name is Tom Warnke and I am the owner of Three Worn Keys, LLC. I have been working in food service since I was 16 years old, and one of my first jobs was actually working concessions at The Garden State Arts Center in New Jersey. For three summers I ran the food kiosks, and from there I moved on to the restaurant business. For the next 20 or so years I worked in many establishments, starting as a dish washer and working my way up through every position, eventually becoming General Manager for two local Boulder restaurants in 2008. In 2012, I left the GM position and opened my first food truck, The Wheel & Whisk. This year, I purchased a second mobile kitchen which I am in the process of getting licensed. We also have a growing catering business which specializes in everything from corporate breakfasts to weddings. Due to our significant growth, this summer I was able to bring on a full time operational business partner, Jaime Martinez, who has lived and worked in Boulder most of his life. Born in Mexico and moving to the US when he was 12, Jaime has been working in restaurants and food service for over 20 years. He was the executive chef at the same restaurants where I was GM, and has worked as a chef in some of the best establishments in town. In addition to his 20 years in the restaurant biz, he has executed hundreds of weddings and other high end events. With many years of management experience, he has the skills necessary to take on many roles in my organization, and his leadership and involvement will be crucial to the success of our operation. 3. Aesthetic Improvements & Additional Equipment and Investments While we believe the stand could use some significant updates, because this is only a one year agreement, I am not looking to invest much money towards improvements. With unknown past sales and an unknown future, we have to be very careful how much money we invest into it this year. As stated in the menu section, we are looking at adding a deep fryer for French fries and a soft serve ice cream machine, which we will probably lease. We would also like to put on a fresh coat of paint, and add some potted plants to the outside area. 4. Staffing & Hours Without having any historical numbers, staffing is going to be a little bit of a work in progress. Our goal would be to have at least two people on site at all times, which would allow us to have one person working the cash register and one person cooking and preparing food. Jaime and I will each work several shifts per week and take on most of the managerial duties. We will also hire one assistant manager and several other part time employees. It will be important to stay active in the staffing levels, as we need to achieve a certain level of service but much be conscious of cost. This dilemma is not unique to this operation, every food establishment deals Attachment C - Original Concession Contract with the same issue. We feel confident that our experience will allow us to navigate these difficulties and produce the right balance of service and cost control. As far as uniforms, we would like them to wear matching T-Shirts with the Boulder Reservoir Insignia, and with khaki pants or shorts. We will also provide aprons to help keep them looking clean and ready for service. Hats will also be required, as well as gloves when handling food. Our normal operating hours will be 10:00-6:00, 7 days a week. When there is a special event of any kind, we plan to open earlier and serve light breakfast and coffee to give the participants an extra option and to capture some extra revenue. We will only close due to weather. S. Social Media and Marketing For all the years I've lived in Boulder I didn't even know there was a concession stand at the reservoir. In order to get the word out to the general public, we must create a social media platform that has local and regional reach. By developing a webpage, facebook, and twitter feed, and linking all ofthese through the city of Boulder's already existing platform, we should be able to reach significant numbers of locals and tourists before they decide to come down to the reservoir. This is key because then they may decide not to pack their own lunch and instead will make the conscious decision to eat at the concession stand instead. We also want to increase onsite marketing, in the form of signage around the entire reservoir property, bright signs near the entrance of the stand, and a menu handed out to visitors when they enter the gate . I'm not sure what has been done in previous years, but there needs to be clear indicators pointing guests to the concession stand. This can be simply achieved with minimal cost, as long as the reservoir is okay with some increased signage. 6. Business Insurance I have been in contact with my current business insurance provider and he says he will probably be able to provide coverage under my existing policy. I currently have Liberty Mutual for general liability, property damage, and worker's comp. Conclusion Our company has been steadily growing over the last 3 years, and we think this opportunity would be a good fit with our existing profile. While it is difficult to predict exactly how this summer will unfold, we believe that our skills and experience give us a great chance to make it work. We have lived and worked in Boulder for many years, and giving back and being part of the community is an important thing for us. With this opportunity, we would be able to not only grow our business, but also be a part ofthe iconic Boulder Reservoir . Thank you very much for the consideration. Attachment C - Original Concession Contract Boulder Reservoir Concession Stand Menu Taylor Ham, Egg & Cheese Sandwich -$7 .00 Taylor pork roll, cheddar, fried egg, salt, pepper, ketchup Pico Quesadilla -$7.00 add chicken -$2 pico de gallo, cheddar jack cheese, flour tortilla, sour cream Cheesesteak Sandwich -$9.00 marinated sirloin, grilled onions, cheddar cheese, hogie Hummus Wrap -$7.00 hummus, cucumbers, tomatoes, onions, lettuce, olives, flour tortilla Buffalo Chicken Wrap -$8.00 grilled chicken, buffalo sauce, ranch, lettuce, onion Cheeseburger -$8.00 cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo, mustard, ketchup Mixed Green Salad -$6.00 mixed greens, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, balsamic vinaigrette Chicken Tenders w/ French Fries -$7 .00 Kids Hot Dog -$4.00 all beef hot dog, bun Kids Quesadilla -$4.00 flour tortilla, cheese French Fries -$2.50 Chips & Candy -$2.00 Ice Cream -$3.00 Beverages -Fountain Soda, Bottle Water -$1.50 Attachment C - Original Concession Contract Phone: (303)441-1880 Fax: (303)441-4241 AE~RD 9 CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE I DA TE (MM/DD/YYYY) 08/26/2015 THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MA TIER OF INFORMATION ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. THIS CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AFFIRMATIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AMEND, EXTEND OR ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES BELOW. THIS CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT BETWEEN THE ISSUING INSURER(S), AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE OR PRODUCER, AND THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. IMPORTANT: If the certificate holder is an ADDITIONAL INSURED, the policy(ies) must be endorsed. If SUBROGATION IS WAIVED, subject to the terms and conditions of the policy, certain policies may require an endorsement. A statement on this certificate does not confer rights to the certificate holder in lieu of such endorsement(s). PRODUCER CONTACT Terri M Hauk NAME: Long's Insurance Agency,lnc m£JN~o-~..+,-(720)684-6012 I FAX (A/C Nol: (720)684-6052 7800 Miller Dr. Unit C E-MAIL Terri@Longslnsurance.com Frederick, CO 80504 ADDRESS: INSURER!Sl AFFORDING COVERAGE NAIC# License #: 252724 Libertv Mutual 24082 INSURER A: INSURED INSURERB: The Wheel and Whisk INSURERC: 3824 Northbrook Dr INSURERD: Boulder, CO 80304 INSURERE: INSURERF: COVERAGES CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 00000000-0 REVISION NUMBER: 3 THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOT\I\IITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT, TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS, EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. INSR ADDLSUBR 1r,,z,M%Mffv, r~TJvWYI LIMITS LTR T1'PE OF INSURANCE •••en lwun POLICY NUMBER A X ! COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY BLS55528182 04/26/2015 04/26/2016 EACH OCCURRENCE $ 1000000 ro CLAIMS-MADE [i] OCCUR DAMAGE TO RENTED 300 000 PREMISES iEa occurrence\ $ f----i MED EXP (Any one person) $ 15 000 '_j PERSONAL &ADV INJURY $ 1 000.000 GEN'L AGGREGATE LIMIT APPLIES PER: GENERAL AGGREGATE $ 2 000.000 ~POLICY Of~ Owe PRODUCTS -COMP/OP AGG $ 2 000,000 OTHER: $ A AUTOMOBILE LIABILIT1' BAS55528182 04/26/2015 04/26/2016 COMBINED SINGLE LIMIT $ 500.000 /Ea accident) - ANY AUTO BODILY INJURY (Per person) $ -ALL OWNED X SCHEDULED BODILYINJURY(Peraccidanl) $ -AUTOS ~ ~~1~J\o\NED HIRED AUTOS AUTOS rp~~~gd,:nt~AMAGE $ >--- $ UMBRELLA LIAB H OCCUR EACH OCCURRENCE $ ~ EXCESSLIAB CLAIMS-MADE AGGREGATE $ DED I I RETENTION$ $ A WORKERS COMPENSATION XWS55528182 04/26/2015 04/26/2016 XI ~ffTUTE I I OTH- AND EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY ER Y/N 100,000 ANY PROPRIETOR/PARTNER/EXECUTIVE □ N/A E.L. EACH ACCIDENT $ OFFICER/MEMBER EXCLUDED? 100,000 (Mandatory in NH) E.L. DISEASE-EA EMPLOYEE $ If yes, dascMbe under DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS below E.L. DISEASE-POLICY LIMIT $ 500,000 DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS/LOCATIONS/ VEHICLES (ACORD 101, Additional Remarks Schedule, may be attached if more space is required) The City of Boulder and all of it's employees are listed as additional insured's wth regards to general liability. CERTIFICATE HOLDER City of Boulder PO Box 791 1739 Broadway 3rd Fl Boulder, CO 80306 ACORD 25 (2014/01) CANCELLATION SHOULD ANY OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION DATE THEREOF, NOTICE WILL BE DELIVERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH TliE POLICY PROVISIONS. AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE MH © 1988-2014 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved. The ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD Printed by TMH on August 26, 2015 at 04:11PM Attachment C - Original Concession Contract AGENDA ITEM V-C_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: November 23, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: 2021 Flatirons Golf Course Proposed Golf Fee Structure PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Stephanie Munro, Regional Recreation Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager Tom Buzbee, Facility Supervisor EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) continues to align business practices with the guidance outlined in the 2014 Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan.  Based upon increasing costs to deliver services, staff is proposing fee increases at the Flatirons Golf Course (Flatirons) for 2021. The fee increases address rising expenses while continuing the department’s commitment to using subsidies for youth, seniors, under-resourced community members with low incomes, and those living with disabilities. The intent of this item is to gather the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) members’ input on the methodology and proposed fees. The board’s input will be considered for the final 2021 fees at Flatirons Golf Course. BACKGROUND: The legacy of the Flatirons Course Golf in Boulder began in 1914 at Chautauqua Park with a nine-hole track including sand greens. Originally commissioned by the Boulder Country Club, the original Flatirons Golf Course was located at 28th and Iris. In 1933, as partially funded by then-President Roosevelt’s WPA (Works Progress Administration) program, the club relocated to the 5706 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 location. The department has operated Flatirons Golf Course as the City of Boulder’s only municipally owned and operated public golf course since 1986. During the last 82 years, the course has been known as: • Boulder Municipal Sports Center (1938-39) • Boulder Golf Club (1939-45) • Country Club Golf Course (1945-56) • Boulder Country Club (1956-65) • University Country Club (1965-70) • Flatirons Country Club / Boulder Municipal Golf Course (1970-86) AGENDA ITEM V-C_ PAGE 2__ • Flatirons Golf Course (1986-Present) In 1986, the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department began operating Flatirons Golf Course as a municipally owned public golf course. Flatirons Golf Course is the only public golf course in the City of Boulder and offers the opportunity for all community members to participate in the sport of golf as a more affordable option than traditional private golf clubs. The golf course is characterized by beautiful mountain views, with a layout of mostly flat holes with only a few subtle, but interesting elevation changes. Players at the Flatirons GC facility can access the following amenities and services: 18 hole championship golf course, 22 bay practice range, chipping area, pitching complex and a putting green. Golf lessons provided through an independent contractor, junior programs conducted by The First Tee-Colorado Rocky Mountains , golf club fitting and repair performed by our golf staff, as well as organized tournaments supervised by the Colorado Golf Association and the Junior Golf Alliance of Colorado are all popular offerings. A quick serve grill operated by a lessee provides simple breakfast and lunch menu items, snacks, drinks as well as alcoholic beverages. In May 2019, several months of discussion with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) on access fees, including the methodology and policy applied in setting fees, resulted in the PRAB’s approval for the approach applied to analyzing and proposing the 2021 fee increases. In October 2019, BPR presented golf course fee adjustments for the 2020 season to align with the financial sustainability goals in the Master Plan and cost recovery goals established with the Recreation Priority Index for “exclusive” benefit programs. These adjustments included increases for daily fees and adding annual and punch passes. ANALYSIS: In the early days of the pandemic, as nearly every aspect of Park and Recreation facilities and programs stopped on a dime, the Flatirons Golf Course was the last facility to close and the first to reopen on May 1. Golf courses across the country have proven to be safe for golfers amidst the pandemic and have continued to flourish well past the typical peak season. The Flatirons facility is enjoying record bookings and corresponding record levels of revenue. Golf Course Value of Service and Market Comparison From 2017 through the proposed 2020 budget, golf course expenses have grown over 15% . Amidst this heavy visitation, expenses continue to rise due to increased sanitation and cleaning practices and growing costs of labor, despite eliminating one position as part of the revised 2020 budget. While BPR had planned to develop a full business plan tied to development of the new facility, that work was delayed due to the pandemic and will resume in 2021 and with final approval of the project. To inform this recommendation, staff analyzed financials for the past several years, market rates, and of course, 2020 AGENDA ITEM V-C_ PAGE 3__ expenditures and revenues through October. Total expenses include direct staffing to maintain and operate the golf course, materials, direct cost of goods for merchandise sales, program offerings and instruction, as well minor repairs and refurbishment to the aging facility. From 2017 through the 2019 actual budget, golf course expenses have grown over 15%. 2020 will be a unique year given the golf course closed for 6 weeks at the beginning of the pandemic which impacted both revenues and expenses for the facility. Based on the phased reopening of different amenities and operational limitations, the 2020 budget is atypical. As demonstrated in the chart below, over the past five years, direct spending has outpaced revenues in four of these five years (see Table 1). Table 1:Golf Course Financials 2016-2020 *Through 0ctober 2020. Recommended Fee Increases Current fees at Flatirons Golf Couse provide a great value for the quality of the experience. The 2020 comparison (Attachment A) showed that the Flatirons Golf course fees fall into the bottom third of this study of comparable front range municipal facilities. In 2020, the golf course outperformed the reduced budget projections while offering higher than normal season services. The Flatirons Golf Course continues to welcome committed players, lapsed players, and new golfers of all ages and abilities. These projections for the strong demand as well as the increased expenses above support fee increases (see Attachment B for proposed increases). Daily Fee Rate Adjustments The recommended fee adjustments for 2021 includes slight increases in all rates except juniors. Junior daily green fees will remain the same, as they are comparable with the market study and align with BPR’s master plan goal to foster youth activity. Annual Pass Adjustments The introductory rates for Flatirons Golf Course annual passes in 2020 proved to be very popular. Anticipating that the demand will exceed sustainable levels going forward, it is recommended that pass sales be capped at the current number in all categories. Renewals for current passholders would be permitted, but no new sales would take place. This cap would be re-visited if and when demand for tee times returns to pre-pandemic levels. The pricing structure for renewals would also be adjusted to be more in line with the market, where pricing is nearly double compared to the 2020 introductory annual pass fee. 2014-2020 Actual Operating Financials Revenue Expenses Net 2020 Revised Budget $964,000 $1,170,248 ($206,248) 2020 YTD* $1,267,930 $1,048,111 $219,819 2019 $1,323,970 $1,442,275 $(118,305) 2018 $1,251,425 $1,297,061 $(46,636) 2017 $1,334,059 $1,233,072 $100,987 2016 $1,215,410 1,275,694 $(60,284) 2015 $1,294,044 $1,300,036 $(5,992) AGENDA ITEM V-C_ PAGE 4__ During the 2020 high season the course sold twice as many junior passes from the previous year. Staff recommends limiting 2020 junior annual passes as shown below and will continue to monitor sales throughout the year. A minor fee increase is proposed and justified due to the popularity of this product and the market rates. Golf Course Annual Passes Pass Type Ages 2020 Price 2020 # Sold 2021 Price 2021 # Cap Adult 18 to 59 $999 67 $1,199 67 Senior 60 and older $899 44 $999 44 Student $499 83 $599 Junior 15 to 17 $399 46 $449 65 Junior Up to 14 $299 17 $349 30 Summary As seen in Attachment ” (Market Comparison), Flatirons Golf Course fees are very competitive when compared with other comparable municipal facilities. With the slight rate increases proposed above and the increased annual pass options, the “Best Value” position remains strong in the marketplace. NEXT STEPS: Based on planned increases to expenses to safely operate the golf course including enhanced cleaning of high touch areas and additional janitorial services, the proposed fee increases are ensure the Flatirons Golf Course maintains full cost recovery. With PRAB’s approval, staff will move forward with coordinating with the City Manager’s Office to post the proposed fee changes for a fifteen-day public comment period as a “City Manager’s Rule Change”. With approval, all fees will be communicated to customers and stakeholders and be effective starting January 1, 2021. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A Golf Fee and Pass Rate Comparison Attachment B 2021 Proposed Fee and Pass Recommendation Attachment A - Golf Fee and Pass Rate Comparison MUNICIPAL GOLF FEE COMPARISON – PEAK SEASON RATES *Market Analysis is based on 2020 fees. 2021 market analysis rates have not been released. 9 -wkdy 9-wknd 18 - wkday 18 - wkend pass walk notes Flatirons Golf Course 2021 proposed Boulder $27 $29 $40 $45 $1199 Adult $999 Senior $599 Student See “2021 Proposed Passes” for breakdown Indian Peaks Golf Course Lafayette $29 $32 $49 $61 Coal Creek Golf Course Louisville $27 $27 $49 $59 $2400 3 free rnds w/pass. Small Louis disc South Suburban GC Centennial $23 $25 $42 $46 $800 M-F Res only No Lone Tree play Res & non avg. Fees Ute Creek Golf Course Longmont $23 $25 $39 $44 $1760 Twin Peaks Golf Course Longmont $20 $21 $32 $34 $1320 Walnut Creek Golf Preserve Westminster $26 $28 $44 $49 $2,400 Res & non avg fees Walnut and Legacy pass Legacy Ridge GC Westminster $26 $28 $44 $49 $2400 Res & non avg. Fees Walnut and Legacy pass Broadlands Golf Course Broomfield $21 $31 $42 $52 $2520 $20 pp cart fee $20 add fee on weekends Westwoods Arvada $24 $27 $45 $55 $1750 wkday only No weekend pass play Thorncreek Thornton $23 $25 $40 $45 $1700 wkday only No weekend pass play Collindale GC Southridge GC Ft Collins $22 $22 $40 $40 Foothills GC Denver $23 $26 $40 $50 Fossil Trace Golden $47 $50 $90 $100 Rates inc. cart and range Riverdale Dunes Brighton $25 $25 $38 $47 Average $26 $28 $45 $52 $1824 Includes weekday only pass products Attachment B - 2021 Proposed Fee and Pass Recommendation 1/1/2019 3/10/2019 2019 2019 1/1/2020 2/28/2020 2020 2020 2021 2021 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole MON-THURS ADULT $21 $34 MON-THURS ADULT $24 $36 $26 $38 FRI-SUN ADULT $23 $36 FRI-SUN ADULT $26 $41 $28 $43 MON-THURS SENIOR $20 $31 MON-THURS SEN-MIL-STUD $20 $31 $22 $33 FRI-SUN SENIOR $20 $34 FRI-SUN SEN-MIL-STUD $22 $35 $24 $37 MON-THURS JUNIOR $15 $25 MON-THURS JUNIOR $15 $25 $19 $27 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $15 $25 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $15 $25 $19 $27 3/11/2019 12/31/2019 2019 2019 3/1/2020 12/30/2020 2020 2020 2021 2021 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole MON-THURS ADULT 24$ $36 MON-THURS ADULT $25 $38 $27 $40 FRI-SUN ADULT 26$ $41 FRI-SUN ADULT $27 $43 $29 $45 MON-THURS SENIOR 20$ $31 MON-THURS SEN-MIL-STUD $20 $33 $22 $35 FRI-SUN SENIOR 22$ $35 FRI-SUN SEN-MIL-STUD $23 $39 $25 $41 MON-THURS JUNIOR 15$ $25 MON-THURS JUNIOR $21 $31 $21 $31 FRI-SUN JUNIOR 15$ $25 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $21 $31 $21 $31 11/1/2019 12/31/2019 1/1/2021 2/28/2021 2020 2020 2021 2021 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole 9- Hole 18- Hole MON-THURS ADULT $21 $34 MON-THURS ADULT $24 $36 $26 $38 FRI-SUN ADULT $23 $36 FRI-SUN ADULT $26 $41 $28 $43 MON-THURS SENIOR $19 $30 MON-THURS SENIOR $20 $31 $22 $33 FRI-SUN SENIOR $20 $34 FRI-SUN SENIOR $22 $35 $24 $37 MON-THURS JUNIOR $15 $25 MON-THURS JUNIOR $18 $28 $19 $27 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $15 $25 FRI-SUN JUNIOR $18 $28 $19 $27 OFF SEASON DATES: 2019 2020 2021 EARLY SEASON DATES: REGULAR SEASON DATES: AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: November 23, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Aquatic Nuisance Species 2020 Program Update PRESENTERS: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Recreation Manager Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Stacy Cole, Reservoir Facility Supervisor Regina Elsner, Parks and Recreation Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Boulder Reservoir, which serves as a City of Boulder drinking water supply and recreational facility, is owned by the city and operated by the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District (Northern Water). Boulder Reservoir is part of the Colorado-Big Thompson project, which includes a series of reservoirs, canals, and pipelines designed to transport water from the west to the east slope of Colorado. The city’s Parks and Recreation Department manages recreation activities on Boulder Reservoir and has been implementing an Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) watercraft inspection program in the fee area since 2009. The Boulder Reservoir Master Plan requires annual reporting on the implementation of the Boulder Reservoir ANS program. The North Shore of the Boulder Reservoir is also managed by Parks and Recreation as a passive recreation area for walking, biking, running and wildlife watching. The North Shore is a popular recreation area and its successful management is critical to the overall goal to keep ANS out of Boulder Reservoir. Despite increased traffic and inspections at Boulder Reservoir and throughout the state, monitoring results from 2020 indicate no detections of ANS in the Boulder Reservoir. This item summarizes the 2020 ANS program, including providing an update on enhancements applied to the program this year. Staff do not recommend further boat permit or fee adjustments at this time (excepting those adjustments discussed by the PRAB at the October business meeting PRAB item ANS Oct 28 19 , and are planning on implementing additional management improvements to the program. The PRAB’s role in this conversation is to provide advise on the operations and ANS program. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 2__ BACKGROUND: Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) are invasive, non-native animals and plants that can be introduced to waterbodies outside their native range primarily via boating, angling, and dogs. ANS can damage the ecosystem, outcompete native aquatic species, negatively impact the economy, stop recreational activities, threaten public health, and disrupt the food chain. The top ANS of concern in Colorado include zebra and quagga mussels, New Zealand mudsnails, rusty crayfish, and Eurasian watermilfoil. Once introduced, these species establish, spread rapidly, and are nearly impossible to eradicate. ANS adversely impact utility infrastructure and water quality, increase water treatment costs, and limit recreational uses (Attachment A). Of the four ANS of concern, zebra and quagga mussels are the most harmful to a waterbody due to the rate of reproduction of these species and the large impact they have on built infrastructure. Colorado is currently mussel-free because of its widespread boat inspection program managed by Colorado Parks and Wildlife and local government entities such as the City of Boulder. The risk for ANS introduction in Colorado is higher than ever, with a 35% increase in inspections from 2019. The number of intercepted mussel-impacted boats in 2020 (as of October) was 94 as compared to 86 in 2019. Most of these boats are coming from Lake Powell, where quagga mussels were first discovered in 2013. Since that time, adult mussels have colonized nearly every part of the lake, including the river below the dam where veligers (larvae) passed through. Without ongoing monitoring and the boat inspection program, the likelihood of an ANS infestation occurring in Colorado is very high. Follow proper procedures and monitoring practices to prevents the introduction of ANS and subsequent irreversible ecological damage from ANS. Additional information on BPR system-wide monitoring for ANS, including collaboration with OSMP on the recently discovered infestation occurring in South Boulder Creek, can be found within the Ecological Services Update in Matters from the Department this month. ANALYSIS South Shore Watercraft Inspections State Program: In 2020 (October), the state conducted 625,000 inspections, a 35% increase over 2019, and performed 22,000 decontaminations, a 50% increase over 2019. There have been 94 interceptions compared to 86 in 2019. Green Mountain Reservoir, the only waterbody in Colorado that has been on the suspect list, has continued to test negative and will be delisted in 2021 for zebra and Quagga mussels (meaning there is no longer suspected contamination in this body of water). The use of the new mobile system by many states across the country has made it much easier to track boats between states as it. This provides a confirmation source to cross-check the last water body a boat visited. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 3__ City Watercraft Inspection Program: All watercraft entering Boulder Reservoir are inspected for ANS by state trained and certified seasonal Parks and Recreation staff. As conditions require, the watercraft may also be decontaminated and/or quarantined. Since the boat inspection program was first implemented in 2009, staff has made continuous improvements to the self-funded program. Since the program’s inception, Parks and Recreation staff have intercepted two mussel-impacted boats – one in 2018 and one in 2019. In 2020, there were no interceptions. The Boulder Reservoir watercraft inspection program is funded by user fees, with boat permits funding overhead and inspection and decontamination fees funding direct costs. A program overview for the most recent two-year period is presented in Table 1. Annual costs vary for several reasons including: the number of watercrafts stored onsite and the number of visitors. Item 2019 2020 ANS Program Cost $96,608 $85,566 Powerboat permits sold 272 217 Smallcraft permits sold 1110 1792 Motorboat inspections 6920 3298 Non-motorized watercraft inspections 6466 7426 Decontaminations± ~43 58 Table 1: Boulder Reservoir ANS 2019-2020 Overview Boulder Reservoir inspection numbers are impacted by the pandemic facility closures from March - May 9 and then the Reservoir drainage project which closed the lake to boating as of Sept 1st 2020. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 4__ Figure 1: Boulder Reservoir watercraft inspection program statistics (2019 to 2020). Note 2020 numbers reflect May 9 – August 31, 2020, due to COVID -19 and the pandemic causing late season-opening and September 1st early closure date due to Every aspect of the reservoir operation was impacted by COVID this year, between limited events, high boating demand, an unexpected start to the life of the new Visitor Service Center and the reduced operating hours to ensure expenses aligned with the significant reductions in revenue. The ANS program experienced a 50% shorter season due to the COVID pandemic and the Northern Water maintenance project, delaying the opening of the season with limited capacity and ending the season short with the closure in September. North Shore The North Shore of the Boulder Reservoir, along with the Coot Lake are popular destinations for visitors coming from all over the region seeking passive recreation opportunities. Visitors are frequently seen walking, dog walking, jogging and wildlife watching throughout the area. Bicyclists often utilize the North Shore trail to access OSMP properties and trails on either side of the Boulder Reservoir. While water access is permitted on the North Shore, per a City Manager’s rule, swimming and watercraft launching are not allowed from the North Shore. In addition to recreational opportunities, the North Shore is also managed for wildlife habitat as the entire area is designated within the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan as critical wildlife habitat. This designation indicates that the area contains unique habitat that is crucial in sustaining populations of native wildlife and in perpetuating and encouraging a diversity of native species. As such, the North Shore is managed to reduce non-native and noxious weed species, reduce habitat fragmentation by undesignated trails and monitor wildlife in the area for their presence. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 5__ Similar to trends seen throughout the Front Range, the North Shore and Coot Lake have seen increased visitation in the past several years. Starting in 2019, visitation has been monitored through the deployment of automated trail counters. During the first year of monitoring, a total of 626,083 detections (i.e., timestamped records) were recorded. The counter deployed at Coot Lake South recorded the highest visitation with 248,800 annual detections. The 55th Trailhead counter recorded 136,938 detections in the first year of monitoring. The counters have remained in place throughout the 2020 season, allowing for direct comparisons of 2019 to 2020 data. Visitation of the North Shore/Coot Lake area has increased between 7% and 26%, depending on the specific location, in 2020. These two charts below show the increase in detections from 2019 to 2020 at the two most popular locations, 55th Trailhead and Coot Lake South. Based on the current trends, Coot Lake South is estimated to have total detections in 2020 of 293,692 (an 18% increase) and 55th Trailhead is estimated to have 171,971 detections in 2020 (a 26% increase). The lower visitation numbers in September are likely due to the Reservoir drawdown as part of Northern Water’s dam maintenance project. Management of the North Shore and Coot Lake area balances two sometimes competing interests: land management and visitor management. Land management takes the form of the previously discussed vegetation management and wildlife monitoring. Visitor management is much more complex and includes physical people management such as trails and fencing, as well as outreach and education components. Physical management includes closing undesignated trails to minimize erosion and habitat fragmentation, while also trying to manage access points to the shoreline. Outreach and education in the past have primarily been accomplished through signage and occasionally staff hosted education tables throughout the summer months. The Parks and Recreation department does not have an urban park ranger or enforcement program, and thus it is challenging to mitigate against the impacts of increased visitation, such as violations of area rules and regulations designed to protect the land. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 6__ 2019 Identified Vulnerabilities In 2019, the annual review of the ANS program at the Boulder Reservoir identified the following vulnerabilities: 1. Illegal boat launchers. Despite the signage, small watercraft owners can illegally launch at various locations around the reservoir as well as after business hours. 2. Boater deviance. The threat of tampering with the tags allows boaters to manipulate ANS protocols illegally to launch, thus putting the Boulder reservoir at risk for ANS introduction. 3. Improved decontamination. The city’s outdated hot water pressure washer used to decontaminate boats, may not have consistently maintained the high temperature necessary to effectively destroy ANS. 4. Six mile Reservoir. The adjacent Six mile Reservoir is managed by the White Rock Ditch Company. The spillway from Six Mile flows directly into Boulder Reservoir. Recreational boating leases for Six mile require inspections before launching, but this approach relies on the honor system for compliance, and inspections are not required for small, non-motorized watercraft. If ANS were introduced to Six mile, they could be carried into Boulder Reservoir during a spillover event, which was more common before 2015. In the past six years, there have been two spillover events and none in 2018 or 2019. ANALYSIS To address the growing threat of ANS in the region, and following outreach with boaters, input from the PRAB (October) and the WRAB (November), staff to implemented several enhancements for the 2020 boating season: Increased Enforcement and education to reduce illegal boat launching, Investigate improved tagging system, Improved decontamination, and Prevent Six mile Reservoir spillovers. Below is a status update on each, including results as they are available at this time. Enforcement and education to limit illegal boat launching and deter boater deviance • Complete: Watercrafts are classified by risk based upon (1) their ability, or not, to carry nuisance species, and (2) the city’s ability to address ANS contamination on that type of craft. Implementation of risk categories began in January with permit sales. (Attachment A ANS Inspection Protocol) • Complete: Protocol adjustments proportionate to a craft’s risk. As permits were sold, the staff informed each customer of the risk category of their craft and the specific protocols associated with their craft.  Result: Permit holders were generally understanding with the most negative feedback coming from those permit holders with the highest risk craft. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 7__  There were approximately six permit holders that choose to not purchase 2020 permits due to the new protocols. • Update to the City Manager Rule authorizing the ANS Program to include: No person shall be in possession of any type of watercraft, human or motor powered, including but not limited to boat, stand up paddle- board, personal watercraft, kayak, canoe, or flotation device, and be located in any city owned or controlled property surrounding or within Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake unless the person has valid proof of a current Boulder Reservoir permit, if applicable, and proof of compliance with the preventative measures in place to address the transportation of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) from one body of water to another.  Result: This change allowed staff to better manage the access and presence of watercraft in the coot lake and north shore areas. Increased education about the risks of ANS contamination to boaters, anglers, and North Shore users. • Complete: Educational signage placed at the South Shore along with the North Shore and the 55th and Coot Lake trailheads. • Delayed: The 2020 original budget included the hiring of a seasonal ANS naturalist/enforcement position. Due to COVID-19 budget reductions, this position was never hired. • Complete: In lieu of standard staffing, a volunteer monitoring program was created and implemented to collect important qualitative and quantitative data on visitor use and illegal water-based activities as well as provide education to visitors. o Five volunteers completed 27 shifts (a total of 66 hours) during which they provided education to visitors about ANS and monitored the North Shore for illegal activities. • Volunteers observed 92 waders and 24 swimmers at the North Shore and 22 waders and 11 swimmers at Coot Lake. • Volunteers spoke to visitors 125 times involving topics about wildlife closures (20 times), aquatic nuisance species (28 times), water use rules (7 times), and COVID-19 safety (70 times). • Volunteers called boat patrol six times to assist with illegal activities but never called 911. Increased enforcement of illegal activity on the North Shore and violations of the boating program at the Boulder Reservoir. • Complete: Four standard staff were commissioned to allow enforcement of the updated ANS rule, and able to issue tickets and impose up to $1000 in fines on violators attempting to launch from illegal areas around the reservoir and Coot Lake. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 8__ • Complete: Increased staffing and water patrol for holiday weekends. Weekend land patrols of the north shore were conducted by Reservoir staff and daily water patrols were led by lake patrol. • Complete: Temporary No Parking signage was placed along 51st Street to manage access during the high peak holidays including Memorial Day, July 4th, and Labor Day. These efforts kept visitation on the North Shore to levels more consistent with 2019, see charts below. Investigate improved tagging system. Parks and Recreation staff work with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, other municipalities, and technology leaders to identify boat tagging systems that minimize the potential for user-tampering. The state implemented the use of a national, mobile system to log inspections and track where boaters have launched their watercraft. In addition to physical inspections of tags, this system enabled the city to confirm where boats have been and confirm that the tag they are entering with is the tag from the last waterbody. This system has also helped curb boater deviance. Improved decontamination Parks and Recreation replaced the hot water pressure washer with a new tankless decontamination unit at the inspection station. The new unit provides consistent water temperatures necessary to eliminate ANS effectively and increases decontamination effectiveness. Prevent Six Mile Reservoir spillovers. Parks and Recreation and Utilities staff are coordinating with the Boulder & White Rock Ditch & Reservoir Company and leaseholders at adjacent Six Mile to limit access to the reservoir and address spillover risks. Outreach to the ditch company was successful for 2020 in that we did not have any spillovers. AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 9__ 2021 Proposed Program Improvements Based on the success of the 2020 ANS program within the South Shore recreation area, staff do not recommend permit, access or fee adjustments for 2021. However, regarding the North Shore and Coot Lake area, staff do recommend additional management improvements for implementation in 2021. As example, in 2020, Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) announced a new grant program, Resilient Communities, to help communities advance outdoor recreation, stewardship, and land protection projects through COVID-19. More information can be found here. These grants are intended to fund one-time, immediate needs or opportunities that have emerged in direct response to the pandemic, within the context of GOCO’s five program values: resource conservation, outdoor stewardship, community vitality, equitable access and youth connections. The BPR multi-disciplinary staff team intends to apply for the final round of these grants in February 2021. The proposed project will implement a cohesive and holistic approach for managing the North Shore and Coot Lake area that address both visitor and resource management through increased staffing, planning and field work. This comprehensive approach includes three primary components: 1) staffing/enforcement dedicated to the North Shore, 2) additional visitor management improvements, and 3) continued educational outreach. Furthermore, a ranger/naturalist position has been identified to accomplish land management objectives. The position will be responsible for providing visitors specific outreach and education messages and providing the department some enforcement capacity dedicated to the North Shore and Coot Lake. Visitor management improvements could include: constructing a trail/access to the North Shore of the Reservoir east of the Boulder Feeder Canal, constructing fencing to better delineate and protect wildlife closure areas, installing new waste receptacles to accommodate increased site usage, and install new signage that addresses both education and regulatory needs of the site. Even if the department is unsuccessful in receiving GOCO grant funding, additional management efforts on the North Shore are planned in 2021. These include continuing to manage undesignated trails and provide at least one additional designated access point to the shoreline. The on-going work of vegetation management will continue to conserve the existing habitat in the area. The Natural Lands Outreach volunteers program will continue as well in 2021. This was a very successful pilot program in 2020 and staff intends to reinstate and grow the program in 2021. NEXT STEPS While these measures do not eliminate the risk of contamination, staff believe the ANS program and the 2020 enhancements address the biggest threats. While some of the enhancements are specific to non-watercraft risks (e.g., a dog could transport mudsnails AGENDA ITEM V-D _ PAGE 10__ and an angler could transport mussels hence the increased education and enforcement measures), the biggest threat posed by powerboats is being addressed by the comprehensive decontamination and quarantine protocols. After the risks from watercraft, illegal launching from the North Shore is the next most significant risk. Staff continues to mitigate this risk through increased education and outreach, as well as pursuing opportunities for enforcement of rules and regulations on the North Shore. Staff will continue to monitor the Reservoir ANS program and state protocols. Question for the PRAB: Do members of the PRAB have questions, concerns or comments about the proposed 2021 ANS program? ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A ANS Inspection Protocol Attachment B ANS Boulder Reservoir Risk Matrix 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Alison Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: November 23, 2020 A. BPR Ecological Services Update Within the Planning and Ecological Services division, the Natural Lands team is responsible for natural resource management throughout the BPR system, including managing approximately 1,200 undeveloped acres out of the total BPR parkland of 1,800 acres. This includes vegetation and wildlife management on most BPR properties, as well as visitor management on natural areas, including the North Shore of Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake (site of the vast majority of BPR’s natural lands). These areas support native wildlife and plant species in urban ecosystems. The four primary components of the Natural Lands program are: • Integrative Pest Management and Restoration, • Wildlife Management, • Visitor Management and • Natural Lands Maintenance. The work within these components is largely driven by federal, state, and local regulations. A multi-faceted approach to land management ensures that balance is achieved between natural resource conservation and provision of recreational opportunities. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration Every year, a focus of the Natural Lands team during the summer growing months is the suppression and eradication of noxious weeds. The State of Colorado classifies noxious weeds by an A, B, and C designation based on the possibility of eradiation, infestation size and ability to manage. List A species, such as purple loosestrife and myrtle spurge, and List B(e) species, such as common teasel and Canadian thistle are the primary focus for the Natural Lands team. Given reduced capacity and resources in 2020, chemical and mechanical controls have been more broadly Photo 1. Purple loosestrife at Boulder Reservoir 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 used as they tend to be the most timely and cost-effective methods for ensuring compliance with State of Colorado Weed Law. The team performs control across the 565 acres of land infested with these listed species. In addition to noxious weeds, the Natural Lands crew monitors and controls a variety of invasive tree species such as Russian olive, salt cedar, green ash, crack willow, and Siberian elm. Following effective suppression or eradication of listed weed species or land disturbance from construction, restoration is often necessary to ensure returning vegetation supports native ecosystems. In 2019 and 2020, the Natural Lands team has collaborated with various departments on the restoration of the corridors for the Carter Lake pipeline near the Boulder Reservoir and the Goose Creek pipeline near Valmont City Park, as well as after the installation of solar arrays near the Reservoir. Other examples of restoration collaboration include on-going restoration on the North Shore of the Reservoir and other areas of the Reservoir as required as part of Northern Water’s maintenance project. The Natural Lands team frequently collaborates with staff from other city departments, including OSMP, Planning (i.e., City IPM Coordinator) and Greenways, to increase effectiveness and efficiency of vegetation management issues that extend beyond BPR boundaries. In 2020, some of those efforts have included working to get a new herbicide (Esplanade) on the city’s approved pesticide list, as well as on-going efforts to update the city-wide IPM manual with best practices that cross departments. Aquatic Nuisance Species In 2004, New Zealand mudsnails (NZMS) were first documented in Boulder by OSMP staff in portions of Boulder Creek. Since then, the Natural Lands team conducts annual surveys to detect the presence or absence of (NZMS) within the waterways of BPR properties. The department has 20 priority sites which are monitored each year in August or September and 16 secondary sites which are monitored every three years as resources allow. These annual surveys have confirmed the presence of NZMS in three BPR areas: Fourmile Canyon Creek north of the Pleasant View soccer fields (confirmed in 2016), Elmer’s Two-mile Park (confirmed in 2019), and the waters of East Palo Park (confirmed in 2020). In 2020, OSMP staff confirmed the presence of NZMS in a reach of South Boulder Creek, near East Boulder Community Park. The Natural Lands team is in ongoing conversations with OSMP staff to collaborate on management efforts to reduce the spread of NZMS from the creek to surrounding water bodies, including nearby constructed wetlands on BPR property and the ponds at East Boulder Community Park. Potential management efforts could include additional exclusion fencing around non-infested waters to prevent spread and additional signage to inform visitors of actions they can take to prevent the spread of ANS. The key to ANS management is prevention of an infestation from the onset. Once an infestation has occurred, it is critical to enact management efforts to prevent further spread of the population. To reduce the potential for spread of ANS due to necessary and critical work of the department or other city departments, the Natural Lands team has developed a protocol for working in areas known to have an infestation based on state and national guidelines. This protocol includes guidelines for monitoring, equipment decontamination and other management Photo 2. New Zealand mudsnails found at Elmer’s Two Mile Park in 2019 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 actions. The protocol has been shared with and is utilized by other departments as part of a city- wide effort to protect Boulder’s water bodies from ANS. Wildlife Management Wildlife management conducted by the Natural Lands team covers the entire spectrum of species, including birds, mammals, and reptiles and amphibians. Some species monitored on BPR properties include species of conservation concern, as designated by federal, state, and local authorities. These species of conservation concern include the Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse (a federally Threatened species), Northern leopard frog (a state-listed species of conservation concern), and the Northern harrier (a Boulder County designated species of conservation concern). Monitoring techniques utilized include direct observation surveys, wildlife cameras and acoustic meters. Prairie dogs The Natural Lands team is primarily responsible for the management of prairie dogs throughout the BPR system. This includes both areas meant for long term conservation of prairie dog populations, as well as maintaining prairie dog free areas. The Natural Lands team actively manages several areas as prairie dog free, such as the Stazio ballfields and Foothills Community Park. For most prairie dog free areas, management includes maintaining barriers to exclude prairie dogs from moving in, as well as relocating individuals that have moved into the exclusion areas. Most relocation in these cases is done utilizing passive methods such as closing burrow entrances in exclusion areas. Occasionally active relocation includes flushing individuals from a burrow and returning them to the active colony area. In 2020, the Natural Lands team has spent more time than usual moving prairie dogs out of these exclusion areas. One potential reason could be the decrease in use of these areas by sporting and other events. Human use tends to drive away the prairie dogs, but there has been less of that this year. In 2020, Natural Lands staff has been collaborating with OSMP to actively relocate prairie dogs that have appeared at Foothills Community Park. Several years ago, the colony at Foothills was relocated to OSMP property south of the city and annual management includes monitoring to ensure the entire area stays prairie dog free. Because there are no designated areas for prairie dogs to exist at Foothills, the prairie dogs to be relocated this year will also end up at OSMP property in the southern grasslands. Active relocation such as this involves significant collaboration to ensure best practices are being followed, such as dusting the colony for fleas and inoculating the colony to prevent spreading plague. Other best practices include closing inactive burrows to concentrate flushing and trapping activities, as well as having artificial burrows available at the receiving site in which to place the relocated individuals. These practices help increase the probability of successfully relocating individuals to new areas. Per the recommendations of the Prairie Dog Working Group from 2019, the second annual community meeting focused on city-wide prairie dog management will be held virtually on December 14th at 5:30 p.m., hosted by OSMP. For more information and links to the presentations as they become available, visit the OSMP Prairie Dog Conservation and Management webpage. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Other species The Natural Lands team also spends a significant amount of time on non-prairie dog wildlife management. This includes amphibian and reptile monitoring, jackrabbit and badger surveys, Preble’s meadow jumping mouse surveys, acoustic monitoring, wildlife camera research, breeding bird surveys, wildlife observation monitoring, and wildlife closure protection. Time spent on these tasks continues to increase as novel observations (i.e., known Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse on OSMP property adjacent to East Boulder) require BPR staff follow-up to understand what is occurring on BPR property to make informed management recommendations. Four properties surrounding the Boulder Reservoir are actively managed to protect state or locally listed birds of conservation concern, including Northern harrier, burrowing owl, American bittern and osprey. Seasonal closures around known nesting areas of these four species increase the probability of success for nesting and ensure the species future in the Boulder area. In addition to the four bird species of concern, Northern leopard frogs, which are a Tier 1 Colorado State Species of Special Concern, were first discovered on BPR property in 2013 at the East Boulder Community Park wetlands. Today, efforts to locate leopard frogs have expanded to annual amphibian surveys at 11 park properties as well as habitat improvement projects such as removing dense patches of cattails to improve breeding habitat. Given limited resources, staff also utilizes a song meter to passively record wetland areas in hopes of detecting Northern leopard frog calls and other amphibian species. In 2019, staff began monitoring another Tier 1 State of Colorado Species of Concern and a federally-listed Threatened species, the Preble’s meadow jumping mouse, by implementing a survey method using track plates. This novel method for surveying allows the Natural Lands team to survey for rodent populations without having to handle individuals and risk capture mortalities, which is critical given their federal listing status. General wildlife observation surveys occur on all natural areas as well as jackrabbit and badger tracking surveys around Boulder Reservoir and Area III when snow conditions allow. Wildlife cameras have been deployed throughout the system since 2014 to monitor wildlife species. Over 90,000 photos from 24 unique locations on 13 park sites have been processed. Cameras have captured 48 unique species, including five species of concern, such as Northern harrier. In 2020, the Colorado Bat Society did independent surveying at Thunderbird Lake at Admiral Arleigh A. Burke Park. That surveying indicated a wide diversity of bats utilizing the area, including the tri-colored bat. The tri-colored bat is one of the smallest bats in North America and is most commonly found in the eastern United States. Due to habitat loss, impacts from wind turbines and White-nose syndrome, the tri-colored bat is currently under consideration for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Photo 3. Tiger salamander offspring at Area III 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Visitor Management: Volunteer Programs The Natural Lands teams oversees two long-term citizen science programs that utilize volunteers to gather data on wildlife species. These are the Birds of Special Concern program at the Boulder Reservoir and Prairie Dog Counts, running 16 and 20 years, respectively. Despite a delayed start to the volunteer season, 18 Birds of Special Concern volunteers provided 280 hours of time recording observations of nesting behavior out at the Reservoir. Northern harriers set a record in 2020, fledging five young from a single nest near Dry Creek. Three osprey fledged from the nesting platform also near Dry Creek. In 2020, eight Prairie Dog Count volunteers assisted with nine total days of counts in June, July and August, increasing staff’s time by 111 hours. These counts provided data that helped determine that most of the colonies around the Reservoir saw some decline in numbers this year, but nothing of major concern. A formal report generated by a consultant will be provided to PRAB over the winter months that summarizes all data gathered and makes some management recommendations to support visitor management and to make habitat recommendations. Normally, staff spends several days providing outreach and education opportunities at the North Shore and Coot Lake during the summer months. In 2020, those duties were performed by the new Natural Lands Outreach volunteers as staff’s time was prioritized elsewhere. This program recruited five volunteers that completed 27 shifts for a total of 66 hours. These volunteers observed visitor behaviors to be able to report immediate issues to Reservoir staff and engaged visitors in conversations. These conversations provided visitors information about a variety of topics including ANS, wildlife closures, water use and rules, and COVID-19 safety on the trails. The Natural Lands Team and Volunteer Services looks forward to continuing this program over the winter and into 2021 as one way to best expand staff’s limited capacity. Natural Lands Maintenance: Thunderbird Lake at Admiral Arleigh A. Burke Park Natural Lands staff manage Thunderbird Lake for multiple purposes including habitat, water storage and recreation. In 2007, the community prompted BPR staff to increase management activities at this site and to evaluate options for better maintaining open water. Consultants were hired and of the options identified, it was decided to pursue a pilot program where potable water was dechlorinated and added to the lake. To preserve open water, aeration units were also installed and maintained annually alongside weed removal and annual vegetation clearing of maintenance corridors into the lake. Since then, contractors are hired annually to perform water quality testing and to add microbes to enhance water quality and decrease algal blooms. Moreover, Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff have provided electro-shock to remove thousands of introduced goldfish/koi and to stock predatory fish for those not captured. Groundwater monitoring wells and an onsite staff gauge/water level reader also provide ongoing monitoring of water levels at the surface and subsurface groundwater. Photo 4. Photo courtesy of Peter Ridgeway. Northern harrier driving away coyote at Boulder Reservoir. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Staff have worked with consultants annually since 2007 to track conditions and identify options for maintaining or increasing water supply. Most recently, a 2016-2019 Adaptive Management Plan established management goals including to maintain an open area of the lake (targeted at 0.9-1 acre in size) and to maintain the diversity of wetland and native plant communities around the lake. These goals allow the park to continue to provide several wetland ecosystems services or functions including shoreline stabilization, food chain support, groundwater discharge/recharge, water quality and recreation. Throughout this adaptive management timeframe, staff and the community have observed declining water levels, increase in vegetation and an overall reduction in the lake water surface area. In response, staff directed the consultant team to prepare a summary report and outline clear options and alternatives that the department can review and determine the best approach to the managing the lake given all the variables. This report found that the size of the combined open water and mud flat areas decreased by 0.08 acres, from 1.11 acres in 2016 to 1.03 acres in 2019, or a rate of approximately -0.3 ft per year. New climate data suggest this is likely related to increasing temperatures causing increased evaporation, and this trend is expected to continue. The native plant community types have remained the same. However, the relative distribution of community types has shifted with drier habitat types of riparian and transition/upland vegetation encroaching on emergent wetland areas. Based on the climate data and lake observations, the plant community transitions are expected to continue. Throughout the next few months and prior to next spring, staff will be reviewing the recommended strategies and determining the key management activities to support the lake. This information will be shared with PRAB and the community on an ongoing basis. B. 2020 and 2021 Operating Budget Update Background Throughout the course of 2020, the department has worked with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB), the Finance Department, the city’s Executive Budget Team, and BPR’s staff to monitor and adjust the 2020 operating budget while also developing the 2021 operating budget. The 2021 Recommended Budget was approved by City Council on Tuesday, October 20, 2020. In developing the budget, every department was faced with difficult decisions based on declining revenue levels attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic, for an overall estimated 16% reduction in sales and use taxes. The City Manager’s Message described the difficulties in developing the 2021 budget, “This reality has required every department in the city to reconsider the programs and services it offers. In many instances, departments have had to do more with less, develop new systems and protocols and find creative ways to meet the community’s needs in a time when resources are declining. There will be continuing service level impacts, and it is important that we be transparent about these.” The total 2021 BPR operating budget submission is $29.6 million, with approximately $2.6 million in significant operating budget reductions, an 8.8% decrease from the 2020 original budget. The department adapted to challenges encountered by the pandemic in 2020’s operations. Adjustments include decreased recreational offerings based on the public health limitations, decreased participation levels in many recreation activities, decreased staffing levels and declines in revenues. The department has responded to each shift and phase of the pandemic in a way that is responsible to participants and staff, while being financial stewards of public funds and reducing corresponding expenses accordingly. The PRAB has been informed of these decisions at multiple touch points throughout the year, including: 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • April 27, 2020 – Parks and Recreation Department Response to COVID-10 and Financial Impacts Update • May 11, 2020 – Ad Hoc Meeting – Recreation Recovery Feasibility • May 27, 2020 – Financial Strategy: 2020 Budget Reductions, 2021 Operating Budget Development, 2021-26 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) • June 22, 2020 – Matters from the Department – 2021 Operating Budget; Public Hearing and Consideration of Motions Approving the 2021 Expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and 2021-2026 Park and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Fund • August 24, 2020 – Public Hearing and Approval of Revised 2021-26 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) • September 30, 2020 – Matters from the Department – Operating Budget Update The department’s Business Services team has conducted bi-monthly analysis of all revenue and expenses which is reviewed by the department’s leadership team and used to make real-time adjustments in operations. The revised 2020 budget assumed revenues declines in three areas: the General Fund was decreased 11% based on declines in sales tax and other revenue sources, the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund was decreased 14% based on declines in sales tax, and the Recreation Activity Fund was decreased 36% based on declines in user fees paid by users of recreation programs. As a result, expenses were decreased: 14% in the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, 32% in the Recreation Activity Fund. In March 2021, the department will report back to the PRAB on the year-end actual revenue and expenses across the department. The following summary of activity between May and September of 2019 and 2020 demonstrates the significant impacts of the pandemic: May to September 2019 Actual 2020 Actual Change 2019 to 2020 % Change 2019 to 2020 Earned Revenue $4.6M $1.8M $(2.8)M -61% Registered Program Offerings 890 275 (615) -69% Registered Participants 7,200 2,010 (5,190) -72% Average Daily Usage - NBRC 485 75 (410) -85% Non-Standard Staffing Hours (Memorial Day to Labor Day) 86,514 23,477 (63,607) -72% Rounds of Golf Played 26,457 31,958 5,501 21% Table 1: BPR Statistics May to September 2019-2020 2021 Operating Budget In April 2020, during the beginning of the pandemic, the department began to prepare the 2021 proposed budget based on guidance from the Finance Department and the city’s Executive Budget Team. Revenue assumptions were developed in consultation with economists from CU Boulder for sales tax dependent funds, while department staff identified anticipated impacts to 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 participation for revenue in the department’s Recreation Activity Fund. The approved 2021 budget is based on the best knowledge and assumptions of a recovery during the timeframe of April to June 2020. The department’s 2021 budget proposal responds to the Finance Department’s request for prioritizing a decreased budget that also adheres to the department’s 2014 Master Plan fiscally constrained planning scenario. New for this process, the department utilized the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience definitions to categorize services and the city’s Rapid Response Racial Equity instrument, which allowed the department to fund 100% of Essential services and more significantly reduce those that fall into Helpful or Amenity categories. The department developed a balanced 2021 budget through decreased staffing levels and decreased operating costs, which correspond to the anticipated participation levels. A total of 19.5 standard positions were reduced from 2020 original staffing levels through attrition, holding vacancies, and layoffs. Over half of these positions are at the management level to minimize the impact customers and residents see in services. Additional reductions were made to non-standard seasonal employment throughout 2021 based on decreased levels of operations. The strategies proposed to achieve a balanced budget are instrumental to the department’s efforts to support the mission of promoting community health and well-being through the provision of high-quality parks, facilities, and programs. Building on all of the previous items and conversations with the board regarding budgeting amidst the pandemic, he board is provided this information to update the board on the outlook of department finances, and ensure the board is aware of the impacts included in the 2021 approved budget. Service Level Impacts The 2021 operating budget maintains funding for services that ensure the safety of park properties, including moving, playground maintenance, hazardous tree removal, waste management, graffiti ordinance compliance and mitigating the impacts of illegal encampments in public spaces. Service levels reduced in the 2021 budget related to park operations, forestry and natural lands include those that enhance the visual experience of visiting a park, proactive maintenance, and preventative work related to the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation in Boulder. Examples include: • Reduced materials and labor to perform the cultural practices (such as topdressing, aeration, and weeding) that support healthy turf without the use of pesticides and allow for rapid repairs, resulting in delays in restroom and lighting repairs. • Reduced the contract with Boulder County Sheriff’s Office for the jail inmate work crew and BridgeHouse Ready to Work; these crews typically perform weeding, mulch distribution, and vandalism repair across the system. • Reduced funding for small equipment transitions to electric equipment, resulting in longer life cycles of current gas-powered pieces and potentially increased maintenance on older equipment. Re-planting fewer trees then what is needed to meet target goals for maintaining current urban canopy throughout the city, the target set in the 2019 Urban Forest Strategic Plan. • Minimal EAB or tree-related outreach, continuing lower-cost methods such as news releases, notifications (letters/doorhangers), and website. • Canceled the annual Tree Sale and Tree Giveaway. • Increased rotational pruning (which makes trees stronger, healthier and more resilient to storm, freeze and snow damage) to 15 years for street trees (previously 10 years) and 9 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 years for park trees (previously 8 years). Urban Forest Strategic Plan sets standard at 8 years for both based upon industry recommendations. • Eliminated contracts for EAB tree removals, now performed by in-house crew and reducing capacity for preventative parks pruning rotation as Ash removals are a higher priority. Recreation services also were evaluated using the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience Categories when developing the 2021 operating budget, and funding focused on those that are Important. For Helpful and Amenity services, services are offered only where fees support due to limited funding. The Rapid Response Racial Equity instrument allowed staff to prioritize the restoration of services for low-income youth and those with disabilities, while maintaining and even expanding Financial Aid support for other services. Programs are provided virtually, in-person in small groups, and by reservation or registration only (no drop-in services available anywhere in the system). Fees have been adjusted to reflect full costs for adults, with means-based free access available via the Health Equity Fund-ed Recquity program, General Fund supported Financial Aid and age-based discounts available for youth and seniors. Additional services will be added throughout 2021 as public health guidelines allow and as community interest and business models indicate positive feasibility. Recreation service reductions in 2021, assume continued public health limitations and decreased demand from patrons: • Drop-in visitation at recreation facilities and pools, including drop-in fitness and yoga, leisure swimming, and gymnasium access; • Significantly reduced portfolio of registered courses in every area with an emphasis on providing those programs with the most community benefit (per the PRAB accepted Recreation Priority Index); • Capacity limits on the swim beach, picnics, and special events at the Boulder Reservoir; and • 50% reduction in Health Equity Funded grants (to allow for HHS Funding of critical community needs) impacted service to underserved populations (in addition to limits in participations based on COVID) Next Steps As mentioned previously, the 2021 operating budget was developed from April to June 2020, when the department used assumptions based on information known at that time to develop the operating budget. The department is monitoring whether these assumptions were accurate in all funds, and particularly in the RAF as it is a department managed quasi-enterprise fund dependent on user fees. An initial review of the 2020 peak season (Memorial Day to Labor Day) indicates that outdoor activities such as reservoir visitation, park usage, rounds of golf and outdoor pools had higher levels of participation than a typical season, while indoor usage such as recreation center visitation, registered programs and camps had lower usage than a typical season. This data will help update the budget with more accurate predictions for 2021 and to make informed decisions about a potential mid-year budget adjustment in 2021. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 At the March PRAB meeting, the department will share 2020 year-end results by fund and the department as a whole, and will identify any proposed adjustments to the 2021 operating budget based on increases or decreases in revenues and anticipated levels of programming in 2021. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: November 23, 2020 A. PRAB Recruitment Materials B. PRAB Retreat Follow Up – Letter to Council C. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Staff Liaison and Board Secretary: Charlotte O'Donnell (303) 413-7223 The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board consists of seven members appointed by City Council, each to five- year terms. The Board offers advice and consultation to City Council and departments on the acquisition, construction and maintenance of city park property. The Board coordinates policy on the development and use of recreational facilities. The Board approves expenditures from the Permanent Park and Recreation Fund. Meetings are held the fourth Monday of the month at 6 p.m. in City Council Chambers, Municipal Building, 1777 Broadway. On occasion, additional meetings or tours are scheduled. Requirements and Expectations of PRAB Members PRAB members generally serve five-year terms. Member of the PRAB must be willing and able to give time and talents. More specifically, members of the PRAB are expected to: •Read distributed materials before each meeting •Participate actively in monthly meetings (usually two hours in length) •Devote at least 5 hours per month to Board matters •Serve as a liaison on a project committee •Attend department, other functions, community events, and be a public presence for the department within the community •Provide feedback, advice and encouragement to the department, Director, staff and the public in meetings and emails •Stay abreast of developments in the world of parks and recreation as technologies and service models change The City of Boulder believes that a diverse work force adds quality and perspective to the services we provide to the public. Therefore, it is the ongoing policy and practice of the City of Boulder to strive for equal opportunity in employment for all employees and applicants. No person shall be discriminated against in any term, condition or privilege of employment because of race, national origin, religion, disability, pregnancy, age, military status, marital status, genetic characteristics or information, gender, gender identity, gender variance or sexual orientation. 1.Why do you want to be on this board? In 5 years, what would you hope to see as a legacy from your time on the board? 2.Parks and Recreation is asked to provide facilities and services for everything from baseball to yoga. What should the Board take into account in deciding to provide resources or subsidies for one program, but not for others? 3.Incoming board members will participate in updating the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. After reviewing the Master Plan, what is one thing you would want to explore? 4.What recreational activities do you and your family enjoy? What is your experience using the City of Boulder’s parks and recreation services, facilities, and programs, and how might that inform your efforts on the Board? MEMORANDUM FROM: Debbie Stamp, Acting Deputy City Clerk DATE: XXXXXXX SUBJECT: 2021 Annual Recruitment Timeline DRAFT 2021 Annual Recruitment Timeline for Boards and Commissions Thursday, December 17 Begin recruitment (10 a.m.) for 6 weeks Thursday, January 28 Application deadline (5 p.m.) February 1 – February 19 Process qualified applications. Interview schedule sent to applicants and posted Monday, February 22 Applications sent to council members. Forwarded to board secretaries to distribute to board members and staff liaisons. Applications published to external website. Thursday, March 4 Group Interviews (5-9:30 p.m.) Council Chambers/Virtual Tuesday, March 9 Group Interviews (5-9:30 p.m.) Council Chambers/Virtual Thursday, March 11 Group Interviews (5-9:30 p.m.) Council Chambers/Virtual Tuesday, March 16 Formal Appointments made at Council Meeting Thursday, April 15 Orientation for new members (CAO) Broadway Conf Rm/Virtual December XX, 2020 Dear Members of the Boulder City Council, Thank you for the opportunity for the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) to provide our thoughts on the positive and negative aspects of the current year, and recommendations for the coming year. 2020 has brought unprecedented challenges and difficulties, but our community has responded in equally unprecedented ways. In discussing what has made our board “happy” this year, we are in awe of the resilience of the Boulder Parks and Recreation Department (BPR), the hard work of the dedicated staff, and their ability to adapt to the constantly-changing dynamic with COVID-19. At the outset of the pandemic, BPR - along with other city partners - worked to quickly establish the COVID Recovery Center to provide shelter and help address the urgent needs of our community. As recreation needs changed and had to adapt to state and local health guidance, the department responded with creative solutions to help more Boulder residents access and enjoy recreation opportunities. When the weather warmed, and the demand for safe and socially-distanced outdoor sports increased, BPR adjusted hours, staffing and developed new and expanded schedules. And when an early-September snow storm hit Boulder, resulting in damaged and downed trees across the city, BPR coordinated a seamless effort across several departments to clean up the damage. Specifically, PRAB wanted to highlight a few examples of how BPR adapted to these unique circumstances. The Boulder Reservoir saw a notable increase in both small watercraft and motor boats and the BPR made changes to the schedule and number of permits to accommodate as many groups and community members as possible. Another example of BPR’s adaptability during COVID was in response to the increased demand for swimming. BPR staff worked with PRAB to amend the hours, availability, and scheduling for the city’s two outdoor pools. In addition to opening up the spectacular new Scott Carpenter Pool facility in the midst of a pandemic, BPR was also able to extend the swim season well into the fall to accommodate more swimmers. PRAB heard from countless community members grateful for the time and effort that went into creating these new recreation opportunities. While we can all rightfully celebrate how well the city and BPR responded to the challenge of COVID, much of this year made us “sad.” As the Council knows, the changing fiscal situation and resulting budget cuts have disproportionately impacted Boulder’s Parks and Recreation Department. From staff reductions to programming cuts, this has been a challenging year for BPR. While PRAB understands the budget realities, we are hopeful that the Council can help ensure that BPR can continue to maintain and provide beautiful, safe, and clean places for Boulder residents and visitors to enjoy. Another urgent issue that concerns PRAB is the ongoing challenge and difficulty - made more so by COVID-19 - in addressing the un-housed, and the impact on our city’s parks and outdoor space, in particular. While we are aware of the work that the City Council has done around these issues, PRAB wanted to highlight our concern about the increase in the number of community members who are reluctant to visit some of our parks or facilities, in part, because of this issue. PRAB has identified three specific concerns as they relate to Boulder parks arising from the un-housed and encampments situation: 1) hazards to public health and safety; 2) cleanliness; and 3) physical safety. In the coming year, PRAB hopes to better understand these challenges and stands willing to work with partners across the community to help find solutions. While we anticipate many of these challenges will continue into next year, and beyond, there are a number of things that PRAB looks forward to in 2021. As with so many, we are looking forward to a time when the board can reconnect with the public, and have the public reconnect with each other at our many parks, recreation centers, and other BPR facilities. PRAB also hopes to properly celebrate two recently-completed projects - the Scott Carpenter Pool and the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Center. These two facilities, a result of significant community investment, input, and vision, will be incredible resources for Boulder residents and visitors for years to come. COVID-19, among other challenges in 2020, has forced our community to make difficult choices. In this letter, we attempted to highlight some of the work BPR undertook to creatively adapt and respond to the disruptions caused by this situation, as well as some of the problems that have been exacerbated. PRAB is also hopeful that many of the changes made to accommodate the pandemic - new approaches to recreation, schedule flexibility, innovative programming - can carry on well past this current environment. Again, thank you for this opportunity to share our concerns and suggestions. We look forward to assisting your work, in any way possible, to help ensure that all Boulder residents can enjoy our incredible parks and recreation opportunities. Sincerely,