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10.26.20 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., October 26, 2020 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Raj Seymour (Chair) Allison Fronzaglia (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV.CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A.Approval of Minutes from September 30, 2020 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.ITEMS FOR ACTION (6:20) A.Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design VI.ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:40) A.2021 Boulder Reservoir Operations Adjustments VII.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (7:15) A.Capital Project Update VIII.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:30) A.PLAY Update (verbal) B.PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (verbal) C.Guidance for Annual Letter to City Council D.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. IX.BOARD RETREAT: 5:00 p.m., November 16, 2020 NEXT BOARD MEETING: 6:00 p.m., November 23, 2020 X.ADJOURN PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared October 21, 2020) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to become a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth presentation and discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item. January 27, 2020 • BPR 2020 Workplan (md) • Boulder Reservoir restaurant lease (a) • BPR and Climate Initiatives (md) • Valmont Programming Contracts (d/i) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (d/i) • Civic Park Art Donation (d/i) (allow 1 hr/per Jeff) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) February 24, 2020 • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Chautauqua Sustainability & Resilience Strategy (md) • Volunteer Program Update (c) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (di) • Civic Park Art Donation (a) • Valmont Programming Contracts (a) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (a) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (d/i) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) March 30, 2020 • Scott Carpenter Concession (d/i) • Pottery Lab (d/i) • 2021 Budget Strategy & Review 2020 Actuals (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB new member orientation (mb) • Departing Board Members (mb) April 27, 2020 • Board appointments (p) • Election of officers (p) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (a) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (a) • COVID Update (d/i) o Operations Adjustments and Impacts o 2020 Financial Overview • 2021 Budget Strategy: o Scenario Planning o 2021-2026 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) • New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (md) May 27, 2020 • Financial Strategy (d/i) o 2020 reductions o 2021 proposed operating w/ service levels o 2021-26 CIP (2nd touch) • PLAY Boulder Access Campaign (md) • COVID Recovery Update (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 22, 2020 • 2021-26 CIP (a) • 2021 Operating Budget (md) • COVID Recovery Update (c) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB Email List and Guidelines (mb) • PRAB Committee (mb) • Valmont Enhancement Update (md) July 27, 2020 * No business; meeting canceled August 24, 2020 • Possible CIP Revision (a/i) • Homelessness Strategy (d/i) • Design Standards Manual (md) • Racial Equity (md) • 9th Street Waldorf School Vacancy (md) • Public Art update (md) • PRAB Retreat Planning and Committee (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) September 30, 2020 • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (d/i) • Master Plan Kick Off (md) • Operating Budget Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) October 26, 2020 • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (a) • 2021 Boulder Reservoir Operations Adjustment • Capital Project Update (md) • PLAY Update (mb) • PRAB Retreat Agenda (mb) • Guidance for Annual Letter to Council (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) November 23, 2020 • Master Plan Update: Preparation for Council Study Session (d/i) • Capital Project Update (md) • Final 2021 Operating Budget (md) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (Letter to Council) (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) December 21, 2020 • Master Plan Update (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: September 30, 2020 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pamela Yugar (arrived 6:10 p.m.) Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Tina Briggs, Regina Elsner, Jeff Haley, Stacie Hoffmann, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Ali Rhodes, Christy Spielman, Dennis Warrington, Denise White Guests Present: Jeff Fossum with ZDesign Group Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:00 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to approve agenda. Motion by Brock. Second by Fronzaglia. Motion passed 6-0. Yugar was not present for this vote. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Jerry Greene, community member, requested that the board consider his concerns regarding several items at the Boulder Reservoir detailed in his letter (see Attachment A). Emily Brake, community member, raised concern that Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) did not have a clear process for ADA requests. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A.Approval of Minutes from August 24, 2020 Motion to approve the minutes from August 24, 2020 as presented. Motion by Seymour. Second by Unger. The motion passed 7-0. B.Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments. •Which projects are included in the Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP)? •Is there anything that PRAB members can do to assist staff with the Great Outdoors Colorado grant for the Valmont skatepark? •Congratulations to staff for successful YSI programs and summer camps. •How did Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) reach Elmer’s Two-Mile park? •Thanks for the rapid response to tree damage after the storm. What was the impact on the forestry budget? •Requested more information about the unusual bat species found in Boulder. •What was the community response to the extension of the outdoor pool season? Agenda Item 5: Items for Discussion and Information A.Flatiron’s Golf Course Facility Design Briggs and Jeff Fossum from ZDesign Group presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •In the future plans, will the size of storage change? •In the future plans, will the location of the restrooms change? •Does staff expect that a golf simulator would produce revenue? •Will the new facility accommodate disc golfers? What percentage of users might be disc golfers? •How did community engagement help decide the style of the facility? •Will there be a permanent elevated stage area for events or performances? •Will all 200 parking spots be used regularly? •Sidewalk to Arapahoe is a great addition. •Can the capacity for electric vehicle charging be easily expanded? •The methods used to gather community feedback in this difficult time are appreciated. •Would there be drive-in movies? •The more users that can be served with this facility, the more community support. •Would staff consider changing the name to include “Event Center” or other items? •Are there paths for neighborhood walkers? •Does staff anticipate the restaurant business to produce revenue long-term? •Will the restaurant be aimed at the broader community and not just golfers? •Recommended that PRAB write a letter to Council expressing support. •The indoor-outdoor space and many community uses make this plan exciting. •The simulator and space to learn golf are great features. •Glad to know that the increase in revenue can help fund expansion of financial aid program. • Excited by event lawn as filling need of space in Boulder and potential for revenue generation. Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department A. Master Plan Kick Off Elsner presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Why is pickleball listed as an example? • Was the cost of this master plan reduced? How does this compare to other master plans happening in other city departments? • Is this a standard process for cities or is this more expensive? • Recommended that the master plan consider potential long-term impacts of COVID and how society might change. • Offered assistance analyzing how this plan will address climate change. • How can this plan engage people and get the community excited? • Recommended using this as an opportunity to educate the public on what parks and recreation does in general (economic benefits, etc). • How will engagement work for people who might not use our services? • Will this project include signage? • Recommended gathering data about the economic benefits of parks through this community engagement and surveys so that this data can be used when applying for grants and fundraising. B. Operating Budget Update Hite verbally presented this item to the Board. The Board did not have any questions or comments. Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A. PRAB Retreat Agenda Review Yugar and Winer, the retreat committee, lead this discussion with the board. The date of the retreat will be Monday, November 16 at 5:00 p.m. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Though PRAB will not meet in person, will members eat dinner together virtually before the meeting or during the opening part? • The committee will make a draft agenda that PRAB will review at the October meeting B. PRAB Community Engagement Updates Members of the PRAB participated in the following outreach activities over the course of the last month: • Responded to community member emails and recommends discussing a better way for PRAB to respond to future messages during the retreat. • Planned and participated in PLAY’s virtual duck race which went well and raised more money than last year. • Swam at the outdoor pools several times and appreciated the fantastic staff help with the reservation process. • Daughter enjoyed returning to gymnastics programming and appreciates staff’s work to make this happen. • Yugar and Fronzaglia will share updates about PLAY at the October meeting. Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, October 26, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 8:53 p.m. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ PRAB Meeting Sept.30.2020 6-8p From: Jerry Greene, 303-449-1232, psychcowboy@yahoo.com RE: Reservoir Suggestions. 1. Have a Parks staff member authorize your board to consider the following issues, as a meeting agenda item with follow up done by email. 2.Replace the 4 wooden picnic tables historic to the Lakeshore and Windsurfer beach. Annual staining should make these last 10 years or more. Metal tables do not fit the idyllic nature of that beach. 4 wooden picnic tables have worked there for decades. There is no legitimate argument that the tables ‘prove costly to users and residents’, as alleged by staff. 3.More suggestions: A.Add shaded wooden picnic tables, beach chairs, and stump benches as in item G. below. B. Stocked fly fishing area. C.Wind/weather monitoring features like a windsock, wind meter, lake webcam. D. An artificial surfing wave. These are becoming popular and successful in varies cities. E.The reservoir used to have music concerts. I would re-instate those, and maybe work with Boulder Theater and The Fox for outdoor shows, to help out these local venues that cannot do indoor shows currently. F. Reduced entry fee for bikers, and half price entry after 6p. G. When large trees are cut down in the city, use the 8ft or so stumps to make natural benches, e.g. like the one at 17th and the creek. Slice the stump in half, makes two benches. There are some large stumps at 17th and University that would work perfect for this. 4. For your new improvements planned in the budget, hire me as a CONSULTANT for $600/month for 12 months. I will come up with cost effective ideas that will be widely appreciated by visitors that you staff will not think of. 5. Examine the validity of the claim that the tear down and rebuild of the staff offices was ‘highly vetted with broad community support’, and that the old offices were ‘limiting quality opportunities by visitors’. 6. Produce a 10-year report itemizing the reservoir bottom line each year. How much did the reservoir make, and how much did it spend in total? This doesn’t need a lot of detail, just a basic examination of the fiscal bottom line, including of course the new staff offices oddly named the ‘Visitor Services Center. Attachment A: Letter from Jerry Greene 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: October 26, 2020 A. Approval of Minutes September 30, 2020 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Master Plan Update: Thank you to the PRAB for the thoughtful questions and discussion at the September meeting, officially kicking off the Master Plan Update. Special thanks to PRAB member Tara Winer for volunteering her time to participate with staff as PRAB’s representative on the MTAG. Strategic kick-off meetings have been completed with multiple groups, including the Core Project Team, a combined MTAG/WTAG group and Strategy Team. A brief introduction to the project was presented to all staff at the BPR Town Hall on October 8th. At the November PRAB meeting, staff and the consultant team, Design Workshop, will be facilitating a deeper conversation about the progress of the synthesis of previous planning efforts, sharing gaps that have been identified in the existing white papers, and providing a more detailed public engagement plan for the overall project. The previous white paper topics included: Asset Management, Community Survey, Financial Analysis, Benchmark Analysis, Planning Area Overview, Recreation Programs and Services, Related Planning Documents, and Trends. The Project Team will be asking PRAB for general feedback on the progress to date, as well as any missed opportunities or resources for inclusion in the updated white papers. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Project (see action item) 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP) o Skate Park Improvements and Pump Track Project Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Interpretive Sign in the Civic Area: As a final component of the donation from the Boulder Rotary Club, the interpretive sign has been completely refurbished with a new artistic information sign panel. The panel describes the International Peace Garden Infinite Walk of Peace including a map and highlights along the way. The Boulder Rotary Club developed an Infinite Walk of Peace web page with more information about all of the components of the donation and other existing peace elements in the park. Staff looks forward to an opportunity for a more public appreciation of the improvements made possible by their donation once allowed by public health orders. In the meantime, please feel free to explore and enjoy this walk created to celebrate a culture of peace, sustainability, and community. • Civic Park Public Art: The Civic Area public art project, 55 Degrees by Adam Kuby, is nearing completion for foundational work. Sculptures will be transported to the Canyon Parking Lot early morning Friday, November 6 and will be placed throughout the day (anticipated 7am-7pm working window). Because of this, we anticipate closure of the Canyon Lot Thursday, November 5 through Sunday, November 8 with the opportunity to reopen as soon as the work is complete, and it is safe to do so. This could very well be earlier than anticipated. Weather delays are possible, and a contingency plan is underway. We anticipate placement of the sculptures to draw some spectators, however the park will still be considered an active construction site and closed to the public. Staff will be on hand to support crowd control if necessary and to reinforce the BCP detour. Due to current COVID gathering restrictions, we do not plan to have a formal public dedication. We will be documenting and sharing the project virtually and hope for a formal dedication when gathering restrictions have been lifted further down the line. • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Construction has started on the renovation of the Chautauqua Park playground. Activities over the past month have included excavation and layout of the new playground features. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 The renovation is expected to be completed within the next 1-2 months depending on weather and material availability. During construction, the following impacts can be anticipated: o The playground will be closed. o Pedestrian and bike paths between Sumac Dr. and 12th St. will be closed. Detours will be posted. o Contractors will take reasonable measures to prevent dirt and other particles from discharging beyond the work zone; however, visitors can anticipate construction noise and limited airborne dust. o There will be intermittent times of increased construction traffic as materials are delivered or removed from the site. o Construction hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., unless otherwise noticed. Once complete, the new playground will consist of new playground equipment and surfacing to meet ADA accessibility standards and safety guidelines and requirements, a new sand play area, additional new nature play features, and seating and climbing boulders that are integrated into the overall playground design. The preferred concept plan was unanimously approved by PRAB in December of 2019. General information and construction updates can be found here, on the Chautauqua Playground Renovation project website. Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment. • Visitor Management: Boulder Reservoir’s North Shore and Coot Lake: OSMP regularly evaluates areas within their system that are a part of the Voice and Sight tag program. The Voice and Sight tag program allows dogs to be off leash in certain areas of the city if their owners comply with the regulations to be a part of the program. The evaluation conducted by OSMP staff ensures recommendations made for any potential changes to the program are supported by data when presented to OSBT. The North Shore and Coot Lake areas are also part of 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 the Voice and Sight tag program. In coordination with the evaluation that occurs on OSMP property, a similar evaluation is being considered for these BPR areas. The evaluation includes data on compliance and visitor experience. To ensure consistency of the data collected across property ownerships, Natural Lands staff will coordinate the evaluation of BPR property with OSMP’s Human Dimension Program Supervisor. • Urban Wildlife Management: Prairie Dogs: The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) permit application for relocation of prairie dogs from Foothills Community Park to OSMP property has been submitted and approval is anticipated soon. Once the permit has been approved, the burrows will be treated with the insecticide Delta Dust as required to kill fleas that transmit sylvatic plague, also known as the plague. In compliance with the second set of recommendations from the Prairie Dog Working Group, these prairie dogs were administered the oral Sylvatic Plague Vaccine (SPV) earlier in the season to also limit the potential that the relocated prairie dogs will bring the plague to the release site. Once these preparation steps have been completed, the prairie dogs will be flushed, trapped and relocated to OSMP grassland property this fall, weather permitting. • Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration: State Mandated Eradication: The end of summer and fall continue to be busy for monitoring and controlling noxious weed species, such as tamarisk, spurge, thistle and teasel, in compliance with state and local weed laws. Treatments are currently focused on areas that are difficult to enter at other times of the year, such as areas of wildlife closures or high use areas that are currently closed due to the Reservoir maintenance project. Two city-wide efforts are on-going with the goal to improve effectiveness and coordination of IPM activities by different departments. First, the city IPM Coordinator is evaluating the herbicide, Esplanade, for inclusion on the approved pesticide list. Esplanade is a newer herbicide that has been shown to be particularly effective in controlling cheatgrass, tall oatgrass and jointed oatgrass, all species that are typically very difficult to control with existing methods. Boulder County has utilized Esplanade since 2014. The County has documented the return of multiple rare plant species to grasslands treated with this herbicide without the need to seed or utilize other restoration efforts. City staff hope to begin trials utilizing Esplanade in the next year. Second, multiple departments are working together to map and develop management agreements for the control of knotweed. Knotweed is a state A-list species mandated for control. Currently, the most effective method to control knotweed is by herbicide 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 application. Knotweed usually occurs along riparian areas, including Boulder Creek. This is particularly challenging for two reasons: 1) the Boulder Creek corridor crosses multiple departments management authority (i.e., Public Works, Greenways, Parks & Rec, OSMP), and 2) the application of pesticides in this area requires City Manager approval. To address these challenges, the multi-departmental group of staff is both mapping known populations city-wide to facilitate better coordination and developing a long-term plan for control of knotweed in the Boulder Creek corridor. • Natural Lands Volunteer Programs: Volunteers provide added capacity to gather data that help inform long-term management decisions. The annual prairie dog census at the Boulder Reservoir is just one of those volunteer programs. This year, eight volunteers contributed 111 hours to monitor the colonies around the Reservoir. • Natural Lands Maintenance: Reservoir Maintenance Project: The drawdown of the Reservoir continues by Northern Water in partnership with Public Works/Utilities. The drawdown is estimated to be completed toward the end of October with the dredging work to begin in early November. As part of this project, there is work occurring to stabilize Fisherman’s Point. This work requires wetlands mitigation per the city wetlands permit. In collaboration with Public Works staff, an area of the North Shore has been identified for additional stabilization and revegetation to meet those permit requirements. Additional benefits include helping to designate safe and managed access points to the shoreline and mitigate existing safety concerns in the area. This mutually beneficial project will occur while equipment is on site as part of the dredging work later this fall. Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination and site maintenance. C. Operations Update Halloween Drive-in Movie To support COVID-safe Halloween activities for the entire community, BPR will be hosting a Drive-In Movie at Flatirons Golf Course on Friday, Oct. 30. Registrants will enjoy pre-made treat bags and watch one (or both) spooky movies under the stars as part of two movie screenings: an early screening at 6 p.m. (suggested for families with children ages 12 and under), and a late screening at 8 p.m. (suggested for adults and children 13+). Admission is $10 per vehicle (per film) and includes a pre-made treat bag. Costumes and car decorations are strongly encouraged for all our ghosts and ghouls. Registration information and event FAQ can be found here. COVID-19 The latest information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus. • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery Team: 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Department staff adjusted operations and signage in support of Public Health Orders (PHO) 2020-08 and 2020-08 which limited gatherings for 18-22 year olds and those residing in collegiate group homes. The primary service areas impacted by these changes were adult sports leagues and the Flatirons Golf Course, which rarely sees utilization for tee-times below 4 golfers. Other department services utilized by this age-group are already limited to self-directed or individual reservation activities. As of this writing, these PHOs have expired and all demographics in Boulder are subject to the same PHOs. o Due to physical distancing requirements, at the October 6 business meeting, Boulder City Council decided to continue all Council meetings and Board/Commission meetings through online platforms through the end of the year. o Since October 3, there have been 11 confirmed positive cases among employees that work out of the Park Operations. The Park Operations building is located at 5200 Pearl St. and serves as the primary building for park operations and forestry work groups. Staff have been working closely with Boulder County Public Health, and everyone believed to have been exposed to an individual with a positive test result has been notified and is quarantining for 14 days. As of this writing, staff believe the spread has been contained and those at risk have been notified and are in isolation or quarantine. This situation serves as a stark reminder that the coronavirus is an infectious disease that spreads quickly. Staff have been reminded that this is not a time to panic; rather, it is extremely important to remain vigilant and take all steps in our control to protect ourselves and our colleagues – including wearing face-coverings, distancing from others, and washing our hands. Recreation Programs & Facilities • Fall Programming: o Fall programming continues or is heading into the second session for some program types. Staff have built programs plans to be scalable as safety requirements change inline with public health guidance. In comparison to summer sessions staff are seeing higher community participation rates in fall programming. • Winter Programming: o Staff are beginning to plan for the winter session. General offerings should be similar to formats found in the fall session with programs being offered both indoor, outdoors and virtual as weather and health safety guidance dictates. • Facilities: o Since operations have transitioned to reservable spaces and as of October 8, 33,148 total participations have occurred across the Recreation Centers and Outdoor Pools. Of those reservations 3,059 of them are 100% discounted financial aid participants accounting for roughly 9% of total entries. Another 5,349 entries are from third-party service providers, such as Silver Sneakers and Silver and Fit, accounting for roughly 16% of all entries. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Spruce Pool has now closed for the season due to nightly temperatures dropping below 50 degrees continuously. At the time of this writing Staff are actively planning for the closure of Scott Carpenter Pool as daily temperatures drop below 50 degrees on average. Staff are preparing indoor facilities for increased usage in the winter season to ensure a safe transition indoors. o Recreation Passes are once again being honored for entry to all Recreation Centers and Pools. Community members were given the option to: ▪ Reactivate passes for use as of Oct. 19, ▪ Convert the value of a pass to a punch pass at a discounted rate, which does not expire, ▪ Receive a credit or refund for the remaining value of a pass, or ▪ Given the option to donate the remaining value of a pass Forestry Last month, the city announced a special and free curbside collection program for downed limbs and branches resulting from an early season snowstorm. Since Sept. 18, the city has been working with its contractor, Custom Tree Care, to perform the collection from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. The collection is still in progress and will likely last a few more weeks. The damage caused by the storm was severe, resulting in the worst impact to trees the city has seen since 1995. Contractors have a shortage of equipment and reduced availability of trucks to support the clean- up due to many disasters throughout the country ranging from fires in the west to hurricanes in the south. Because of this, the collection is taking longer than originally anticipated. The city is asking for the community’s assistance to help expedite the process. The community should be aware that staff know where all the remaining piles are located through daily assessment and inspection and are directing the contractor to visit the locations that remain as quickly as possible. To prepare, residents should collect and place limbs and branches curbside, either against the curb or on the landscaping strip next to the street and know that the crews will be there soon. Due to the high volume of calls from residents, staff are asking neighbors to visit the website for more information and only call if a specific, detailed question remains. Contractor stands next to downed limbs picked up in free curbside collection. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 “We recognize the challenges this storm and the resulting debris has caused our community and we thank the community for their patience during this collection,” said Parks & Recreation Director Ali Rhodes. “Our crews have been working diligently and will continue the collection until it is complete.” Here are a few additional tips for a smooth pickup: • Avoid parking near piles to ensure easy access for trucks and do not allow cars to block piles along the curb. • It is helpful for neighbors to combine individual piles into bigger piles, which means fewer pickup stops for collection trucks. • Debris should be placed as close to the curb as possible for easy access to pick up from the street. The debris pile should not block the flow of traffic in the roadway. Collection will not occur in the alley ways due to the tight and constrained corridors. • Bike and pedestrian lanes and paths must be kept clear, and traffic flow should not be impeded. • Only tree debris will be collected. Nonorganic materials, including plastic bags, treated or painted lumber or household materials will NOT be picked up because all collected debris will be composted. • Community members that wish to expedite the process can consider cutting and bundling debris according to your waste management hauler’s guidelines and put out on compost pick-up day. • Please call the city (303-441-3200) only with specific questions about storm debris collection. However, staff do not have information about the specific timing or location of pick-ups. If you wish to specify a location for pickup, leave a voicemail with your address. Calls to specify locations for pickup will not be returned. Residents and property owners are reminded that it is their responsibility to remove fallen branches and other debris from their property. For more information about the collection, including answers to frequently asked questions, visit the city’s webpage C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: October 26, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve the Flatirons Golf Course Concept Plan PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director Jeff Haley, Planning and Ecological Services Manger Tina Briggs. Parks Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Flatirons Golf Course facility replacement project replaces core infrastructure destroyed in the 2013 flood and follows direction determined with City Council input in 2014. The current concept replaces the temporary restroom trailer and to-go snack shop with an energy-efficient building that includes accessible and gender-neutral restrooms, provides space for a family- friendly, neighborhood restaurant, and takes advantage of the setting and iconic Flatirons views with an outdoor event space. The project was originally approved in the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) last year for the current planning and design process to be ready for bidding and construction starting in late 2021. The construction is funded almost entirely from Permanent Parks and Recreation Funds (PPRF), which are dedicated to the acquisition or permanent improvement of parkland. This investment will ensure that golf operations are not subsidized and can instead contribute funding for services that benefit the broader community. Concept plans for the Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design were presented to PRAB on September 28, 2020 for discussion and staff is returning to request an approval of the concept plans. City Council was provided additional information about the project on Oct. 6, 2020 while reviewing the CIP and unanimously approved the 2021 CIP. If the concept plans are approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) and with City Council approval of the 2021- 2026 CIP, the proposed plan will move into the next phases outlined in the Design Standards Manual, which are: Design Development, Construction Documents, and Bidding and Construction with anticipated overall project completion in 2022. BACKGROUND: The Flatirons Golf Course is the only public golf course in the city of Boulder and offers the opportunity for all community members to participate in the sport of golf while it also strives to be more than a traditional municipal course. With the new facility, BPR will expand access to non-traditional players. The proposed facility will be a re-imagined community space replacing some of the functions provided by the previously demolished building. Community engagement for this project showed that current users are interested in and excited for community events to return to the facility, creating a more vibrant and inclusive atmosphere. The facility is designed first and foremost as a golf facility but will also become a multi- functional space open to the community for dining, entertainment/games, and small outdoor events. The Proposed Concept Plan is roughly estimated within the existing construction budget of approximately $6.95 million and will continue through design development and construction, if approved. This plan focuses on replacement of the core infrastructure such as indoor restrooms and a small indoor/outdoor food and beverage area designed to serve as a family-friendly neighborhood restaurant. Click on the plans below to review the Proposed Concept Plan with a regular and enlarged view of the facility. The existing golf services building, built in 1987, provides space for the pro shop, staff offices and some golf cart storage. The proposed plan includes some minor improvements that are required to ensure that it will continue to function properly in the near future. Improvements such as exterior finishes, roofing and refreshing interior finishes are examples of improvements that will be part of this project or planned in upcoming years in the CIP. A 50+ year facility lifespan requires some consideration of future needs for flexibility and expansion. Future phases of the Concept Plan were developed to ensure that a potential future expansion could be constructed at minimal cost, if and when, the funding is available. Click on the image on the right to review the Future Concept Plan. ANALYSIS: Staff presented a discussion item to PRAB at the September meeting to solicit feedback and comments on the concept plans that were developed directly from input received from the community as well as PRAB throughout the process. PRAB supported the concept plans and followed the meeting with a letter provided to City Council in support of continued funding for this project during 2021 Budget Study Session. The main points for support include: • the need for permanent restrooms, • the addition of a restaurant in east Boulder, and • an indoor/outdoor space with incredible views for dining and other activities. A few points of discussion between staff and PRAB are outlined below. • Multi-use path through the golf course: Staff had explored the option of a multi-use path through the golf course. The Flatirons Golf Course was designed in a way that is intended to be a very walkable course with a tight configuration of fairways and little space between. A safe route for a multi-use path through the course is not feasible based on the design of the course. The concept plans do, however, promote walking with a 6’ path from the facilities to the entryway. • Golf simulator: There was also discussion regarding the need for a golf simulator in the future concept plan. The community had some interest in a simulator to extend the type of activity and season at the course and have potential revenue generation. At the time of any future development, the feasibility will be evaluated to determine the best use for that space. It should be considered a flexible use space in the Future Concept Plan. • Stage Facilities: Stage facilities was another consideration from PRAB. The flat open lawn is intended to maximize flexibility and will be able to accommodate a portable stage, like the event tents. Locations of and access to power supplies will be considered in the design development to accommodate either use on the event lawn. • Future technology: Including infrastructure for future expansion of Electronic Vehicle (EV) stations and/or solar panels is not on the concept plans due to the level of detail on this type of plan. It should be noted that preparation of the infrastructure for future expansion will be included in design development. For example, planning for future placement of EV station expansion would allow consideration of power supply needs and location of conduit sleeves to be run under concrete and asphalt. None of the inquiries resulted in alterations of the concept plans, however, did provide some guidance for the next phase of design development, if approved. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests the PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to Approve the Flatirons Golf Course Concept Plan. NEXT STEPS: If the concept plans are approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) and with City Council approval of the 2021-2026 CIP, the proposed plan will move into the next phases outlined in the Design Standards Manual, which are: Design Development, Construction Documents, and Bidding and Construction with anticipated overall project completion in 2022. AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: October 26th, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: 2021 Boulder Reservoir Operations Adjustments PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Stephanie Munro, Regional Recreation Facilities Manager Stacy Cole, Boulder Reservoir Facility Supervisor Chris Passarelli, Data Analyst EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) continues to align business practices with the guidance outlined in the 2014 Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan. At the Boulder Reservoir, operations are also informed by the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan. As a result of 2020 post- season evaluation, staff propose modifications to fees and service levels at the Boulder Reservoir. New flank season and twilight access fees will support the expenses incurred to deliver services and incent off-peak access while boat permit fees are adjusted to create greater transparency in access fees. Adjustments to the lake schedule attempt to balance access amongst various users while also promoting off-peak weekday access. The PRAB’s role in these items is to advise the department, providing input to guide the final 2021 Boulder Reservoir fees and service levels. BACKGROUND: The Boulder Reservoir Constructed in the 1950s, the Boulder Reservoir collects and retains water for municipal, domestic, agricultural and industrial uses for members of the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District (Northern Water). The Reservoir is, first and foremost, a valuable drinking water supply for the City of Boulder. The Recreational activities at the Reservoir are supported by the Parks and Recreation Department in a manner that is compatible with the protection and management of the water supply. The Boulder Reservoir (Reservoir) is one of the city’s premier recreation destinations and one of only eight reservoirs and lakes offering significant water-based recreation and boating opportunities along the Front Range corridor. Over the years, the Boulder Reservoir has increased in popularity as a local and regional venue for small and large-scale group and organized events. The management of and investments in the Reservoir are guided by the 2014 Parks and Recreation Master Plan (master plan) and Boulder Reservoir Master Plan (BRMP), approved by City Council in January 2012. The BRMP integrates the principles of economic, social, and environmental sustainability and includes recommendations addressing AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 2__ water quality, natural habitat, and recreational uses at the Boulder Reservoir. Finally, investments and operations at the reservoir are also guided by the 2020 South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan, approved by the PRAB in April 2020. Reservoir Services The 1190 acres of land surrounding the reservoir are divided into four management areas (see Figure 1). The South Shore Management Area (“South Shore”) consists of roughly 76 acres and is the location of the most intensive active recreational uses at the reservoir. Facilities on the South Shore include gate house buildings, Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) inspection building, a new Visitor Services Center, lifeguard station, boat house maintenance building. Popular amenities are the swim beach, boat parking, boat moorings, boat ramps, a variety of docks, reservable picnic site locations and numerous vehicle parking areas. Figure 1 Boulder Reservoir Management Areas Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) are invasive, non-native animals and plants that can be introduced to waterbodies primarily via boating, angling, and dogs. Key ANS of concern in Colorado include zebra and quagga mussels, New Zealand mudsnails, and Eurasian milfoil. If these ANS were introduced to a body of water, including the Reservoir, they would establish and spread rapidly, and eradication would likely not be possible. Since 2008, the reservoir has operated a leading ANS program, which is also reviewed and updated annually. Since acceptance of the BRMP and as part of the ANS protective measures, reservoir operations require staffing the gate any time the facility is open to the public for recreational uses and all boating requires a permit to ensure operators are informed of ANS protocol and to manage use. AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 3__ Staff are awaiting final data from the State of Colorado Division of Wildlife and will deliver the 2020 ANS review before the end of the year. The height of recreational use occurs from Memorial Day to Labor Day when the reservoir is fully staffed, and services include the swim beach. The spring and fall months see reduced staffing and the closure of the swim beach, however, other services are still available. The winter months see the least visitations and offer the least amount of services (Lake Patrol does not operate November – February). See Table 1 for a summary of reservoir seasons and services available. Table 1: Boulder Reservoir Operating Seasons Jan 1- April 15th April 15th- Memorial Day Memorial Day - Labor Day Labor Day to - October 15th October 15th- December 31st Season Low Season Flank Season High Season Flank Season Low Season Gate Staffed All Open Hours Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Gate Fee No No Yes No No Swimming area Water Safety No No Yes No No Lake Patrol Begins in March Yes Yes Yes Ends in November Boating Access- (permit and ANS protocol required) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Reservoir Funding and Access Recreation operations at the Boulder Reservoir, which include boating and the activity in the managed South Shore recreation area, are funded from the BPR managed Recreation Activity Fund (RAF). The RAF is characterized as a quasi-enterprise fund where the department manages all expenses, receives revenues from user and participation fees, and relies on a subsidy from the General Fund to support community benefit programming. In May 2019, the department presented an update to the PRAB on the Recreation Activity Fund (RAF) and the related revenue management strategies developed to align with the master plan and additional guiding documents. The department uses this guidance, including the Recreation Priority Index and the Service Delivery Model, to classify services based on their exclusivity and degree of community benefit. Exclusive activities should achieve at least full cost recovery while AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 4__ community benefit programming is subsidized through the General Fund and other program revenue because of its importance to the department and the city. More details can be found in the May 2019 PRAB memo (starting on page 15). Specifically, at the Reservoir, the General Fund subsidy supports age-based discounts for youth and seniors and financial aid to support participation by community members with lower resources. All other programming and operations are expected to achieve full cost-recovery. Capital efforts at the Reservoir are funded from the department’s dedicated .25 Cent Sales Tax and Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Since 2020, the entrance fee has matched the entrance fee at other BPR facilities based upon feedback from users indicating this was preferred to ensure annual and other multi-visit passes included the reservoir and seasonal outdoor pools. Boat permits historically have included punches or annual passes in the permit fee, while small watercraft users would purchase entrance fees in addition to paying the smallcraft permit fee. Reservoir Visitation The South Shore is visited by approximately 300,000 visitors in the typical year, a large majority of which occurs during the high season from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Historically, the Reservoir has only charged an entrance fee during the peak season between Memorial Day and Labor Day and visitation numbers are carefully recorded. Outside of the high season, visitors can use the South Shore without paying a gate fee. As demonstrated in Figure 2, the majority of visitation takes place during the peak season. Figure 2: Typical Annual Reservoir Visitation Distribution Boating is one of the most popular activities, with boating representing approximately 40% of all annual revenues. To manage the popularity of water activities, the lake has historically been managed with three options: • Open Lake: All areas of the lake, except the wildlife closure areas, are open to all watercraft. Fast-moving power boats creating wakes, and thus moving quickly, and AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 5__ smallcraft alike may access the wake area in the middle of the lake. In 2020, the lake was “open” Monday-Thursday. • Shared Lake: The lake is open to all watercraft. Smallcraft are limited to the No- Wake Zone to limit potential for conflict with fast-moving power boats. In 2020, uses at the lake were separated like this Friday-Sunday. • No-Wake Lake: The lake is open to all watercraft, however, no wake is allowed. This limits activities by power boats (no water skiing or wake boarding), allowing smallcraft to visit all areas of the lake safely and without significant waves. In 2020, 8 hours of operation were no-wake. A survey of nearby lakes and reservoirs shows that Boulder Reservoir is unique in this respect: while many other bodies of water have specific “no-wake” areas, none ensure wake-free water at designated times (note that Standley Lake and Union Reservoir do not ever allow power boats and thus all access is wake-free). This no-wake time is offered as a safety recommendation from the BRMP and makes Boulder Reservoir an excellent facility for rowing and other activities that require still water. These varying types of management have been offered to balance the interests of varying users. Interest in smallcraft activities, such as Stand Up Paddling (SUP) and kayaking have grown significantly in the past several years (see Figure 3). Figure 3: Reservoir Boat Permit sales 2018-2020 AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 6__ Reservoir management has adjusted each year to balance the interests of users. For example, no- wake time was introduced to provide exclusive access to watercraft operating with no wake. This precludes some recreation activities to provide the wakeless water some recreationists prefer. ANALYSIS: 2020 Operations Every aspect of the reservoir operation was impacted by COVID this year. Large events and picnics, which made up over 41% of reservoir revenue in 2019, were canceled under the County health guidelines. In consultation with the PRAB in May of 2020, the department continued charging the 2019 gate fees rather than raising them as approved for 2020 given the limited operations. For example, the swim beach area was limited to circle swimming by reservation only and not available until late in the season and the planned hospitality partner was not able to launch due to the limits of the pandemic. After initially closing on March 13, the Reservoir reopened to passive recreation, including boating, on May 9. Given the increased community interest in outdoor activity this year, power boat permits sold out by the end of May and smallcraft permits sold out the first week of June. Despite limited capacity and operations, the reservoir collected 97% of 2019 gate revenue in 2020 ($283,353 vs. $292,204) illustrating the community desire for outdoor activity. Because of this exceptional demand and increased visitation, staff made 300 additional smallcraft permits available to the community in June and a reservation system was implemented for large craft to balance access on weekend days. The reservoir dredging maintenance project schedule was accelerated by Northern Colorado Water District, forcing the boating season to end at the start of September. In summary, every aspect of operations was impacted between limited events, high boating demand, an unexpected start to the life of the new Visitor Service Center and reduced operating hours to ensure expenses aligned with the significant reductions in revenue. This is evidenced in the final season ending revenue. At $768,623 in revenue, the reservoir generated just 70% of the original revenue projection (see Table 2). Table 2: Reservoir Revenue 2021 2020 Original Revenue Projection YTD ACTUAL 10.14.2020 Reservoir Revenue $1,137,000 $768,623 While the BRMP guides long-term goals, the plan also calls for annual reviews and refinements to help achieve those goals in an ever-changing environment. As part of the adaptive management principles outlined in the BRMP, the reservoir management team completed an After-Action Review of the peak season and boating program to evaluate and improve services. This process involved a city-sponsored user questionnaire delivered to users and visitors. As a result of this evaluation, staff are proposing adjustments to fees and lake access. AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 7__ RECOMMENDED FEE ADJUSTMENTS The challenges of 2020 highlight the importance of ensuring that expenses align with revenue targets, especially for exclusive programming that is expected to fully recover costs. The department is recommending three changes to reservoir access options which include Flank Season gate fees, reduced Twilight evening fees, and separating entrance access from boat permits. Flank Season Gate Fee As noted above, currently no fees are charged outside of the peak season between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Despite that, the reservoir still sees high visitation April 15 – Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day – October 15 and during these periods all services are offered except for the swim beach. Boulder Reservoir’s peak season tends to start one month later than and end one month earlier than other comparison sites (see Attachment A for comparison with other Front Range lakes). For flank season visitors, this represents two months per year that other sites are fully operational, including collecting revenue, while Boulder Reservoir is operating with no fees charged. Staff propose introducing a “flank season” gate fee of $5.00 per visitor (see Table 1 for flank season dates). This reduced fee aligns with the reduced level of service while still having visitors pay for the expenses of front gate supervision and Lake Patrol. The $5.00 gate fee is projected to generate approximately $13,000 in revenue in 2021. The estimated staffing costs during these periods is approximately $15,000. The remaining staffing costs are offset with the recommended Twilight Fee. Peak Season Twilight Fee Staff propose a reduced “twilight fee” of $5.00 per person or $10.00 per car to visitors entering the reservoir after 6:00pm in the peak season. This reduced fee recognizes that services are reduced after 6:00p.m. with the closure of the beach and to incent off-peak usage as recommended in the BRMP. This fee intends to incent off-peak hour visitation, encourage visitation to the reservoir’s boating concessionaire and to the new hospitality partner at the Visitor Service Center. In addition, a per car fee incents carpooling. The lower fee is expected to increase visitation in the evenings for an estimated $5,000 in additional revenue. This total revenue increase of $18,000 will then offset the $15,000 in staffing expenses already spent during these periods to safely operate the reservoir. Boat Permit Fees and Access Fees separated Historically, small watercraft permits have been purchased separately from entrance fees while large boats (power and sailboats) have included entrance passes and punches as part of their purchase price. As power boating is categorized as Exclusive in the Recreation Priority Index, the price of each pass has been aligned with the costs related to reservoir operations and the Aquatic Nuisance Species program, however, feedback on the 2020 questionnaire indicated a desire for easier comparison and consistency in pass structure. By separating large boat permits AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 8__ from access fees, like the current structure for smallcraft, users will be able to easily determine the access option (e.g. monthly pass, punch card or daily entry) that are right for them. Selling boat permits independently from admissions also more clearly aligns fees with the benefit being received and associated expenses. A permit holder can purchase the right to a boat on the reservoir and contribute to those associated expenses, while they can also determine the appropriate number and type of passes to meet their needs and offset the associated staffing and facility costs. This structural change is not anticipated to increase or decrease total revenue; however, some permit holders will see fee adjustments depending upon the type of access option they select (see Attachment B). RECOMMENDED SERVICE ADJUSTMENTS Staff recommends three changes to reservoir service levels in 2021 as a result of the 2020 post- season review. The proposed changes, bolstered by community feedback, are designed to maintain sustainable operations while providing flexible, multi-use access pursuant to foster well-being in line with policy direction of the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan and the Parks & Recreation Master Plan. 2021 Operating Hours As the community continues to recover from the impact of COVID-19, financial constraints are expected to continue until full operations can resume. Based upon projected revenues and service levels, a modest increase in operating hours can be sustained in 2021. In addition, operating hours will be made consistent throughout the week to simplify planning for all user groups. The 2021 peak season operating hours focus on serving the broadest mix of users and are based upon visitation levels. Visitation by general users occurs within the hours of 7:00am – 7:00pm. The open-ended comments from the 2020 questionnaire indicated strong community support for increasing operating hours, and staff carefully assessed what the 2021 budget can bear. Because BPR is anticipating 2021 revenue to still be short of 2019 (due to anticipated limitations on events and gatherings), operating hours can be increased but not to prior levels (see Figure 4). Specialized user groups activating the reservoir outside of the operating hours will have the opportunity to do so through lake rental options. 2019 Peak Season: Mon-Sun: 5 am - 9 pm 2020 Peak Season: Mon-Thurs: 8 am – 7 pm Fri-Sun: 7 am - 8 pm 2021 Peak Season: Mon-Sun: 7 am - 9 pm AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 9__ Figure 4: 2019-2021 Peak Season Operating Hours per Week 2021 Flank Season hours are also based upon current 2021 budget projections. By reducing flank season hours, more services can be offered during the peak season when more visit and benefit from the services. Should recovery conditions exceed projections, hours can be adjusted accordingly. Like peak season hours, the operating hours will be kept consistent every day of the week to simplify the planning process for patrons. 2019 Flank Season: Mon-Sun: 7 am – 7 pm (total of 84 hours per week) 2020 Fall Flank Season*: Mon-Sun: 10 am - 6 pm (total of 56 hours per week) 2021 Flank Season: Mon-Sun: 10 am - 6 pm (total of 56 hours per week) *Because of COVID impacts and closures as well as the dredging project, 2020 flank hours were significantly reduced. Lake Access Lake access is based on a desire to provide a balanced recreational experience that is safe for all visitors, including the 1,200 smallcraft and 270 large craft permitholders in a typical year. As reviewed above, and through 2020, there have been times when the lake is open to all uses across the body of water. In this scenario, when power boats are moving fast and creating a wake and with the increased quantity of smallcraft, there is significant risk for conflict. Safety and Eliminating Shared Use in the middle of the lake Currently, smallcraft users must stay in the No-Wake Zone Friday through Sunday to avoid conflicts with power boats in the middle of the lake. To keep all user groups safe, it is proposed that this policy be expanded so that uses are always safely separated. This proposal was strongly supported by the large craft permit holders but resisted by smallcraft users (See Figure 5). Staff believe this shared use in the middle of the lake cannot safely continue with the popularity of smallcraft. AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 10__ Figure 5: Support for additional "smallcraft in no-wake" times. Note that twice as many smallcraft survey responses were received than large craft. Moving forward, power boats will not be allowed to create wakes at the same time that small craft are allowed in the middle of the lake (and vice versa, smallcraft will not be allowed in the middle of the lake when power boats are allowed to create wakes). The lake will be operated as either shared, with wake-creating vessels limited to the wake area and slower moving craft to the No-Wake Zone, or as entirely a No-Wake Lake. No-Wake Time Small watercraft users have consistently expressed a desire for more designated “no-wake” hours when the entire lake is exclusively available to slower moving craft. This gives them an opportunity to safely recreate across the entire lake and on still water, which can be necessary for certain activities like rowing. Small watercraft users strongly support these no-wake hours and have requested more, though large craft users are not interested in any less wake time (see Figure 6 for results from the post-season questionnaire). Respondents were also asked when no-wake times were most preferred, and mornings were the most requested option. Note that mornings are preferred by many users, as water-skiers also prefer the mornings for the smoother, “glassy”, water. AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 11__ Figure 6: Support for additional no-wake hours across all boat user groups For 2021, staff propose offering the below No Wake times: Tuesday: 7:00a.m.-11:00a.m. Thursday: 7:00a.m.-11:00a.m. and 4:00p.m.-8:00p.m. Sunday: 7:00a.m.-11:00a.m. This schedule is driven by feedback from users and a desire for a consistent, easy to remember schedule. Previously, no-wake hours were scheduled at different time frames on different days, causing confusion and difficulty with enforcement (see Attachment C for visual summary of historical and proposed lake schedule). This new schedule provides no-wake time on weekends for the first time and overall provides 16 hours of no-wake time in the peak season, or nearly 20% of operating hours. This doubles what was provided in 2020, and means that 1/5 of the time, other recreation activities will be limited. One on, One Off After trialing a reservation system to manage increased weekend demand in 2020, staff will return to a “one-off, one-on” system for power boats when capacity is reached. This could result in long wait times, such as what was experienced in the early summer of 2020, however, many power boat permit holders expressed frustration with the reservation system. Weekday Smallcraft Permit As mentioned above, staff sold an additional 300 smallcraft permits in 2020 given the increased demand during the pandemic for a total of 1,500 smallcraft permits. While allowing the Reservoir to serve more customers, it created traffic and safety challenges during peak times. Since these smallcraft permits are in high demand and sell out quickly, staff proposes offering 500 weekday-only passes along with the returning to the historic limit of 1,200 all-week passes. This will encourage more visitation during the quietest times of the week and avoid compromising safety or capacity on the busier weekends. AGENDA ITEM VI-A_ PAGE 12__ QUESTIONS FOR THE PRAB Does the board have questions on reservoir operations in 2020? Does the board have any feedback on proposed fee adjustments for 2021? Does the board have any feedback on proposed adjustments to operating hours and lake access for 2021? NEXT STEPS The PRAB’s input will inform adjustments to 2021 reservoir fees and service levels. These proposals have also been shared with permitholders, and their feedback will be considered for final 2021 fees and service levels. Upon finalizing the 2021 reservoir program, updates will be communicated to users and community members. This communication will include website updates, direct e-mails to users as well as personal (virtually or in-person) during permit sales. We will continue to monitor and evaluate these changes and adjust as needed. ATTACHMENTS Attachment A Front Range Lake/Reservoir Comparisons Attachment B Boulder Reservoir 2021 Proposed Fees Attachment C Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Attachment A: Front Range Lake/Reservoir Comparisions Body of Water State or Municipal Fee Season Annual Pass option Powerboats Allowed Non-Vehicle Entry Fee Vehicle Fee Add'l Boat Fee Per person fee Wake Information Additional Information Aurora Reservoir Municipal Year-round $65NR/$55R No gas powered No $10 $10 for trailered or compartmented boats, no fee for kayak or SUP N/A Wakeless boating only Barr Lake State Year-round $80 or $120 <10HP not listed $9 No $4 Wakeless boating only Only low powered fishing vessels, sailboats, and SWC allowed Bear Creek Lake Park Municipal Year-round $80/$50senior <10HP No $10 No N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Awaiting confirmation of details Boulder Reservoir Municipal Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day Summer Unlimited Fun Passes: $297R/$366NR Household; $186R/232NR Adult Yes No N/A Yes. Annual Only $50 SWC, 50+HP $837R/1050NR; other options apply $7R/$9NR; Other fees apply Boyd Lake State Year-round $80 or $120 Yes not listed $10 No N/A Designated areas of the lake for wakeless and for skiing. (I.E. South end for skiing) No specific wakeless days/times Carter Lake County Year-round $90/VehicleR $120/VehicleNR $180/Vehicle+BoatR $240/Vehicle+BoatNR $90/Vehicle+SWC Yes not listed $9 $9 for trailered vessel N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Managed by Larimer County, no fee listed for SWC daily entrance. SImillar fees to Horsetooth Reservoir. ANS decon fees not listed Chatfield State Year-round $80 or $120 Yes, only on main reservoir not listed $10 No N/A Divided into zones for each type of activity. No other days/times specifiec. SWC allowed on any water inside of park, powerboats only allowed on main reservoir. Full service Marina Cherry Creek State Year-round $83 or $123 Yes not listed $11 No N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Durango/Nighthorse Municipal mid April-early Nov $70Household/$60Senior/ $20Walkin Yes $3 $8 No N/A Mondays and Wednesdays are designated wakeless No additional fee for anything boating related included decontaminations. Slated for an increase in daily vehicle/season pass fees for 2021 of $10/$80 Horsetooth Reservoir County Year-round $90/VehicleR $120/VehicleNR $180/Vehicle+BoatR $240/Vehicle+BoatNR $90/Vehicle+SWC Yes not listed $9 $9 for trailered vessel N/A Designated no wake zones but no other days/times specified Managed by Larimer County, no fee listed for SWC daily entrance. SImilar fees to Carter Lake. ANS decon fees not listed Standley Lake Municipal Year-round $60 No N/A $7 $8 N/A No powerboats allowed Did not allow day passes for small craft in 2020, only annual smallcraft passes which include entrance ($200). Boating season is only May 1-Sept 30 though fees remain in place year round. Union Reservoir Municipal Year-round $65R/$150NR Yes but wakeless $2 $10 Weekdays/$12 Weekends $5 smallcraft/$8 trailered N/A All wakeless Walk in only Nov 1-Feb 28, but fees still apply. Craft type Status Package Price Includes:Permit Price Includes:A la carte purchases to match existing Price of entries Total Price Variance from 2020 4 x 10 Adult punches $324 $854 2% Household $297 $827 -1% 4 x 10 Adult punches $396 $1,059 1% Household $366 $1,029 -2% 2 x 10 Adult punches $162 $442 -8% Household $297 $577 20% 2 x 10 Adult punches $198 $548 -9% Household $366 $716 19% 2 x 10 Adult punches $162 $342 -18% Household $297 $477 15% 2 x 10 Adult punches $198 $423 -19% Household $366 $591 14% Resident $50 $50 $50 0% Non-Resident $55 $55 $55 0% Resident N/A $30 $30 0% Non-Resident N/A $35 $35 0% Total Revenue $285,622 Total Revenue $285,622 Notes and assumptions: Boat storage/mooring fees remain unchanged. 2019 permit sales used for consistency. Revenue estimates are based on a 50-50 split between the current entrance options offered. Additional entry purchases, including those for small craft, are not included. 50-499hp Weekday Resident $480 1 Adult Summer + 20 OR Household $280 $520 Resident Smallcraft Smallcraft Weekday (no entry included)(no entry included) (no entry included) 1 Adult Summer + 40 OR Household 1 Adult SummerNon-Resident $600 $350 Resident Non-Resident Non-Resident $837 $1,050 $416 2020 Structure Attachment B: Boulder Reservoir 2021 Proposed Fees 1 Adult Summer + 20 OR Household $663 50-499hp 1-49hp & Sail 1 Adult Summer 1 Adult Summer Proposed 2021 Structure (no entry included) $225 $180 $530 Attachment C: Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Note: Closed hours shown in light red, “no-wake” time is shown in green, and shared time is in blue. For 2019-2020, white areas represent times when the whole lake was open to all watercraft. 2019 Schedule: 112 weekly operating hours, 15 hours no-wake Attachment C: Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Note: Closed hours shown in light red, “no-wake” time is shown in green, and shared time is in blue. For 2019-2020, white areas represent times when the whole lake was open to all watercraft. 2020 Schedule: 83 weekly operating hours, 8 hours no-wake Attachment C: Boulder Reservoir Peak Season Operating Hours Note: Closed hours shown in light red, “no-wake” time is shown in green, and shared time is in blue. For 2019-2020, white areas represent times when the whole lake was open to all watercraft. 2021 Proposed: 98 weekly operating hours,16 hours no-wake: 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: October 26, 2020 A. BPR Capital Projects Update Despite all the challenges facing our community this year, staff have been actively working on a variety of capital projects ranging from planning initiatives such as the departmental master plan update to the construction of the new playground at Chautauqua Park while maintaining the ability to respond to COVID-19 impacts as well other unforeseen issues. Throughout the budget work this past summer, there have been many changes to the current schedule of the department’s capital projects for 2020 and 2021 and staff would like to ensure the PRAB is aware of the final outcomes of the 2020 projects and what’s in store for next year. During the October PRAB meeting, staff will provide a brief presentation to the board outlining the status of capital work within the department and respond to questions from the board. This will not be an in-depth discussion on any specific project as PRAB is engaged in discussion items and action items as needed during the regular processes of projects, like the recent Flatirons Golf Facility project. Rather, this will be a general overview of the projects and scheduling implications. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: October 26, 2020 A. PLAY Update (verbal) B. PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (verbal) C. Guidance for Annual Letter to City Council The following letter from Council Members Mary Young and Bob Yates provide guidance and instructions for the PRAB’s annual letter to Council. Good Afternoon Board and Commissions and those who support them, The Council Retreat Subcommittee has begun planning the annual retreat this coming January. As requested annually, we would like to engage Board and Commissions to get feedback on city performance. The Retreat Subcommittee asks that each Board and Commission submit these items through a letter due 12/18/2020, and framed under the following categories: • What has made your board or commission happy in the past year? • What has made your board or commission sad in the past year? • What is your board looking forward to in 2021? For the happy category letters should reflect and recap on 2020 actions that resonated as positive for the Board/Commission. For the sad category letters should reflect and recap on 2020 actions that resonated as negative for the Board/Commission. Items listed in each category should be city related, and substantive. To close out each letter, please share what your Board or Commission is looking forward to in 2021. Please limit these letters to approximately 2 pages, and submit them to Taylor Reimann, Assistant to the City Council (treimann@bouldercolorado.gov), no later than December 18. Each Board and Commission should also designate one of their members to (virtually) present the letters at a Pre-Retreat Study Session on January 12 at 6 p.m. Presenters will be given no more than 3 minutes to discuss the 3 questions; time can be allocated at their discretion. Using a slide deck is optional, and presentations should also be submitted to Taylor no later than Monday, January 11 at noon. After all Boards and Commissions have presented, Council may have follow-up questions for some based on the information shared. Please feel free to reach out to Taylor Reimann with any clarifying questions. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Thank you for your effort to support our Boards, Commissions, and Council as we continue planning for 2021. Respectfully, Mary Young and Bob Yates D. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal)