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09.30.20 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., September 30, 2020 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Raj Seymour (Chair) Allison Fronzaglia (Vice Chair) Charles Brock Mary Scott Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV.CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A.Approval of Minutes from August 24, 2020 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:20) A. Flatiron’s Golf Course Facility Design VI.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (7:00) A.Master Plan Kick Off B.Operating Budget Update VII. MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:30) A.PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (verbal) B.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. VIII.NEXT BOARD MEETING: October 26, 2020 IX.ADJOURN PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared September 24, 2020) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided). Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to become a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth presentation and discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item. Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item. January 27, 2020 • BPR 2020 Workplan (md) • Boulder Reservoir restaurant lease (a) • BPR and Climate Initiatives (md) • Valmont Programming Contracts (d/i) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (d/i) • Civic Park Art Donation (d/i) (allow 1 hr/per Jeff) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) February 24, 2020 • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Chautauqua Sustainability & Resilience Strategy (md) • Volunteer Program Update (c) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (di) • Civic Park Art Donation (a) • Valmont Programming Contracts (a) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (a) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (d/i) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) March 30, 2020 • Scott Carpenter Concession (d/i) • Pottery Lab (d/i) • 2021 Budget Strategy & Review 2020 Actuals (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB new member orientation (mb) • Departing Board Members (mb) April 27, 2020 • Board appointments (p) • Election of officers (p) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (a) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (a) • COVID Update (d/i) o Operations Adjustments and Impacts o 2020 Financial Overview • 2021 Budget Strategy: o Scenario Planning o 2021-2026 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) • New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (md) May 27, 2020 • Financial Strategy (d/i) o 2020 reductions o 2021 proposed operating w/ service levels o 2021-26 CIP (2nd touch) • PLAY Boulder Access Campaign (md) • COVID Recovery Update (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 22, 2020 • 2021-26 CIP (Hearing and Approval) (a) • 2021 Operating Budget (md) • COVID Recovery Update (c) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB Email List and Guidelines (mb) • PRAB Committees (mb) • Valmont Enhancement Update (md) July 27, 2020 * No business; meeting canceled August 24, 2020 • Possible CIP Revision discussion (a/i) • Homelessness Strategy Update (d/i) • Design Standards Manual (md) • Racial Equity (md) • 9th Street Waldorf School Vacancy (md) • Public Art update (md) • PRAB Retreat Planning and Committee (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) September 30, 2020 • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (d/i) • Master Plan Kick Off (md) • Operating Budget Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) October 26, 2020 • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (a) • Chautauqua Resilience Project (d/i) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Reservoir 2021 Operational enhancements, ANS program review and fee adjustments November 23, 2020 • Master Plan Update: Study Session (d/i) • Capital Project Update (md) • Final 2021 Operating Budget (md) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (Letter to Council) (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) December 21, 2020 • Master Plan Update: (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: August 24, 2020 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Charlotte O’Donnell, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Charles Brock, Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Tara Winer, Jason Unger, Pam Yugar Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Bryan Beary, Tina Briggs, Tim Duda, Regina Elsner, Jeff Haley, Stacie Hoffmann, Megann Lohman, Stephanie Munro, Charlotte O’Donnell, Ali Rhodes, Christy Spielman, Dennis Warrington, Denise White Guests Present: Brenda Ritnour, Aimee Kane, Vicki Ebner Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:00 p.m. A quorum was present for the conduct of business. Motion to amend agenda to move the Racial Equity presentation to directly follow public participation. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. Motion passed 7-0. Motion to amend agenda to add a discussion of the November and December PRAB meeting schedule to Matters from the Board. Motion by Seymour. Second by Unger. Motion passed 7- 0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes reviewed upcoming agenda items for PRAB. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Emily Brake, community member, raised concern that Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) staff were not communicating well with the community about pools and COVID protocols, especially with people with disabilities. As a person with a disability she felt disrespected. Rhys Campbell, community member, BAM member and a member of other aquatics communities, encouraged BPR to keep outdoor pools open for a longer season in light of the pandemic. Robbert Smit, community member, encouraged BPR to keep outdoor pools open for a longer season in light of the pandemic. There being no one else who wanted to speak, public participation was closed. Rhodes presented information on extending the pool season. PRAB members had the following questions and comments: • What is the normal schedule for closing the outdoor pools? • When is the first freeze of the year? • If keeping the outdoor pools open in the winter is not an option, will staff consider opening pools earlier in the spring? • Is part of the hour-long reservation 15 minutes of transition time? Is there a way to shorten time slots to get more people in the water? • Because of the pandemic this year, would the city consider prioritizing needs of people, especially those with disabilities, instead of following energy policies? • Shared a comment from a family who was also interested in using the pool in a different capacity than some of the other more vocal stakeholders. • What is being done at the indoor pools to increase safety or ventilation? • Requested more communication from staff on updates during the pandemic. Rhodes verbally shared information on BPR’s relationship with Boulder Aquatic Masters (BAM). PRAB members had the following questions and comments: • Why will there be split or shared lanes? Who developed this guideline? • What happened to cause a perceived “disconnect” between BAM and BPR that several emails from community members referred to? Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department A. Racial Equity and the City of Boulder Aimee Kane, Equity Program Manager for the City of Boulder, presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Could this be added to new board member orientation? • Does this equity work focus mainly on race or also on other equity issues such as gender, socio-economic status as well? • Suggested discussing this topic at the retreat. • Observed that there is not an indoor facility in North East Boulder, where many people of color live in the city. Increasing equitable access may include short-term strategies like increasing transportation options and long-term strategies including considering where facilities are sited. • Suggested using a racial equity quiz and other engagement for citizens. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from June 22, 2020 The board had the following question: • Are questions recorded in the minutes answered at the next meeting? Motion to approve the minutes from June 22, 2020 as presented. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. The motion passed 7-0. B. Development and Operations Update The Board did not have any questions and/or comments. Agenda Item 5: Items for Action A. Public Hearing and Approval of 2021-26 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Haley presented this item to the Board. For the Public Hearing, no members of the public wanted to comment. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Is the backlog of deferred maintenance growing as a percentage of total CIP? • Thanks to staff for finding a low impact way to move contingency funding. Motion to approve the 2020 recommended expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Motion by Seymour. Second by Fronzaglia. Motion passed 7-0. Motion to approve the recommended 2020-2025 Parks and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Program. Motion by Seymour. Second by Yugar. Motion passed 7-0. Agenda Item 6: Matters from the Department (continued) B. City of Boulder Homelessness Strategy Vicki Ebner, Homelessness Initiatives Manager for the City of Boulder, presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • What is the percentage of people who are in Boulder only temporarily? How do they fit into the services and strategy? • Observed an encampment at the farmers market this past weekend. • Will the city continue to enforce the camping ban? • Shared that encampments near 13th St. caused fear for others walking nearby. • What is the process and timeline for enforcing the camping ban? • What happens when camps re-appear in the same location? • What are some of the responses for resistance to services? • Does the City of Boulder have policy advisors lobbying for these issues at the state and national level? C. Design Standards Manual Elsner presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Was this helped by the new Beehive software? • Thanks for making this so understandable and including helpful background information. D. 9th Street Waldorf School Vacancy Haley presented this item to the Board. The Board had no questions and/or comments. E. Public Art Update Haley presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Why was the donation rescinded? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Board A. PRAB Retreat The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Yugar and Winer volunteered to serve as the retreat planning committee. • PRAB members will send topic suggestions to the committee. • Would it be possible to have any in-person gathering? B. PRAB November and December Meeting Schedule The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • PRAB will meet on November 23 and December 21. • The retreat will be scheduled separately. C. PRAB Community Engagement Updates Members of the PRAB participated in the following outreach activities over the course of the last month: • Fronzaglia reported on the recent greenways committee meeting. • Yugar spoke with a community member who was concerned about Eben G. Fine park and wanted staff follow up. • The PLAY duck race will happen in September. Board members encouraged each other to contribute by purchasing a duck. • Scott met with Unger for a mentor and orientation conversation. Agenda Item 8: The next PRAB meeting will be held Monday, September 28, 6:00 p.m. virtually (via video conference). Agenda Item 9: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before PRAB at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 9:33 p.m. Motion by Seymour. Second by Winer. The motion passed 7-0. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Charlotte O’Donnell Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: September 30, 2020 A. Approval of Minutes from August 24, 2020 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Multiple Resources Preservation Plan (MRPP): In late August 2020, a Notice to Proceed was issued for Mundus Bishop, a local landscape architecture firm specializing in historic preservation. Mundus Bishop will complete the analysis and planning for the creation of the Multiple Resource Preservation Plan. Currently staff is mobilizing project kick off, engagement planning, and aligning project goals and objectives to other systemwide plans including the department’s Master Plan update. • Skate Park Improvements and Pump Track Project: Staff from the Parks and Recreation and Open Space and Mountain Parks departments are exploring options for applications for the GOCO Resilient Communities Grant, including a request for the new skate park proposed for Valmont City Park. This project was impacted by recent budget reductions but could be a good match for the GOCO Resilient Communities Grant due to its ability to serve low-income communities while providing COVID-compliant recreation opportunities Due to constrained resources, this project will not officially begin until early 2021 so that staff can determine the final budget amount that is available from the grant application and other competing resources. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Master Plan Update (see Matters from the Department) o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Project (see discussion item) 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement: Construction activities at Scott Carpenter were completed on August 17, 2020 and the facility re-opened to the public for reserved lap swimming on August 21. Given the current high demand for outdoor swim lanes, and after an extensive feasibility analysis, the Scott Carpenter Lap Pool will remain open in the 2020 season for reserved lap swimming until public utilization drops below 60% of available capacity, or the daily average temperatures routinely drop below 50 degrees. Should the current pandemic continue into spring 2021, the pool would again open once operational setup is complete and temperatures allow. While in this state of recovery, the pool will remain in the 25- yard, 20-lap lane configuration or in the 17- lap lane, 5 leisure pod configuration during the warmest months. When able to open in its entirety, the enhanced Scott Carpenter Pool is a state-of-the-art aquatic destination with leisure amenities designed to serve all ages and abilities planned to be opened annually May through September, weather permitting. The new Scott Carpenter Pool offers an Olympic-sized, 50-meter lap pool, a leisure pool with climbing wall, deep water exercise and diving area and lazy river, a remodeled bathhouse, tower slides, splash pad with zero- depth entry pool, and many access improvements through the park. Once opened, the completely renovated bathhouse will offer year-round public restrooms, and the new concession area will be accessible from the park so that playground visitors can also enjoy tasty treats. The Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement project was made possible through a variety of funds including $4.2 million by the 2017 renewal of the Community, Culture and Safety Tax (CCS), $5.3 million by parks development excise tax, and $4.7 million of Parks and Recreation capital improvement funds. The PLAY Boulder Foundation supported efforts to pass the CCS and additional fundraising needs. Renovation construction started in late spring 2019. Construction continued despite experiencing extreme winter weather conditions and through the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Chautauqua Playground Renovation: Construction has started on the renovation of the Chautauqua Park playground. Activities over the next month will include removal of existing playground equipment, sidewalks, and site furnishings. Other activities will include excavation and initial layout of the new playground features. The renovation is expected to be completed within 2-3 months depending on weather and material availability. During construction, the following impacts can be anticipated: o The playground will be closed. o Pedestrian and bike paths between Sumac Dr. and 12th St. will be closed. Detours will be posted. o Contractors will take reasonable measures to prevent dirt and other particles discharging beyond the work zone; however, visitors can anticipate construction noise and limited airborne dust. o There will be intermittent times of increased construction traffic as materials are delivered or removed from the site. o Construction hours are Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., unless otherwise noticed. Once complete, the new playground will consist of new playground equipment and surfacing to meet ADA accessibility standards and safety guidelines and requirements, a new sand play area, addition of nature play features, and seating and climbing boulders that are integrated into the overall playground design. The preferred concept plan was unanimously approved by PRAB in December of 2019. General information and construction updates can be found here, on the Chautauqua Playground Renovation project website. • 55 Degrees – Civic Area Art Installation: Installation of the newest public art piece, 55 Degrees by Adam Kuby, began in September 2020. A project through the Office of Arts and Culture, the installation will include three large steel sculptures near the Main Library which refer to Boulder’s iconic Flatirons and become an iconic complement to the park. The sculptures will function as interactive windows, framing the sky, the park, and the mountains beyond. The project has employed many local businesses across Boulder County, with the sculpture itself being fabricated at Living Design Studios, Inc. Construction is anticipated to take 8-10 weeks. During construction, park users and the general public can anticipate detours including a re-route of the Boulder Creek Path. The Boulder Creek Path will be re-routed to the south side of the creek during active construction and reopened daily at the close of active construction. Questions or comments on the project can be directed to publicart@bouldercolorado.gov Additionally, the full news release may be accessed at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/newsroom/city-prepares-for-55-degrees-and-other-public-art- installations-in-civic-area 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in the urban park environment. • Urban Wildlife Management: Prairie Dogs: Relocation of prairie dogs from Foothills Community Park is progressing with Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) working toward the relocation permit with the State and selecting a contractor for their relocations. Natural Lands staff continues to manage the prairie dogs on-site to facilitate the coming relocation efforts. Expansion of the colonies at Tom Watson Park, Pleasant View and the Boulder Reservoir south shore have been managed through passive relocation efforts. Birds of Special Concern and Closures: The seasonal closures at Coot Lake and the Boulder Reservoir ended on September 10th. The annual Birds of Special Concern volunteer program wrapped up on September 12th with a virtual appreciation event. The data gathered by volunteers and staff this year is being analyzed and a report is anticipated in October. Bats: The Colorado Bat Society (CBS) recently shared amazement that Thunderbird Lake “was amazingly active with hundreds of bats”. Species present were diverse and included big brown, little brown, small-footed, hoary, silver-haired and tricolored bats. Tricolored bats are a newly established species in Colorado. Normally tricolored bats are found in the eastern United States where their numbers have been decimated due to White-Nose Syndrome. This species is currently under petition with the US Fish and Wildlife Services for listing as an endangered species. They roost only on the branches of deciduous trees in riparian habitats. Staff hopes to collaborate with CBS to perform official surveys and educational talks at this and potentially other sites in 2021. • Natural Lands Maintenance: Thunderbird Lake: Biohabitats, an environmental consulting firm that has worked on various issues at Thunderbird Lake, has finalized a summary report of annual data and the Adaptive Management Plan for Thunderbird Lake. Data on water levels has been gathered annually on this lake beginning in 2008, with the Adaptive Management Plan implementation starting in 2016. This summary report will be evaluated, and a long-term management strategy determined for Thunderbird Lake. • Human Dimensions & Visitor Management: Boulder Reservoir’s North Shore and Coot Lake: Drawdown of the Reservoir began on September 1st. In collaboration with Public Works, temporary fencing was installed along both the South and North Shores to prevent public access to the shoreline and basin areas. Monitoring and education over the Labor Day holiday weekend indicated lower visitation than anticipated, likely due to a combination of the drawdown and smoky conditions. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration: State Mandated Eradication: Continued monitoring and control of noxious weed species ensures compliance with state and local weed laws and maintains viable wildlife habitat. Work is finishing up to control for purple loosestrife this year, as well as finishing mechanical control of Canada thistle, teasel and other species. Fall spraying opportunities are being evaluated to take advantage of cooler temperatures and timing for the most effective control of these species. Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS): A new population of New Zealand mud snail (NZMS) was found in South Boulder Creek near the East Boulder Community Park (EBCP) by OSMP staff. BPR staff surveyed the week of September 14th to monitor existing populations and determine if new populations have established in the last year. NZMS presence has previously been confirmed at waterbodies flowing through three BPR properties: Elmer’s Two-Mile Park, East Palo Park and Pleasant View Soccer Complex. Temporary fencing and signs were constructed to limit the potential spread from these locations. Needs for EBCP and longer-term solutions at these other sites are being evaluated. Mosquito Management: Mosquito counts are low, with the end of the season near. Of the 1566 statewide mosquito samples submitted for West Nile Virus (WNv) have been positive—or 3.8%. These positive samples were from Boulder (6), Delta (13), Denver (1), Larimer (36), La Plata (1) and Weld (5) counties. In addition to the WNv surveillance trap grid in Boulder, additional traps are set in areas with traditionally high nuisance mosquito activity. The map to the right shows the number of mosquitoes caught in city traps that are part of the WNv grid, as well as these additional traps that are marked with an “N.” • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination and site maintenance. C. Operations Update COVID-19 Update • City of Boulder COVID-19 Recovery Team: The City of Boulder has established a multi-department team structure to organize COVID-19 pandemic recovery coordination and communication. Team members remain in their daily roles but reserve time in their work plan to address city-wide recovery activities. Parks and Recreation staff serving on the team are: Ali Rhodes, Recovery Steering Committee; Tina Briggs, Community Recovery Coordinator; and Bryan Beary, Operation Recovery Team. The latest 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 information and results of recovery efforts can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/coronavirus. Recognizing the growing concern about the increase in positive COVID-19 cases in Boulder, the City of Boulder, the Boulder County Public Health Department and the University of Colorado-Boulder will begin offering weekly community briefings to provide updates to, and take questions from, the public. Briefings can be accessed using this sign-up link. • Recreation Facility and Program Offerings: Summer successes: These photos capture some of the success of our "physically-distant" Summer, 7-week Teen Mentor program with YSI. YSI successfully partnered with Wildlands Restoration Volunteers and OSMP Junior Rangers to provide challenging and rewarding skill-based volunteer opportunities. Projects included fuel mitigation, creek bed restoration, flood prevention, willow planting, gear hauling, fence removal and trail restoration. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 BPR also hosted 11 weeks of camp during summer 2020, ending on Aug. 21. Games and activities were chosen to help keep kids physically distance and safe. On a recent survey to parents of campers, 100% of respondents reported satisfaction with their child’s camp experience this summer. Return to Fall Programming: On Aug. 17, BPR marked the return of a standardized registration period for new and revitalized fall programming. A fall program informational flyer, which highlights the options available for various comfort levels, has been created to highlight program formats which include virtual, outdoor and indoor options ranging from private, small group or groups less than ten while in the Safer at Home recovery level. Programs available include Fitness, Mind and Body, Gymnastics, Swim Lessons, Softball, Kickball and Volleyball Leagues, Kinesis Dance, Gonzo Tennis and more. Most programs began the week of Sept. 7. The Camps team is offering new programs to support school days off and safe active fun this fall. Games and activities will be chosen to help keep physical distance and safety in mind. Masks will be required for both staff and kids. Program meets rain or shine and include options to participate virtually. The East Boulder Community Center reopened on Sept. 21 to the community on a reservation basis. Facility services include weight room and open gym times, dance, fitness/mind/body, EXPAND, aquatics, adult volleyball and adult dodgeball. BPR is gearing up to reactivate monthly and annual passes, allowing community members with passes to reserve timeslots at no additional cost for any currently available bookable recreation opportunity. The initial target date for this activation was Oct. 1; however, we will continue to monitor community COVID-19 numbers and respond accordingly. For pass holders who are not comfortable coming back to the facilities, or who may not wish to return at all, options are available to freeze the pass to Dec. 15, or to request a refund or credit, or to donate their remaining balance. For all programs and services, staff have prepared plans, and backup plans, to readily adapt as the public health context might require. Modified business practices, including virtual, private/semi-private and small group options will allow programs to be sustainable in a high change environment. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • The State of Colorado’s Recovery “Dial” and Boulder Status Update: The city is experiencing increased COVID-19 case counts in the University of Colorado Boulder student population, most of which are occurring off campus. The city is in close coordination with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) and CU Boulder to implement more testing facilities, increase communication and education, and improve systems to mitigate COVID-19 exposure within our community. Recently, all CU students were strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days – and further, residents of several properties on University Hill were informed that self- quarantine is mandatory. In addition, the city is coordinating closely with BCPH and CDPHE to open a free walk- up testing site at the Pleasant Street parking lot as well as a drive-through COVID-19 testing for free to anyone who would like to be tested. The drive-thru option is now available at Stazio Ballfields, 2445 Stazio Dr, Boulder, which will be open through Oct. 2. The site operates from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., seven days a week. More information is available at http://www.boco.org/COVID19Testing. These testing facilities are free to all Boulder County residents, with the intent to increase testing availability for CU Boulder students. City of Boulder Policy Agenda During the August meeting PRAB asked how Boulder sets different legislative priorities. City Council will hold a public hearing to discuss the proposed 2021 Regional, State and Federal Policy Agenda at their meeting on October 6. Staff will forward those materials when they are final. Forestry City staff are conducting a special curbside collection program for downed limbs and branches resulting from the recent snowstorm after Labor Day. Based upon participation in a competitive bidding process conducted earlier this year to identify partners for more rapid response to emergency weather events as part of the city’s resilience efforts, the city contracted Custom Tree Care to perform this work. Collection began Sept. 18 and will run for approximately three weeks, weather permitting. This initiative has been led by BPR staff and involves many teams within the department. The city has been divided into two zones, North and South, to facilitate the work, with specific collection start dates for each. Each zone's tree debris pick-up will initiate on the northern boundary and progress each day toward the southern edge. This work will occur from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, including weekends, until complete. Custom Tree Care also helped prune public trees. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 o Starting Sept. 18: North Zone – North of Canyon Boulevard, including houses on the north side of Canyon Boulevard, to the north city limits, including residential streets with blue signs in Gunbarrel. o Starting Sept. 25: South Zone – South of Canyon Boulevard, including houses on the south side of Canyon Boulevard. During the program, crews will collect tree debris only. Other yard waste such as grass clippings or leaves should be placed in curbside compost collection containers. Nonorganic materials, including plastic bags, treated or painted lumber, or other household materials will NOT be picked up because all organic material collected during this collection program will be composted. City crews are currently removing hanging branches, tree limbs and other debris from public lands, roadways and other areas that may pose a public safety hazard. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: September 30, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design & Community Engagement Manager Tina Briggs, Parks Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Flatirons Golf Course facility replacement project replaces core infrastructure destroyed in the 2013 flood and follows direction determined with City Council input in 2014. At that time, and with analysis of options for long-term viability of the city’s only public golf course, staff proceeded with demolition of the Flatirons Events Center and began saving and planning for a smaller replacement facility to serve base needs. The current concept replaces the temporary restroom trailer and to-go snack shop with an energy-efficient building that includes accessible and gender-neutral restrooms, provides space for a family-friendly, neighborhood restaurant, and takes advantage of the setting and iconic Flatirons views with an outdoor event space. The project was originally approved in the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) last year for the current planning and design process to be ready for bidding and construction starting in late 2021. The construction is funded almost entirely from Permanent Parks and Recreation Funds (PPRF), which are dedicated to the acquisition or permanent improvement of parkland. As PRAB will recall, staff have gone through several rounds of budget prioritization and reductions to ensure that the top priorities for the community and the department’s assets are addressed given this time of fiscal responsibility. Golf course operations are funded entirely by user fees and included in the quasi-enterprise Recreation Activity Fund (RAF). This investment will ensure that golf operations are not subsidized and can instead contribute funding for services that benefit the broader community. In the current state, the temporary facilities limit operations and the ability to support community-benefit programming, such as programs for youth, those with low- income, and community events. Like the recent Scott Carpenter Pool redevelopment and the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Services Center, this project has been planned and prioritized within the department’s capital program to ensure that the operations are not interrupted and the most cost- effective solution for replacing the core infrastructure is realized. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 2__ The project process through October of 2020 is concept planning only. If the concept plans are approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) and with City Council approval of the 2021 CIP, the proposed plan will move into the next phases outlined in the Design Standards Manual, which are: Design Development, Construction Documents, and Bidding and Construction with anticipated completion in 2022. BACKGROUND: The Flatirons Golf Course is the only public golf course in the city of Boulder and offers the opportunity for all community members to participate in the sport of golf as a more affordable option than traditional private golf clubs. Flatirons green fees do not require membership and are in the lower third when comparing pricing with other local golf courses, with senior and youth programming provided at a discount. This project also leverages the growth of golf in the pandemic and the role of municipal golf in providing a safe and family-friendly sport, developing new players of all ages, providing experiential learning opportunities and using the profitability to support non-golf related programs for community members systemwide. The Flatirons Golf Course strives to be more than a traditional municipal course. With the new facility, BPR will expand access to non-traditional players while also providing traditional golf including senior, women’s and youth leagues. This will be facilitated by the increase in profit anticipated with the project, which will allow for greater discounted access. For example, the department’s extensive Financial Aid program does not currently include discounts at the golf course and increased operating revenue will fund the expansion of this program to the golf course, facilitating access for all at Flatirons. In addition, the proposed facility will be a re-imagined community space replacing some of the functions provided by the previously demolished building. Community engagement for this project showed that current users are interested in and excited for community events to return to the facility, creating a more vibrant and inclusive atmosphere. The re-imagined design does not intend to duplicate the pre-2013 event uses but has focused on current needs and relied heavily on the early outreach for the East Boulder Subcommunity Plan. The golf course is adjacent to the actual borders of the plan but is representative of community needs in that part of Boulder. Below are highlights of the proposed facility design that emphasize how multiple needs of the facility can be fulfilled while considering the greatest community benefit for the investment. • Primary Need – Replace core infrastructure destroyed in the 2013 flood and as determined with City Council input in 2014. Temporary facilities, installed in 2015 and estimated to last 3-5 years, provide for a very minimum level of service, however, impact the long-term viability of the facility and limit options for community-benefit programming o Temporary mobile restroom trailer will be replaced with year-round indoor plumbing to a full-service restroom including family-friendly and gender-neutral options and more convenient ADA accessibility. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 3__ o Temporary salvaged corner of the previous event building currently functioning as a snack shop (serving golf course patrons only) will be replaced with a small indoor/outdoor food and beverage area designed to serve as a neighborhood and family-friendly restaurant. • Secondary Need – Maximize community benefit through design that serves the community beyond golfers. o The new facility will include a kitchen sized appropriately to service continued takeaway items for golf course patrons, an indoor/outdoor restaurant, and the outdoor event lawn. o The lawn space to the west of the proposed facility will be designed to accommodate outdoor events, including space for the placement of larger event tents to extend the use into the shoulder seasons. This will allow the golf course to increase revenue, with the ability to host full golf tournaments onsite (not currently possibly and local organizations host fundraising golf tournaments outside the city) while also serving as an outdoor event venue for the community. The department plans to host multiple free events for the community throughout the year in addition to allowing reservations for other community events. o The proposed indoor/outdoor food and beverage areas will feature partially open- air dining areas, extended shaded outdoor areas, and unshaded patio space connected to a game lawn (example: cornhole). The intention of the casual space is to provide a family-friendly experience that serves the local community in addition to golf course patrons. o The facility was designed to take advantage of natural features and minimize the investment. The facility was evaluated and set on the building site to take advantage of the iconic views of the flatirons and maximize passive and active solar energy. The existing parking lot was not heavily impacted by the 2013 flood and can continue to accommodate capacity for the proposed and future design plans, including community events. The area to the west of the facility requires only minor modifications to create the appropriate space for an event lawn, which would increase opportunities for a multitude of activities that could attract participants from all parts of Boulder. Air circulation in the building and extended outdoor areas was also maximized to take advantage of the quiet, beautiful, and already well-manicured surroundings. • Future Need – And finally, with the expectation of facilities to have a life span of 50+ years, the design needs to consider future needs and growth of the community with flexible and scalable spaces. o The current financial situation shifted the project focus on infrastructure and core needs, however, a 50+ year facility lifespan requires some consideration of future needs for flexibility and expansion. The proposed design focuses on maximizing the use of the core infrastructure, while a future design developed alongside the core concept ensures that future expansion could be constructed at minimal cost, AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 4__ if or when, the funding is available. The future design (not funded or in the budget request) includes indoor reservable community event space. The facility is designed first and foremost as a golf facility but will also become a multi- functional space open to the community for dining, entertainment/games and small outdoor evets. The Proposed Concept Plan is roughly estimated within the existing construction budget of approximately $6.95 million and will continue through design development and construction, if approved. The Proposed Concept Plan shows a new facility that includes restrooms, indoor/outdoor dining space, kitchen/prep areas, storage and other related functional areas. The golf services and cart storage remain in the existing building with some renovations. This plan also shows a multi-purpose lawn with the potential to place an event tent to host a full tournament (144 attendees) in addition to hosting other events that would attract the broader community to the facility. Click on the plans below to review the Proposed Concept Plan with a regular and enlarged view of the facility. The existing golf services building, built in 1987, provides space for the pro shop, staff offices and some golf cart storage. Some minor improvements are required to ensure that it will continue to function properly in the near future. Examples of improvements that will be part of this project or planned in upcoming years in the CIP include: • Repairing and updating exterior finishes for coordination with the new building • Roof repair and/or replacement • Window repair and/or replacement • Repair and replace stairs/railings as needed • Update and refresh interior finishes • Repair mechanical/electrical systems Figure 1: Current Golf Services Building behind the temporary restroom trailer. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 5__ The Future Concept Plan was developed to ensure that the new facility is primed for the least expensive scalable growth as funding or need arises. The Future Concept Pan shows an expansion of the new building to include golf services, offices, additional indoor/outdoor dining and small event/meeting space. The existing building currently used for golf services would be replaced by a cart barn that could accommodate a full fleet of golf carts. This plan would allow a full tournament or other small events/meetings to be held indoors and still accommodate other community activities on the lawn. The Future Concept Plan building footprint is smaller than the previously demolished event center. The parking lot will accommodate parking for intended use of the building and lawn without creating competing need between events and golf services. Click on the image on the right to review the Future Concept Plan. The project process through October of 2020 is concept planning only. The current part of the process heavily relies on community and PRAB feedback. Future project process moves into technical development of the concept plan which commonly does not include additional community feedback. PRAB will receive regular updates throughout the overall project process. This project was identified, planned and funded prior to COVID-19. Nonetheless, the city and its consultants remained committed to community safety and followed social and physical distancing guidelines in gathering community input. Community engagement conducted per these guidelines, included virtual sharing, questionnaires, digital connection tools and limited in-person contact at the golf course. Several rounds of community engagement focused on reaching out to existing users and the general Figure 2: Summary of the Entire Project Process from Planning Through Construction, as defined in the Design Standards Manual AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 6__ community. Those efforts were combined with recent engagement and research from other related projects, such as the East Boulder Subcommunity Plan. The golf course is adjacent to the actual borders of the subcommunity plan but is representative of community needs in that part of Boulder. Community Engagement was an important part of the design process. Two engagement periods were planned and executed to ensure the community and patrons were aware of the project and were provided opportunities to participate and influence the future. Engagement summaries and all comments for round 1 are available in 2 parts (a and b) on the project web page. The feedback in part 1a referenced building style, atmosphere and other general user aspects. That feedback was used to refine the design and develop a more specific visual questionnaire for part 1b. An example of key engagement outcomes that influenced the design: • Careful screening of light and noise for golfers and neighbors • Placement, access and number of restrooms • Casual, welcoming and flexible spaces for a wide variety of community members • Continued focus on golf as a primary function while being inviting to the community • Taking advantage of the amazing views with consideration for shade • Modern architectural style with lots of windows and some mountain inspiration • Access, circulation and wayfinding improvements • Conservative budget consideration Figure 3: Detailed View of the Current Process (pre-planning initiation and concept planning) Including Community Engagement Timeline AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 7__ The engagement summary for the round 2 shows an overall interest and approval of the concept designs. Questions, comments and concerns were addressed and incorporated into the plan where feasible. The full list of comments are available on the project web page. The second round of comments did not result in any design changes to the concept plans. Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design Engagement Summaries can be found here: • Summary of Public Engagement Summary 1a (July 6 - 13) • Summary of Public Engagement Summary 1b (July 22 - 31) • Summary of Public Engagement Summary 2 (Sept. 3 – 15) Other engagement considerations included applicable areas of the East Boulder Subcommunity Plan Focus Group Report submitted in March of 2020. Six of the 10 general areas of consensus from the report were considered in the design of this project to support needs of the general community and as highlighted below: Increasing the walkability of and multi-modal transit options within East Boulder There was near-universal agreement among the Focus Group participants for increasing the walkability of and multi-modal transit options in East Boulder. Participants expressed the desire to access restaurants, breweries, parks, and community spaces without the need to travel by car. Often, participants cited specific streets, intersections, or routes for improvement. Providing options for a commuting workforce Focus Group participants were enthusiastic around ideas that would provide options for a commuting workforce, including non-vehicular travel and public transit; options for local housing; and local amenities including lunch restaurants and daycare facilities. Holistic approach to support equity, access, and affordability Another common theme among Focus Groups was support for holistic, inclusive approaches to East Boulder that would ensure continued support and/or improvement around equity, access, and affordability. This discussion often included social elements, such as homelessness, gentrification, and housing affordability, but also touched on representation of diversity and culture, affordable community-oriented spaces, and senior and disabled-accessibility and housing. Supporting small local businesses and nonprofits Focus Group participants expressed pride in East Boulder’s small, local businesses, and participants had many ideas to support, promote, and increase them. Many participants would like to see East Boulder continue to support mom-and-pop shops; quirky and unique storefronts; nonprofits and start-ups; and commercial spaces for service industries. Protecting natural spaces and views Most Focus Group participants want to see the natural spaces, trails, and Flat Iron views preserved and protected. Participants placed value in the accessibility of these natural spaces and views, including the value for mental and physical health, community gathering, and the environment. Creating spaces for arts and culture Many Focus Group participants identified arts and culture as a priority area for East Boulder. Participant ideas included the construction of a library, shared arts and business co-ops, art galleries, flexible community theaters, and public outdoor gathering spaces. AGENDA ITEM VI-C_ PAGE 8__ ANALYSIS: The Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design extends beyond golfers to provide broader community benefit not currently available or feasible today. Several opportunities for community feedback were provided and used to improve the design with patron support and excitement to re-imagine a vibrant facility for everyone. The increased community benefit is outlined below. Increased Community Benefit: • Indoor/ Outdoor Food and Beverage Area managed by a community-oriented local partner o Walkable neighborhood dining experience that draws non-golfing guests  When asked “What kinds of businesses would you want to see in East Boulder?” in the East Boulder Inventory and Analysis Report, the most popular answer was overwhelmingly “Food/Restaurants” at 56%, suggesting a restaurant would be well-supported here o Casual, family-friendly atmosphere with outdoor patio space and outdoor games area to host simple, free active opportunities like cornhole. o Tourist destination that includes an accessible facility with incredible views of the iconic flatirons (no need for a rooftop) • Outdoor Event Lawn o Reservable outdoor space for events such as tournaments, small weddings, and private parties. o Event/program operations can run simultaneously with golf activities while not detracting from event guests’ or golf patrons’ experiences. The success of the above, along with increased visitation anticipated from addressing the site deficiencies, will contribute to greater profitability at the golf course. With operating revenues going into the quasi-enterprise Recreation Activity Fund, profits are available to subsidize community benefit programming such as: programs for youth, programs for those with low-income, and community events. NEXT STEPS: Based on feedback from PRAB and community members at the September PRAB meeting, staff and consultants will make necessary alterations to the concept plans. Staff and consultants will return in October to request PRAB’s approval for the Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design. If the concept plans are approved by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) and with City Council approval of the 2021 CIP, the proposed plan will move into the next phases outlined in the Design Standards Manual, which are: Design Development, Construction Documents, and Bidding and Construction with anticipated completion in 2022. Attachments: Previous Project Updates: PRAB – Consent Agenda, January 27, 2020 PRAB - Matters from the Department, April 27, 2020 PRAB – Consent Agenda, June 22, 2020 PRAB – Consent Agenda, August 24, 2020 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: September 30, 2020 A. Master Plan Update Kick-off The intention for this item is to update PRAB on progress to date on the Master Plan Update, as well as updates on what is coming next and how PRAB will be involved. A Notice to Proceed has been issued for Design Workshop, a consulting firm, to facilitate the Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) Master Plan Update. BPR originally budgeted $280,000 for this planning effort. Due to the financial impact of COVID-19, BPR has negotiated a reduced scope and cost with Design Workshop to provide budget reductions in both 2020 and 2021 that will still yield a valuable strategic document with robust staff and public engagement. The project is now budgeted at a direct cost of $242,000, with staff providing some of the services removed from the consultant contract. This capacity is available due to capital project reductions (also a result of COVID-19). Design Workshop is an international design studio integrating landscape architecture, urban design, economics, and engagement. Their team includes subconsultants with expertise in indoor recreation, statistically valid surveys, and operations. The team has years of experience working with cities and communities to create plans that guide equitable programming, improvements and sustainability and can help shape the future of the BPR system. Some representative projects include: OSMP Master Plan, Vancouver Parks & Recreation Vision Plan (“VanPlay”), and South Suburban Parks and Recreation Master Plan. With the Notice to Proceed, work has begun to host a series of strategic kick-off meetings throughout September and October. This series of meetings ensures that the project gets off to a running start and will meet upcoming deadlines, including a Study Session with City Council scheduled for December 8th and the first window of public engagement in the first quarter of 2021. These kick-off meetings have included the Core Project Team (for project management purposes), BPR Strategy Team, BPR Town Hall for all staff, the Management and Working Technical Advisory Groups comprised of various staff members, and PRAB. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Project Schedule The current schedule for the BPR Master Plan Update (graphic below) has the project finishing in Q1 of 2022, just in time for the 2023 budget cycle. Research and Trends is the first phase of work for the Master Plan Update. In coordination with the MTAG and WTAG, Design Workshop will update the white papers developed as part of the 2014 Master Plan. These include: Service Delivery Framework and Demographic Trends, Climate change, sustainability and resiliency, Social and racial equity trends (i.e., affordability, homelessness, aging population), Financial analysis (reserve policies, use of general fund dollars, subsidies and grants), Asset management, Benchmarking, Programs and services, and Industry trends. Design Workshop will also summarize previous planning efforts as they relate to the Master Plan Update, including but not limited to the Aquatic Feasibility Plan, Athletic Field Study, Facilities Strategic Plan, Capital Investment Strategic Plan, among others. These efforts in combination with a summary of the past six years’ progress by the department will result in the System Overview Snapshot. The System Overview Snapshot will provide a shared foundation of knowledge for the department and the community to engage in the rest of the planning process. Public Engagement and Communication Public engagement will occur during four windows throughout the Master Plan process. BPR is utilizing the framework of engagement windows used during the OSMP Master Plan process for several reasons. By defining windows of engagement, staff can be clear on the goals for engagement during that period and get specific input from the public to inform those goals. Windows also define an end point of the engagement, allowing the project team to gather the input collected, analyze the information, and allow decision-makers to make the most informed decisions. The project team will work closely with the Communication and Engagement Department to ensure planned public engagement will meet the stated goals for each window, while also 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 conforming to current public health directives and guidelines related to COVID-19. The public engagement plan will carefully balance the need for appropriate and robust engagement with health and safety of all community members. The project team is exploring creative ways to engage the public virtually while also ensuring a diverse cross-section of the community, including vulnerable populations and traditionally under-represented community members, participate in the process and discussions. As part of the effort to identify project cost savings, staff will complete most of the public engagement tasks in-house, including, but not limited to, development of content for webpage and newsletter updates, facilitation of public engagement both virtually and in-person as allowed in the future, and a written summary of each engagement window. Staff will coordinate with the Design Workshop team to ensure that the questions asked of the community are appropriate given the project phase and help further the process overall. Some of the tools staff intend to utilize throughout the process include: a project website, inclusion on Be Heard Boulder, social media and news releases, and regular updates to PRAB, Planning Board and City Council. The project webpage has been updated with current information and will continue to be updated regularly throughout the project. Next Steps Research and Trends is the first phase of the project. Work is on-going and PRAB will be updated with progress, including at the November meeting in preparation for a study session scheduled with City Council on December 8th. When completed, the System Overview Snapshot will be shared with PRAB, City Council and the community. B. Operating Budget Update This item is an update to the PRAB and identifies the proposed 2021 operating budget presented to City Council for consideration at the Study Session on September 8, 2020. Summary The 2021 Parks and Recreation Department operating budget submission (pg. 139) includes requests of approximately $29.5M. The operating budget request considers the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the city and department’s sources of revenue and the programming and service levels expected in 2021. The financial impact of the pandemic has resulted in a decrease in sales tax revenue which impacts the General Fund and .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund. The Recreation Activity Fund (RAF) is a quasi-enterprise fund, which relies on user fees for 85% of its revenue. Changes in operations based on local and state health guidance and financial feasibility, results in fewer program participants in 2021, and therefore a lower revenue projection. In response to this, the department carefully examined expenses and current program offerings to predict 2021 program levels; however, actual program offerings will be dictated on the financial feasibility and public health guidance as recreation levels return to normal. The department also receives funding from the Lottery Fund and Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund, both of which are stable in 2021 based on property valuations. Collectively the department identified approximately 15% in reductions to the operating budget (personnel, operating and interdepartmental transfers) compared to the 2020 original budget. The capital budget has 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 increased based on funding from delayed and reduced projects in 2020, and savings planned to fund the Flatirons Golf Course project in 2021. The department’s budget submission was based on best knowledge and economic forecasts in June 2020. Funding and 2021 Context The 2021 budget submission outlines the department’s direct financial management responsibilities of $29.5M for operating and capital purposes. The department’s expenses derive from six funds that vary in sources, stability and restrictions (see Figure 1). General Fund: The city’s General Fund is supported by fees, sales, property, and other taxes. General Fund dollars are managed by Central Finance and allocated annually to city departments and projects by City Council through the annual budget process. The department primarily uses its allocation to fund park and forestry operations, natural lands, and department administration. Due to the flexibility in how General Fund dollars can be used, there is increasing pressure from other city departments and Council priorities for these funds. The decline in sales tax attributed to COVID-19 has put additional strain on this fund, which required reductions in 2020 and 2021. Permanent Parks and Recreation: The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund is the department’s capital improvement and acquisition fund. Funded specifically from property and development excise taxes, the fund is dedicated for acquiring land and renovating or improving existing parks and recreational facilities. It may not be used to fund daily operations or routine maintenance. Property tax collections are reassessed every 2 years which has resulted in increased revenue to this fund in even years in the past. 25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (.25): The .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund provides for operations, maintenance and development of department facilities and natural lands. Sales tax is the primary source of revenue in this fund, which has been impacted on COVID-19’s reduction in sales tax collection in Boulder from decreased purchasing power of residents and fewer in commuters who support the local economy. To maintain a balanced budget, non-essential services were reduced as described above and some capital related expenses were shifted from the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund to the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Recreation Activity Fund (RAF): The RAF is used to operate the department’s many recreation, fitness and sports facilities and programs. RAF funds are largely derived from program and facility user fees with some supplemental funding from the General Fund that funds community benefit services such as age-based discounts for youth and seniors and programs for individuals with disabilities and those with low-incomes. In the first half of 2019, the PRAB supported facility use fee increases after reviewing the current state of the RAF, existing service levels, planned enhancements at Boulder Reservoir Visitor Services Center and Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement, and a community survey. The department is not proposing any facility use fee increases with the 2021 budget; however, has reduced operating costs in line with anticipated operating revenues. In developing the budget, the department relied on public health guidance, actual usage and demand and financial feasibility for programming to balance the RAF in 2021. General Permanent Park and Recreation .25 Cent Sales Tax Recreation Activity Lottery Capital Development Figure 1: Uses of Funds 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Based on the continuation of COVID-19, the department will likely need to make a mid-year adjustment to this fund based on service levels the first half of the year. Capital Development Fund: The capital development fund accounts for development fee proceeds to be utilized the for the acquisition, construction, and improvement of facilities to maintain the current level of public amenities. This fund is shared with other departments, and Parks and Recreation intends to fund capital infrastructure enhancements at the Flatirons Golf Course in 2021. Other Funds: In previous years, the department has utilized funding from the Boulder Junction Capital Improvement Fund and the Community Culture and Safety Tax (CCS). Due to the nature of these funds, the funding was specific to either park land acquisition and development of the Boulder Junction Pocket Park or projects included in the 2017 ballot measure. The department does not have projects funded from these funds in 2021. The department does receive a portion of Lottery Funds annually that go towards park improvements. Due to the nature of Lottery, anticipated revenue is estimated conservatively and goes toward park improvement projects. 2021 Operating Budget Submission The department’s 2021 budget proposal responds to the Central Budget Office’s request for prioritizing a decreased budget based on declining sales tax revenues and user fees that also adheres to the department’s 2014 Master Plan fiscally constrained planning scenario. New in 2021, the department utilized the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience definitions to categorize services and the city’s Rapid Response Racial Equity instrument, which allowed the department to fund 100% of Essential services and more significantly reduce those that fall into Helpful or Amenity categories. The department developed a balanced 2021 budget through decreased staffing levels and decreased operating costs, which corresponds to the anticipated participation levels. A total of 19.5 standard positions were reduced from 2020 staffing levels through attrition, existing vacancies, and layoffs. Over half of these positions are at the management level to minimize the impact customers and residents see in the services they use. Additional reductions were made to non-standard seasonal employment throughout 2021, based on decreased levels of operations. Operating costs were decreased based on the cost constrained environment and reducing costs that correspond to lower participant rates. The department will continue to monitor the recreation and financial trends to make informed decisions about a potential mid-year budget adjustment in 2021. The strategies proposed to achieve a balanced budget are instrumental to the department’s efforts to support the mission of promoting community health and well-being through the provision of high-quality parks, facilities and programs. In recognition of the PRAB’s advisory role related to the operating budget, the board is provided this information to review the department’s operating strategies, update the board on the outlook of department finances, and share the operating budget submission. Across the system, including operations, Forestry, and Natural Lands, adjusted 2020 funding supports services that maintain safety such as mowing, playground maintenance, hazardous tree removal, waste management, graffiti ordinance compliance and mitigating the impacts of illegal encampments in public spaces. Services reduced include those that enhance the visual experience of visiting a park, proactive maintenance, and preventative work related to the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation in Boulder. Examples include: 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Reduced materials and labor to perform the cultural practices (such as topdressing, aeration, and weeding) that support healthy turf without the use of pesticides and allow for rapid repairs, resulting in delays in restroom and lighting repairs. • Reduced the contract with Boulder County Sheriff’s Office for the jail inmate work crew and BridgeHouse Ready to Work; these crews typically perform weeding, mulch distribution, and vandalism repair across the system. • Reduced funding for small equipment transitions to electric equipment, resulting in longer life-cycles of current gas-powered pieces and potentially increased maintenance on older equipment. Re-planting fewer trees then what is needed to meet target goals for maintaining current urban canopy throughout the city, the target set in the 2019 Urban Forest Strategic Plan. • Minimal EAB or tree-related outreach, continuing lower-cost methods such as news releases, notifications (letters/doorhangers), and website. • Canceled the annual Tree Sale and Tree Giveaway. • Increased rotational pruning (which makes trees stronger, healthier and more resilient to storm, freeze and snow damage) to 15 years for street trees (previously 10 years) and 9 years for park trees (previously 8 years). Urban Forest Strategic Plan sets standard at 8 years for both based upon industry recommendations. • Eliminated contracts for EAB tree removals, now performed by in-house crew and reducing capacity for preventative parks pruning rotation as Ash removals are a higher priority. Recreation services also were evaluated using the 2020 Budgeting for Resilience Categories, and funding focused on those that are Important. For Helpful and Amenity services, services are offered only where fees support due to limited funding. The Rapid Response Racial Equity Assessment allowed staff to prioritize the restoration of services for low-income youth, while maintaining Financial Aid support for other services. Programs are provided virtually, in-person in small groups, and by reservation or registration only (no drop-in services available anywhere in the system). Fees have been adjusted to reflect full costs for adults, with means-based free access available via the Health Equity Fund-ed Recquity program and age-based discounts available for youth and seniors. Additional services are added as public health guidelines allow and as community interest and business models indicate positive feasibility. Recreation service reductions in 2021, assume continued public health limitations and decreased demand from patrons: • Drop-in visitation at recreation facilities and pools, including drop-in fitness and yoga, leisure swimming, and gymnasium access. • Significantly reduced portfolio of registered courses in every area with an emphasis on providing those programs with the most community benefit (per the PRAB accepted Recreation Priority Index); • Capacity limits on the swim beach, picnics, and special events at the Boulder Reservoir. • 50% reduction in Health Equity Funded grants (to allow for HHS Funding of critical community needs) impacted service to underserved populations (in addition to limits in participations based on COVID) 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 2020 Operating Budget Update As shared with the PRAB on April 27, May 11, May 27 and June 22, the department has been significantly impacted by COVID-19 and the declining sales tax collection in Boulder. The department continues to meet weekly to discuss the response to COVID-19 and safe operating levels and services for our patrons. The Business Services team is providing bi-weekly financial reporting for all funds, with an emphasis on the Recreation Activity Fund based on the close correlation between revenues recognized from participants and expenses to operate facilities and programs. This real time feedback has allowed the department to monitor revenues and expenses and make adjustments as needed. Staff recognizes the valuable role Boulder’s parks and recreation system plays in the lives of community members and submits the above requests with thoughtful consideration of the need to be fiscal stewards of limited community resources and to maintain accessibility to all community members. Next Steps: City Council will discuss the first reading of the budget at the October 6 business meeting, and second reading is scheduled for Tuesday, October 20. All funds would be available to use beginning January 1 for the 2021 fiscal year.