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05.12.20 DMC PresentationsWAIT LIST & LONG-TERM PARKING PRODUCT POLICY Re-Evaluating the Wait List ■Parking software and policy upgrades –FlexPort ■Purchase permits online ■Permit management functionality for large companies –Wait List ■Community outreach ■Policy formulation ■Audi t Planned Upgrades and Changes Wait List Background Started in 2007 452 Customers or Companies 1,906 permits 9 different downtown garages/surface lots Current Wait List Concerns Little movement due to high demand for garage and surface lot parking permits Customer information out of date or inaccurate No formalized policy Project Next Steps Support Provide outreach and technical assistance to customers Implement Implement policy and business process changes Audit Complete audit of current wait list •Simultaneously notifying customers of new policy Engagement Engage stakeholders and “super users” to get feedback on policy components Policy Components Permit Cap Renewal Inactive Permit Removal One Wait List per Garage/Lot Administration Fees Specific Customer information need to process purchases ■A permit cap for any single customer on a wait list per garage/surface lot –This is important to include because the wait list is so large and experiences minimal movement Permit Cap Wait List Demographics 8% 92% Number of Permits Requested Customers Requesting 5+ permits Customers Requesting <5 permits 66% 34% Permits on the Wait List Customers Requesting 5+ permits Customers Requesting <5 permits ■Wait list requires that customers periodically “renew” their place in line –Requires that customers stay active and ensures that the wait list stays current Renewal ■Customers who have permits that haven’t been used for a certain period of time risk having those permits revoked –This encourages movement and prevents permit hoarding Inactive Permit Removal ■There will be individual wait lists for each garage and surface lot –Customers may apply to be on multiple wait lists simultaneously –Allows customers to apply for a garage or lot that is more convenient to access their destination One Wait List per Garage or Surface Lot ■Clarity around if and how the City of Boulder will handle wait list deposits moving forward –$10/permit fee used historically –Reimbursement (if needed) Administration Fees ■Transitioning to LPR-based permitting –Requires collecting license plate information from customers during the permit purchasing and wait list process Specific Customer Information needed to process permit purchases COVID-19 Impact on the Downtown Boulder Business Community QUESTIONS? CV COVID Budget Impact & Strategies DOWNTOWN MANAGEMENT COMMISSION MAY 12, 2020 Current COB Impact/Central Finance Guidance Prioritized proposed reductions up to 10% of 2020 budget (all funds) and ongoing reductions of up to 10% for 2021 (2020 reductions included) Evaluate all programs and projects through the following lenses: ◦Budgeting for Resiliency ◦Four Categories: ◦Essential, Important, Helpful (Flex Rebate), or Amenity (Event support) ◦Whether service should reasonably be provided during next 6-12 months ◦Revenue impact ◦Racial Equity ◦Citywide goals (Sustainability + Resilience Framework), Dept. Strategic Plans, Collaboration Budget reductions for 2020 are currently being evaluated Adapting Framework to CV Strategic plan ◦Access for People ◦“Invest in existing infrastructure to enhance and extend life of district-owned assets and develop a strategic asset plan for future opportunities.” ◦“Set and achieve customer service enhancements such as, reducing in-person wait times, setting standards for responsiveness to customer issues, and further development of partnerships.” ◦Vision of Place ◦“Utilize existing programs to contribute to the city-wide Vision Zero goals; safety enhancements for pedestrians, bikes, and vehicles.” ◦Pursuit of Vitality ◦“To facilitate a diverse and dynamic economy where residents and businesses grow and succeed together through strategic partnerships (internal and external), policies, and programs.” Adapting Framework to CV CIP project prioritization criteria 1.Project addresses Life/Safety issue 2.Project addresses deferred maintenance as outlined in CIP/Farnsworth and/or maintenance costs increase without addressing 3.Project is critical to generate and/or increase revenue 4.Project is related to a type of service (Essential, Important, Helpful, Amenity) 5.Project advances CV Strategic Objective(s) Adapting Framework to CV Reductions a mixture of one-time and ongoing Reductions made over a two-year budget horizon (2020-2021) Reductions prioritized against CV Strategic Plan CV-COVID Recovery activities should also be considered CAGID-Specific Impact Tenant Management City-wide policy to offer rent hiatus for April and May Payable over 3-6 months beginning in June Reviewing capacity to allow for longer payback or extend to June Will be aligned with other city departments One lease extension signed during this time Additional positive lease negotiations are occurring for vacancy at 1100 Spruce Operational adjustments due to COVID (staffing and enforcement) Overall revenue loss and projected impact CAGID Revenue Impact -100.0% -90.0% -80.0% -70.0% -60.0% -50.0% -40.0% -30.0% -20.0% -10.0% 0.0% Mar-9 - Mar-15 Mar-16 - Mar-22 Mar-23 - Mar-29 Mar-30 - Apr-5 Apr-6 - Apr-12 Apr-13 - Apr 19 Apr 20 - Apr-26 Apr-27 - May-3 May-4 - May-10 May-11 - May-17 May-18 - May-24 May-25 - May-31 Jun-1 - Jun-7 Jun-8 - Jun-15 Jun-16 - Jun-22 Jun-23 - Jun-29 DECLINE FROM 2019 UTILIZATIONDECLINE IN PARKING GARAGE UTILIZATION FROM 2019 (%) CV Funds -Projected Financial Impact on Revenue Fund 2020 Adopted Budget Revised 2020 Revenue Surplus (Shortfall)% Change from Adopted General**$5,742,000 $3,435,065 ($2,306,935)-40% UHGID $558,374 $477,207 ($81,167)-15% CAGID $10,453,063 $7,854,166 ($2,423,354)-25% BJAD –Parking $603,094 $569,437 ($33,657)-6% BJAD –TDM $580,074 $580,074 -0 --0 - TOTALS $17,936,605 $12,915,949 ($5,020,656)-28% **Includes on-street meters, NPP, and parking violations $10,534,474 $7,854,166 $6,000,000 $7,000,000 $8,000,000 $9,000,000 $10,000,000 $11,000,000 $12,000,000 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 COVID IMPACT ON CAGID REVENUE (PROJECTED) Original CAGID Revenue Revised CAGID Revenue $- $500,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $2,500,000 Q1 - 2019 Q2 - 2019 Q3 - 2019 Q4 - 2019 Q1 - 2020 Q2 - 2020 Q3 - 2020 Q4 - 2020 Quarterly CAGID Parking Revenue -2019 vs. 2020 Projected Short-Term Parking Revenue Long-Term Parking Revenue Punch Cards & Other Parking Product Revenue Other factors to consider Long-term behavioral changes Remote working Public transportation preferences Changes to Special Event Schedules Changes in University educational design Online learning Fund Balance & Operating Reserve Application Fund Balances and Application Fund 2020 Beginning Fund Balance Application of Operating Reserve 2020 Ending Fund Balance ($) % to 2021 Projected Operating Uses CAGID $14,984,155 $1,601,507 $11,711,153 135% UHGID $1,122,191 $105,601 $940,923 159% BJAD –Parking $67,563 $60,542 $4,699 1.3% BJAD –TDM $451,327 $52,937 $489,979 100% Potential Strategies to Address Shortfall Fund Balance Applied Operating Reserve: $1,601,507 CIP Delays/Cancellations Affordable Commercial Pilot Technology Improvements Limited Flexibility on Large Projects EcoPass Reduction Expected Reimbursement from RTD ~$200,000 Furlough Savings Limited financial impact Other Operational Reductions 10% reduction recommendations (city- wide) Budget Process Reductions being considered this month Additional guidance may be forthcoming from Central Finance for 2020 & 2021 Capital Improvement Plan review is proceeding Department budget (draft) is due June 8 Expect DMC to review a close to final budget in July City of Boulder City Manager’s Office COVID-19 Briefing – EV SLIDES ONLY City Council Meeting –May 12, 2020 City of Boulder City Manager’s Office •Restaurants (like many Retailers) represent a large and valued segment of Boulder’s small business employers •The industry has reported significant COVID pandemic impacts (immediate and ongoing) •The Boulder Business Response and Recovery Alliance initiated response and continues focus -Opportunities to provide insights and ideas (surveys, webinars, consulting) -Grants and industry-specific resources and information -Assistance (reworking business operations, commercial space lease navigation and other efforts addressing immediate needs) Response to needs of Restaurant Industry 2 City of Boulder City Manager’s Office •Limits on changes likely to increase operating costs •Uncertainty of demand •Aid in addressing reopening challenges •Anticipated indoor seating capacity and gathering limitations •Continued need for access affording pick-up and delivery ease Challenges expressed by industry leadership 3 City of Boulder City Manager’s Office •Limits on changes likely to increase operating costs •Uncertainty of demand •Aid in addressing reopening challenges •Anticipated indoor seating capacity and gathering limitations •Continued need for access affording pick-up and delivery ease Challenges expressed by industry leadership 4 •Clarity regarding wage-related initiatives •Alliance-driven promotional opportunities •Access to assistance navigation, safety information & other resources •Interim parking and access initiatives City of Boulder City Manager’s Office •AMPS implementation efforts include 2020 curbside management piloting -Originally established to identify safe and accessible on-street TDM parking allocation in the special districts (@ two dozen locations between Downtown and University Hill to start) -Effort will be implemented on a pilot basis to accommodate pick-up and delivery •Interim adjustments to special district parking (May-June to start) -Balances impacts in special districts (varied business types and residents), surrounding neighborhoods and amongst customer groups -Garage evening pilot will continue through the end of the year ($3 flat from 3pm-3am M-F) -Daytime hourly rate interim adjustment for garages ($1.25/hour to $8 cap for daytime use) -General Fund supportive on-street parking grace period increased from 5 to 20 minutes Interim Curbside Management and Parking Pricing 5 City of Boulder City Manager’s Office •Additional exploration -State alcohol licensure area expansion potential -Temporary right-of-way repurposing through revocable permits (prioritizing segments of angled parking locations in special districts and consideration of minimum parking requirements for retailers) -Permitting guidance re: space modification (patios, alleys, event street) •Ongoing and enhanced Alliance promotion assistance -BCVB “Dining to Go” -https://www.bouldercoloradousa.com/curbside -and-delivery/ -DBP “Love the Local” -https://www.boulderdowntown.com/love -the-local •DBP survey underway exploring consumer sentiment Other initiatives under consideration 6 City of Boulder City Manager’s Office •Staff, partners and industry meetings concerning options •DBP survey of consumer sentiment (results reporting) •May 19 Council update -Curbside Management pilot and implementation of interim parking practice -Engagement and consideration of right-of-way and minimum parking requirements -State update concerning alcohol licensure limitations -Outreach to State and County Public Health Department to discuss any “gathering” considerations Next Steps 7