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04.27.20 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD Virtual Meeting 6:00 p.m., April 27, 2020 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2020 Charles Brock Allison Fronzaglia Mary Scott Raj Seymour Jason Unger Tara Winer Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.INDUCTION OF NEW MEMBERS (6:01) III.ELECTION OF OFFICERS (6:02) IV.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:03) V.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:05) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to three minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. VI.CONSENT AGENDA (6:20) A.Approval of minutes from February 24, 2020 B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update VII.ITEMS FOR ACTION (6:25) A.Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease B.Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan VIII.ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:40) A.COVID-19 Operations and Finance Review B.2021 Budget Strategy i)Capital Improvement Program 1st Touch IX.MATTERS ROM THE DEPARTMENT (7:00) A.Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design B. 2021 Master Plan Project Update X.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:15) A.New Member Orientation and Mentors B.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. XI. NEXT BOARD MEETING: May TBD XII. ADJOURN I, Jason Unger, do solemnly swear (affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States of America and of the State of Colorado and the Charter and ordinances of the City of Boulder, and faithfully perform the duties of the office of a member of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board which I am about to enter. Jason Unger STATE OF COLORADO ) ) COUNTY OF BOULDER ) SS.: ) CITY OF BOULDER ) Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of _______________, 2020. Board Secretary OATH OF OFFICE I, Tara Winer, do solemnly swear (affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States of America and of the State of Colorado and the Charter and ordinances of the City of Boulder, and faithfully perform the duties of the office of a member of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board which I am about to enter. Tara Winer STATE OF COLORADO ) ) COUNTY OF BOULDER ) SS.: ) CITY OF BOULDER ) Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of _______________, 2020. Board Secretary OATH OF OFFICE PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared April 22, 2020) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided) Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention Consent Item (c):An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to become a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth presentation and discussion. Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item January 27, 2020 • BPR 2020 Workplan (md) • Boulder Reservoir restaurant lease (a) • BPR and Climate Initiatives (md) • Valmont Programming Contracts (d/i) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (d/i) • Civic Park Art Donation (d/i) (allow 1 hr/per Jeff) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) February 24, 2020 • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Chautauqua Sustainability & Resilience Strategy (md) • Volunteer Program Update (c) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (di) • Civic Park Art Donation (a) • Valmont Programming Contracts (a) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (a) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (d/i) • PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) March 30, 2020 • Scott Carpenter Concession (d/i) • Pottery Lab (d/i) • 2021 Budget Strategy & Review 2020 Actuals (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • PRAB new member orientation (mb) • Departing Board Members (mb) April 27, 2020 • Board appointments (p) • Election of officers (p) • Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease (a) • Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (a) • COVID Update (d/i) o Operations Adjustments and Impacts o 2020 Financial Overview • 2021 Budget Strategy: o Scenario Planning o 2021-2026 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) • New Member Orientation and Mentors (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (md) May 25, 2020 (reschedule due to Memorial Day) • 2021 Budget Strategy o 2021-26 CIP (2nd touch) (d/i) o 2021 Service Levels • ANS Program Update (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 22, 2020 • 2021 Budget Strategy o 2021-26 CIP (Hearing and Approval) (a) o Operating Budget (md) • Master Plan Update: Systems Overview (study session?) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) July 27, 2020 • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) August 24, 2020 • PRAB Retreat Planning (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) September 28, 2020 • Operating Budget Update (md) • Master Plan Update: Mid- Needs Assessment (md) • PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) October 26, 2020 • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) November 23, 2020 • Master Plan Update: Needs Assessment (study session?) • Capital Project Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (Letter to Council) (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) December 21, 2020 • Master Plan Update: Needs Assessment (study session?) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: February 24, 2020 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Ali Rhodes, 303-413-7249 Board Members Present: Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Jennifer Kovarik, Valerie Yates, Charles Brock, Pam Yugar, Alli Fronzaglia Board Members Absent: Staff Present: Ali Rhodes, Jeff Haley, Mora Carrillo, Bryan Beary, Tina Briggs, Stacy Cole, Regina Elsner, Stephanie Munro, Margo Josephs. Guests Present: James Hewat Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:00 p.m. Motion to approve agenda passed 7-0. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Rhodes shared the events coming up and noted that Board and Commission interviews are scheduled for March 4-5, with appointments scheduled to be made at the March 17 City Council meeting. Agenda Item 3: Public Participation Mary Ann Mahony (Resident and CEO of the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau) - Appreciates the PRAB members for their service. Provided notice about a survey to be shared with PRAB, assessing needs and to inform the CVB’s workplan. Brandon Kass (Representing Community Sailing Colorado) - Providing programs for the last six years, speaking on behalf of the water sports groups that utilize the Boulder Reservoir. Here to learn, and excited about what is happening at the Boulder Reservoir. Marina Fleming (Resident and participant of Women’s Wilderness Institute) - Spoke in support of leasing the Harbeck-Bergheim House to Women’s Wilderness Institute Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from January 27, 2020 Minutes from January 27, 2020 were approved as written (Brock Motion, Scott second, 7-0) B. Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • PRAB appreciates the restoration of the window at the Harbeck-Bergheim House and seeing the process involved in the restoration. • Support was expressed for the skate park projects and concerns shared related to bringing skateboarding features to the parks due to potential conflicts with other uses. Skate boarding can feel aggressive to non-skaters. • The Sweetheart’s Dance was very nice. • The Tree City Award is notable. Agenda Item 5: Action Item A. Valmont Programming Contracts Munro presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Is this going to the consent agenda to Council? Motion language: Motion to approve the Agreements between the City of Boulder’s Parks and Recreation for Valmont City Park Recreation Program Agreements with Avid4Adventure (AVID), Lee Likes Bikes, and 303 Dirt. Motion by Seymour, Second by Brock, Motion passed 7-0. B. Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease Joseph presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Appreciate the work done onto this, and the organization selected looks great. • Some concerns about vagueness of community use and would like a more descriptive details for community use. • Confidence that organization is interested in fostering community. Public Comments was opened on this topic: Rishi Raj (Resident) – Appreciates the time and work of staff, would like Harbeck to be available ad hoc to community groups. Marina Fleming (Resident and Women’s Wilderness participant) – Shared the value in Women’s Wilderness programming and how it fosters community. Sarah Murray (Executive Director of Women’s Wilderness) – Described how their business purpose aligns with their proposal and interest in fostering community at Harbeck. The Board had the following discussion on this topic: • Conversation about public use and level to which it is addressed in the lease. • This lease is a good compromise, WW is a great organization and see the partnership between the City and this Organization • Comments that the tenant and community are willing to work together, and would like to approve. • What happens at three years? • Appreciates the Boulder Parks & Rec for maintaining the property while it has been vacant. Motion language: Motion to approve the Lease Agreement between the City of Boulder and Women’s Wilderness Institute and to authorize the City Manager to make minor amendments prior to or during the term of this agreement in order to ensure that the Harbeck-Bergheim House is managed in a manner that is consistent with applicable laws, the policies and regulations of the City of Boulder and the Declaration of Use applicable to the property. Motion by Kovarik, Second by Yugar. Amendment to lease clause 2.B.iv proposed: split this clause into two clauses to call out availability for public use and strike “Infrequent and non-recurring” from last sentence. The motion passed as amended 6-1 (Yates opposed). Agenda Item 6: Discussion Item A. Reservoir Capital Strategy and Concept Plan Briggs presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • What is the reason for designing a new road to the Fire training center? • Why is paved boat storage more desirable than the non-paved areas, and do we charge more for the paved areas? • Concerns about protecting species of concern on West shore. • Is there a sculpture garden as an idea for this? • Is the proposed regional trail on the southern edge to be paved, or soft surface? • Concerns about ANS and bringing more people to the Rez: How do we determine and mitigate risks? • Are there any enhancements for rowers or other water sports group in the fiscally constrained plan? • Is there a vision for transportation to and from the Reservoir, the current pricing model does not incent alternate modes? B. Boulder Aeromodel Society Lease Elsner presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Is BAS on-site to enforce flying policies? • How many uses per day are there at the airport? • How many members of the BAS are there currently? • Have we had any problems with wildlife interaction? • What is the difference between a drone, and these types of devices flying here? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Department A. Chautauqua Sustainability and Resilience Strategy Hewat presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Electrical infrastructure seems to be the biggest risk. • It will be nice to have QR codes in place to provide information about Chautauqua. • Education is going to be a key for opportunities. Agenda Item 8: Matters from the Board A. PRAB Community Engagement Updates – Members of the PRAB participated in the following outreach activities over the course of the last month: Kovarik: Engaging with P&R social, external communication with Harbeck House. Seymour: Sweetheart Dance attendance. B. Subcommittee Updates: Onboarding, Community Engagement and Letter to Council Onboarding: Scott presented subcommittee work • Feedback will be sent to PRAB Admin and compiled for review by Kovarik/Scott. • Communication will be sent in March regarding the process. • Bios will go to the PRAB Admin as well. • Mentoring, onboarding a new member to be established prior to new member arrival. Community Engagement: Fronzaglia presented subcommittee work on community engagement. Idea is to make it easier for PRAB to engage with community – especially those who are new board members. • Fronzaglia/Brock will develop a generic PRAB card to easily provide PRAB information, department will produce. • Aim to have one to two PRAB members at high-profile events. • They presented a Community Outreach Guide for PRAB Members (as attached to these minutes). C. May Meeting Date Discussion: Currently Memorial Day • Follow up with Doodle Poll for alternate dates upon arrival of new members. Agenda Item 9: Next Board Meeting: Monday, March 30th, 2020 at the NBRC. Agenda Item 10: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before the Board at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 9:45 p.m. Approved by: Attested: _______________________ _________________________ Raj Seymour Mora Carrillo Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ Community Outreach Guide for PRAB Members Introduce Yourself • Wear PRAB name badge • “Hi, my name is ____. I serve on the City of Boulder’s Parks and Recreation Advisory Board.” • Offer a PRAB contact card Key PRAB Talking Points • PRAB is one of several boards and commissions serving the city • Boards and commissions are comprised of Boulder residents, appointed by City Council, who offer advice and consultation to City Council and city departments • PRAB advises and consults on the acquisition, construction, and mainte nance of city park property • PRAB coordinates policy on the development and use of recreational facilities • PRAB approves expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund • BPR facilities and spaces include: North/East/South Boulder Recreation Centers , Scott Carpenter Park and Pool, Spruce Pool, Boulder Reservoir, Pearl Street Mall, the Civic Area, Columbia Cemetery, Flatirons Golf Course, & over 60 neighborhood parks • PRAB meets on the 4th Monday of each month (usually in Council Chambers) and meetings are open to the public • Meeting minutes and other materials may be found on the PRAB website Questions to Ask Community Members • What park facilities or programs do you regularly use? • Do you have any concerns, questions, or suggestions about parks facilit ies or programs? Wrapping Up • “Thanks for speaking with me today about the City of Boulder’s Parks and Recreation! I appreciate your feedback.” • If applicable: “I’ll be sure to follow up with you regarding ______ as soon as possible.” • Get contact info if appropriate Follow Up If any community members had specific concerns or questions that you weren’t able to answer during your conversations, be sure to get the information needed and follow up with them by email or phone. Report Back At the next PRAB meeting, please share your experience with the Board and include feedback received from community members. Important Reminders • Do not wear your PRAB name badge when you are not representing PRAB • When you are out in the community, be very clear when expressing personal opinions that do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Board as a whole AGENDA ITEM VI-B _ PAGE 1 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: April 27, 2020 A. Approval of Minutes from March 23, 2020 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Chautauqua Park Playground Renovation: Chautauqua Park is one of only 25 National Historic Landmarks in the state of Colorado. All exterior changes to a property designated as an individual landmark or located within a historic district require review and approval through a Landmark Alteration Certificate (LAC). The intent of the design review process is to ensure that proposed changes will not adversely affect or destroy their historic character or architectural integrity and that all changes are consistent with the spirit and purpose of the Landmark Preservation Ordinance. Staff submitted a Landmark Alteration Certificate Application for the Chautauqua Park Playground Renovation on March 12, 2020. The Landmarks Design Review Committee (LDRC) reviewed and approved the application on March 18, 2020. A Landmark Alteration Certificate was issued for the reconstruction of the playground at Chautauqua Park. Staff is currently reviewing the construction timeline based on current circumstances. • Harbeck-Bergheim House: On March 3, 2020, City Council unanimously approved the lease agreement of the Harbeck–Bergheim House to Women’s Wilderness. In March, staff submitted an application to change the non-conforming use of the house to better match the planned use and to accommodate future similar use. Planning staff requested AGENDA ITEM VI-B _ PAGE 2 additional information regarding the occupancy and inclusion of bike parking. Staff will submit requested information and a plan to include bike parking for a second review. The lease with Women’s Wilderness, originally intended to begin April 1, is being amended to initiate June 1, 2020, given the challenges of a move amongst the pandemic. • Skatepark and Pump Track Enhancements: Staff and consultants have been working to develop a preferred concept plan based on community feedback provided about the previous design ideas. The preferred concept plan will be presented to the community and PRAB in May pending development of a community engagement plan that can be informative and interactive while accommodating social distancing. The discussion will focus on identifying the priorities for phase I of construction and future capital improvements within the context of the department’s funding priorities (fiscally constrained, action and vision). • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o BPR Master Plan Process and Approach (Matters from the Dept.) o Boulder Reservoir South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (Action Item) o Engagement Coordination Committee o Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design (Matters from the Dept.) o International Peace Garden o Multiple Resources Preservation Plan o Sustainability and Resilience Strategy for Chautauqua o Violet Park Planning Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement: Construction activities continue at Scott Carpenter. February and March were cold, snowy months and some construction activities were delayed as a result of record snowfall. Activities over the last month have included continued work on the bathhouse including pouring the concrete floors and interior utilities. The tower slide that was delivered and has been erected and the installation of the recreation pool play structure is complete. AGENDA ITEM VI-B _ PAGE 3 The main focus for the month of April has been preparing for and pouring the concrete pool decks. Another main activity will be the installation of the 2-5 age splash pad. General information and construction photos and updates can be found here on the Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement project website. • Boulder Reservoir, Visitor Services Center: Construction of the new Visitor Services Center (VSC) at the Boulder Reservoir continues and the project is nearing completion. Activities over the past month have included interior painting, trim work, and beginning on exterior site work and landscaping. The Parks and Recreation Department construction crew has also started work on the installation of the boardwalk. AGENDA ITEM VI-B _ PAGE 4 Staff will be able to move in and occupy the new building after the completion of final inspections which are expected in early May. General information and construction updates can be found here on the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Services Center Redevelopment project webpage. • Construction Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Foothills Parkway Underpass Natural Lands The following projects are focused on habitat and wildlife management in the urban park environment. • Urban Wildlife Management: Avian: Seasonal closures are in effect to protect sensitive bird habitat around the Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake. Staff is currently evaluating options for monitoring these sites to determine presence of state-listed species of concern and better inform management decisions with limited volunteer assistance. • Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration : Mosquito Management: Kick off is currently underway for the 2020 city-wide mosquito management plan. An RFP for a mosquito control contractor has been issued and selection will occur shortly after. The contract is anticipated to begin in May. • Natural Lands Volunteer Recruitment and Training: Volunteer recruitment for the Birds of Special Concern program was underway as the city began to respond to COVID-19. That recruitment has been halted at this time. An on- line training for volunteers is being developed to allow volunteers to assist with monitoring state-listed species of concern later this season, as conditions allow. • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination and site maintenance; and o Natural Lands Maintenance. AGENDA ITEM #___VII-A___PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 27, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve License Agreement with Boulder Aeromodeling Society PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design, and Community Engagement Manager Regina Elsner, Parks Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item seeks the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB’s) approval of multi-year License Agreement with the Boulder Aeromodeling Society (BAS) for the continued operation of the Boulder Model Airport (Airport), located in the northwest portion of Parks and Recreation property around the Boulder Reservoir. The proposed agreement terms are May 1, 2020 through April 30, 2023. The proposed agreement (Attachment A), and all its associated attachments, grants BAS and its members a license to use the model airport, consistent with the public’s right to use and enjoy the Airport. The agreement outlines operating agreements for the Airport, including improvements made to the property and management and maintenance of the Airport. BACKGROUND: BAS is a chartered club of the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA). AMA charters m ore than 2,500 model airplane clubs and represents more than 195,000 model aviation enthusiasts across the United State. AMA provides chartered clubs substantial insurance and other assistance. The Airport has been in the northwest quadrant of Parks and Recreation property surrounding the Boulder Reservoir since at least 1980 when the first agreement between BAS and the City was signed. The current agreement governing BAS use of the Airport was signed in 2009 for a term of one (1) year or until termination by either the City or BAS. The license agreement covers approximately 2.25 acres in the northwest quadrant of the City property surrounding the Boulder Reservoir. This area includes specifically the parking lot, buildings, runways and helicopter pads associated with the operation of the Airport. The license agreement does not cover the immediately surrounding natural areas. ANALYSIS: The PRAB discussed this item at the February 24, 2020 PRAB meeting and there were no concerns expressed regarding the terms of the license agreement. Since that meeting, one minor AGENDA ITEM #___VII-A___PAGE___2____ addition has been made to the term regarding operating hours of the Airport to incorporate impacts from special events at the Boulder Reservoir. The additional language is highlighted below and has been reviewed and accepted by the City Attorney’s office as well as BAS. 3.SCHEDULE A.Flying shall be permitted seven days per week from 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. or sunset, whichever is earlier, unless otherwise directed by the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or his/her designee. Occasionally, access to the Airport may be reduced or completely restricted due to special events being held at the Boulder Reservoir. The City will communicate any known impacts from special events as soon as possible, but no later than one month prior to any scheduled special event. All maintenance and improvement activities will occur within the flying hours noted here. With the approval of this license agreement, the department can continue to offer this unique recreational opportunity to the Boulder community with little to no investment for the operation or maintenance of the facility. It continues to be a part of the department’s work to manage the natural areas surrounding the Airport, as it would be regardless of the presence of the facility. The department and the City Attorney negotiated in good faith with representatives from BAS to develop the agreement. An existing staff member will be responsible for agreement oversi ght and management. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to approve the Agreement between the City of Boulder’s Department of Parks and Recreation and the Boulder Aeromodeling Society for continued operation and maintenance of the Boulder Model Airport. NEXT STEPS: If approved by the PRAB, and based on the proposed length of term, the agreement will be routed for execution. Following execution, staff will continue to work with BAS to ensure compliance with the agreement and satisfactory performance. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A: FINAL Aeromodeling License Agreement AGREEMENT GRANTING A LICENSE TO USE A SECTION OF THE BOULDER RESERVOIR RECREATION AREA AS A MODEL AIRCRAFT FLYING FACILITY THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT (“Agreement”) is made this ____ day of ______________, 20__ by and between the City of Boulder, Colorado, a Colorado home rule city (“the City”), and Boulder Aeromodeling Society (“BAS”), a non-profit corporation. RECITALS A.The parties are mutually interested in setting aside a portion of the City’s property in the vicinity of the Boulder Reservoir for the operation of a public recreational activity, and that the name of this area will be the Boulder Model Airport supervised by the City through its Department of Parks and Recreation. B.The City desires assistance from qualified and experienced model aircraft flyers in improving and maintaining the Airport. C.The City recognizes a need to promote the safety and welfare of persons using the Airport. D.The supervision of a competent organization, familiar with the proper use of radio frequencies assigned by the Federal Communications Commission, enhances the operation of a radio- controlled flying field and protects flyers and general public from the misuse of such radio frequencies. E.The Academy of Model Aeronautics (“AMA”) is the chartering organization for more than 2500 model airplane clubs and represents more than 195,000 model aviation enthusiasts across the United States of America and provides its chartered clubs with substantial insurance and other hobby and professional assistance. F.BAS is chartered club #906 of the AMA and has shown itself through its long association with the City to be qualified to provide the supervisory services needed for the successful operation of the Airport. G.Both parties wish to enter into a new Agreement with certain modifications. COVENANTS AND CONDITIONS NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the promises and obligations set forth below, the City and BAS agree as follows: 1.GRANT OF USE A.The City hereby grants to BAS and its members, a license to use as a model aircraft flying facility the area commonly known as the Boulder Model Airport (the “Airport”). B.The Airport is located within the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 4, Township 1 North, Range 70 West, 6th Principal Meridian, as further shown on Attachment A, attached and incorporated herein by reference. The terms of this license extend to the parking lot, shelter, pit/preparation area, and runways as mapped using Global Positioning Satellites with a Trimble GeoExplorer 3 on January 8, 2003, as shown in Attachment B, attached and incorporated herein by reference. C.This license shall always be consistent with the public’s right to use and enjoy the Airport, which is not intended for exclusive use by any group. D.Neither BAS, nor any member thereof, shall obstruct, inhibit, nor in any manner prevent any other persons from using the Airport for flying model aircraft or small unmanned aircraft as defined in applicable federal statutes and regulations. 2.LICENSE TERM The license shall commence on May 1, 2020, and continue until April 30, 2023, or until termination by either the City or BAS under the provisions of paragraph 12.B hereof. From the effective date of this Agreement forward the Parties shall be governed by this Agreement. The parties agree to work in partnership in the twelve (12) months following execution of this agreement to develop an adaptive management plan for the airport. The purpose of the adaptive management plan is to outline a set of agreed upon management goals and objectives that balances the recreational use of the airport with the need to manage the habitat and wildlife surrounding the airport using good data and best management practices to accomplish these objectives. The parties agree to work in good faith to accomplish this planning effort. Some terms of this agreement may be subject to change pending the outcome of this planning process. 3.SCHEDULE A.Flying shall be permitted seven days per week from 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. or sunset, whichever is earlier, unless otherwise directed by the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or his/her designee. Occasionally, access to the Airport may be reduced or completely restricted due to special events being held at the Boulder Reservoir. The City will communicate any known impacts from special events as soon as possible, but no later than one month prior to any scheduled special event. All maintenance and improvement activities will occur within the flying hours noted here. B.BAS agrees to abide by all generally-applicable city ordinances and city-manager rules, as well as any policies and procedures in place for the purposes of wetlands protection, wildlife protection and integrated pest management (IPM), which may change from time to time. As such, the Parks and Recreation Department may place signage at the facility at their discretion. C.BAS shall have the right to close and lock the parking lot gate at times when flying is not expected, such as times outside the flying hours above and during inclement weather when the Airport is unusable. Any such locking system shall include a lock provided by the City, which shall be used so that at all times authorized City and emergency personnel may open the gate by opening the City lock. The City may install a pedestrian gate to ensure public access to the facility within the permitted flying hours identified above. 4. CONSIDERATION FOR USE In consideration for the maintenance, repair, and operational services provided hereunder for the benefit of the general public, the City shall permit BAS and its members to make and maintain improvements, with prior written approval by the City, and to use the Airport free-of-charge for the term of this Agreement. BAS and its members are subject to the same cost structure as other members of the public for areas of Boulder Reservoir that require a fee. 5. BAS’S DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES A. Operating Rules and Postings. BAS may also post a list of operating rules subject to prior written approval by the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or his/her designee. Such operating rules shall be accompanied by a written request that they be observed by all persons using the Airport. The operating rules shall be printed in the form of a list which shall be attached to a sign. The operating rules shall be stated in the form of a request for, rather than a requirement of, compliance by all persons. The operating rules shall not be accompanied by any stated punitive measures in the event of non-compliance by any person. These operating rules are independent from any generally enforceable city manager rules that the City develops related to the use of the Boulder Model Airport. B. Single Point of Contact. The duly elected President for BAS will serve as a single point of contact for the City. The President will act on behalf of BAS in decision-making processes and communicate to BAS membership decisions regarding changes in use or management of the airport. C. Notification of violations. If any user appears to be in violation of the rules of the airport, BAS members should endeavor to notify a Parks and Recreation Department representative or enforcement personnel (Parks and Recreation Department enforcement officer or the Police Department) promptly should any such apparent violation continue, with or without advising the user of the applicable regulations as seems most likely to avoid a breach of the peace, and to cooperate with said enforcement officer, at the officer's request, in any investigation and ensuing prosecution. Acts of BAS members of advising users pursuant to these provisions, if they exclude any accusation of wrongdoing directed at the user or threat to seek the assistance of law enforcement personnel, shall not be deemed “enforcement” as described in the following paragraph. C. The City hereby specifically withholds its consent, either express or implied, to any enforcement whatsoever, verbal or physical, by BAS or any individual member thereof, of any ordinance or regulation of the City or of any posted BAS operating rule. Enforcement of all rules and regulations shall be performed only by duly authorized Department of Parks and Recreation personnel or the Boulder Police Department. BAS and its members are hereby authorized only to notify the Department of Parks and Recreation or the police of non-compliance with any ordinance or regulation. D. BAS shall take reasonable safety and health precautions to protect the City, the public and the property of others at all times. 6. WILDLIFE RESTRICTIONS A. BAS must be in compliance with all wildlife restrictions including but not limited to closures and wildlife protection ordinances. Seasonal wildlife closures will begin annually on March 15 and last through September 10 or October 31, depending on the species observed on site during the season. Flight zones and heights will be restricted during the seasonal wildlife closures. The City will communicate flight restrictions prior to March 15. B. BAS agrees that only city staff or BAS members trained by the City will enter the wildlife closures to retrieve downed aircraft. The City will continue to annually provide downed aircraft training to all interested BAS members. All downed aircraft retrieved will be logged and the logs provided to the City annually. C. Annually, as early as is practicable, but no later than July 1, the annual wildlife closures shall be re-evaluated. If specific species of concern are not present, modification of the restrictions shall be considered by the City, as appropriate. 7. LICENSES BAS shall be solely responsible for obtaining any necessary licenses and for complying with any applicable federal, state, and municipal laws, ordinances, resolutions, codes and regulations in connection with its use of the Airport. 8. INSURANCE A. During the term of this agreement BAS, at its sole cost and expense, shall procure, pay for and keep in full force and effect a policy of commercial general liability insurance covering in an amount not less than One Million Dollars $1,000.000.00) combined single limit, Two Million Dollar ($2,000,000.00) aggregate covering bodily injury, including death to persons, personal injury and property damage liability arising out of a single occurrence. Such coverage shall include, without limitation, legal liability of the insured for property damage, bodily injuries, and deaths of persons in connection with the operation, maintenance, or use of the Airport, including acts or omissions of BAS. B. All policies of insurance carried by BAS shall name the City as an additional insured. A certificate of such insurance shall be filed with the City prior to signature of this Agreement by the City. The certificate of insurance shall provide that BAS or BAS’s insurance broker notify the City of any cancellation or reduction in coverage or limits of any insurance within thirty (30) days of receipt of insurer’s notification to that effect. BAS shall forthwith obtain and submit proof of substitute insurance in the event of expiration or cancellation of coverage. C. The City will endeavor to implement a set of airport rules through the city manager rule-making process within six (6) months of execution of this agreement. This set of rules will be agreed upon between BAS and the City and may include insurance requirements, operating hours, and specific Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) safety code language, among other restrictions on use of the airport. 9. INDEMNIFICATION/LIABILITY A. Indemnification. BAS, as an entity as defined in the first paragraph of this Agreement, and not its individual members, covenants that it will release, indemnify, and hold harmless the City, its officers, agents and employees from all claims, demands, judgments, costs, and expenses, including attorney’s fees, arising out of accidents or occurrences caused by the use or maintenance of the Airport by BAS, its members, or its guests. The Parties acknowledge that the Airport is open to the public. Therefore, this indemnification clause shall not extend to accidents or occurrences caused solely by the use of the Airport by members of the public who are not members or guests of BAS. The existence of the Airport, in and of itself, shall not be considered “use or maintenance” of the Airport by BAS. B. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement to the contrary, no term or condition of this Agreement shall be construed or interpreted as a waiver, express or implied, of any of the immunities, rights, benefits, protection, or other provisions of the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act, Section 24-10-101 et seq., C.R.S., as now or hereafter amended. The parties understand and agree that liability for claims for injuries to persons or property arising out of negligence of the City, its departments, institutions, agencies, boards, officials and employees is controlled and limited by the provisions of C.R.S. § 24-10-101, et seq., as now or hereafter amended. 10. IMPROVEMENTS AND MAINTENANCE A. Any improvements made by BAS to the Airport parking lot, runways, pit/preparation area, shelter or other areas within the terms of this license shall be exclusively at the expense of BAS and subject to prior written approval of the Department of Parks and Recreation. BAS hereby acknowledges and accepts liability for all personal and property damages to its members or to any member of an AMA chartered club or to any participant in an event sponsored by BAS or any AMA chartered club in any way arising from, incident to, or affected by said improvements or their use. BAS hereby irrevocably dedicates said improvements to the City. Upon termination of this agreement, the City reserves the right to remove all existing improvements. Any maintenance or improvement activities outside the license area as shown in Attachment B are strictly forbidden. B. BAS is not required to maintain the perimeter fencing on 51st Street. C. BAS agrees to maintain and make all necessary repairs to the parking lot, runways, pit/preparation area, interior fence and shelter per the conditions in Attachment C. BAS is responsible for the removal of trash and debris from the trash barrels, which may be provided by the City. BAS agrees to comply with all State, Federal and Municipal codes, regulations and ordinances including but not limited to those protecting wildlife and wetlands. BAS shall be allowed to complete approved maintenance activities as outlined in Attachment C. BAS shall notify the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or Director’s designee at least one week prior to any approved maintenance activities, as outlined in Attachment C. If no response is received by the proposed start of work date, consent to the proposed work will be deemed granted. All other changes, alterations, or improvements to the Airport shall be permitted only with the express written consent of the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or Director’s designee. D. BAS shall manage vegetation within the area delineated in Attachment D. BAS agrees to comply with all State, Federal and Municipal codes, regulations and ordinances relating to integrated pest management (IPM), including but not limited to the limited use of certain chemicals for control of vegetation, adhering to all required notification protocols prior to use of chemicals, as well as all other city policies related to IPM. BAS shall notify the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or Director’s designee by Thursday the week prior to any use of chemicals for vegetation control to ensure the treatment is added to the City’s IPM hotline for notification purposes. Approved sign(s), provided by Parks and Recreation, shall be posted at access points at least 24 hours in advance of any chemical spraying activity and removed no sooner than 24 hours after spraying is complete. Mowing of the area delineated in Attachment D is permitted as a maintenance activity further defined in Attachment C. BAS may not conduct maintenance activities on or manipulate the natural areas of the Airport in any manner inconsistent with this agreement. E. BAS shall have the right to place, at its own expense, temporary portable toilets of the kind commonly known as port-o-potties in the parking lot. If it does so, it shall maintain them in a safe, functional, and hygienic condition. F. BAS shall have the right to place, at its own expense, an AED defibrillator at the Airport. If it does so, it shall maintain the device in a safe and functional condition and in a generally accessible location on site. G. Annually during the winter months, the BAS President and other Elected Officers and city staff will meet to discuss the upcoming needs for the Airport, including but not limited to updates to the City IPM policy and procedures, identified maintenance or improvement needs, and other items requiring coordination of effort. H. Any special events occurring at the Airport shall conform to the Parks and Recreation Special Events Guide as found on the Department’s public webpage, including permitting if Department criteria for such are met. 11. INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR The relationship between BAS and the City is that of an independent contractor. BAS shall supply all personnel, equipment, materials and supplies at its own expense, except as specifically set forth herein. BAS shall not be deemed to be, nor shall it represent itself as, an employee, partner, or joint venture of the City. No employee or officer of the City shall supervise BAS. 12. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS A. Assignment. BAS shall not assign this Contract without the written consent of the City, which it may withhold at its sole discretion. B. Termination. Either BAS or the City may, at any time, terminate this Agreement, in whole or in part, for their own convenience and without cause of any nature by giving written notice at least thirty (30) days in advance of the termination date. For the City, this power is held by the Director of Parks and Recreation. For BAS, this power is held by the club President. In addition, pursuant to Section 164 of the Charter of the City of Boulder, this Agreement shall be summarily revocable by the City Council without compensation of any kind, notwithstanding BAS' compliance with all terms and conditions hereof. C. No Third-Party Beneficiaries. It is expressly understood and agreed that the enforcement of the terms and conditions of this Agreement and all rights of action relating to such enforcement, shall be strictly reserved to the City and BAS. Nothing contained in this Agreement shall give or allow any claim or right of action whatsoever by any other third-person. It is the express intention of the City and BAS that any such party or entity, other than the City or BAS, receiving services or benefits under this Agreement shall be deemed an incidental beneficiary only. D. Waiver. The waiver of any breach of a term, provision, or requirement of this Agreement shall not be construed or deemed as waiver of any subsequent breach of such term, provision, or requirement, or of any other term, provision, or requirement. E. Amendments. This Agreement is intended as the complete integration of all understandings between the parties. No prior or contemporaneous addition, deletion, or other amendment hereto shall have any force or effect whatsoever, unless embodied herein in writing. No subsequent notation, renewal, addition, deletion, or other amendment hereto shall have any force or effect unless embodied in a writing executed and approved by the City pursuant to City rules. F. Force Majure. A party shall not be liable for any failure of or delay in the performance of this Agreement for the period that such failure or delay is due to causes beyond its reasonable control, including but not limited to acts of God, war, strikes or labor disputes, embargoes, government orders or any other force majeure event. G. Authority to Sign. BAS warrants that the individual executing this Agreement is properly authorized to bind BAS to this Contract. H. Non-Discrimination. BAS hereby certifies that it does not and will not practice any discrimination against any person or group on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religious creed, ancestry, or national origin. I. Entire Agreement. This Agreement contains all of the agreements and conditions made between the parties and may not be modified orally or in any other manner other than by written agreement signed by all the parties. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties hereto have signed this Agreement effective as of the day and year first written. BOULDER AEROMODELING SOCIETY By: _____________________________ Title: ____________________________ STATE OF COLORADO ) ) ss. COUNTY OF BOULDER ) Acknowledged before me, a notary public, this ______ day of ______________, 20__, by ________________________________ (licensee name) as ______________________________ (licensee title). Witness my hand and official seal. (SEAL) _________________________________ Notary Public My commission expires: _____________ CITY OF BOULDER ___________________________________ City Manager ATTEST: _____________________________ City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: ______________________________ City Attorney’s Office Attachment A r-L.~nR~I l ~~~._.~r//rl r..c=tl 3 4~ 4, t 29 5 1 f l~~^Zi 11 ^'•a t~_fir' r~,t\„~n,..~'-`r y J l a r u 32 r E~ r 711 f ti DIOULIAR& L_ ti mss-.~s"'°i~j'~ F I~--- ,4TH.,- 1 do IAA ~ rY" 44. Boulder Aeromodel Airport, located on City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Property (P- Axcelson Parcel). Legal Description: Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 4, Township 1 North, Ranger 70 West, 6th P.M. NW1/4 of NE1/4 of Section 4, T1 N,R70W). N y of eo~< Ry W E Map produced by Environmental Resources Dig ision. Parks and Recreation, City of Boulder. 2/2003 S Attachment B p~ R r 4 a . eY J c r wvy ~s F t r: u r t.d i L 3 If "Ni a m r All-, K S~atr EP a w? R6 ask p'• .a Sri 4s T- tAIN M y...w.,o t. i Inset and aerial view of Boulder Aeromodeling Airport located on City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Property (P. Axelson Parcel). r NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 4, T1 N, R70W). NOTE: Yellow lines indicate Boulder Aeromodel agreement boundary. Green lines on inset indicate City of Boulder Parks boundary. ID FootPrint Notes ACRES 1 Parking Lot Graveled Lot 1.10 i r 2 Sheffer Wood Structure 0.02 OF13 Preparation/ Pit Area Seating and preparation tables 0.08 I ll~'V 4 Walkway and Runway Hardened surfaces 0.55 N Map p-h- 7 hp I cutul Rc,.,ur - , 6nvon'Nro;Raax•ParAs and Rccrimi.a,. C% of B<w Id"2/2003 Attachment C: BAS Maintenance Activities All Approved Maintenance Activities, as described below, require prior notification year-round. Notification must be given to the Department of Parks and Recreation Director or Director’s designee at least one week prior to any Approved Maintenance Activity. If no response is received by the proposed start of work date, consent to the proposed work will be deemed granted. All other changes, alterations or improvements not specifically outlined in the table below as Approved Maintenance Activities shall be permitted only with the express written consent of the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or Director’s designee. The list of Prior Approval Required Activities is illustrative only and is not exhaustive. All activities must occur during the Airport’s approved operating hours, unless otherwise approved in writing by the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or Director’s designee. During the seasonal wildlife closure, Approved Maintenance Activities are subject to these additional requirements: 1)as much work as possible must be done offsite; 2)hand tools or small battery-operated power tools may be used; 3)gas or generator powered tools, other mechanized equipment, and vehicles must not be used; and 4)the timing of the work must be limited to less than five hours per day for no more than two consecutive days. If any of these requirements are not met, express written consent of the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation or Director’s designee is required. Approved Maintenance Activities Prior Approval Required Activities Painting, cleaning and other maintenance (including roof repair) of existing structures (i.e., building, benches, tables, round tables) Change to footprint or materials of existing area or structures Runways, taxiways, or helipad repair or maintenance Enlarging or addition of area for the purposes of runways, taxiways, or helipads Parking lot repair or maintenance where there is not a change in existing size or materials Parking lot repair, maintenance, or improvement that does include a change in size or materials Parking lot and airfield fencing repair or maintenance Change in the alignment or type of fencing Mowing allowed once a month within area delineated in Attachment D Replacing BAS-specific signage, with no change in language or content Replacing BAS-specific signage, with changes to language or content* Servicing or replacement in-kind of allowed temporary restroom facility Other maintenance or additional restroom facilities Prairie dog management activities In general, repair or maintenance includes: 1. Addition of material of the same type as existing material to correct or repair issues. 2. No change of existing materials. 3. No additional area of land disturbance. Once every four (4) years BAS will be permitted to seal the runway asphalt within the seasonal wildlife closure provided the following criteria are met: 1. Work is scheduled for after August 1st, in coordination with the Department representative. 2. Work is scheduled for a single day. 3. Work will occur during airport operating hours. 4. Current season monitoring of the species present in the area indicates that no species are present that require additional protections under state or federal law. This allowance assumes no additional asphalt work is to be completed during the seasonal wildlife closure. At the same time of sealing, BAS is permitted to repaint the runways to indicate they are not a suitable landing location for manned aircraft as per section 2-3-6-d of the Airman’s Information Manual (AIM). *Parks and Recreation will be responsible for posting all site identification, enforceable rules and regulations, and liability signage. Regulatory Wetlands High Functioning Wetland High Functioning Inner Buffer High Functioning Outer Buffer Spraying area (2 ft from edge) Mowing area Boulder Aeromodel Society License Agreement Vegetation Management Area F 10 feet 30 feet 30 feet 30 feet 0 60 12030Feet Attachment D AGENDA ITEM #___VII-B___PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 27, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Accept the Boulder Reservoir – South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Tina Briggs, Parks Planner Morgan Gardner, Associate Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This item seeks the support of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) regarding the proposed Boulder Reservoir – South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (CSCP). The intent of the plan is to identify sustainable, physical improvements for short and long-term prioritization of capital funding. This will satisfy the need for a comprehensive site master plan and capital plan as highlighted as a need in the 2012 Boulder Reservoir Master Plan (BRMP). Later phases will include the South Shore Management Plan, which will address management, programming and partnership from an operational perspective. Through this action item, PRAB will be asked to consider support of this multi-year capital strategy and concept plan as a guiding document for future improvements at the Boulder Reservoir South Shore. Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to accept the Boulder Reservoir – South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (CSCP). BACKGROUND: The City of Boulder Reservoir is one of the most popular and heavily visited park facilities in the city and region. It is also one of only six northern Front Range facilities supporting water -based and power boating recreation opportunities. Though smaller than other area facilities, the reservoir offers a significant range of services to the community and maintains one of the highest visitation rates of approximately 300,000 per year. Constructed in 1950, the reservoir collects and retains water for municipal, domestic, agricultural and industrial uses for member of the Northern Water Conservancy District. The reservoir is, AGENDA ITEM #___VII-B___PAGE___2____ first and foremost, a valuable water supply source. Recreational activities at the reservoir must be managed in a manner that prioritize protection and management of the water supply contained in the 560 acres of water surface. The South Shore receives the most intensive active recreational use at the reservoir. Facilities on the South Shore include gate house buildings, Aquatic Nuisance Species inspection building, a new Visitor Services Center (currently under construction), lifeguard station, boat ho use and maintenance building. Popular amenities are the swim beach, boat parking, boat moorings, boat ramps, a variety of docks, reservable picnic site locations and numerous vehicle parking areas. The BRMP outlined a set of goals and objectives intended to achieve a vision for future the reservoir. Among many objectives, the BRMP sets forth an objective to develop a site management plan for the South Shore to address programmatic opportunities, operation and management thresholds, sustainable business model(s), vehicle and trail access, capital improvements, a site plan, as well as traffic and noise impacts of the South Shore facilities and supported activities. The CSCP is the current phase of the Site Management Plan for the South Shore. It addresses the short and long-term physical improvements and prioritizes capital funding needs. Phase II will complete the Site Management Plan for the South Shore by addressing management, programming and partnerships from an operational perspective. Recognizing that capital improvements need to be coordinated with long-term operations and management to ensure adequate care of the improvements, the subsequent operations and management planning will outline key focus areas for staff to ensure life cycle management of the assets that are developed. ANALYSIS: Like any park or facility within the department’s portfolio, capital improvements are considered within the context of the department’s funding priorities (fiscally constrained, action and vision). The CSCP outlines the process used to develop a list of categorized capital improvements, defined goals, refined recommendations and set prioritization based on the each of the funding alternatives. Analysis of the capital improvements and prioritization provided the framework to develop a physical plan to demonstrate the logical order of improvements. Additionally, the CSCP supports prioritization of capital improvements and future community initiatives to improve the reservoir. This includes fundraising efforts and potential partnership opportunities for identifying funding beyond what the department’s existing budget can support , known as fiscally constrained. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff requests PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Suggested Motion Language: Motion to accept the Boulder Reservoir – South Shore Capital Strategy and Concept Plan (CSCP). AGENDA ITEM #___VII-B___PAGE___3____ NEXT STEPS: Upon acceptance of this plan, it will inform the improvement of this unique and vibrant community resource. Projects outlined within will be considered as part of the department’s upcoming CIP process and within the constraints of available funding. ATTACHMENTS: All linked in text above. AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 1__ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 27, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: Parks and Recreation Department Response to COVID-19 and Financial Impacts Update PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Bryan Beary, District Services Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Boulder Parks and Recreation (BPR) staff have been working to respond to the coronavirus outbreak since early March. Collaborating closely with citywide teams, efforts have been largely focused on alignment with public health guidance, addressing financial sustainability, and providing staff support. The intent of this item is to share milestones of response efforts and the ongoing financial and operational impacts to the department. BACKGROUND: Colorado had its first case of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, on March 5 and hundreds of cases have since been confirmed in Boulder County. To address the coronavirus public health crisis, the City of Boulder is working with Boulder County Public Health and other partner organizations to coordinate operations. A summary of key actions taken by the City of Boulder includes the following: • Issued a stay at home order March 16, later rescinded to align with State of Colorado Stay at Home Order in effect through April 26. • Declared a local disaster emergency and issued a variety of emergency orders to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus. • Closed all City of Boulder buildings and facilities through April 30. • In partnership with Boulder County and the City of Longmont, opened a COVID- 19 Recovery Center at the East Boulder Community Center for unhoused individuals. • Increased the frequency of cleaning and sanitizing of common areas and public areas to help prevent the spread of germs. • Moved City Council meetings online and gave boards and commissions the option to do the same. • Actively sharing up-to-date information and news about the evolving public health crisis with the public, in both English and Spanish,. AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 2__ • Developed resources and information to help individuals, families, employees and businesses through these challenging times. In alignment with the above, Boulder Parks and Recreation staff have adjusted operations. Key actions by the department are summarized in the timeline below: • 3/9 Participation in Citywide Response Teams: o Community Services - focused on assisting people, businesses and engaging the community in the response process. o Internal Operations - focused on coordinating internal operations to assist in coordinated action on issues such as pay policies, sick leave policies and staffing issues o Infrastructure/External Operations (led by Jeff Haley) - focused on the needs of our external facing essential services departments that must continue to provide services to the community. • 3/11 BPR Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) updated for pandemic response • 3/12 Daily BPR COVID-19 response coordination begins • 3/13 BPR recreation centers close to public; courses & permits suspended • 3/16 BPR response teams activated: Essential Services - focused on the delivery of essential services and support of the citywide infrastructure team. Operating on a skeleton-crew and rotating schedule to protect employees while they perform critical functions, which for Parks & Recreation include: - Trash removal - Construction response - Snow removal - Citywide emergency response - Protection of assets - Storm response (e.g., hazardous limbs) - Playground inspection - Ordinance compliance (e.g., graffiti removal) Remote Work - focused on providing guidance to and supporting staff performing critical work remotely. BPR Internal Ops - provides support and instruction for how to manage payroll, financial records and HR-related functions during this period. Customer Service - coordinates the support of customers impacted by facility closures and suspension of services. Focused on developing a process to respond to customer inquiries and then on rescheduling, crediting and refunding accounts in a consistent, efficient and centralized manner. • 4/2 City of Boulder order issued to clarify that parks remain open, however, playgrounds, picnic areas and other areas conducive to public gathering are closed AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 3__ (Flatirons Golf Course, Valmont Bike Park, dog parks, disc golf courses, sport courts, and skate parks). • 4/8 Pearl Street restrooms closed and replaced with portable units to address vandalism and other crime in the downtown core. • 4/17 Virtual staff Town Hall meeting followed by staff furloughs effective 4/20. The above actions and other conditions are creating dramatic impacts on businesses, including the City of Boulder. Following is a summary of department funding sources, and then an overview of how these sources are impacted by the current crisis. The Parks and Recreation Department receives revenue from five major funds: General Fund, Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund, Recreation Activity Fund (RAF), .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund, and Lottery Fund. In addition, the Department receives additional funding on a limited basis from the Boulder Junction Capital Development Fund, Capital Improvement Fund and Community, Culture and Safety (CCS) capital improvement bond (2012 and 2017). These funds vary in frequency each year and are primarily intended for one-time capital improvement program projects and are funds shared with other departments. General Fund: The city’s General Fund is supported by fees, sales, property and other taxes. General Fund dollars are managed by Central Finance and allocated each year to city departments and projects by City Council through the annual budget process. The department primarily uses its allocation to fund park and forestry operations and department administration. Permanent Parks and Recreation: The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund is the department’s capital improvement and acquisition fund. Funded by property and development excise taxes, the fund is dedicated for acquiring land and renovating or improving existing parks and recreational facilities. It may not be used to fund daily operations or routine maintenance. Recreation Activity Fund (RAF): The RAF is used to operate the department’s many recreation, fitness and sports facilities and programs. RAF funds are largely derived from program and facility user fees with some supplemental funding from the General Fund (primarily to subsidize programs for individuals with disabilities, provide financial aid to those with low incomes and age-based discounts for youth and seniors). 25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (.25): The department receives voter-approved sales tax funds (.25 cent) that are dedicated to acquiring, developing, operating and maintaining parks and recreation facilities. In November 2012, voters renewed the tax with an 85% voter approval through 2035. Lottery Fund: The city lottery fund is a special revenue fund that accounts for state conservation trust fund monies allocated to local governments based on population. State conservation trust fund monies are dedicated to parks, recreation, and open space site maintenance and capital improvements. The city receives lottery money on an annual basis from the state and allocates money to the department. AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 4__ 2019 Year End Summary: In 2019, the department spent $38.1 million against a revised budget of $48.5 million. Most of the unspent money was tied to capital improvement projects as staff wrap up multi-year projects at Boulder Reservoir and Scott Carpenter Pool. Both projects are anticipated to be complete in 2020 and in-line with revised budgets. Department expenditures were below budgeted amounts and revenue collection was within 98% to 106% and as such, each of the funds ended the year with a fund balance (in addition to reserves that are included in the budget). The work PRAB supported in 2019 to adjust fees for recreation facilities was expected to address the rapidly increasing expenses; however, much has changed regarding the 2020 budget. ANALYSIS: COVID-19 Impacts: The COVID-19 pandemic is causing financial strain to citywide and department budgets. The city relies heavily on sales tax dollars to support a variety of funds including the General Fund and the Parks and Recreation dedicated .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (see the 2020 Budget in Brief for a summary of citywide tax sources and uses). Sales Tax has declined due to the impacts of Stay at Home orders and the city’s Central Finance division is predicting at least 12% decline in sales tax revenues. Recreation Centers were closed and programs canceled starting on Friday, March 13, resulting in fee refunds and very few revenue collections in the time since. The department is working closely with the Central Finance Department to identify the long-term impacts to each funding source. Central Finance in turn is working with consultants and economists to predict the overall loss of revenue by each fund across the organization. Due to the timing of sales tax collection, there is a 6-8 week lag between when a month closes and when data is available, meaning March’s fiscal impact is not understood until May. Below is a chart highlighting the different scenarios the Central Finance Department shared with City Council on March 30 for the 3 departmental funds directly impacted by COVID-19: March 31, 2020 Update to City Council – Potential Revenue Shortfall by Fund Scenario 1: 2 month Closure, Back on Track Scenario 2: 2 Month Closure, Slow recovery rest of year Scenario 3: 2 Month Closure, Begin Recession General Fund 5% 8% 11% .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund 4% 10% 12% Recreation Activity Fund 4% 16% 20% Total Impact to BPR $1.1 million $3.2 million $4.0 million With additional analysis of the economic impact of COVID-19 and as the pandemic continues, staff are preparing new scenarios to inform financial strategy. Demonstrated in AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 5__ the chart below, these new scenarios project more significant losses than those shared above and on March 30, 2020. Parks and Recreation staff update projections daily; however, there is a great deal of uncertainty. It is unknown when and how facilities will reopen and what activities will be allowed as efforts to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 are anticipated to continue. April 28, 2020 Update to City Council – Potential Revenue Shortfall by Fund Scenario 4: 12 Week Closure, Slow recovery for rest of year Scenario 5: 12 Week Closure, Deeper recovery rest of year Scenario 6: 16 Week Closure, Slow recovery rest of year General Fund 12% 13% 13% .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund 16% 21% 18% Recreation Activity Fund 32% 37% 42% Total Impact to BPR $5.8 million $6.9 million $7.2 million *These were best estimates at time of writing this memo, numbers are subject to change as the Finance Department refines projections. BPR’s Fiscal Response to COVID-19 Staff began looking at cost reduction scenarios in late March. To date, the cost reduction measures have been in coordination with other departments and impact personnel, operating and capital budgets. All personnel were paid during the period of March 13 through April 19, 2020 based upon scheduled hours or average hours worked over the last 6 months. This was not sustainable long-term due to the reduction in funding and as much work could not occur due to facility closures and program cancellations. On Tuesday, April 14, the city announced furloughs for 737 employees, with 487 employees being in the Parks and Recreation Department. 450 of BPR furloughed employees were non-standard employees (non-benefited and part-time) who provide front-line services across the department, such as recreation program instruction or lifeguarding. The employees were furloughed beginning Monday, April 20, 2020 and furloughs are scheduled to continue through June 28, 2020. The city will pay 100% of benefit-eligible employees’ healthcare insurance, for individuals and families, through June 30. Decisions to recall staff to active service, extend the furlough, or layoff staff will be made by June 1. Staff on furlough are subject to a 48-hour callback allowing for employees to return as services require and funds permit. In addition to furloughing staff, the city has implemented a hiring-freeze on all non-essential vacant positions for the remainder of 2020. Collectively, these personnel actions provide $2.1 million in savings for the department. Operating expenses are being evaluated by every division to identify cost savings. Collectively the non-personnel reductions identified to date account for approximately $801K in savings. Additionally, staff have evaluated Capital Improvement Program (CIP) AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 6__ projects planned for 2020. The CIP cost savings identified so far are approximately 1.3 million and will be further discussed in the PRAB’s April agenda. Collectively, the total savings identified to date for the 2020 budget are $4.2 million based on cost reductions from personnel, operating and capital budgets. COVID-19’s Impact to Work Plan and Service Levels COVID-19 is an unprecedented pandemic that has impacted BPR’s 2020 operations and will continue to do so. The department is continuing to monitor the impacts to service levels as a result of public health guidance and reductions in funding. BPR will have fewer resources to provide services for the remainder of 2020. As a result, staff are working to identify projects and work plan items that can be completed in 2020, while postponing or delaying other projects based on need. Staff are also evaluating service levels to identify core services. NEXT STEPS: BPR staff meets nearly daily directly related to COVID-19 response and to develop plans for reconstitution of parks and recreation facilities and programming. Ultimately, health recommendations provided by the Governor’s Office and the Boulder County Office of Public Health will inform provision of services. Considering public health guidance, financial feasibility and staffing capacity will also inform service levels through the remainder of 2020. BPR leadership will continue to work with colleagues across the city, Parks and Recreation agencies across the country, and national organizations such as National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA) to identify and implement leading practices as they are developed. AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 27, 2020 AGENDA TITLE: 2021-2026 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) PRESENTERS: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of this agenda item is for the Parks and Recreation Department (department) to review the current 2020-2025 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and to initiate discussion of the upcoming 2021 – 2026 CIP process. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) will have an opportunity to ask questions and provide comments on the current CIP projects and upcoming process. The Board’s input is essential throughout the capital budget process as the PRAB’s role is to provide a formal recommendation of the CIP, including the appropriation of the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. Given the uncertainty of the current COVID-19 situation, the department is carefully reviewing the department’s overall budget, including the capital projects, to provide strategic decision-making in response to the financial and staffing constraints forecasted as a result of the pandemic. Information on the financial impacts of COVID-19 is not fully available at this time; staff anticipate a clearer indication will be available for the May meeting. Staff will provide PRAB with all the necessary information to make informed decisions on approving the CIP. Once approved by the PRAB, the department’s CIP will then be submitted to the Planning Board and City Council for review and respective consideration and approval. IMPACTS Fiscal: $4.9 million recommended for 2020 with the 2020-2025 CIP projecting an investment of $27.8M throughout the six-year program. This equates to average annual CIP funding of $4.6M and reflects the total uses of funds projected for 2020 in the Lottery (Fund 2100), .25 Cent Sales Tax (Fund 2180), Capital Development Fund and Permanent Parks and Recreation (Fund 3300). The total portfolio of assets managed by the department has an estimated Current Replacement Value (CRV) of $215M and the facility portfolio represents a significant investment in public infrastructure critical to the execution of our mission to provide quality park and recreation facilities to the community. AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 2 PUBLIC FEEDBACK This item is intended to provide the PRAB with information related to the CIP definitions/criteria found in Attachment A (CIP Process and Methodology), current capital improvement projects Attachment B (2020-2025 CIP Project Summary Sheet) and linkage to the master plan as it relates to the 2020 – 2025 CIP. The community’s input is also valuable to inform capital planning., A follow-up CIP discussion with the PRAB is scheduled for the May regular meeting, and public comment is available for both the April and May conversations. A public hearing is scheduled for June with PRAB’s action on the CIP program. The public will also have an opportunity to comment during the Planning Board’s CIP review and City Council’s discussions and review of the 2021 recommended budget during future public hearings in fall 2020. Additional public engagement will continue to be solicited for the individual projects identified for improvements as part of the master plan goals. BACKGROUND CIP Process The CIP is how the city manages its assets and implements capital projects that are chosen by residents through their elected representatives, City Council, with recommendations from advisory boards. The department budget is formulated within the context of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan (master plan) that was adopted by the PRAB and accepted by City Council in February 2014. The master plan is currently scheduled for updating throughout the next two years as feasible with the current health orders and once updated, will inform new CIP priorities. The CIP has always been developed in support of achieving master plan goals and will continue with the new, updated plan. The current master plan included several significant strategies and action items that will guide future capital investments for the department. These include: Focus on “Taking Care of What We Have” – With over $215 million in current replacement value (CRV) of built assets and a current projected backlog of $16 million the community expressed a clear intent to spend priority funds on maintaining and enhancing existing park and recreation facilities to a high standard. The city’s desired Facility Condition Index (FCI) is .05 to .06 and the current backlog of department assets is a projected FCI of .08 (FCI equals total estimated backlog of repairs divided by total CRV). The department’s master plan outlines an FCI goal of .07 to ensure the assets are in a safe and acceptable standard for public use. Throughout the past six years since the MP acceptance, the department has been able to reduce the FCI by completing major projects such as the Civic Area redevelopment, many neighborhood park renovations, athletic field upgrades and improvements to the regional facilities such as the Flatirons Golf Course. The current renovations to the Scott Carpenter Pool and Boulder Reservoir Visitor’s Center will allow the department to continue lowering the FCI. Total Cost of Facility Ownership (TCFO) – The master plan also recommends that proposed development of any new park and facility assets shall be evaluated through a feasibility study that includes a needs assessment, user profile, projected participation analysis, development funding method, life cycle cost pro forma and alternative AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 3 development trade-off analysis. This move toward life cycle management of assets using a concept called the Total Cost of Facility Ownership or TCFO is at the heart of the department’s effort to better manage assets through the Asset Management Program (AMP). This approach frames agency asset management decisions in a framework of ‘cradle to grave’ consideration of how an asset is conceived of, designed, built, managed and maintained, recapitalized and eventually disposed of as shown in Figure 1 (below). Figure 1 Two areas of significant impact for both new and existing facilities is the desire to allocate adequate funding to take care of the Operation and Maintenance (O&M) annual costs and establishing a sinking fund to provide the anticipated Renovation and Refurbishment (R&R) of facilities to maintain them at the desired standards intended of a new facility. While the O&M and R&R vary depending on the type of facility and the level of use, there are national standards that the department is reviewing to develop recommendations for future investments. The estimated values of each of these requirements are listed below: • Operations and Maintenance (O&M) – This includes all activities required to operate facilities and parks and is included in the operation budget of the department. National standards indicate that approximately four percent of the assets current replacement value is required to keep all system components open and functioning at desired levels. With approximately $215 million in CRV, the annual O&M should be approximately $8.4 million. The current expenditures for O&M are approximately $8 million leaving a $400,000 shortfall based on those estimates, which also do not consider Boulder’s unique sustainable practices such as Integrated Pest Management. The department is currently evaluating all outdoor operations for O&M functions through the General Maintenance and Management Plan (GMMP). The department has also finalized the Facility Strategic Plan that provides information on O&M for major recreation buildings. The findings of these reports inform development of the department’s budget, including operating and CIP expenses. • Renovation and Refurbishment (R&R) - These are funds required to keep the backlog of regular repairs and renovations of existing assets at the desired condition. Most park major assets can have a useful life of between 30 and 50 AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 4 years if regular preventative maintenance (PM) and periodic renovations are provided. Using a standard of two percent annual investment in a typical asset, the total recommended annual budget for capital maintenance projects is $4.3 million. Capital Investment Strategic Plan – Working with the PRAB in 2015, staff developed a comprehensive 10-year capital investment strategy (CIS), (Attachment C, CIS Overview) that outlines changing recreation uses for existing facilities, needs for capital maintenance and development of new facilities. To prepare for and inform the CIS, the department has conducted several planning projects over the past few years as outlined in the MP. These studies are related to the larger goals outlined in the master plan that would significantly replace existing aging facilities while at the same time developing new facilities desired by the community. These studies identified the investment level required to maintain and operate existing facilities as well as provide cost estimates to build new facilities and/or replace aging infrastructure as needed. The capital investment strategy (CIS) is needed to meet those projects that are identified as critical public improvements needed over the next ten years that are beyond existing financial resources. Sources of funds may include additional long-term bonding, pay-as-you-go sales tax, private/public and public/public partnerships, as well as opportunities for private investments for commercial rate facilities and services. To help inform the CIS, the PRAB participated in a voting exercise to help establish a ranking and priority for the capital projects that are most needed and meet the largest needs in the community to allow the department to continue the programs, services and facilities that the community supports. These projects have ultimately become the priority for future funding and demonstrated within the CIS. PRAB’s Role Once again, this year, staff is providing the PRAB with a “three touch” approach to addressing CIP. These “touches” include: 1) the discussion item presented at this meeting that will communicate process, policies and procedures and definitions/criteria that guide the CIP development; 2) a discussion item presented at the May meeting to review draft projects and prioritization as it relates to the 2021-26 CIP; and 3) a PRAB public hearing to be held in June to consider motions approving and recommending the Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program. Budget and Current Funding Status As illustrated in Table 1, the department’s 2020 CIP is funded primarily from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund (Fund 230), .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (Fund 118) and Lottery Fund (Fund 111). Not all these funding sources are the same and it is important to recognize certain restrictions and characterizations the funding provides. AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 5 •Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund – property tax dedicated funds for the “permanent improvement of parks and recreation infrastructure” specific only to the Parks and Recreation Department. •.25 Cent Sales Tax Fund – dedicated only to Parks and Recreation but can be used for a wide variety of needs. Currently only used for personnel, non- personnel and capital within the administrative and mostly land-based work groups. Could be flexible and repurposed for recreation needs if necessary and deemed appropriate. •Lottery Fund – state funded lottery proceeds with certain restrictions, requires tracking and reporting. Currently only used for capital ($428K) Additional sources of funding that have limitations on the type of capital investment and are not managed exclusively by the department, include the: •Capital Development Fund (Fund 110), •Boulder Junction Improvement Fund (Fund 250) and •Capital Improvement Fund (Fund 260). Given the current uncertainty related to COVID-19, staff are reprioritizing the current CIP projects and considering pauses and delays on specific projects to provide the greatest flexibility and responsiveness to budget challenges that exist. Staff have reviewed prioritization criteria to determine what projects should continue and what projects should pause. This information is still under refinement given current budget discussions and will be shared with the board during the presentation at the meeting. CIP Prioritization Criteria 1 Safety and Deficiencies: Projects represent important deficiencies and address essential safety and health concerns. Project may include ongoing infrastructure repairs, restrooms, replacements and/or refurbishments of park play equipment and park amenities and critical facility improvements to prevent shutdowns or emergency closure of assets. 2 Compliance and/or Commitment: Projects that are required by law or a ballot initiative or are in process of development and/or are required to be completed within a specific period. Projects on department action plan or council work plan. (Pool, Rez, ADA Access Enhancements, Boulder Revised Code, master plan reference, etc.) 3 Operational Efficiencies: Projects that represent important operational and/or maintenance efficiencies resulting in improved life cycles, cost efficiencies and savings in resources, energy or water usage. AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 6 The criterion considers an asset's importance to day-¬to-¬day park management and employee satisfaction. (playground resurfacing, parking lot r enovation, turf and irrigation repair, tennis court resurfacing, etc.) 4 Revenue Generation: Projects that support facilities and assets that generate revenues to support valued recreational opportunities in the Boulder community. Projects will enhance the department's ability to earn more revenue after initial investment and operational costs are considered (e.g. Flatirons Golf Course ) and/or possible collaboration/partnerships leveraging outside funding sources. Asset plays a direct role in providing a profitable funding source to the community or has a positive cash flow or asset has demonstrated high RPI scoring. Table 1: 2020 Parks and Recreation Capital Projects Fund Project Amount Permanent Parks & Recreation Fund (3300) Athletic Field Improvements (Scoreboards, Ballfield Irrigation Maintenance) $160,000 Boulder Reservoir South Improvements (Visitor’s Center Construction) $100,000 Columbia Cemetery Capital Maintenance (Headstone Repair) $32,000 Flatirons Golf Course Capital Enhancements (See “Matters from the Department” within the board packet $2,195,000 Neighborhood and Community park Enhancements (Skatepark Enhancement) $132,000 Play Court Capital Maintenance (Tennis Courts/Pickleball) $56,000 Parking Lot Capital Maintenance (Valmont City Park) $180,000 Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund Total $2,855,000 Capital Development Fund Capital Infrastructure Enhancements (East Boulder Community Park New Park Restroom) 400,000 .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (2180) Aquatic Facility Enhancements (Scott Carpenter Pool Project) $575,000 Master Plan Update $140,000 Urban Forest Management (EAB) $500,000 .25 Cent Sales Tax Total $1,215,000 Lottery Fund (2110) Neighborhood and Community Park Capital Maintenance (Chautauqua Park Playground Renovation) $428,000 Lottery Fund Total $428,000 AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 7 The City of Boulder takes seriously its responsibility to the community as a steward of public funds. This commitment requires ongoing analysis of expenditures, and monitoring and evaluation of revenue. For example, staff monitors revenues to help ensure the city uses ongoing revenue sources, such as taxes, to fund ongoing work, of delivering city services. This also limits one-time funding revenue to one-time expenditures to ensure it can maintain core services without incurring operational deficits. Continual monitoring and prudent fiscal management have helped maintain the City of Boulder’s strong financial position. For example, the city has a healthy reserve of funds and a favorable bond rating and the city uses policies, fiscal tools and metrics to fund efficient and effective delivery of city services while remaining resilient to changing economic and environmental conditions. Currently, about twenty-five percent of the department’s capital is funded in the .25 cent sales tax fund while the remainder is primarily funded by property tax via the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. As additional information and guidance is available related to revenue projections, the department’s budget development will align with updated strategies. The PRAB will be informed and future touches will include updates as appropriate. 2020 Budgeted CIP Projects Attachment B (2020-2025 CIP Project Summary Sheet) is the currently approved CIP and provides an overview of 2020 projects as well as planned priorities through 2025. Staff will present a brief review of the projects during the regular meeting on April 27 as well as describe current updates that are under consideration for 2020 and beyond for the PRAB’s review. QUESTIONS FOR THE BOARD •Does the PRAB have any questions or seek clarification related to the current 2020 projects? •Does the PRAB have comments regarding the department’s CIP project list for 2021 –2026 and updates that are considered? •Are there any priority project areas for the PRAB in the upcoming CIP program that align with the departmental master plan and capital investment strategy? NEXT STEPS Important milestones for the CIP process are included below but are subject to refinement. The city’s budget and finance staff are still actively working on the guidelines, schedule and process for the budget development for 2021 and beyond. More AGENDA ITEM VIII-B _ PAGE 8 information will be available to PRAB at the May meeting. The anticipated schedule is below: PRAB -1st Touch CIP Discussion April PRAB – 2nd touch Discussion Item May PRAB – 3rd touch Approval (Action) June CIP PB/Council Tour TBD Planning Board Hearing August Council Study Session September Attachments: A.CIP Process and Methodology B.2020-2025 CIP Project Summary Sheet C.CIS Overview 1 Attachment A CIP Process and Methodology The city develops a CIP that addresses the ongoing major business needs and maintenance and repair of city assets as well as enhancements and expansion called for in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP). The CIP is a strategic document that assures that the municipal organization maintains a strong bond rating, implements community values, and has fiscal integrity. This includes projects defined as any major project with a cost greater than $50,000 for purchase or construction, or major replacement of physical assets. CIP projects are potentially subject to a Community and Environmental Assessment Process (CEAP) review that evaluates any potential environmental, traffic or social impacts to Boulder residents, neighborhoods and businesses. These projects are budgeted within the framework of the City of Boulder’s CIP Budget. CIP projects are categorized as: •Capital Enhancement o Expansion or significant improvement of an existing asset o Repair damage to existing infrastructure o Enhancement results in a durable, long lasting asset, with a useful life of at least 15 years •Capital Maintenance o Renovate, repair, or replace an existing asset o Enhancement results in a durable, long lasting asset, with an extended useful life of at least five years •Capital Planning Studies •Land and Asset Acquisition •New Capital Project o Construction or acquisition of a new asset o Expanded square footage of an existing asset with associated new use o Project results in a durable, long lasting asset, with a useful life of at least 15 years •Transfers CIP Guiding Principles The city and department prioritize investments both across and within funds based on the following guiding principles: 1. Capital improvements should be consistent with and implement Council accepted master plans and strategic plans. 2 2. Capital improvements should achieve Community Sustainability Goals: a.Environmental – sustainable materials, construction practices, renewable resources, etc. b.Social – enhancements that improve accessibility to city services and resources provided to the community c.Economic – effective and efficient use of public funds across the community. 3.As potential capital investments are identified, the city must demonstrate in the CIP process that there are sufficient funds to operate and maintain the project or program. This approach adopted by BPRD is reflected in the Total Cost of Facility Operations (TCFO) policy of the department. 4. The CIP should provide enough capacity and flexibility in long-term planning to be able to respond to emerging, unanticipated needs. 5. The CIP should maintain and enhance the supporting city-wide “business systems”, such as information and finance systems, for the city over the long term. 6. The CIP should sustain or improve maintenance of existing assets before investing in new assets. 7.Capital improvements should: a. Meet legal mandates from federal, state, or city levels; b. Maintain or improve public safety and security; c. Leverage external investments; d. Promote community partnerships; and e.Reduce operating costs and improve efficiency. 8. Capital programming should maximize efficiency of investments demonstrated by measurable cost/benefit analyses and coordination of projects across departments within and across funds. 9. The CIP should provide sufficient reserves to allow for a sound fiscal foundation with benefits that include: a.A strong bond rating; and b.The ability to address emergencies and natural disasters. To plan and prioritize capital investments, department staff applies specific guiding principles based on the city’s CIP Guiding Principles and the department’s master plan goals. The following departmental framework is also utilized to determine and plan CIP projects and make budget decisions that are sustainable over time. These priorities are also focused on maintaining the integrity of the current infrastructure and facilities before expanding and/or enhancing programs and facilities. 3 1. Safety/Compliance (S) – Projects represent important deficiencies and are essential safety and compliance concerns. Projects may include ongoing infrastructure repairs, replacements and/or refurbishments of park play equipment and amenities, irrigation systems, landscape and turf upgrades and facility improvements. Compliance considerations also include meeting local, state and federal requirements that are required to be completed to comply with specific regulations, such as city ‘dark sky’ lighting ordinance and the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). 2.Commitment (C) – Projects that are required by law/ballot (e.g., Elks Park), are in-process of development (e.g., Valmont Community Park), as part of a prior development agreement, are recommended as part of the department master plan (e.g., playground and irrigation system renovations) and/or are required to be completed within a specific period. 3.Efficiencies (E) – The department will consistently seek efficiency improvements in both operational and capital investments. Projects will represent important operational and/or maintenance efficiencies resulting in improved life cycles, cost efficiencies and savings in resources, energy or water usage (e.g., Flatirons Golf Course irrigation system replacement, computerized irrigation system). 4. Revenue (R) – The department will invest in facilities and programs that generate revenues to support valued recreational opportunities in the Boulder community. Projects will enhance the department's ability to earn more revenue after initial investment and operational costs are considered (e.g. Flatirons Golf Course playability enhancements) and/or possible collaboration/partnerships leveraging outside funding sources. BPR Draft 2020-2025 CIP 6-Year PlanProjectsDescription/Comments2020 Projected2021 Projected 2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025)Aquatics Facility Capital EnhancementsBased on recommendations of the 2015 Boulder Aquatics Feasibility Plan, this project provides implementation of priority indoor and outdoor pool enhancements for Boulder's aquatics programs. In 2020, funding will provide the final touches to the new Scott Carpenter pool with infrastructure and equipment to operate the facility. In 2021, the East Boulder Community Center leisure pool will be redesigned with community input to determine a new and improved family aquatics experience. This work will include a new multi-use leisure pool for warm water classes and instruction, a new kids play structure and an outdoor splash pad will be completed in 2022 in partnership with Facilities and Asset Management funding necessary facility repairs. Finally, in 2025, funding is provided to partner with City Transportation to begin the design of the 30th street improvements along Scott Carpenter park to remain in compliance with necessary infrastructure required through the city's regulatory planning and development review process for Scott Carpenter Pool enhancements. The construction of the 30th street improvements is anticipated to be approximately $1M and is required to be complete by 2026. 575,000$ 120,000$ 2,000,000$ 250,000$ 2,945,000$ Athletic Field Capital EnhancementsBased on key recommendations of the Athletic Field Study, this program will allow implementation of field repairs and enhancements including turf, field renovations and expansion to accommodate additional capacity for sports uses. Average cost for a complete renovation of an irrigation system is $63K and which is necessary to ensure preventative maintenance of the systems. System failures can lead to field closures and loss of revenue from field use. In 2020, funding is provided for replacement of all the scoreboards at Pleasantview Fields and Gerald Stazio Sports Complex. The two premier revenue generating facilities for the department.160,000$ 63,000$ 63,000$ 286,000$ Natural Lands Management The department's natural lands team manages over 1,000 acres of wildlife and vegetation conservation areas to support the regions vulnerable ecosystems within urban areas. Capital funding helps support planning and implementation of critical conservation measures and management strategies on the properties. In 2021, funding will provide an opportunity to partner with other department's in developing a comprehensive restoration plan for Boulder Creek to balance recreation and public use with maintaining the streams ecosystem which is critical to Boulder. In 2023, funding will allow the department to complete and inventory and prioritization of the department's populations of prairie dogs across the system to better manage the colonies aligned with the department's goals. In 2024, funding will allow the department to begin relocation of the prairie dogs at Valmont Park to allow for the next phase of planned improvements.50,000$ 75,000$ 500,000$ 625,000$ Boulder Reservoir South Shore Capital EnhancementsContinuing to implement the 2012 Master Plan and recent Site Management Plan, this project will provide key improvements to the south shore recreation area and various visitor amenities to serve the region. Funding is planned through 2025 to continue key enhancement priorities that are outlined each year in the site management plan. Projects include a variety of amenities including dock repairs, trail connections, pavilions, facility maintenance, road repair, landscaping, signage and parking lot repair.100,000$ 515,000$ 120,000$ 1,300,000$ 355,000$ 721,500$ 3,111,500$ Attachment B ProjectsDescription/Comments2020 Projected2021 Projected 2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025)Columbia Cemetery Capital MaintenanceThe cemetery is a designated landmark and requires ongoing maintenance to meet the preservation requirements associated with all the infrastructure ranging from headstones, markers, ornamental fencing and grounds maintenance. This project will provide necessary funding to complete projects as well as local match for leveraging state grant funds.32,000$ 40,000$ 32,000$ 32,000$ 136,000$ Urban Forest ManagementThis project provides annual funding to continue the EAB response by allowing critical safety measures of removing identified trees throughout the city and replacing with new tree species to slow the spread of the pest and ensure safety of the public as well as expanded urban forest management practices. This project also provides treatment of trees designated for preservation and associated infrastructure improvements such as irrigation to ensure sustainability of the new trees.500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 3,000,000$ Flatirons Golf Course Capital EnhancementsThe Flatirons Golf Course is the only public course in Boulder and provides a highly desired recreation amenity while also contributing to funding sources through revenue generation. The golf course has many planned enhancements to ensure playability and provide necessary visitor amenities. This project will provide design and construction of a new pro shop, clubhouse and staff office to replace the former events center that was demolished as a result of the 2013 flood. The design of the replacement facility will occur in 2019, permitting in 2020 and construction to begin in 2021. In 2024, funding is provided to allow for various course improvements.2,195,000$ 2,805,000$ 500,000$ 5,500,000$ Department Master Plan UpdateThis project will provide funding for consultants and staff to complete a 5-year update to the department's master plan to ensure alignment of departmental programs, services and facilities to meet the needs and goals of the community. This project will include various research tools such as a recreation facilities and programs assessment, an updated community survey and outreach to all members of the community to analyze the mission and offerings of the department. A comprehensive historic and cultural plan will be completed in conjunction with this master plan update to provide for goals and recommendations to ensure the sustainability of the departments' historic and cultural assets over time.140,000$ 140,000$ 280,000$ Neighborhood and Community Park Capital MaintenanceThis project provides funding for asset maintenance throughout the system as well as a complete renovation of one neighborhood park annually to meet the goals outlined within the BPR Master Plan and Capital Investment Strategy. The renovations typically include playground replacement, irrigation renovation, forestry maintenance, ADA compliance and shelter repairs. The current list of parks within the CIP include:2019 - Chautauqua Park2020 - Skatepark 2021 -North Boulder Park2022 - East Boulder Community Park2023 - Martin Park2024 - Parkside Park560,000$ 900,000$ 500,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 4,660,000$ ProjectsDescription/Comments2020 Projected2021 Projected 2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025)Capital Infrastructure Enhancements and Partnership OpportunitiesThis project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. Currently undeveloped park sites such as Violet Park in north Boulder and Eaton Park in Gunbarrel have planned amenities that need to be implemented to meet service levels of surrounding neighborhoods. Other properties have seen a dramatic shift in land use adjacent to the park and warranting a redevelopment option to serve more residents such as Mapleton Ballfields. Additionally, this project will provide implementation of planned amenities at developed park sites that haven't been constructed such as restrooms, ballfields, additional sport courts and play areas. The Recreation Facility Needs Assessment completed in 2020 will also outline future priorities that will be funded through this project that will enhance the existing recreation facilities. In 2020, funding is provided to construct a restroom and pavilion at the East Boulder Community Park to serve the park users and many sports teams who use the fields. This is the only community park left without a restroom and has been planned for many years. In 2021, funding is identified to improve portions of Violet Park in north Boulder. Plans will be finalized and prioritized in 2020.400,000$ 793,300$ 1,580,000$ 1,000,000$ 3,773,300$ Parking Lot Capital MaintenanceBPR manages approximately 20 different parking lots across the system with a current replacement value of $5.5M. Current backlog of maintenance is estimated at $2M which increases annually due to the deterioration of asphalt in poor condition. This project provides critical funding to renovate and renew existing parking lots to ensure safety of visitors and access to a variety of parks and recreation facilities. Individual parking lot repairs are prioritized through the department's asset management system and identified for construction efficiencies based on locations. In 2020, maintenance will be performed on the existing lot at Valmont Park due to improve the surfacing and reduce the amount of maintenance required each year.180,000$ 180,000$ Recreation Facility Capital MaintenanceBased on recommendations of the 2016 Facility Strategic Plan and upcoming Recreation Needs Assessment, this program will provide annual capital funding for implementation of key facility repairs and renovations at the city's three recreation centers to ensure acceptable facility conditions and continue cost-effectively meeting the needs of health and wellness opportunities within Boulder. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Division of Public Works. In 2022, facility maintenance will be focused on the East Boulder Community Center in conjunction with the planned improvements to the leisure pool.500,000$ 500,000$ 1,000,000$ ProjectsDescription/Comments2020 Projected2021 Projected 2022 Projected2023 Projected2024 Projected2025 Projected6 Year Total (2020-2025)Play Court Capital MaintenanceBPR manages approximately 52 courts supporting basketball, tennis, handball and other uses. Funding must be programmed to maintain the courts to ensure safety and accessibility for the community. In 2020, improvements will be made to the courts behind the North Boulder Recreation Center, striping for pickleball at various locations as well as crack filling and repairs to a variety of courts within the system. In 2022, additional pickleball courts will be developed at the East Boulder Community Park in conjunction with other planned improvements. BPR does not currently have dedicated pickleball courts to serve the growing number of players with the trend of pickleball increasing in popularity.56,000$ 100,000$ 156,000$ Valmont City Park Phase 2 DevelopmentThis project provides for the development of the next major phase of Valmont City Park, south of Valmont Road. Potential amenities to be built include adventure playground elements, community garden space, a splash pad, skate elements, an event pavilion and additional parking. Final plans will be completed in 2023 to determine amenities for development as well as available funding. Final design and permitting will occur in 2024 with construction to commence in 2025. This project also allows for increased park service to the surrounding areas of east Boulder as well as the entire Boulder community.147,500$ 2,000,000$ 2,147,500$ Annual Total Budget 4,898,000$ 5,823,300$ 3,760,000$ 4,450,000$ 4,434,500$ 4,434,500$ 27,800,300$ 43 a b c d e f g h i j k Jay Rd tS ht82tS ht03tS ht74tS ht91US H w y 3 6 Monarch Rd Canyon Blvd Iris Ave Pine St Baseline Rd Lee H i l l D r tS mosloFdR enipStS ht9Valmont Rd Arapahoe Av Pearl St Pearl Pk w ydR egatS edlOWalnut St tS ht67tS ts16Linden Dr South Boulder Rd Colorado Ave tS ht75Violet Ave Mineral Rd tS ht71Gil l a sp i e D rFlagstaff RdtS ht55Independence Rd dR elavyrrehCF o o t h i l l s P kw y Balsam Ave Mapleton Ave Yarmouth Ave Lookout Rd Sunshine Ca n y o n D r Edgewood D r College Ave Spruce St tS ts17State Hwy 119 Marshall Rd Kalmia Ave University Ave tS dr36tS ht55tS ht57tS ht55Foothills PkwyyawdaorBtS ht03Diagonal Hwy28 t h S t Baseline RdBaseline Rd Table Mesa DrtS ht9Valmont Rd GreenbriartS ht82tS dr36B r o a dw a y South Boulder CreekSkunk CreekBoulder Creek Goose Creek W o n d e r l a n d C r e e k 4-Mile Creek Bear Cr e e k Viele Channel Capital Investment Strategy Map February 2016 A B C D E A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Legend Major Capital Investments Park Assets (over 20 years) Nature Areas within 10 minute walk of Parks (1/2 mile) Bike and Ped Trails Designated Bike Route On Street Bike Lane Paved Shoulder Parks Community Areas Maintained by Parks Natural Lands Schools Open Space and Mountain Parks County Open Space Main Creeks YSI /Housing Partner Sites City Limit 1 a Map ID L O CA T IO N 1 Boulder Reser v oir 2 F latir ons G olf Cour se 3 V almont City P ar k 4 P ear l Str eet Mall 5 Civ ic Ar ea P ar k 6 Staz io Ath letic F ields 7 P leasant V iew F ileds 8 Satelitte Ath letic F ields 9 Map leton Sp or ts P ar k 10 Tom W atson P ar k 11 Sc ott Car p enter P ool 12 Sp r uc e P ool 13 Nor th Boulder Rec Center 14 South Boulder Rec Center 15 East Boulder Rec Center 16 Coot L ak e 17 Columb ia Cemeter y 18 Andr ew s Ar b or etum 19 Har b ec k House 20 Haw th or n Com G ar dens 21 Haer ting Sc ulp tur e G ar den 22 Hic k or y Community G ar den 23 Ar ea I I I 24 V iolet P ar k 25 Boulder J unc tion Rail P laz a 25 Boulder J unc tion P ar k 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 3 7 9 2 15 14 11 5 4 17 21 19 22 18 13 12 25 6 10 16 20 24 23 BPR CAPI T A L I N V E S T M E N T STRATEGI C P L A N 2 0 1 6- 2 0 2 6 Prepared f o r t h e C a pi t al I n v e s t m e n t T e a m January 2 0 1 6 BPR CAPITAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2026 Prepared by the Capital Investment Team March 2016 Capital Investment Strategy Boulder P&R 100+ Years of Excellence CIS Three Top Projects Scott Carpenter Pool $8M Boulder Reservoir $3M Valmont City Park South $4M In 2014 the City Council adopted the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan and guiding principles. This plan reected over two years of public input as to the future of the urban park system. The master plan identied a clear vision, mission and six core themes to implement the community vision. In addition to the BPRD Master Plan the department has undertaken a number of site plan studies that were identied in the master planning process required to meet future park and recreation needs or address current deciencies. These plans have been summarized in the Capital Investment Strategic Plan. The Capital Investment Strategy provides a development framework plan with specic, implementable urban park design and development recommendations for the enhancement of Boulder’s urban park system. The strategy addresses the need to invest up to $40 million in existing assets as well as $24 million in backlog or enhancements and the desire to invest an additional $60 million in new facilities as identied in the department’s Master Plan over the next ten years. This strategy includes three areas of focus that builds on the vision and values set by the master plan desired to be achieved over the next 10 years through strategic investments in the CIP process. The plan includes a long-term investment strategy as well as an action-oriented implementation strategy that includes both public and private sector investment and partnership opportunities. The project calls for a new 50-meter 10-lane pool would be built for $8 million and an outdoor water park to the site for $5.3 million. The project calls for a new bathhouse and administration building, upgrades to south shore amenities and repairs to boat house and maintenance building. Phase one includes completion of disc golf course, nature playground, picnic area and shelters. Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D r Lee H i l l D rddRReeggggaattSSeeddllOOA 1 2 8 The 1910 Plan for Boulder by the Olmsted Brothers above established parks and open space as community priority. The 2016 Capital Strategy Map to the right builds on this 100 year legacy to invest capital in close to home parks, greenways and major attraction sites for future generations. The department has $75 million to invest over the next 10 years in capital projects. This includes $8.9 million for the Civic Area, $3.3 million for Boulder Junction that is committed. In addition the department is projecting an addition of $50 million from dedicated park funding and approximately $3-5 million from DET funding. . BPR Planning Process & Results Attachment C Asset Management Systems (AMS) Financial Background Major Facility CRV FCI 90% Standard 80% Standard Savings Backlog EBRC $18,907,343 0.10 $3,079,892 $3,146,599 $66,707 $1,962,118 NBRC $21,337,047 0.06 $5,166,970 $5,428,246 $261,276 $1,377,900 SBRC $9,376,617 0.13 $1,642,329 $1,876,919 $234,590 $1,181,104 Res-Admin $1,500,000 0.31 $837,779 $1,062,297 $224,518 $471,729 Res-Boat House $800,000 0.14 $129,476 $135,551 $6,075 $109,738 Res-Maint $750,000 0.19 $258,080 $305,886 $47,806 $144,623 Totals $52,671,007 0.10 $11,114,526 $11,955,498 $840,972 $5,247,212 Dierence between maintaining facility at 90% over 80% condition saves $840,972 and provides higher quality facilities with higher customer satisfaction. Farnsworth 10-Year Investment Strategy Current Replacement Value = $215 Million Facility Condition Index = .11 Operation & Maintenance - 4% annually of CRV estimated at $8.9 Million Preventative Maintenance (PM) plus Regular & Recurring Maintenance (RR) –2% per year of CRV estimated at $4.4 Million Deferred Maintenance (DM) - items that have not been repaired or replaced based on industry standards estimated at $24 Million. Work Completed Next Steps Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well-being of the entire Boulder communi- ty by collaboratively providing high-quality parks, facilities and programs. Community Health & Wellness Taking Care of What We Have Financial Sustainability Building Community Youth Engagement Organizational Readiness Goals In 2011 the community voted to extend the .25 Sales Tax that funded urban park and recreation facilities and programs. This extension provides an additional $2.2 million in funding available in 2016. In 2011 the community also passed a 3-year bond that provided approximately $9 million in urban park upgrades to existing facilities. In 2014 citizens approved ballot proposition 2-A that included $8.7 million for the Civic Area improvements, $5 million for Boulder Creek Path improvements and $1 for Chautauqua Park improvements. The department’s 6-year Capital Investment Plan (2017-2022 CIP) proposes a total of $40 million in investment in assets. In addition Facility and Asset Management (FAM) proposes to invest $2.7 million in major recreation facilities repairs during the same time period. This represents an annual investment in assets of approximately $7.1 million or $2 million more than outlined in the scally constrained budget of the master plan. This level of investment will maintain existing facilities as well as begin to make the level of investments in key aging facilities required to maintain public service levels. It does not address the full action or vision strategies desired by the community. The facilities portfolio is typically the most valuable asset that public park and recreation organizations manage and often are considered critical to the execution of the organization’s mission. Updating facilities management practices to reect sustainability and asset management principles for these facilities requires the application of complex, interconnected, and comprehensive facility management practices to the asset portfolio. This includes ; 1. Determining the total cost of ownership for the asset portfolio. 2. Developing systems and sta knowledge to support agency implementation of life cycle management. 3. Approval of a capital investment strategy for the agency that focuses on the organization’s mission and is nancially sustainable. This eort will take time and resources; it will require the department to prioritize asset management initiatives as a primary responsibility of our sta, park board, and community. This commitment to the asset management practices uses the simple process below, combined with long range capital investment planning. The department has already begun to address the rst three questions above. It has inventoried all major assets department wide, calculated a portfolio and established a baseline Facility Condition Index (FCI) from which to measure the condition of our portfolio: While the majority of Boulder Park and Recreation assets are in good to excellent condition approximatively 10 percent of existing assets have a poor or worse rating greater with an FCI of .30 or greater. Many of these assets have not been upgraded for a number of years with some aging infrastructure over 60 years old. Investments in these aging assets is a high priority of the department and includes renovations of the Civic Area with 2-A funding that will be constructed in 2016-2018. In addition the department has prioritized Scott Carpenter Pool and the Boulder Reservoir for complete renovations in the next few years. While these improvements and enhancements will dramatically lower our overall FCI there still remains a number of historic assets in need of ongoing repair or replacement. Taking Care of Aging Assets One of the principles of asset management is establishing benchmark standards for each asset to achieve community desired conditions. The city has hired Farnsworth Ltd. to evaluate current condition of major buldings including the three recreation centers and to develop a 10-year preventative maintenance work plan for each building. The chart at the right illustrates the life cycle curve on building maintenance to extend the overall life of a facility. The table above illustrates the investment required over 10-years to maintain facilities at 80 percent versus 90 percent condition. By maintaining facilities at a higher standard the city can increase customer satisfaction while spending less over time. Why Have High Standards? AGENDA ITEM VIII-A_ PAGE 1__ TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Ali Rhodes, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: April 27, 2020 A. Flatirons Golf Course Facility Design In 2019, the Parks and Recreation Department allocated Capital Improvement Program (CIP) funds to design a new Flatirons Golf Course Facility. The department seeks to construct a new facility or renovate and add to the existing facilities at the golf course to enhance and/or expand services currently offered at the Flatirons Golf Course. In some respects, this project began in 2014 after the demolition of the large event center that existed at the golf course and was damaged by the 2013 flood. Construction of a new club house with golf-shop, restaurant area, cart storage and administrative space has been a need since the retirement of the previous facility. Staff outlined several options to Council about how to proceed and selected the option we are working on now. The urgent need is that visitors are using the temporary restroom trailer that was intended to only be used for a few years and is not a long-term solution. This current phase is only the “concept design and cost estimating”, this is not constructing a new building. Staff have carefully evaluated the feasibility of this project continuing considering the current COVID-19 situation and deemed it to proceed. In order to successfully budget and plan, staff need to know realistically what the building needs to be (size, program), costs, realistic site constraints, permitting requirements, etc. The current design phase is $52K and was initiated in 2019 and funded through the Perm Parks and Rec Fund (funds limited to the permanent improvement of parks/rec facilities) This facility will offer enhanced golf services with a strong focus on the customer experience and flexibility in use to accommodate a variety of programs and events. Additionally, the facility will be designed to meet the City’s Energy Conservation Code and other climate action goals for energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. The building should also integrate with and reflect the area’s natural surroundings and the overall course. Project Goals 1. The priority of the facility is to provide a functional yet aesthetic facility to the golf course to support the current and expanded programs and needs. 2. The facility will serve the golf operations through community-oriented design, flexible, multi-functional spaces, and perhaps complementing existing facilities. AGENDA ITEM IX_ PAGE 2 3. The facility might be a replacement for the existing buildings on site or complement the existing buildings. 4. Deliver a well thought out and functional operations center that will reach new markets, increase revenue flow and create a first-class image that will leave a lasting impression with our guests. 5. Provide conceptual designs that consider and incorporate all relevant City of Boulder Revised Code requirements including the most recently adopted Energy Conservation Code and, where possible, incorporate aspirational goals for energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. Project Process The project process and approach graphic outlines the 3 phases of the facility design including the public participation staff and the consultant had anticipated prior to the recent circumstances. The timeline will be adjusted due to the coronavirus and as more information becomes available and PRAB will receive regular project updates. PHASE 1: Research and Scope Development (Jan. – Feb. 2020) This phase is focused on gathering background information, assessing existing conditions, and developing the goals and objectives for the project. PHASE 2: Alternative Concept Plans Development and Review (Feb. - June 2020) In this phase, the background information, goals and objectives will shape the draft alternatives for the concept plans. Staff and consultants will be seeking input from operation staff, boards, stakeholders and the community on the alternatives and ideas. PHASE 3: Preferred Concept Plan Development and Review (July – Sept. 2020) This phase is focused on developing a preferred hybrid concept plan considering community feedback in addition to existing limitations and regulations required for renovation. Public engagement will be an important part of this project. Staff will work with consultants to adjust the project as need to accommodate the recent circumstances. Timelines may need to be adjusted as well as developing creative strategies to engage the public while respecting their social distancing and the community’s capacity for engagement. B. 2021 Master Plan project update In December 2019, staff presented PRAB the approach and process anticipated for the Master Plan update. Since then, progress has been made and changes to the approach are being evaluated due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Staff are currently evaluating options to proceed with the master plan process and will update PRAB as final decisions are reached. The BPR Master Plan update is a critical project for the department to begin, even in the current environment dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. As with most planning efforts, this is envisioned to be an 18- to 24-month project, with a final product anticipated at the end of 2021. AGENDA ITEM IX_ PAGE 3 It is critical to begin this work now so the discussions that occur during the process can inform the department’s long-term response to COVID-19, from impacts to financial sustainability to questions about continued access and equity across the system. Staff has been working to refine the scope of work to reflect the current situation regarding the response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. The goal is to start the project with as much internal work completed by city staff and the consultant during this time of social distancing and facility closures. As restrictions begin to be lifted, potentially as early as next month, the project’s more external focus will also begin, as allowable. Stage 1 is intended to capture the strategic kick-off portions of the project scope, as well as the initial research phases of the project. Stage 1 is focused on the work that can be done to set the future project up for success. Some preliminary outreach will occur through the launch of the project webpage and a presence of Be Heard Boulder, but the focus of the research is to compile the status of BPR and develop the system overview outlining current conditions. This builds t he foundation of information to be shared with the community in Stage 2 of the project. Nothing in Stage 1 is subject to change related to the COVID response. These tasks can be completed with current staffing and identified funding. Should Stage 1 be completed before Stage 2 can begin, the work of Stage 1 will not be lost. Rather it will remain a f oundation for the future phases of the project to begin upon. Because Stage 1 is primarily internal and introspective, momentum on the project will not be lost if there is a delay before Stage 2 commences. Stage 2 of the project is intended to kick off once the in-person and public components of the Master Plan can be accomplished safely and effectively. In addition to revising the timing of the project in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, staff has also identified cost savings for the project. Staff is proposing to complete most of the public engagement tasks in house, including but not limited to development of content for webpage and newsletter updates, facilitation of public engagement both virtually and in-person as allowed in the future, and a written summary of each engagement window. Staff will coordinate with the consultant to ensure that the questions asked of the community are appropriate given the p roject phase and help further the master plan process overall. Staff is also proposing to limit consultant attendance at staff meetings to critical project junctions, creating additional cost efficiencies. Below is a table that outlines the previously defined project phases and how they are broken up among the project stages. Stage Phase Approx. Timeline 1 May – June 2020 1: Project Initiation and Engagement Plan May 2020 2a: Research and Trends: Internal June 2020 2 July 2020 – Dec 2021 2b: Research and Trends: External July-Aug 2020 3: Needs Assessment Sept 2020-Jan 2021 4: Implementation Plan Feb-Mar 2021 5: Final Plan and Adoption April-Dec 2021 AGENDA ITEM IX_ PAGE 4 For this Master Plan update, the department has chosen to enlist the services of a consultant tea m to assist in completing the project. Using a consultant team provides the department additional capacity to accomplish all the goals set out for the project. This capacity ensures that the project will meet the aggressive timeline set out to complete the update by the end 2021. Bringing in a consultant team also boosts the professional expertise dedicated to the project. Staff are experts in the details of the system and the community we serve. A consultant team can bring in state- wide, national and even international experience to the project that bolsters the ability to address the unique challenges and opportunities faced by our community. A Request for Proposals (RFP) was issued in early January and closed on February 14, 2020. The evaluation team reviewed the five proposals received and selected three consultant teams for interviews. Interviews were held at the end of February. Staff is currently negotiating with the selected firm to finalize their scope and cost for the contract. Once the contract is executed, PRAB will be notified of the identity of the selected firm. As the project’s adjusted scope and timeline are confirmed, staff will share an Information Packet (IP) with Council. This IP will include an update on the process, approach, consultant selection and project timeline. The first work session with Council is anticipated in late summer 2020 to review a Systems Overview Report, a foundational document that assesses the current state of the department, the system, facilities and programs. PRAB will also be involved in the review of this document prior to moving into the Needs Assessment portion of the project. PRAB Welcome Committee April 2020 Greetings Alli, Chuck, Pamela & Raj, Our fellow board member Jen Kovarik has completed her 5 year tenure on PRAB thus I remain on the PRAB Welcome Committee to get the finishing touches to our new board member Welcome Packet. Charlotte & I have had several phone meetings to get the Welcome Letter & PRAB Reference Calendar produced. The letter was approved by each of you at the February 2020 meeting & had only several minor changes to bring it to its current form. Charlotte has attached it to this packet so you can see what Jason & Tara received. There are 3 “asks” of you here: 1) Please review the attached doc titled “PRAB Reference Calendar”; come with comments changes or approvals. 2) We will need to come up with a general process for member mentors. Please consider volunteering on this committee with me to create this process. 3) We discussed at some length what the purpose of Board member bios might be. To start, we thought a brief bio for City Staff & new members would be helpful. Let’s discuss! Any use that ALL Boards & Commissions might have a not-too-detailed bio published on the City website? Keep it internal? Shall we link the bio to the Board application answers? Do we want to include a photo with each bio? Here’s a template and an example bio: _______joined PRAB in _______, lives in the _______ neighborhood, moved to Boulder in _______ & works with _______ as a _______. Mary Scott joined PRAB in 4/2018, lives in the Table Mesa neighborhood, moved to Boulder in 2003 & works primarily with Boulder Community Hospital as a Nurse Practitioner. Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on how to best welcome our new members. Best, Mary Scott Dear Name, A warm welcome to the City of Boulder PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD! We hope this welcome packet will help to start a foundation for your five years of service and ease the transition to your new position. We, your fellow Board Members and City of Boulder Parks & Recreation Staff, are eager to meet and work with you! Your staff liaison is Charlotte O’Donnell, the Administrative Specialist in the Director’s Office. She can be reached at: PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov or 303-413-7223. She will be the best point of contact for your questions. As you will learn in the Board & Commission orientation, we do not use “reply all” or group email chains to ensure that public business is conducted publicly; rather, the staff liaison can be a common point of contact. Your fellow board members are: (in order of term end date) Allison Fronzaglia allifronzaglia@gmail.com April 2018 - March 2021 Raj Seymour rseymour35@gmail.com April 2017 - March 2022 Mary Scott msboulderprab@yahoo.com April 2018 - March 2023 Pamela Yugar tapatiochick@gmail.com 626-407-7144 April 2018 - March 2023 Charles Brock Charles.a.brock@comcast.net 303-887-2523 April 2019 - March 2024 We would like to connect with each of you; please reach out at your convenience. As you will find, we all have different approaches to PRAB, and know that you will bring your own. We each look forward to talking with you soon. Several guiding questions we might consider to support our first conversation: What moved us to apply to PRAB? How would we describe the role of a PRAB member? We also are currently setting up a PRAB mentor process, which we will discuss at your first PRAB meeting next week. Our meetings are generally held on the last Monday of each month, in City Council Chambers. There will be months in which we start early, with a tour of a park or facility, and some mon ths we will meet in different locations. Please pay attention to your calendar appointments from PRABAdmin@bouldercolorado.gov. Dinner is always provided; please notify the staff liaison about any dietary restrictions so that our meals can be inclusive. Please note that due to COVID restrictions, the next PRAB meeting on Monday, April 27 at 6:00pm will be held remotely. Parks and Recreation is a large department serving the needs of the people and the environment in our city. As you begin to acquaint yourself with all of the services provided, please feel free to ask questions and explore resources like the Parks and Recreation website as well as the PRAB website. Our community outreach toolkit will help you navigate upcoming meetings and potential communications from community members. Being on a board will often require reviewing somewhat large volumes of information. Foundational materials for PRAB include the PRAB Handbook and the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. As we prepare to embark on the Master Plan update, please familiarize yourself with this document as quickly as possible as it will be very helpful for you feeling inclu ded in the issues that will be discussed in the coming years. Parks and Recreation has excellent social media accounts (this page has the various platform information as well as email lists to which you can subscribe). You are invited to follow the accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as BPR’s official philanthropic partner, the Play Boulder Foundation, to learn more about events and the work of Parks and Recreation. We look forward to collaborating with you, soon! PRAB PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR Date / Time Event / Task Location Details Mondays, 6pm Attend PRAB Meetings Various, Details will be emailed in advance and posted online here. • Location changes, so please check your email each month. • Dinner is provided before each meeting from 5:30-5:55pm. • PRAB meetings will run from 6-7:30pm (meetings may go as late as 9pm depending agenda). • Remaining PRAB meetings for 2020 are as follows: • April 27, 2020 • May TBD, 2020 • June 22, 2020 • July 27, 2020 • August 24, 2020 • September 28, 2020 • October 26, 2020 • November 23, 2020 • December 21, 2020 Spring 2020 Self- orientation • Meet fellow board members individually. • Meet with your board mentor. • Submit your bio to be distributed to fellow PRAB members and PR staff. • Please familiarize yourself with the following resources: • City of Boulder Website • Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Website • Parks and Recreation Master Plan • 5-year Progress Report • PRAB Handbook • PRAB community outreach toolkit • Parks and Recreation social media accounts Summer 2020 Meet with City Staff TBD Please reach out to the following City Staff to arrange meetings. Contact information can be found here. • Jeff Hailey, Parks & Planning Manager • Jackson Hite, Business Services Manager • Stephanie Munro, Regional Facilities Manager • Megan Lohmann, Programs & Partnerships Manager • Margo Josephs, Community Outreach Manager • Dennis Warrington, Urban Parks Manager • Denise White, Communications Specialist • Bryan Beary, Recreation Manager – District Services PRAB ORIENTATION CALENDAR (continued) Date / Time Event / Task Location Details TBD Attend Welcome party Council Chambers Mingle with incoming and outgoing Board and Commission members and City Council Members TBD Attend Orientation with City Clerk and Attorney (REQUIRED) TBD • Meet with City Attorney and various other officials regarding your duties and obligations as a Board and Commission Member • Required for your tenure on PRAB TBD Meet with Director of Parks and Recreation TBD • Please check email for contact from Charlotte O'Donnell, your liaison between PRAB and the Parks and Recreation City Staff • Time to be arranged to answer questions that you and the Department may have for each other: Please bring your questions to this meeting! • Staff will order your meeting name plate, t-shirt and official name badge for events and note any dietary restrictions. Monday, April 27, 2020, 6pm Attend your first PRAB meeting TBD • Please review the agenda and meeting packet emailed to you in advance of the meeting. • PRAB meetings will run from 6-7:30pm (may go as late as 9pm depending agenda). May 2020 Tour Sites TBD • Please check email and listen for discussion at your meetings for dates for this tour of select locations • Opportunity for new and sitting board/commission members to take a tour of select sites of interest associated with the work that you will do on this board Autumn 2020 TBD Attend the PRAB Retreat TBD • Members volunteer to begin annual letter to Council • Committee annual check-in • Year-end review by City Staff Ongoing Participate in Additional Opportunities TBD Examples include: joint board meetings with other boards and commissions, new committee work and attendance at Parks and Recreation community engagement and masterplan engagement events.