Loading...
12.17.2019 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD East Boulder Community Center, Eldorado Room, 5660 Sioux Dr, 6:00 p.m., December 17, 2019 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2019 Jennifer Kovarik (Chair) Raj Seymour (Vice-Chair) Charles Brock Allison Fronzaglia Mary Scott Valerie Yates Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I.APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II.FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III.PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to 3 minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV.CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A.Approval of October 28, 2019 Meeting Minutes B.Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V.ITEMS FOR ACTION (6:20) A.Chautauqua Park - Playground Renovation VI.ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:40) A.2020-2021 Master Plan Update VII.MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (7:00) A.Harbeck – Bergheim House Lease VIII.MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:15) A.Subcommittee Updates: Onboarding, Community Engagement and Letter to Council B.PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal update) This portion of the meeting is for members of the board to report on PRAB’s annual work plan goal of each member: attending two or more parks and recreation-related community activities per month; promoting parks and recreation through social media; attending site tours; and supporting the department’s partnership initiatives. IX.NEXT BOARD MEETING: Monday, January 27, 2020 X.ADJOURN PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared December 11, 2019) January 27, 2020 •BPR 2020 Workplan (md) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •Pottery Lab (d/i) •BPR and Climate Initiatives (md) •Valmont Programming Contracts (d/i) •Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (d/i) •Civic Park Art Donation (d/i) (allow 1 hr) • February 24, 2020 •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •Chautauqua Sustainability and Resilience Strategy (md) •Volunteer Program Update (c) •Pottery Lab (a) •Civic Park Art Donation (a) •Valmont Programming Contracts (a) •Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (a) • March 23, 2020 •2021 Budget Strategy & Review 2020 Actuals: (d/i) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) April 27, 2020 •Board appointments (p) •Election of officers (p) •First meeting for new Board members (p) •2021 Budget Strategy: o 2021-2026 CIP (1st touch) (md) o Facility Fee Scenarios (1st touch) (d/i) •New Member Orientation (mb) (attach workplan) •PRAB Mentors for New Members (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) May 25, 2020 •2021 Budget Strategy o 2021-26 CIP (2nd touch) (d/i) o 2021 Facility Fees •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 22, 2020 •2021 Budget Strategy o 2021-26 CIP (Hearing and Approval) (a) o Operating Budget (md) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) July 27, 2020 •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) August 24, 2020 •PRAB Retreat Planning (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) September 28, 2020 •Operating Budget Update (md) •PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) October 26, 2020 •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) November 23, 2020 •Capital Project Update (md) •PRAB Retreat Follow Up (Letter to Council) (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) December 21, 2020 •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) October 28, 2019 •Community Gardens (md) •Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation Plan (d/i) •2020 Operating Budget and Recreation Fee Update (md) •Chautauqua Sustainability and Resilience Strategy (md) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •Boards and Commissions Annual Recruitment Questionnaire (mb) •PRAB Retreat Follow Up (Letter to Council) (mb) November 25, 2019 •Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation Plan (a) •Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (d/i) •2020/2021 Master Plan Update - Scope and Approach (d/i) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) •PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) December 17, 2019 •Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation Plan (a) •Harbeck-Bergheim House Lease (md) •2020/2021 Master Plan Update - Scope and Approach (d/i) •PRAB Subcommittee Update (mb) •PRAB Community Engagement (mb) Agenda Item: II 1 PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD FUTURE BOARD ITEMS (prepared December 11, 2019) LEGEND Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided) Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department. Clarifying questions are to be discussed prior to board approval of the consent agenda. Discussion/Information Item(d/i): An item likely to become a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in- depth presentation of background, financial/social/environmental impacts, public process, staff analysis and next steps (e.g., presentation of major project initiative) Matters from the Department (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in- depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item Matters from the Board (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item Agenda Item: II 2 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: Oct 28, 2019 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Michael Warstler, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Alli Fronzaglia, Mary Scott, Raj Seymour, Jennifer Kovarik, Valerie Yates and Charles Brock Board Members Absent: Pam Yugar Staff Present: Ali Rhodes, Jeff Haley, Michael Warstler, Bryan Beary, Yvette Bowden, Stephanie Munro, Megann Lohman, Jackson Hite, Stacie Hoffman, Stacy Cole, Morgan Gardner Guests Present: James Hewat, Kate Dunlap, Tom Buzbee, Michelle Wind Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:02 p.m. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Bowden shared the events coming up Agenda Item 3: Public Participation No public participation Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from September 23, 2019 Minutes from September 23rd, 2019 were approved as amended. Amendment: Clarification of comment related to Chautauqua Park planning: Expression of interest in how city parks will address seniors and those aging in the community. B.Development and Operations Update The Board had the following questions and/or comments: •When will the Foothills underpass be completed? Agenda Item 5: Action Item A. None Agenda Item 6: Discussion Item A.Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation Plan Haley presented this item to the Board Agenda Item: IV-A 1 The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Discussion of tennis and half-court pickle ball court options. • Question about bicycle loop: Provides children in Chautauqua neighborhood access to a place to learn to ride their bike (well received by community). • Shared concerns about bicycles and community members outside of Chautauqua community traveling to the park to ride bicycles. • Shade and location of benches/picnic areas? • Curious about specific adaptive/inclusive play elements. Is the community happy with play element choices? • Select natural elements that fit into the environment (stay away from equipment with lights/noise). Explore non-electrically powered park equipment. • Create art nooks and interactive natural elements on the trail. • Keep Chautauqua a natural space and have the park reflect that. • Who are the primary users of this playground? Who uses the majority of parking? • How will the park renovation impact parking? • Question about removal of dead vegetation and Emerald Ash bore infested trees. Desires to replant healthy vegetation. • Question about tennis court reservation/booking conflicts/programs/lessons. • Will the shuttle bus be able to accommodate bicycles (bike racks)? • Expressed appreciation for Chautauqua meeting setup and comment collection. Feedback that community members were happy with the process. • Feedback for amenities and budget – what are the most expensive elements? • Key elements: hill slide, climbing boulder, upgraded playhouse – unique elements to Chautauqua. Play structure can be used by 5-12-year-old age group. • Prioritize Flatiron climbing rock and refurbished playhouse. • Will PRAB be provided further input about this project? • Who determined 2-5 and 5-12 age groups? What about 13-18-year-olds? B. 2020 Aquatic Nuisance Species Program Cole presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Does Boulder currently allow Type 5 vessels in the reservoir? Should consider eliminating highest risk vessels. • Staffing and time required for the decontamination process - even if limited to most at- risk watercraft. • Do boats currently get inspected/decontaminated if they leave the reservoir? Agenda Item: IV-A 2 • How is the ANS infestation spread? What about overflows from neighboring bodies of water? • How many trailered craft use the reservoir? Would there be major concern if we barred Type 5 vessels from the reservoir? • Is there any way to install a filter between the Boulder Reservoir and Six-Mile Reservoir? • Significant risks from North Shore access point and illegal circumventing of pass system. • Can community groups help communicate the message/educate other boaters? • Infinite risk from surrounding bodies of water being fed into the reservoir – evaluate risk quantitatively. • Combine options in order to find common ground/compromise to meet needs of community members. • Explore what happens if/when the reservoir gets contaminated. • Recreation priority index – cost will be passed to the user. • If a craft goes through the full decontamination process is there a risk to staff members? • Where does the runoff from decontamination go? • Support for scheduled decontamination (user must schedule a time). • How many permits sold? • Consider options for monthly access use? • What is the outreach to non-boaters (anglers, etc)? • Can a gate be installed at the North Shore parking lot? Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Department A. 2020 Flatirons Golf Course Fees Buzbee presented this item to the Board The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Concerns that Flatirons Golf Course is not a “beginners” course. • Interest in expanding beginner and intermediate game play. • Continue to work on affordability and accessibility. • Consider option for payment plans/pricing. • What does success look like after fee adjustment? What metrics will be used to quantify success? • Why are we proposing lower annual pass cost than local competitors? • Thoughts that fees proposed are acceptable – encourages golfing. Agenda Item: IV-A 3 B. 2020 Athletic Field Rental Fees Lohman presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Who determines which group pays fees? • How does this impact staff pay rate? • Will fees be reviewed in the future as well? • Equivalency for staff pay rate and field painting fee (cost capture). C. Chautauqua Sustainability and Resilience Strategy Hewat presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Why hasn’t the rest of the City of Boulder not considered similar options? • What about Emerald Ash Bore infestation/vegetation? • Important work paying attention to changes to the ecosystem. Worries about tree species/vegetation not being able to survive and how that will impact the City of Boulder. • Question about microgrid and why? D. Community Gardens Lohman presented this item to the Board. The Board had the following questions and/or comments: • Why did community gardens not move forward with the 5-year contract (even with option to amend)? • Concerned that Community Gardens might not be interested in future contracts? Agenda Item 8: Matters from the Board A. Boards and Commissions Annual Recruitment Questionnaire -Why do you want to be on this board? -In five years, what would you be proud to share about being on the PRAB? -Link to master plan – what might you consider proposing (question 6) -Ask questions that require research and expertise. -Board has recommended making a draft due Friday, November 1st, 2019. Agenda Item: IV-A 4 B.November and December Meeting Dates -November Meeting: Monday, November 25th, 2019 -December Meeting: Tuesday, December 17th, 2019 C.PRAB Community Engagement Updates – Members of the PRAB participated in the following outreach activities over the course of the last month: Fronzaglia attended: None Brock attended: Art donation meeting Yates attended: Art donation meeting Scott attended: Chautauqua community meeting Seymour attended: None Kovarik attended: Chautauqua community meeting, Civic Area events D. PRAB Retreat Follow Up -Finalized working groups for community engagement, onboarding, letter to council and 2020 work plan. Agenda Item 9: Next Board Meeting: Monday November 25, 2019 Agenda Item 10: Adjourn: There being no further business to come before the Board at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 8:45 p.m. Approved by: Attested: _________________________ ________________________ Jennifer Kovarik Michael Warstler Board Member Administrative Specialist Date _____________________ Date ____________________ Agenda Item: IV-A 5 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Ali Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: December 17, 2019 A. Approval of Minutes from October 28, 2019 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. •Boulder Reservoir Site Management Plan: Staff continues to develop the plan with updates in process to ensure the plan includes the most current information and will be useful in future guidance. The plan is anticipated to be complete with staff review for presentation to PRAB in early 2020. •Engagement Coordination Committee: •The City of Boulder organization achieved the significant honor of being named the USA Organization of the Year by the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2). This prestigious award recognized the value of our work together over the past two years to create a culture of meaningful and inclusive engagement in Boulder. The City of Boulder also won the International Organization of the Year award! This honor was announced Oct. 30 at the IAP2 Australasia Conference, held in Sydney, Australia. The judges praised our organization for our “unfettered, intensive and collaborative response” to the community feedback we received about our engagement processes and noted that the result has been empowerment of both city employees and residents. Agenda Item: IV-B 1 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • The Engaging Local Government Leaders (ELGL) organization amplifies the good in local government by engaging the brightest minds, encouraging joy in public service and welcoming new ideas and technology. ELGL has named the City of Boulder a 2019 Best Local Government Workplaces Meagle Award Winner! The award recognizes local governments that have developed, cultivated and nurtured the best workplaces for encouraging employee creativity, loyalty and success. • Save the date for the next What’s Up Boulder. April 9, 2020 is the next community-wide open house. This well attended event boasts participation from almost every City department highlighting projects across the City. It makes a convenient one stop shop to get an overview of the 2020 projects, initiative and events. • Flatirons Golf Course Facility Enhancements: Ten submissions to the request for proposals for the facility project were reviewed by a committee of 5 staff members. One of the proposals was selected to proceed to contract negotiation. More information will be provided once the contract negotiation is complete. • Skatepark and Pump Track Enhancements: The skatepark at Scott Carpenter Park has served Boulder and the front range for many years but needs renovation and enhancement. Currently, staff understands that existing skate facilities within Boulder don’t meet the recent trends and demand for skaters and riders within the community and would like to improve the facilities that support this important recreation activity. Many Boulder residents must travel to other communities to experience different types of features and amenities to advance their abilities. The only formal skatepark within the city is at Scott Carpenter Park, which needs updating and refreshing. In addition to the Scott Carpenter skatepark, a DIY area was recently constructed at Valmont City Park, called the Green Block Project , that was designed and built by community partners and installed at the park. This area is primarily a street/plaza course that provides opportunities that don’t exist at the Scott Carpenter Park. In addition, a paved pump track has been proposed for Valmont City Park. This pump track will complement the existing track at Valmont Bike Park, providing additional biking features for all skill levels. To address the needs for skating and biking in Boulder, staff is completing a project in 2020 to design and build new skate and pump track features and will be listening to the community to understand the needs and desires of skaters and riders in Boulder. The goal of the project is to create flexible and multi-use features that accommodate a variety of skill levels and abilities while also ensuring innovative design ideas that provide features that aren’t provided in nearby parks. The community will be engaged early and often throughout the project to ensure the community has input and collaboration throughout the process. A public meeting in early December allowed staff and the contractors to provide information related to the project budget and schedule, as well as seek input and ideas Agenda Item: IV-B 2 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 from the community to design and build a park that provides the widest range of skill levels and styles within the project budget. To support the project, staff has engaged a team of contractors who are leaders in the industry and will provide their information and ideas for the community to consider and give feedback. The public meeting information is posted on the project web page along with a questionnaire that will remain open until Dec. 19 for additional community feedback from those who were unable to attend the meeting. Staff will provide PRAB with a feedback summary in Jan. • Sustainability and Resilience Strategy for Chautauqua: The Colorado Chautauqua Historic District is one of Boulder's most beloved and significant landmarks. However, climate change and other environmental factors pose serious risks to Boulder, and Chautauqua is no exception. In 2019, the City of Boulder and the Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA) partnered to begin creating a Chautauqua Sustainability & Resilience Strategy to determine how this landmark can best be preserved for future generations. In line with the city's resilience strategy, the project will identify site vulnerabilities and sensitive historic resources while developing a long-term plan for achieving sustainability and resilience at Chautauqua. The resulting strategy will serve as a model of sustainable practices for the community and historic districts around the country. This project is being managed by staff of the Historic Preservation program with support from multiple City departments, including Parks and Recreation. Please visit the project page for more details. • Violet Park Planning - Staff has had the opportunity to work with a CU Environmental Design class to engage students in developing some ideas for what the park could look like, and to provide some initial concepts for the park design. Staff anticipate that if the neighbors enjoy some of the design themes, and if they meet the design and operation standards of the department, that these ideas can be further explored through a formal design process. This initial neighborhood engagement allows the community to share their goals and desires for the park, respond to some of the design themes presented by the students, and gives an opportunity for the students to have a real-life experience in facilitating a community meeting. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: • BPR Master Plan Process and Approach (Discussion Item); • Chautauqua Park -Playground Renovation (Action Item); • Design Standards Manual; • Harbeck-Bergheim House (Discussion Item); and • International Peace Garden. Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. • Civic Area Restroom: The restroom project is underway with the Water/Sewer tie-ins completed and the slab for the restroom has been poured. The electric conduit has been Agenda Item: IV-B 3 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 stubbed outside of the library building and is ready to be connected to the restroom. The concrete contractor will be pouring the sidewalk connections to the restroom slab. Currently staff project the restroom being completed by the end of January with the following key tasks: •Foothills Parkway Underpass: The Transportation Department has started construction on the Foothills Underpass Project near Colorado Ave. and Foothills Parkway. This project is located adjacent to Park East Park. Park East Park will experience some impacts during construction. Information on the Foothills Underpass Project can be found here. •Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement: Construction activities continue with the Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement Project. This past month’s activities included continued work on the lap and recreation pools and the lazy river. Notable work included beginning work on lap pool tile and installation of the steel members for the curved roof of the renovated bathhouse. Curved roof steel installation Lap Pool tenting and tile installation Upcoming activities include continued wall construction at the recreation pool, steel and masonry block wall installation at the bathhouse, continued lap pool tile work, multi-use path construction, and installation of ball field poles. Please note that the east west path between the 29th St. parking lot and 30th St. is currently closed. Pedestrians and cyclists are being detoured north to Arapahoe and south to the Boulder Creek Path. General information and construction photos and updates can be found here on the Scott Carpenter Pool Enhancement project website. Agenda Item: IV-B 4 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 • Boulder Reservoir, Visitor Services Center: Construction of the new Visitor Services Center (VSC) at the Boulder Reservoir continues. Activities over the last month have included roof installation, interior utilities and wall layout, and on-going work around the building. Interior wall layout and utility installation Vestibule construction General information and construction updates can be found here on the Boulder Reservoir Visitor Services Center Redevelopment project webpage. • Construction Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Verizon Wireless at South Boulder Recreation Center. Natural Lands • Urban Wildlife Management: A contractor working for OSMP finished the active relocation of prairie dogs from the Foothills Park area, both OSMP and Parks property, in October. Also in October, all prairie dog colonies on Parks property were mapped. This data is used to inform the Urban Wildlife Management Plan and city prairie dog practices for the upcoming year. The data also helps the department make informed decision related to wildlife resources and site use. Through November, staff has passively relocated prairie dogs and maintained prairie dog barriers at other sites such as Tom Watson Park to deter encroachment on lands designated for recreation. Following one of the October snow storms, a citizen reported fish dying at the Evert Pierson Kid’s Fishing Pond. Multiple departments and agencies responded quickly to address the issue and continue to evaluate long-term strategies to maintain water flow to the ponds to ensure fish survival. Winter raptor surveys are set to begin at the Boulder Reservoir in December. A field training for volunteers to assist with these surveys will be held on December 8th. Other winter wildlife surveys continue as weather permits, including hare and badger surveys. • Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration: As weather cools, fall continues to be an important time of year to control invasive species. Focus during the fall turns to invasive tree species, including Russian olive and Agenda Item: IV-B 5 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 salt cedar. These species are being controlled around the Boulder Reservoir, Gerald Stazio Ballfields, Harlow Platts Park and Eaton Park, among others. Over winter, Parks staff will work with the city IPM coordinator to update the city IPM policy and procedures. • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Natural Lands Maintenance, o Natural Lands Volunteer Recruitment and Training, and o Boulder Aeromodeling Society coordination and site maintenance. C. Operations Update • 2020 Recreation Facility Access Update & Financial Aid Enhancements The recreation facility access options and fees developed as part of the 2020 Recreation Facility Access Strategy were accepted as part of the approved 2020 budget and published publicly for comment as a City Manager Rule between November 12th- November 27th 2019. No comments were received through this process, and the rule is now in effect for fees beginning January 1, 2020. The most recent BPR newsletter and Winter Parks and Recreation Guide included an update on the access options and fees. A new website layout has been published to display the options and fees in a user-friendly format, and includes a dedicated landing page for background on the development of the fees and links to the PRAB May Access Strategy memo. Staff are being trained to provide great customer service and support customers in understanding and taking advantage of the great new options. Improvements are also coming to the Financial Aid program in 2020. After piloting a fully subsidized recreation pass program for residents of Boulder Housing Partners low- income sites in 2018 and 2019, staff received a grant from the Health Equity Fund to expand this pilot to serve ALL residents with household income below 50% of the area median with fully subsidized recreation center access. The $150,000 grant for the ‘Recquity’ program will support these efforts beginning January 1st, 2020 and aims to subsidize over 30,000 visits by year-end. • SilverSneakers & Renew Active Staff have negotiated an amendment for the Healthways SilverSneakers program to continue providing access to recreation facilities for older adults enrolled in eligible Medicare plans. BPR has participated with SilverSneakers since 2008 at the East Boulder Community Center, adding participation for the North and South Boulder Recreation Centers in 2016, and now adding participation for Scott Carpenter Pool, Spruce Pool, and Boulder Reservoir beginning January 1, 2020. BPR is compensated per-visit, per-month up to a monthly ‘cap’ for visitation by program participants. In addition to adding the seasonal locations to the agreement, business terms Agenda Item: IV-B 6 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 of were updated to increase program compensation rates based on 2020 recreation facility entry fees. Staff have also been made aware that United Healthcare will cease participation with SilverSneakers beginning January 1, 2020. United has created a new program called Renew Active to serve older adults with eligible United plans. BPR has an agreement with Renew Active to provide participants with uninterrupted facility access during this transition. Renew Active will also provide access to the Recreation Centers, Outdoor Pools, and Boulder Reservoir. In developing the 2020 Recreation Facility Access Strategy, staff identified that over 60% of older adult visits were facilitated by third-party providers like Silver Sneakers in 2018. The department is proud to support the well-being of older adults via these various programs and will continue to seek ways to enhance the health of all community members. • University of Colorado Boulder Leadership Studies Program Students from the CU Boulder School of Education participated in observations of BPR staff during their fall semester as part of a capstone course for the Leadership Studies Minor at CU, a course primarily for seniors who will graduate this May. A major component of the class is a practicum where a small group of students shadow leaders at a Boulder organization. Over the course of the semester, students visited meetings held by the Recreation Centers staff team, District Services staff team, department Strategy Team, the October PRAB meeting, and a citywide leadership workshop. The class professor shared a student reflection-paper that mentioned, among other observations, that “I have seen examples of collaborative leadership, empowerment, and transformational leadership that have inspired my own leadership ambitions. I have been most impressed with the City of Boulder’s Department of Parks & Recreation’s (BPR) engagement in transformational leadership. The leaders we have shadowed throughout our practicum experience have practiced transformational leadership by empowering lower-level employees and community members to engage in decision-making processes and by recognizing the complexity of leading a civil organization such as Parks and Recreation”. Staff attended an event on December 10th, where students had the opportunity to share a poster-presentations on their experience (below). Agenda Item: IV-B 7 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Agenda Item: IV-B 8 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 •Snow Operations While winter has not yet officially begun, Boulder has already experienced several significant inclement weather events. The intent of this update is to provide an overview of Parks and Recreation snow operations. More information on citywide snow programs is available here. Each time it snows, the department has in excess of 35 staff focused on snow removal and working in shifts to support access to major transportation corridors (such as the Boulder Creek Path) and city facilities (including recreation centers, the Pearl Street Mall, and sidewalks adjacent to parks). Staff is committed to meeting city standards for snow removal as well as providing safe and accessible means of transport throughout our community. Department snow removal responsibilities consist of nearly 3.4M square feet, or 77.7 acres, of shoveling and plowing that is equivalent of 58 NFL Football Field including: •Hand Shoveling = 14,455 square feet (sq. ft.) •Path Plowing by Utility Vehicle = 1,032,411 sq. ft. •Path Plowing by Truck = 609,270 sq. ft. •Plowing of Parking Lots and Driveways = 1,729,312 sq. ft. Currently, snow routes are coordinated through a very manual process. Future phases of Beehive (City of Boulder asset management software) implementation will facilitate process improvement through linkages to GIS mapping, work orders, and community member feedback via the Constituent Relationship Management (CRM) software. •2020 Aquatic Nuisance Species Program Update Following outreach with boaters, the PRAB (October) and the WRAB (November), on December 3 the department announced the 2020 ANS Protocol. It includes the following enhancements to protect water quality: o Watercraft are classified by risk based upon ability, or not, to carry nuisance species and the city’s ability to address ANS contamination on that type of craft; o Protocol adjustments proportionate to a craft’s risk; o Increased education about the risks of ANS contamination to boaters, anglers and North Shore users; o Increased enforcement of illegal activity on the North Shore and violations of the boating program at the Boulder Reservoir; o Upgrades to wire and tagging to improve reliability of system; o Inclusion of all inspections in permit fee; o Increased Boat Inspector staffing to perform the anticipated additional inspections and decontaminations; and finally, o An upgraded decontamination unit to improve the effectiveness of decontaminations. While these measures do not eliminate the risk of contamination, we believe they are proportionate and address the biggest threats. Some of the measures are specific to non- watercraft risks (e.g. a dog could transport mud snails and an angler could transport mussels hence the increased education and enforcement measures), the biggest changes are to address Agenda Item: IV-B 9 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 watercraft that pose the largest risk, such as pontoons or boats with ballasts that cannot be visually inspected. Staff will continue to monitor both the threats and options to mitigate them. For example, Utilities teammates have coordinated a meeting with Northern Water in January to address risk at bodies hydrologically connected to the Rez (e.g. Carter Lake). In addition, staff are monitoring technological advancements that would allow for monitoring of boating activity and allow for appropriate response based upon visitation to contaminated bodies of water. Agenda Item: IV-B 10 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: December 17, 2019 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve the Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation Concept Plan PRESENTERS: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Ali Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Tina Briggs. Parks Planner Caitlin Berube-Smith, Historical and Cultural Asset Coordinator EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Chautauqua Park, located at the base of the iconic flatirons of Boulder, is one of only 25 National Historic Landmarks in the state of Colorado. While Chautauqua Park is best known for its arts, culture and educational programs, the community’s recreational activities are also popular, as they were historically. In 2019, the Parks and Recreation Department allocated Capital Improvement funds to renovate the playground at Chautauqua Park. The playground equipment has exceeded its life expectancy. ADA accessibility and playground equipment safety regulations are examples of new guidelines that must be followed in the renovation process. Staff recognizes the historic designation of the site and has aligned the project approach accordingly. A concept plan for the playground renovation was presented to PRAB on October 28, 2019 for discussion and is returning to request an approval of the concept plan. The November 25, 2019 meeting was cancelled due to inclement weather, therefore staff will request an approval in December. BACKGROUND: Staff outlined and followed a 4-phase project process and approach to the Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation including a robust community engagement process outlined in previous memos. The outcome of the project process and approach is the preferred concept plan linked below. The first preferred plan exhibit focuses on the park features on the periphery of the playground. The second preferred concept exhibit is a close-up focuses on the amenities within the playground. Agenda Item: V 1 Preferred Concept Plan Preferred Concept Plan Close Up ANALYSIS: Staff presented a discussion item to PRAB at the October meeting to solicit feedback and comments on the preferred concept plan that was developed directly from input received from the community as well as PRAB throughout the process. PRAB generally supported the plan and had several positive comments with a few items recommended for refinement. PRAB enjoyed the robust engagement that has occurred including the online opportunities for sharing input. PRAB also appreciated the staff recognition of several of the key themes from the community such as incorporating all ages and abilities within the play areas, retaining the full court for multiple sports, considering the unique context of Chautauqua and providing special features for the site such as the climbing boulder to represent the flatirons. A few items were mentioned for refinement and these items included the removal of an inclusive play table that would have incorporated lights and sounds to engage children of all abilities in interactive play. This table has been removed from consideration given the PRAB concern about the table’s appropriateness given the context of the site; however, several other inclusive play features will still be provided within the playground to achieve the desired inclusive design. The other element to receive special mention was the bike skills loop for children. Questions were raised about the concern of conflicts on the pathways between children playing in the nature exploration area and kids coming through on bikes along the pathways. Staff explained that the pathways will be kept separate. Staff have noted the concerns and will be providing specific separation between the two amenities to make sure that the two distinct types of play are kept separate and a safe and thoughtful experience is achieved by both amenities. Staff will also Agenda Item: V 2 ensure that effective signage and information is present to convey that children’s bikes are only allowed within the play area loop and not on the adjacent trails within the open space areas. PRAB also had brief comments related to staff considering the parking challenges at the site and ensuring that the new features don’t add to the parking situation. Staff ensured PRAB that analysis and management of the parking situation will continue through the current access management plan (CAMP) and will address any modifications that might be needed. PRAB also agreed that the main attraction to Chautauqua will remain the open space and programs at Chautauqua including concerts at the auditorium. The playground will be popular, but likely not result in any major impact on visitation considering the overall site. Finally, the last discussion item at PRAB revolved around the prioritization of amenities to be included should budget challenges arise during the final design process. The feedback provided was considered and will be used for guiding the prioritization of amenities as the plan develops and estimated costs are refined with consideration in any value engineering required to keep the project within the expected budget. Currently, staff are considering the following priorities: Primary features to be installed: • Full-sized multi-use sport court, including pickleball and basketball • 2-5 and 5-12-year-old play structures • Swings • Hill slide • Inclusive play features • Climbing boulder • Playhouse revitalization and enhancement • Nature exploration area Secondary features to be considered (pending available budget): • Bike skills loop • Sand play • Space net • Tire Swing • Zip line • Smaller climbing boulder STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests the PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motion: Motion to approve the Chautauqua Park – Playground Renovation Concept Plan. NEXT STEPS: Staff presented the playground renovation project to the Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA) Building and Grounds Committee on Nov. 21 to request a recommendation. Staff anticipates a letter of recommendation as an outcome of that meeting. If a PRAB approval and a CCA recommendation is acquired, staff will apply for a Landmarks Alteration Certificate. Agenda Item: V 3 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: December 17, 2019 AGENDA TITLE: 2020/2021 Master Plan Update - Scope and Approach PRESENTERS: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Alison Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design & Community Engagement Manager Regina Elsner, Parks Planner Tina Briggs, Parks Planner Morgan Gardner, Associate Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Note: Some minor adjustments have been made to both this document and Attachment A since the November PRAB packet, specifically to the discussion of public engagement. Staff are in planning to kick off the 5-year update to the BPR master plan. The purpose of this item is for the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) to review and discuss the proposed focus, process and approach for the 2020/2021 update to the current Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan to ensure staff are in alignment with the board in determining the successful process and focus. Since the Master Plan’s adoption in 2014, the department has focused on the identified key themes and priorities to improve facilities, programs and service delivery. The current master plan and its development can be reviewed here. To initiate the upcoming process, staff has developed a project plan (Attachment A: Project Management Plan) that outlines the preliminary process and approach for the comprehensive update. In the last five years, new trends and important community initiatives have developed that should be addressed in the Master Plan update. Similarly, based upon the success of the plan, certain goals have been accomplished and others have become business as usual and are now part of BPR’s ongoing operations. Staff plans to focus on the new trends and topics in the community while continuing the ongoing work of the current themes that are still relevant within the current plan. The update to the Master Plan will provide the department a strategic guide for continued improvements in the programs, facilities and services provided to the community. An important component of the success of the Master Plan process is public engagement. Staff will build on the success of the 2014 Master Plan, as well as other recent city master Agenda Item: VI-A 1 planning efforts, to engage a robust cross-section of the community to shape the future of the department. Specific community groups to engage include community members, allied service providers, facility users and program attendees, youth and teens, older adults, people with disabilities, and non-English speakers. PRAB’s input and direction now will ensure that the Master Plan update is a success and incorporates strategic direction for the department. The next step for this discussion is a similar conversation with City Council to ensure alignment with city-wide priorities. BACKGROUND: In February 2014, City Council accepted the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2014 Master Plan). With acceptance of the master plan, the Parks and Recreation Department (department) committed to a new mission and vision, as well as initiatives outlined associated with long-term goals and key themes. The goals of the master plan are outlined around key themes which were developed as a result of the broad and deep community engagement, research and needs assessment elements of the planning process. These themes are Community Health and Wellness, Taking Care of What We Have, Financial Sustainability, Building Community and Relationships, Youth Engagement and Activity, and Organizational Readiness. The Master Plan also outlines key strategic alternatives under differing funding scenarios: fiscally constrained, action and vision. These strategic alternatives outline service provision for the department’s core services including parkland levels of service, recreation facilities, and recreation programs and services. Using the master plan as a guide, annually the department develops a strategic action plan to ensure the Master Plan is a living document used to improve the overall system. Since the Master Plan’s adoption in 2014, the department has either completed or otherwise started 92% of the specific initiatives identified. Agenda Item: VI-A 2 As the department continues to enhance and improve the work done to serve the community, new areas of focus and gaps in existing information develop. The focus of the 2020 Master Plan update will be on those new areas of focus and finding strategic ways to address gaps in service provision within the existing framework of the 2014 Master Plan. The 2020 Master Plan will seek to incorporate strategic direction from city- wide initiatives and other department Master Plans, such as climate initiatives and equity, among others. ANALYSIS: Process and Approach The 2021 Master Plan is intended to be an update to the current 2014 Master Plan and not a complete replacement. The update provides the department the opportunity to re-engage the community on the key themes identified in 2013 to determine success to date and future direction for the department. The 2021 Master Plan is intended to refine the department’s focus and direction, address gaps and update to current policies, practices and trends. Several important issues today were not as visible in 2012/2013, such as climate, sustainability and resilience, social equity and affordability, and population change and growth to name a few. 6 12 12 11 10 9 4 4 2 1 4 22311 Community Health and Wellness Taking Care of What We Have Financial Sustainability Building Community and Relationships Youth Engagement and Activity Organizational Readiness Items complete/ongoing Items in Progress Initiatives not yet started Agenda Item: VI-A 3 The Master Plan Update is broken into five phases: Project Initiation and Kick-off, Research & Trends, Needs Assessment, Implementation Plan, and Master Plan Adoption. The Project Initiation and Kick-off phase is comprised of the internal scoping for the project, as well as the procurement process for securing a consultant and/or consultant team to assist in the process. This phase will end with the public kick-off of the project and the kick-off with the selected consultant. The Research & Trends phase of the project is intended to update the white papers developed as part of the 2014 Master Plan. Those include: financial sustainability, asset management, benchmarking, community survey, trends, programs and services, and related plans. Additional white papers may be identified to help understand and prioritize other community concerns, including but not limited to climate change, sustainability and resilience, social equity and affordability, and other industry trends. Functionally, this phase will end with a system-wide assessment to further identify and clarify the focus for the Master Plan. This phase will end with the initial public engagement window, sharing the information gained and beginning the community conversation about future direction. More information about the proposed public engagement approach is below. The Needs Assessment phase of the project includes analysis to identify community priorities to focus the department’s work and service delivery. This includes Levels of Service analysis, Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment, and scenario planning. These pieces will assist the department in identifying strategies and initiatives for the next five to seven years. The end of this phase will be marked by the identification of priorities and confirming of those priorities with the community. The Implementation Plan phase of the project is defined by the identification of specific initiatives geared to addressing the priorities previously identified. This step will help the department appropriately align staff resources and budget to advance those priorities. During this phase of the project, the draft Master Plan will be developed including information gathered from the previous phases. The final phase of the project is Master Plan Adoption. This phase includes all the formal steps required for the plan to be adopted by City Council. This includes review and Agenda Item: VI-A 4 recommendation from the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, review and recommendation from the Planning Board, and public hearing and adoption by City Council. Public Engagement Public engagement will occur during four windows throughout the Master Plan process. The initial engagement window will occur at the end of the Research and Trends Phase. During this window, the public will be informed on the system-wide assessment. Engagement will primarily be focused on informing the community of the progress from the 2014 Master Plan and the updated white papers and topical reports. The second engagement window will overlap the entire Needs Assessment Phase of the project. During this window, the public will assist the department to identify priorities and policies to inform the future direction of the department. This phase will include multiple engagement tools and opportunities, including but not limited to a statistically valid community survey, targeted stakeholder workshops, youth engagement opportunities, and micro-engagements. The third engagement window will occur during the Implementation Plan phase of the project. The public will be asked to help confirm the strategies and initiatives selected as focus areas for the next five to seven years. There will also be an opportunity to review and provide feedback on the draft Master Plan. The fourth and final engagement window will occur throughout the formal Master Plan Adoption phase of the project. This window consists of the formal public feedback received during public hearings for the adoption of the plan with PRAB, Planning Board and City Council. Stakeholders There are several specific stakeholder groups that the department will actively seek to engage to solicit their input and feedback for this update. Those groups include PLAY Boulder Foundation and other community and program partners. General public engagement will include typical groups such as community members and facility users and program attendees, with additional focus on reaching groups not typically engaged in public processes, including youth and teens, older adults, people with disabilities, and non-English speakers. Staff will work cross-departmentally to reach these groups through several potential tools. Staff has been in contact with the Youth Opportunities Advisory Board (YOAB) and Growing Up Boulder (GUB) to determine what methods and approaches could be utilized to receive feedback from youth and teens. Discussions have begun with other departments on the potential to utilize Community Connectors, Be Heard Boulder and other digital tools to reach the community. Community Connectors are Boulder residents, natural relationship builders trusted within their own, oftentimes underrepresented, neighborhoods and communities, who partner with the city to create and support public engagement activities. Agenda Item: VI-A 5 QUESTIONS FOR PRAB: 1. What are the demonstrated successes of the current plan that you observe in the community that don’t need further refinement? In other words, what are we doing well since the current plan adoption? 2. Do you agree with the issues and challenges that our next plan needs to address? 3. What aspects of our proposed process resonate with you? Do you feel that the engagement strategy will allow all voices to be heard in the process? Are there additional groups or communities that we need to specifically work to engage through the process? 4. How will you define/measure success for this upcoming planning process? What are the key components, outcomes or topics we need to address? NEXT STEPS: Staff will continue to refine the project management plan with PRAB feedback in preparation for a training session with City Council on January 31, 2020. In the meantime, staff are developing a Request for Proposals (RFP) to solicit a consultant/consultant team to assist the department on this project. Official public kick- off of this project is anticipated for the first quarter of 2020. Attachments: Attachment A: Project Management Plan Agenda Item: VI-A 6 UPDATE PARKS AND RECREATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN NOVEMBER 2019 DRAFT 2020MASTERPLAN Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 1 B DRAFTDRAFTContents Purpose 1 Background 2 Goals and Objectives 3 Scope 4 Assumptions and Constraints 5 Stakeholders 6 Public Engagement 10 Engagement Objectives 10 Engagement Timeline 10 Ongoing Project Communication 11 Deliverables 12 Budget Summary 13 Human Resources 14 Roles and Responsibilities 14 Schedule Summary 15 Decision-Making Process 17 Project Risks 17 Project Issues 17 Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 2 1DRAFTDRAFTPurpose The 2020 Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan will serve as a guide for the department for the next five to seven years. Through the process, the department will engage with the community to gather their input on the department’s direction and focus. The Master Plan will identify strategies and initiatives through engagement with staff and the community that will contribute to the department’s future focus and priorities, allowing for alignment of resources providing positive results for the community. These agreed upon priorities allow the department to prioritize future financial needs ensuring financial sustainability. The 2020 Master Plan is an update to the current 2014 Master Plan. The update provides the department the opportunity to re-engage the community on the key themes identified in 2013 to determine success to date and future direction for the department. The 2020 Master Plan is not intended to provide new direction for the department, but rather refine the department’s focus and direction. Based upon the success of the 2014 Master Plan, certain themes have been accomplished and are now part of BPR’s ongoing operations and have become business as usual. The focus of the update will be on the new trends and topics in the community while continuing the ongoing work of the current themes that are still relevant within the current plan. As the department continues to enhance and improve the work done to serve the community, new areas of focus and gaps in existing information develop. The focus of the 2020 Master Plan update will be on those new areas of focus and finding strategic ways to address gaps in service provision within the existing framework of the 2014 Master Plan. The 2020 Master Plan will seek to incorporate strategic direction from city-wide initiatives and other department Master Plans, such as climate initiatives and equity, among others. Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 3 2 DRAFTDRAFTBackground In February 2014, City Council accepted the Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2014 Master Plan). With acceptance of the master plan, the Parks and Recreation Department (department) committed to a new mission and vision, as well as initiatives outlined in the fiscally constrained plan. The goals of the master plan are outlined around key themes which were developed as a result of the broad and deep community engagement, research and needs assessment elements of the planning process. These themes are Community Health and Wellness, Taking Care of What We Have, Financial Sustainability, Building Community and Relationships, Youth Engagement and Activity, and Organizational Readiness. The Master Plan also outlines key strategic alternatives under differing funding scenarios; fiscally constrained, action and vision. These strategic alternatives outline service provision for the department’s core services including parkland levels of service, recreation facilities, and recreation programs and services. Using the master plan as a guide, annually, the department develops a strategic action plan to ensure the master plan is a living document this is used to improve the overall system. Since the Master Plan’s adoption in 2014, the department has either completed or otherwise started 92% of the specific initiatives identified. 6 12 12 11 10 9 4 4 2 1 4 22311 Community Health and Wellness Taking Care of What We Have Financial Sustainability Building Community and Relationships Youth Engagement and Activity Organizational Readiness Items complete/ongoing Items in Progress Initiatives not yet started Initiative Progress Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 4 3DRAFTDRAFTGoals and Objectives Goal: Integrate all relevant plans and analyses completed since the adoption of the current master plan, including those done to inform capital decisions, programs and operations. • Objective: Create integrated implementation strategies to achieve the desired outcomes from all related planning processes and allow for interim incorporation of desired outcomes from future planning efforts. • Objective: Incorporate updated background information as appropriate to inform future departmental policies and priorities. • Objective: Strategically include information and strategies from related city-wide policies and initiatives and other city departments’ planning processes to ensure strategic alignment across the city. Goal: Continue to refine the departmental decision-making process and how to balance affordability, financial sustainability and program quality. • Objective: Confirm the direction of the department through a robust public engagement process, including communities and populations not easily reached by traditional outreach methods. • Objective: Engage city and departmental leadership to ensure Master Plan goals, strategies and initiatives identified continue the progress of the previous five-year plan. Goal: Begin with the end in mind as it is related to data and being a data-driven organization. • Objective: Identify goals, strategies and initiatives with clearly defined metrics. • Objective: Identify the specific data to be gathered to maximize efficiency in meeting the predefined metrics. • Objective: Create flexibility in data collection methods to accommodate current and future systems. Goal: The Master Plan will continue to serve as a guiding document that all department staff rely on and revisit often in their everyday work. • Objective: Fully involve staff throughout the planning to process to ensure their participation and support. • Objective: Engage staff in the decision-making process through their involvement in the Management Technical Advisory Group (Management TAG) and Working Technical Advisory Group (Working TAG) (described later). • Objective: Include an implementation strategy to ensure the document guides regular and strategic work of the department. Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 5 4 DRAFTDRAFTScope This section summarizes the scope of the proposed project by providing a list of key activities and deliverables. The scope of this project is outlined in the table below. In Scope Out of Scope Updating white paper topics and research from previous master plan, including but not limited to financial sustainability, asset management, benchmarks, programs and services, trends, etc. A direct case for renewal of sales tax that supports the department Address financial sustainability, including the threats and opportunities of existing funding sources, both dedicated sales tax and general fund dollars, ensuring continued high-quality service provision An extensive revisioning of the department Collect additional background information and conduct additional research on emerging trends, both within the community and the larger parks and recreation industry A significant change in direction from the previous Master Plan Conduct a statistically valid community survey Significant change in the Key Themes identified in the 2014 Master Plan Address gaps/obstacles encountered in implementing the previous master plan, as appropriate Identify additional studies, plans or assessments needed in the future to continue to address community desires and priorities Robust public engagement process, including new methods and tools for engaging populations more difficult to reach Identification of new priority strategies and initiatives to assist the department in meeting the Key Themes Scenario planning to test assumptions about the future and how choices affect that future Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 6 5DRAFTDRAFTAssumptions and Constraints An assumption is a circumstance or event outside the project that can affect its success and that the authors of this plan believe will happen. Constraints are restrictions or boundaries placed upon the project that limit the choices of the project team. The assumptions and constraints for this project are listed in the table below. Assumptions Constraints Public engagement and discussions with city and departmental leadership will not result in major shifts in direction/focus. Current funding allocations over 2020 and 2021 with a significant portion of one year’s funding tied to the Multiple Resource Preservation Plan grant. Updated city-wide master plan process will not significantly increase the timeline for this update project. Timeframe for the update would ideally be compressed to have a completed Master Plan in time for the next round of CCS tax. Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 7 6 DRAFTDRAFTStakeholders The table below lists stakeholders and indicates how they will be impacted and engaged by the project. Stakeholder Impact Engagement Community members The community shaped the department’s vision and mission for the 2014 Master Plan. It is critical to ensure that the department’s work continues to serve the needs and desires of the entire Boulder community. Community survey, Open Houses, micro- engagements, etc. PLAY Boulder Foundation PLAY Boulder Foundation is a critical partner for the department, aligning closely with the mission and work of the department. Involving PLAY in on-going discussions of the future of the department will ensure the two organizations continue to be closely aligned in mission, vision and action. Stakeholder workshop(s), Open houses, etc. Community and Program Partners It is important to involve the department’s community and program partners to ensure facilities are still meeting their needs and the needs of their customers. Stakeholder workshop(s), Open houses, etc. Facility users It is important to understand the needs and desires of current facility users to ensure future priorities and strategies continue to meet their needs. Community survey, Open Houses, micro- engagements, etc. Program attendees It is important to understand the needs and desires of current program attendees to ensure future priorities and strategies continue to meet their needs. Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 8 7DRAFTDRAFTStakeholders (continued) Youth and teens Many department programs are focused on young children. It is important to involve them in conversations about the future to ensure their needs and desires are being met. Teens are an often overlooked part of the community, with a gap in the programs, services and facilities provided to this community. It is important to understand their needs and desires to ensure the department is addressing those concerns. YOAB fall ’20 action team, GUB fall ‘20 project, Open Houses, micro-engagements Older adults The Master Plan sets the priorities and strategies for on-going programs and facilities. It is important to hear from older adults to ensure programming and facilities are meeting their needs to age well. Silver and Fit, Silver Sneakers, etc. People with disabilities The Master Plan sets the priorities and strategies for on-going programs and facilities. It is important to hear people with disabilities to ensure programming and facilities are meeting their specialized needs. Stakeholder Impact Engagement Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 9 8 DRAFTDRAFTNon-English speakers Non-English speakers are an important part of the community that the department serves. It is important to ensure the department priorities, programs and services continue to meeting their needs and desires. Community Connectors, YSI and Youth and Families Other city departments Parks and Recreation interacts on a daily basis with staff of other departments. It is crucial that there is strategic alignment in the priorities and strategies identified in the BPR Master Plan with other city department priorities and strategies. Stakeholder workshop(s), city-wide Master Planning Coordination Committee BPR staff The Master Plan guides the day-to-day work and operation of the department. It is used in developing annual action plans and workplans. The Master Plan has a significant impact on the work individuals do for the department. Staff will be engaged in several ways. Specific staff will serve on the Management TAG and the Working TAG, providing strategic and day-to- day assistance developing the Master Plan. Staff will get periodic updates via internal newsletters and an internal project website. Additional engagement may include staff workshops to help identify priorities, strategies and initiatives or assistance in gathering public engagement information from micro-engagements. BPR leadership The Master Plan provides a strategic framework for decision-making and prioritization of projects and work. The Master Plan also provides metrics for ensuring the work of the community is being completed responsibly and efficiently. BPRD leadership will be engaged through periodic updates, both directly at Strategy Team meeting and indirectly through updates to PRAB. BPRD leadership will also be asked to engage with the rest of staff in specific workshops. Stakeholder Impact Engagement Stakeholders (continued) Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 10 9DRAFTDRAFTParks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) The Master Plan provides a strategic framework for decision-making and prioritization of projects and work. The Master Plan also provides metrics for ensuring the work of the community is being completed responsibly and efficiently. PRAB will be engaged through regular updates and discussion at critical points through-out the project. PRAB will be invited to participate in all public engagement activities to hear first- hand the information staff is receiving from the community. Planning Board The Master Plan provides a strategic framework for decision-making and prioritization of projects and work. The Master Plan also provides metrics for ensuring the work of the community is being completed responsibly and efficiently. Planning Board will be engaged through regular updates through-out the project. Following plan drafting, Planning Board will review the plan for recommendation to City Council. City Council The Master Plan provides a strategic framework for decision-making and prioritization of projects and work. The Master Plan also provides metrics for ensuring the work of the community is being completed responsibly and efficiently. City Council will be engaged through regular updates through-out the project. Council members will be invited to participate in all public engagement activities to hear first-hand the information staff is receiving from the community. City Council is the ultimate decision-making body for this effort through their action to formally adopt the Master Plan. Stakeholder Impact Engagement Stakeholders (continued) Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 11 10 DRAFTDRAFTPublic Engagement Engagement Objectives An important component of the success of the Master Plan process is public engagement. This update will build on the success of the 2014 Master Plan, as well as other recent city master planning efforts to engage a robust cross-section of the community to shape the future of the department. Critical community groups to engage include community members, facility users and program attendees, youth and teens, older adults, people with disabilities, and non-English speakers. • Engage with the Boulder community on the future direction of the department. • Improve reach to include populations not readily accessed through traditional outreach, including but not limited to seniors, youth, people with disabilities, and non-English speakers. • Ensure facilities and programs meet the needs of the entire Boulder community. Engagement Timeline Public engagement will occur during four windows throughout the Master Plan process. The initial engagement window will occur at the end of the Research and Trends Phase of the project. During this window, the public will be informed on the information that has been gathered. Engagement will primarily be focused on informing the community of the progress from the 2014 Master Plan and the updated white papers and topical reports. This is effectively Step 4 of the city’s decision-making process, sharing a foundation of information and inquiry. The second engagement window will cover the Needs Assessment Phase of the project. During this window, the public will assist the department to identify priorities and policies to inform the future direction of the department. This phase will include multiple engagement tools and opportunities, including but not limited to a statistically valid community survey, targeted stakeholder workshops, youth engagement opportunities, and micro-engagements. The window spans Steps 5 and 6 of the city’s decision-making process; identify options and evaluate options/develop recommendations. The third engagement window will occur during the Implementation Plan phase of the project. The public will be asked to help confirm the strategies and initiatives selected as focus areas for the next five to seven years. There will also be an opportunity to review and provide feedback on the draft Master Plan. This engagement window spans Steps 6 and 7 of the city’s decision-making process; evaluate options/develop recommendations and make a decision. The fourth and final engagement window will occur throughout the formal Master Plan Adoption phase of the project. This window consists of the formal public feedback received during public hearings for the adoption of the plan with PRAB, Planning Board and City Council. This engagement window spans Steps 7 and 8 of the city’s decision-making process; make a decision and communicate decision and rationale. Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 12 11DRAFTDRAFTOngoing Project Communication While there will are specifically identified public engagement windows, there will also be on-going communication with the public throughout the Master Plan process. This communication will include a project website, information presented on Be Heard Boulder and updates at www.BoulderParkNews.org, email newsletter, and regular updates to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. Internal staff communication will include a project page set up on the Parks & Recreation Sharepoint site. This will include periodic updates and links to important documents and deliverables. Additional updates will be provided to staff through the monthly BPR newsletter. Public Engagement (continued) Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 13 12 DRAFTDRAFTDeliverables The project is completed when the deliverables listed in the following table are completed. Deliverable Name Description Format White papers and topical reports Updated research and trends reports on a variety of topics including but not limited to: • Financial sustainability (including reserve policies, use of general fund dollars, subsidies, and grants) • Asset management • Benchmarking • Programs and services • Industry trends • Climate change, sustainability and resilience • Social equity • Social challenges (i.e., affordability, homelessness, aging population) • Organizational assessment Document(s) Community survey A statistically valid survey intended to drive policy direction and needs assessment. Survey instrument, data analysis and report Needs assessment Updated needs assessment to include, but not limited to: • Levels of service (LOS) analysis • Recreation facility needs assessment Document(s) Scenario planning Define critical uncertainties and develop plausible scenarios in order to discuss the impacts and the responses to each Document(s) Implementation Plan Specific, metric-driven goals, strategies and initiatives to assist the department in addressing the key themes previously identified. Document(s) Final Master Plan A final master plan combining critical elements of previous deliverables. This document will be heavily graphically formatted with compelling visuals and infographics to assist in conveying information effectively. Document and all native files Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 14 13DRAFTDRAFTBudget Summary The estimated cost of the project and cost assumptions are as follows: Item Cost Notes Staff Consultants $280,000 • $140,000 budgeted each year 2020-2021 • Includes $77,000 for match for Multiple Resource Preservation Plan grant Supplies Other Total Cost $280,000 Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 15 14 DRAFTDRAFTHuman Resources Roles and Responsibilities The following human resources are required for the project. Role Name(s)Responsibilities Executive Sponsor Jeff Haley • Provide guidance, leadership and overall project direction including key decision-making Project Manager Regina Elsner • Manage all day-do-day activities on the project • Manage the consultant chosen for the project • Provide strategic insight for how various other plans and projects fit with the Master Plan Public Engagement Coordinator Tina Briggs • Lead the public engagement component of the Master Plan process • Provide strategic advice and leadership on when and how to engage the public and specific stakeholder groups Deputy Project Manager Morgan Gardner • Provide logistic and administrative support • Coordinate communications, both internal and external to the department • Assist with public engagement coordination and facilitation Management Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) • Review progress reports and data gathering • Review major milestone documents prior to release to PRAB and the public • Provide Project Manager with strategic advice on process direction and approach • Develop and provide recommendations to decision makers • Serve as a subject matter expert representing their workgroup • Serve as an additional liaison between the Master Planning process and their workgroup • Time reserved on their work plan to dedicate to the Master Plan Working Technical Advisory Group (WTAG) • Core group working on the day-to-day aspects of the Master Plan • Regularly attend meetings of the Working TAG • May also provide staff support on specific sub-committees (i.e., Rec Needs Assessment, Financial, Public Engagement) • Serves as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) for the Master Plan • Serves as a liaison between the Master Plan process and their work group/team, creating 2-way communication • Time reserved on their work plan to dedicate to the Master Plan Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 16 15DRAFTDRAFTSchedule Summary The scheduling relies on a number of parameters between the project team, and other stakeholders. This schedule summarizes major milestones only. The Master Plan Update is broken into five phases: Project Initiation and Kick-off, Research & Trends, Needs Assessment, Implementation Plan, and Master Plan Adoption. The Project Initiation and Kick-off phase is comprised of the internal scoping for the project, as well as the procurement process for securing a consultant and/or consultant team to assist in the process. This phase has begun with identifying staff to participate in various roles for the project and scoping the project with department and city leadership. During this phase a Request for Proposals will be publicly advertised and consultant services solicited. This phase will end with the public kick-off of the project and the kick-off with the selected consultant. The Research & Trends phase of the project is intended to update the white papers developed as part of the previous Master Plan. Those include: financial sustainability, asset management, benchmarking, community survey, trends, programs and services, and related plans. Additional white papers may be identified to help understand and prioritize other community concerns, including but not limited to climate change, sustainability and resilience, social equity and affordability, and other industry trends. This phase will end with the initial public engagement window, sharing the information gained and beginning the community conversation about future direction. The Needs Assessment phase of the project includes analysis to identify continued community priorities to focus the department’s work and service delivery. This includes Levels of Service analysis, Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment, and scenario planning. These pieces will assist the department in identifying strategies and initiatives that will continue the improvement in those areas of the department. This phase will be informed by various public engagement tools including a statistically valid community survey, targeted Project Initiation & Kick-off Public Engagement Research & Trends Needs Assessment Implementation Plan Master Plan Adoption 2019 2020 2021 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S PRAB Check In City Council/Planning Board Check In Planning Stage Shared Learning Stage Options Stage Decision Stage Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 17 16 DRAFTDRAFTstakeholder engagement and discussion, and opportunities for micro-engagements. The end of this phase will be marked by the identification of new priorities and confirming of those priorities with the community. The Implementation Plan phase of the project is defined by the identification of specific initiatives geared to addressing the priorities previously identified. This step will help the department appropriately align staff resources and budget to advance those priorities. During this phase of the project, the draft Master Plan will be developed including information gathered from the previous phases. The end of this phase will be marked by a final window of public engagement, reaffirming with the community the priorities and how the department intends to address those priorities over the next five to seven years. The final phase of the project is Master Plan Adoption. This phase includes all the formal steps required for the plan to be eventually adopted by City Council. This includes review and recommendation from the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, review and recommendation from the Planning Board, and public hearing and adoption by City Council. Throughout the process, there will be multiple check-ins with PRAB, Planning Board and City Council. These check-ins will ensure that the process, outcomes and deliverables are on track and meeting the needs of the department, city and community. Schedule Summary (continued) Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 18 17DRAFTDRAFTDecision-Making Process The Master Plan will be developed in collaboration with the community, staff and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. At the conclusion of the planning process, the draft plan will be reviewed and recommended for adoption by the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. That recommendation will be considered by the Planning Board before ultimately being adopted by City Council. Project Risks Project risks identified to date are provided below with an assessment and recommended response. No.Risk Event Statement Probability H/M/L Impact H/M/L Recommended Response 1 Incomplete data on new operations (Scott Carpenter Pool & Reservoir Visitor Services Center) prior to needs assessment M L Can the data from these two operations be provided Q4 2020 after a full season of operations has been completed? Are there trends/ analysis from comparable facilities on dip or growth in Year 2 that can be factored in? 2 Increase in scope of project H H To remain on schedule and budget, staff have completed a rigorous process to develop a project plan based on input from multiple sources. Project Issues Project issues identified to date are provided below with a recommended response. No.Description Priority H/M/L Recommended Action 1 2 3 4 5 Agenda Item: VI-A Attachment A 19 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Alison Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager Tina Briggs. Parks Planner Caitlin Berube-Smith, Historical and Cultural Asset Coordinator SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: December 17, 2019 A. Harbeck – Bergheim House Lease EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: In response to the recent call for proposals for leasing, proposals to lease the Harbeck-Bergheim House have been received and evaluated by staff. The evaluation was based on the criteria previously agreed upon with the community, PRAB, Landmarks Board and City Council. The process developed by and supported by the community is being closely followed to honor the collaborative process and ensure the successful outcome desired by all who have been involved in the process. After careful and comprehensive evaluation, 1 of the 5 submitted proposals has been selected to proceed with the lease/contract negotiation. The process, as presented to the community and PRAB, is aligned with a typical Request for Proposal process to ensure transparency and fairness. The process and level of confidentiality staff is adhering to also aligns with standard real estate negotiating practices. BACKGROUND: In April of 2018, staff began a planning initiative to engage the community and decision-makers in determining the long-term approach to the future use, management and ownership of the locally designated historic Harbeck-Bergheim House. The initiative became a priority when the previous tenant, Museum of Boulder, announced plans to vacate the Harbeck-Bergheim House. The initiative began with multiple options considered for the future use and ownership of this landmarked amenity. The final decision was based upon in-depth research, robust community engagement, multiple stakeholder meetings and thoughtful consideration by both the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) and the Landmarks Board. The outcome of that initiative was a 7-1 City Council vote on April 16, 2019 approving the following motion. Agenda Item: VII-A 1 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 City Council Amendment: Motion support the exploration of a lease for the Harbeck - Bergheim House at market rate favorably considering community values but expected to be no less than full cost recovery. Staff immediately began developing a fair and transparent proposal process and investigating the most efficient and effective way to list the Harbeck-Bergheim House for lease. The project web page details the process with monthly updates posted to keep the community abreast of the initiative. The Colorado Group was selected through a separate traditional Request for Proposal (RFP) process for real estate services to support the department by applying industry standard methods for a lease listing, marketing, proposal evaluation recommendations and contract negotiation with the understanding of the special needs and community interest for this house. The Parks and Recreation Department opened the process to receive competitive proposals to lease the landmarked Harbeck-Bergheim House on Aug. 30, 2019. Standard real estate methods of marketing complimented the departments robust outreach efforts commonly used to communicate public meetings in effort to ensure the community was aware of the opportunity. The brochure created by the Colorado Group and the proposal selection process developed with the community and related boards were widely marketed with a focus on non-profit organizations. The selection process document outlines the community values, department key themes and an overview of the evaluation model. Lease Proposal Schedule: Request for Lease Proposals Issued: August 30, 2019 Open House: September 18, 2019 Proposal Responses (Due 5 p.m.): November 1, 2019 Lessee Selection Notification: November 15, 2019 Overview of Marketing: Colorado Group • The Colorado Group listed the property on their website •The property was listed on commercial multiple listing data bases of Catalyst and Costar (These data bases are used by real estate professionals both locally, regionally, and nationally) • Standard 4’ x 4’ real estate sign installed on the property • Broadcast emails to the Commercial Brokers of Boulder (CBB) which has a membership of 300+ real estate professionals that are active in Boulder and Boulder County •Direct marketing and an e-mail campaign to a list of 255+/- non-profit organizations located in Boulder County • Two open houses on September 18, 2019 (one for real estate brokers and one for the general public) • Over a dozen showings to over three dozen individuals throughout the marketing period Agenda Item: VII-A 2 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 BPR • The opportunity was posted on the Harbeck-Bergheim House web page with links to the brochure and selection process •Multiple e-mail campaigns to the Parks and Recreation following of over 30k • Monthly e-mail updates direct to the project e-mail list •Outreach to BPR partners • Several social media bursts including Facebook, twitter, Instagram and Citywide NextDoor posts • Volunteer projects advertised and completed for projects in and around the house • Key staff was requested to reach out to their networks with information ANALYSIS: Staff is excited to share as much information as possible about the proposal selection process leading to the initiation of a lease of the Harbeck - Bergheim House. Existing city purchasing guidelines are considered in this regard. Staff recognizes that this is not a purchased service or good, however, following the purchasing guidelines ensures consistency within our organization. Colorado Group received 5 lease proposals by the response due date and time. The staff review team received a package of all submitted proposals and a list of criteria for evaluation, which mirrored in the selection process outlined in presentations to the community and related boards. The criteria are divided in 2 categories to ensure that the proposals evaluations honor the evaluation model developed during the community engagement process. Proposal Evaluation Criteria Community Value Considerations (weighted community value score, horizontal line) •Interior Preservation - Use is compatible with historic interior features •Neighborhood Compatibility - Complimentary to the surrounding neighborhood, parking needs, foot and car traffic expected, noise, hours of operation, number of occupants •Public Access - Includes a plan for how the public has at least limited access for the community to be able to experience the asset •Community Benefit - The organization provides a service to a wide range of community members with consideration for underserved populations and equitable access to resources. •Community Use - Proposal outlines a program for public use of the space in reference to meeting space or small events Agenda Item: VII-A 3 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Financial Considerations (financial contribution, vertical line) •Requested Investment - Is the organization requesting capital improvements from BPR prior to move-in? •Viability of Organization (mission) - Is the proposing organization aligned with BPR mission, years of experience as an organization, operationally sustainable, solid financial history, etc. •Financially Sustainable Business Model (business) - Years of experience in the business they are proposing, professional business plan, financially viable •Lease Rate - Monthly lease payment proposed Each reviewer completed the evaluations and met as a team to review the cumulative outcomes, which were automatically calculated. Staff evaluations included considerations for community values and financial considerations as shown above. In addition to staff evaluations, Colorado Group provided a recommendation in the form of pros and cons for the proposals based on traditional real estate business transactions. Their recommendation was a piece of the information, but not the determining factor used to select a proposal to move into lease negotiation. Real Estate Recommendation Criteria • Amount of rent offered •Length of lease term offered •Financial stability of tenant • Length of time in business • Impact on property The staff review team evaluations led to an offer to 1 of the 5 submitted lease proposals that most aligned with the selection process criteria to proceed with lease/contract negotiation. All proposals will remain confidential until the contract negotiation is complete. This is consistent with the City’s traditional RFP process and standard real estate practices. Once the negotiation is complete, the final lease/contract approval will become public through the customary practices of sharing PRAB packet materials in advance of the Board’s consideration. The final lease agreement requires PRAB approval of at least 4 members. Once the agreement is finalized, all submitted proposals become public record and would be available through the Colorado Open Records Act (CORA). Concurrent and Ongoing Efforts The stained-glass window restoration is underway. The window was removed on Dec. 9 with an anticipated timeline of 4-6 weeks. The glazing on the exterior (box window on the exterior protecting the window) will be completed in the spring of 2020 based on current weather conditions. The interior easement is in process and expected to be complete by the end of the year. Any new lessee will be provided a draft and any negotiation points to ensure they are aware and willing to comply. The lease agreement will include additional details and required permissions from staff or director not covered by the easement. Preservation continues to be a high priority for this house and surrounding property. Agenda Item: VII-A 4 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 NEXT STEPS: Staff will work diligently to quickly and efficiently execute the lease/contract negotiation returning to PRAB with a draft lease for discussion. Any changes that arise from that discussion will be presented to PRAB again as an action item requesting approval of the agreement by at least 4 members. Agenda Item: VII-A 5 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: December 17, 2019 A.Subcommittee Updates: Onboarding, Community Engagement and Letter to Council Last month members of the PRAB participated in a study session to develop a work plan and priorities to share with staff and City Council. The study session offered an opportunity to celebrate successes, make course corrections in work plans and chart the course ahead. During this session PRAB formed subcommittees to address board onboarding, community engagement and to draft a letter to City Council. Community engagement subcommittee members share the following updates: Attachment A: Community Engagement Update Attachment B: PRAB Board Feedback to Council Agenda Item: VIII 1 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Attachment A: Community Engagement Update Community Engagement Subcommittee Goals: (1) Write a community engagement guide for PRAB to include the following: •how to identify yourself (wear name tag, make an intro, use small handouts with a brief description of PRAB, email address, website) •script with general talking points •things you can/can’t say when representing PRAB •wrapping up conversations/thank yous •after the event, taking notes on interactions with community members, takeaways, etc. •follow up with community members if needed (reconnect with anyone who had asked for additional information) •follow up with PRAB (report back during the next board mtg) (2) Prioritize community engagement opportunities and events for PRAB •work with staff to identify most important events •aim to have 1-2 PRAB members present at high priority events (3) Create our own PRAB outreach •explore “Gab with PRAB” opportunities, monthly or seasonal at rec centers, parks, & more Agenda Item: VIII Attachment A 1 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Attachment B: PRAB Board Feedback to Council Agenda Item: VIII Attachment B 1 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 Agenda Item: VIII Attachment B 2