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11.12.19 DMC Packet DOWNTOWN MANAGEMENT COMMISSION November 12, 2019 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. Canyon Conference Room, 1777 Broadway AGENDA • Roll Call • Approval of the September 10, 2019 Meeting Minutes • Public Participation • Parks Update – Dennis Warrington • Police Update – Greg LeFebre • DBP Update – Chip • Matters from Commissioners • Citylab article on Social Infrastructure – Jerry Shapins • Matters from Staff • 2020 DMC Goals and Annual Letter to Council • EcoPass Audit Results and Distribution in 2020 • B-Cycle • Confirm 2020 DMC Meeting Schedule • January 14, 2020 • March 10, 2020 • May 12, 2020 • July 14, 2020 • September 8, 2020 • November 10, 2020 Attachments: • Draft DMC Joint Meeting Minutes – September 10, 2019 • Citylab article on Social Infrastructure • Council Questions to Boards and Commissions • Commission Focus Matrix • Downtown Employee EcoPass Audit Executive Summary Commissioner Term Exp. DMC 2019 Priorities Eli Feldman Adam Knoff Andrew Niemeyer Susan Nuzum Property Owner/Rep Property Owner/Rep Citizen-at-Large Property Owner/Rep 2020 2023 2022 2024 -Continue implementation of Retail Strategy action steps including possible BID expansions and creation of affordable retail space. Jerry Shapins Citizen-at-Large 2021 -Partner with CU and city staff to ensure strong transit connections between downtown and University Hill to capitalize on new hotel development on the Hill. -Participate in the planning of the future development of the East Book End, including improved pedestrian access between the Civic Area and the commercial district and advocating for effective parking policies. -Engage with City Council. -Advance innovative downtown access and mobility strategies. -Maintain CAGID facilities and improve the user experience. CITY OF BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES DOWNTOWN MANAGEMENT COMMISSION NAMES OF MEMBERS, STAFF, AND INVITED GUESTS PRESENT: BOARD MEMBERS: BJAD: Wells, Cook, Hyde-Wright, Knapp (left at 6:14), Prant, Bush (left at 6:09) DMC: Feldman, Shapins, Niemeyer, Nuzum (arrived at 4:28) (Knoff absent) STAFF: Bowden (4:35), Jones, Woulf, Landrith, Dammann, Yates, Ebner, Kemp GUESTS: Chip PERSON PREPARING SUMMARY: Rachel Dammann, 303-441-4191 TYPE OF MEETING: DMC/BJAD Joint Meeting September 10, 2019 Roll Call: Called to order at 4:03 p.m. Approval of the July 9, 2019 DMC Minutes Approved. Approval of the July 17, 2019 BJAD Minutes Approved. Public Participation None. Discussion about public participation at the different commission meetings. Both boards expressed interest in increasing public participation. HHS Update Vicki Ebner, Homeless Initiatives Manager, for the city introduced herself. Homeless Solutions for Boulder County – coordinated services for the homeless. They are working on building better data repository and how they handle the way they guide people to the shelters. The Broadway shelter is focusing on housing, and more intensive services. People who have been in the county for six months and have disabilities are the focus for housing. Bridge House gets everyone else. In January there was a change and they implemented a six month rule at Bridge House. They are exploring more divergent services like paying for a bus ticket for someone to go back to family, helping with car repair, etc. Severe weather services focuses on life saving services. The philosophy is Housing First – get someone stabilized in housing before you try to get someone clean. Bridge House short term services is the facility by Boulder Junction. As is the severe weather facility. Knapp - How short on housing are we? Ebner – they have a massive budget request. The county goal is to have 200 more opportunities next year. It will be a combination of units willing to take vouchers and building new units. There are an estimated 623 homeless people in Boulder County. There is no specific city count. The Boulder shelter house 160 people and there are fifty at Bridge House. There are seventy two beds for severe weather. Business owners in Boulder Junction have become frustrated with the homeless in the area. A subset of business owners started meeting to find solutions. It has morphed into a working group talking about options such as public toilets. Ebner said to call the non-emergency police line if you encounter negative behavior. They are working on engaging more people for services. Wells recommended a BJAD rep at this working group. Bush said he heard people who attended the meeting were disappointed in the answers and lack of funding, etc. Bush said he would like to volunteer. Wells also recommended the working group reach out to HOAs. PD Homeless Outreach Team is two officers and is citywide. City and County works on facilitation – finds the services available to people. DBP Update Chip started at DBP about a month ago. Mobility, Access, and Parking are top items from his constituents. Niemeyer brought up the idea of DMC, DBP, and BID coordinating and presenting a unified voice to Council. Shapins recommended a project with a joint action. Bowden Update Bowden gave a City update. Council is reviewing the budget for the first time tonight. Community Vitality is focusing on new parking kiosks and the citywide retail strategy. Council is not looking into the Civic Area right now because they are focusing on Alpine Balsam. Matters from Commissioners Feldman talked about a report titled Growing Greener Boulder from Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, the Copirg Foundation, and Frontier Group. He recommended everyone read it. It has good data and specific recommendations. He proposed the report authors come to the commissions. https://copirg.org/reports/cop/growing-greener Matters from Staff Community Vitality and the Role of Parking & Access – Cris Jones Jones gave a presentation on the history, purpose, and workplan of Community Vitality. He shared information on parking utilization. https://survey.commutifi.com/?organization=2f6371d4- e491-4deb-9bff-bd7336f26e26 Niemeyer asked about charging for parking on Sunday. Bowden said that will be reviewed as part of future policy development. Shared Mobility Program Update – Dave “DK” Kemp Kemp presented on Shared Micro-mobility which is station-based bike share, dock-less bike share and scooter share. The goal is to support first and final mile travel options. They want to limit scooters to 1-2 companies for a one-year pilot and are looking at a spring 2020 launch. Bush – What are the biggest concerns about scooters? What kind of data are coming out of cities that have embraced scooters.? Kemp – It’s good we waited; we have learned a lot and problems are being sorted out. Is there data on scooter accidents vs bike accidents? For 100,000 miles traveled, there is a higher uptick in scooter related injuries vs bike injuries. Cook – Is the City is going to have a framework, what is the rationale for the number of companies that can operate? Kemp – They don’t want so much scooter inventory to have scooters sitting around and not being used. Nuzum – Is this just going to happen? Kemp – No. He is collecting input and will bring it to TAB and then Council for consideration. Prant – Are we really going to force people to use helmets? Kemp – It is hard to enforce, but the City can request it. Prant asked if this requirement would impact B-Cycle. Kemp – Yes, possibly. Hyde-Wright – Is the pilot citywide? Kemp – Yes. Chip – Should bike share and scooters be de-coupled? Kemp – The trend is that many cities have them coupled. Other things will come along that can be considered part of micro-mobility. Niemeyer – Enforcement is difficult. What are the conversations that have happened with PD? Kemp - PD has been straightforward that this is not their priority. We can help with the policy development. Nuzum – Is there any technology to prevent drunk riding? Kemp – He agrees about the concern, but hasn’t seen the tech yet. Feldman and Bush voiced support for a pilot. Bowden – Why is the pilot will be citywide and not specific to transportation corridors? Kemp – The average size person could get two hours of ridership and the scooters could end up far away. Hyde Wright – We need to be willing to balance low-usage areas for equity vs busy places like campus and downtown. Knapp – Perhaps we should subsidize companies so they are willing to serve low income areas. Kemp recommended checking the TMP Master Plan update that was recently approved by TAB for more information. Adjourned 6:17 pm NEXT MEETING: November 12, 2019 APPROVED BY: DOWNTOWN MANAGEMENT COMMISSION Attest: Rachel Dammann, Secretary Eli Feldman, Chair 11/7/2019 From Dead Store to Pop-Up 'Social Infrastructure' - CityLab https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/09/retail-vacancy-business-public-space-culturehouse-boston/597724/1/6 Thank you for printing content from www.citylab.com. If you enjoy this piece, then please check back soon for our latest in urban-centric journalism. With free WiFi and free coffee, Cambridge's CultureHouse provides a kind of instant public space. // Courtesy CultureHouse From Dead Store to Pop -Up ‘S ocial Infrastructure’ J O H N S U R I C O S E P T E M B E R 1 0 , 2 0 1 9 A Boston nonprofit called CultureHouse is demonstrating how empty storefronts can be transformed into instant “social infrastructure.” Cambridge’s Kendall Square, nestled between the MIT campus and the Charles River, suffers from some familiar symptoms of 2019-style retail malaise: an abundance of “For Rent” signs and hollowed-out storefronts. Though this is a booming area that’s home to a growing tech-entrepreneurial base, much of the commercial activity is reserved for weekdays; at nights and on weekends, Kendall Square gets sleepier. www.citylab.com 11/7/2019 From Dead Store to Pop-Up 'Social Infrastructure' - CityLab https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/09/retail-vacancy-business-public-space-culturehouse-boston/597724/2/6 While other cities have toyed with vacancy taxes and vacant-storefront registries to combat the proliferation of dead retailers, as CityLab has reported, the Boston nonprofit CultureHouse has taken a tactical urbanist approach: physically occupying vacant storefronts and turning them into pop-up public places. In a long-vacant former coffee shop on Kendall Street, for example, people can sit and talk, read, eat, see a show, or aend an ever-changing rotation of events. This last week, the space hosted a “Game Night,” a ping-pong tournament, Dog Trivia, and a screening of a documentary on Jane Jacobs. This is the group’s second pop-up location, which will be open until October; previously, CultureHouse took over the lobby of a nearby pop-up complex called Bow Market for a month. The idea, says co- founder Aaron Greiner, is to create a shortcut to “social infrastructure” in communities that need more welcoming public spaces—amenities like parks and libraries, where neighbors can interact with one another. And the kicker: In exchange for injecting Kendall Square with a lile street-level energy, Greiner* and his team pay no rent: Agreements with property managers rely on the premise that the non-commercial activation of idle stores will draw more life (and business) to the surrounding area. Early signs have been promising. “A lot of these spaces are in amazing locations, because they’re right on the street,” Greiner says. “And vacant storefronts are everywhere. They’re on the major streets, occupying some of the most high- potential-impact areas, siing completely unused.” We caught up with Greiner to talk about how cities can put vacant spaces back to work, what this model could look like in more disadvantaged urban centers, and why he hopes to one day see a CultureHouse in every American downtown. Our conversation has been condensed and edited. So how did CultureHouse come about? The idea for CultureHouse came from my experience studying abroad in Copenhagen, where there’s this real dedication to public life and public spaces. I was studying urban design and livability there, and learning about the theories behind how those spaces cultivate community and connections. I could see how those spaces increased happiness. One of the reasons why [Denmark] has such a happy population is because of all of those opportunities to exist in public. I also worked at the Beer Block Foundation, an organization based in Dallas that does temporary streetscape renovation. I worked on a project in Farmington, Ohio, a forgoen lile town, transforming a street for a weekend into something that’s vibrant. There are tons of vacant storefronts in these towns, and streets that aren’t designed for people. That’s when I saw the idea of pop-up spaces that are non- commercial. I saw how that pop-up framing could allow a project or an idea to gain footing, and to show what’s possible. 11/7/2019 From Dead Store to Pop-Up 'Social Infrastructure' - CityLab https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/09/retail-vacancy-business-public-space-culturehouse-boston/597724/3/6 Once I came back to Boston, which is where I grew up, I started to realize the city’s vacant storefront problem. I moved into Somerville and saw that there were all of these vacant storefronts downtown, and at the same time, a huge lack of public space. There are parks, but they’re really only great a couple of months out of the year, because of the weather. Coffee shops or breweries all have a significant financial barrier to entry: You have to buy a $8 cup of coffee or a $10 beer or whatever. That doesn’t end up forming the community that truly public space is for. Just activating storefronts helps to increase foot traffic, encourages people to come to the area, and simply makes it more alive. Creating a public space there then creates what I call an “element of stickiness.” It gives people a reason to to stay, and that, in turn, supports the businesses that are still open. In Somerville, how have these vacancies affected the surrounding area? It’s had a huge effect, because vacant storefronts—even just from how they look visually—discourage people from walking in that area. We collected data on our pop-up in Kendall Square, and not a single person stopped on the street before we opened. The space we’re in was vacant for a year and a half—it’s a dead storefront with a boring facade, and there was lile foot traffic [on the street] outside of work hours, so there was really no life in the street. There was no reason to be there, so people don’t stay. There’s this urban-design sociology idea that you can rate a facade by how fast you have to travel by it for it to be interesting. Humans are likely to change in their minds every 10 to 15 seconds, because we’re impatient people, and so if you look at a street that has completely empty windows, people will feel more bored and less happy. Simply puing something in those windows changes the way people interact with the street. They’re much more likely to choose walking, or some more active transportation mode; they’re much more likely to feel happier. Just activating the windows of the storefront already has an effect. The icing on the cake is then geing people to actually walk in and spend meaningful time there. Once this coffee shop closed, how’d you go about convincing the landlord to open up this space rent- free? We’re working with a huge real estate company that owns the spaces on the ground floor of office buildings. They recognize that this isn’t an area that people come to outside of when they have to. So they saw an interest in activating the space, to create more life on the street. That makes their buildings feel more alive, which is a benefit for them. 11/7/2019 From Dead Store to Pop-Up 'Social Infrastructure' - CityLab https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/09/retail-vacancy-business-public-space-culturehouse-boston/597724/4/6 In addition to free WiFi and hang-out space, CultureHouse hosts community events. (Courtesy CultureHouse) For this pop-up, not only are we in this space rent-free, but they’re also giving us some funding to help go towards the operations. We also have grants and donations and all that, but they’ve seen the value so much, that they’re also willing to put funds toward making the space operational. So say the area comes back to life and the landlord basically says, “We got people—you guys need to go.” Do you see that as “Mission Accomplished”? I think being able to create a place that is alive is success. But there’s also a long-term reason for something like CultureHouse to stick around. Even when you have businesses that are open, if there aren’t public gathering places, people are less likely to stay. Keeping a space like us around creates a draw. It’s supporting the businesses that are open around it. We don’t sell food; people go out and get lunch next door. We believe that there’s a really great reason for us to exist in every downtown area. What sort of impact have you seen thus far at your locations? We’ve been able to show that this addresses a community need—we aract people and give them a reason to stay in the area. And we’ve also been able to find a lot of people who have been able to use CultureHouse. There’s one guy who works out of here most days. It’s like his co-working space, and he said that those spaces are $300 a month, and he can’t do that as a freelancer. For him, being able to have this space increases his quality of life. 11/7/2019 From Dead Store to Pop-Up 'Social Infrastructure' - CityLab https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/09/retail-vacancy-business-public-space-culturehouse-boston/597724/5/6 From what you’re describing, CultureHouse functions like a library or a similar piece of “social infrastructure.” We took a lot of inspiration from what Eric Klinenberg wrote in Palaces for the People, about how having spaces where people interact and gather can literally be life or death, as he talks about with the [1995] heat wave in Chicago. How could a city like Boston scale this? Something that has been a part of our mission since we started the organization is scalability. We’ve gone back and forth internally about where we focus our efforts—there’s something to be said about expanding, but there’s also a lot to be said about really honing in and focusing, because these spaces are tailor-made to the communities they serve. When we open pop-ups, we spend weeks interviewing community members, figuring out their needs and wants. So what we’ve done is open-source our entire project: We’ve created the CultureHouse Manual, which is essentially a how-to document that we’ll continue building and updating. We see the model as being really adaptable. [Each could be] tailor- made for the context it’s in. What about in cities that are more economically troubled, like Detroit or St. Louis, which have huge vacancy issues? We’ve goen interest from cities like that. I can see a place like Detroit really benefiting from something like this, but it would definitely take time and effort to determine what are the elements that are common and what are the elements that are different. We do a lot of programming, and events are key, because they really come from the community. In Boston, we’ve done a bike workshop, because a lot of people commute by bike. In a city like Detroit, maybe there’s a specific community need, or organizations that are looking for spaces to have events. A lot of our events tend to be collaborative; we’ll do them with organizations that are looking for a new audience and have some public good to offer. It’s really about partnering with local resources and offering CultureHouse as a platform and a stage to enhance what’s already there. What’s the path forward from here? We’re in our current space until the end of October. We’re looking to find a new space that we’ll move to after our current pop-up shuts down. There’s a lot to be said for moving around—you get to go to a lot of areas, do a lot of broad impact—but we’d love to have a permanent presence somewhere, and then open up satellite pop-ups around that. Long-term, we really do see this as a national model. We’d love to see a CultureHouse in every city. 11/7/2019 From Dead Store to Pop-Up 'Social Infrastructure' - CityLab https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/09/retail-vacancy-business-public-space-culturehouse-boston/597724/6/6 CultureHouse is also a place where people that are new to a city can interact. We’ve seen that in Cambridge, which has a very high renting population. Our space gets used by people who have lived in the neighborhood forever and by people who are just coming; we see them interact and get to know each other here. We see this as something that can really spread across the country. “Hey, I live in Boston, I have a CultureHouse there.” And then, “Oh, I’m moving to a new city—I know I can go to CultureHouse Dallas, or CultureHouse Detroit. That can be my touchpoint; I’ll be welcome or start to find a community there.” It would be different in every place it goes, but have a similar thread as a home. *CORRECTION: An earlier version of this piece misspelled Aaron Greiner’s name. From:Beck, Lynnette To:Beck, Lynnette Subject:Board and Commission Feedback for 2020 City Council Retreat Date:Wednesday, November 6, 2019 10:44:04 AM Dear Boulder Board and Commission Members: At the end of each year, the Boulder City Council requests input on next year's goals and objectives from the city's boards and commissions. Your input is considered in setting the council and city staff's annual work plan at their January retreat. As appointed officials of our community, you are necessarily aware of a spectrum of topics and issues. Below, please find this year's questions. You need not limit your responses to the area of expertise of your board/commission. Each board/commission may provide a single set of responses or, if preferred, each member can provide an individual response (if the latter, please submit all of the member responses in a single packet). In order for council to benefit from your input, please provide your input via your board secretary, no later than the close of business on Thursday, December 12. Thank you for your service to our community. Sincerely, Mary Young Bob Yates Council Retreat Committee 1. What do you think the City’s top three priorities should be for the 2020-2021 work plan? 2. How do your suggestions connect back to the work of your specific board or commission? 3. Are there additional boards or commissions that should weigh in on those issues? 2020 District Focus (Subject to New Council Priorities to be Determined at January 17-18, 2020 Council Retreat) BJAD – P BJAD – TDM DMC UHCAMC Community Vitality Strategic Plan Update X X X X Budget X X X X CIP X X X Placemaking Pearl Street Inventory/Refresh X Hill Hotel & area infrastructure revitalization X Access-Related Wayfinding & Infrastructure X X AMPS Implementation X X X X Parking Pricing X X X Curbside Management X X X X Micromobility X X X NPP evolution X X TDM solutions & strategies (incl. EcoPass) X X X Economic Resilience X X Retail Strategy and Implementation X X Small Business initiatives X X City of Boulder Community Vitality Parking & Access | District Management | Economic Vitality 1500 Pearl Street, Suite 302 | Boulder, CO 80302 | phone 303-413-7300 | fax 303-413-7301 To: Community Vitality Strategy Team From: Lane Landrith, Rachel Dammann, Sharon Doyle Re: City of Boulder CAGID DBBID Employee EcoPass Audit - 2019 Community Vitality Staff were given the opportunity to conduct a systemwide audit of the City of Boulder Downtown Employee (CAGID and DBBID) EcoPass Program in June 2019. The objectives were as follows: •Documentation of the audit process and staffing requirements •Ongoing audit frequency to coincide with RTD year-end renewal and fund balance implications •Key findings and recommendations Executive Summary During the period of June - October 2019, Community Vitality staff conducted a comprehensive review audit of all active RTD EcoPass cardholders as authorized through the CAGID district qualifications. During the first month, 78 employers were identified as either outside the district or no longer in business, resulting in the deactivation of 236 active rider accounts. Based on total full-time employee counts, the top 31 employers were sent a roster of active riders which resulted in 541 suspended accounts. In August, staff sent emails containing active rider rosters to the remaining employers. Of the 8,830 active riders at the project outset, staff experienced a 53% response rate from employers resulting in 1,905 individual account (21.6%) deactivations. Based upon the $1,219,046 payment to RTD in 2019 for all 8,830 EcoPass cards, the imputed value per active riders would be $138 per person. With our current statistic of having suspended this benefit from 1,905 ineligible riders due to the audit, the revenue retention to the district is estimated to be $262,890. Total staff time to date is at approximately 200 hours, which has an opportunity cost to this program for time not spent on other district initiatives. Moving forward, there are just over 300 employers who have yet to reply to the initial email of their active rider accounts. We can conservatively expect to see another 650 rider accounts deactivated before year-end 2019. Staff will repeat the full comprehensive review of CAGID/DBBID employers annually in Q1 and complete a smaller audit of the top 50 employers during Q3 of the same year.