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10.02.19 BLC PacketCity of Boulder 2019 Library Commission Agenda Meeting date: Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 Location: George Reynolds Branch Library meeting room, 3595 Table Mesa Drive Meeting start time: 6 p.m. (Note: There is no access to the building after 8 p.m.) 1. Approval of agenda 2. Public comment – commission chair will introduce public comment parameters. 3. Consent agenda a. Approval of Sept. 4, 2019 minutes 4. Library policy update a. Review and approve Security Camera Policy b. Update on revision of Privacy Policy c. Review staff recommended updates to the Meeting Room and Study Room Policies 5. Review, input, and approval of the 2020 Library Commissioner application questions and job description 6. Discuss priorities for annual letter to City Council 7. Library Commission update a. Interesting upcoming dates from ALA website b. Items from commission (verbal) i. Update on the status of Library Champions’ efforts (Gomez/O’Shea) • Outreach to Council Candidates • Sept 30th Budget Event at Main ii. Discussion of City budget / Library budget 2020 and beyond iii. Uptick in interest on Gunbarrel branch iv. Colorado Association of Libraries Conference 2019 (CALCON) Panel on Strengthening Local Relations: Library Leadership & Government Officials (O’Shea) v. Alpine-Balsam Update (Gomez) c. Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update (verbal: Sykes-Wilson) d. Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues (verbal) e. Update on emails and phone calls to Library Commission 8. Library and Arts Director’s Report a. Main Library restroom renovation project b. North Boulder branch library project c. Recap of 5th Annual Zee Jaipur Literature Festival d. Follow up on 2020 Library Recommended Budget 9. Adjournment 2019 Library Commissioners Tim O’Shea Juana Gomez Joel Koenig Jane Sykes Wilson Steven Frost 1 Library Commission Minutes September 4, 2019 Page 1 of 4 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES Name of Board/ Commission: Library Commission Date of Meeting: September 4, 2019 at the Main Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. Contact information preparing summary: Celia Seaton, 303-441-3106 Commission members present: Tim O’Shea, Joel Koenig, Jane Sykes Wilson, Steven Frost, Juana Gomez Commission members not present: Joel Koenig Library staff present: David Farnan, Director of Library & Arts Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director Celia Seaton, Administrative Specialist City staff present: None Members of the public present: None Type of Meeting: Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to order and approval of agenda [0:00:32 Audio min.] The meeting was called to order; O’Shea asked if there were any changes to the agenda. O’Shea mentioned the additional documents provided (see handouts). Items 4 and 5 were switched chronologically from the original agenda. There was a nod of approval from the commission for this agenda. Agenda Item 2: Public comment [0:01:17 Audio min.] None. Agenda Item 3: Consent agenda [0:01:25 Audio min.] a.Approval of August 2019 Meeting Minutes: Frost moved to approve these minutes, Sykes Wilson seconded, and the motion was unanimously approved 4-0 in Koenig’s absence. Agenda Item 4: Library Budget Update [0:03:15 Audio min.] a.2020 City Manager recommended budget (see packet) – Farnan welcomed questions. Gomez received clarification around the overlap of Library and Arts’ budget – staff indicated the lines pertaining to Arts with the remainder to Library. Gomez queried whether the noted bilingual Youth Services Specialist (a new FTE) would potentially serve as a new member of REFORMA. Farnan replied that he would gladly offer that opportunity to the new staff. Gomez offered reaching out herself to gauge interest and Farnan welcomed her efforts. O’Shea referenced p. 37 of the link in the memo regarding fund balances/contribution to fund balance, tracking projected fund balance and recommended fund balance. Grants and property tax monies go to the library fund balance for. Estimation based on City’s property tax projections. Commission wondered whether further adjustments to FTE are anticipated depending on needs. Farnan explained that the 2021 budget requests won’t occur until May 2020 (when north Boulder staffing will be allocated). Currently estimated at 4.5 FTE for north Boulder staffing. Sykes Wilson wondered whether that was sufficient. Farnan: it’s equivalent to the level of the other branches; it’s not enough – “we get by, but it’s pretty bare bones at the branches.” Difficult to manage absences and vacations. With the number of operation hours and the level of business, 10-25% increase in staffing would assist. Sykes Wilson asked whether patronage is expected to leave Main in favor of the new north Boulder branch. Farnan doesn’t predict this shift. Gunbarrel residents often come to Meadows branch, they may visit the new branch. Difficult to predict from where the patronage levels will draw. 2 Library Commission Minutes September 4, 2019 Page 2 of 4 Regarding the listed George Reynolds Branch (GRB) reconfiguration, commission recalled a reorganization four years ago and asked about the purpose. Staff explained that the previous rearrangement accommodated the materials sorter and staff offices. In contrast, this is an internal, cosmetic renovation for the public space to update the patron experience and provide more security. O’Shea confirmed that north Boulder’s site review process is on track to complete by late 2019/early 2020 when a NoBo project cost estimate can be redone. On September 10th, City Council will hold a study session to discuss budget; Farnan will attend to answer questions. Agenda Item 5: Library Policy Update [0:37:55 Audio min.] a. Review and approve the Photography and Video Recording Policy O’Shea appreciated the edits and adjustments made for this draft and welcomed further input. Gomez noted some needed edits. Beyond publishing online, Frost wondered whether there will there be a sign in the bathroom that clearly forbids photography. Phares: we post the rules at the entrances. In the past, bathroom signage has been defaced. O’Shea moved to approve the Photography and Video Recording Policy. Frost seconded; all were in favor and the motion passed unanimously. b. Review Privacy and Security Camera Policies Gomez inquired about the nature of the requestor of footage. Farnan: usually in these rare occurrences, police or a defendant ask a judge to issue a subpoena; the library would then act in compliance. A member of the general public would have to submit a CORA (Colorado Open Records Act) request. The footage would then go to the CAO for review before potentially being made available for public viewing. Gomez wondered about the duration of “retained information.” Phares: until account is purged by inactivity. Commission wondered whether youth materials are treated differently that adult materials. Phares: judgement call for the staff, depends on the age of the item, circulation numbers, etc. O’Shea approved of the direction these policies are going, tightened up to reduce room for misinterpretation. Phares noted that CAO review on this policy will be the next step; it will be brought back to commission in October. Agenda Item 6: Library Commission Update [0:56:15 Audio min.] a. Interesting upcoming dates from ALA website b. Items from Commission i. Update on the status of Library Champions’ efforts – In August, Champions put together two items in the first bullet below to assist with funding discussion.  “The scoop on the Boulder budget” and “The Scoop on Sustainable Library Funding” – O’Shea noted that these are changeable, “living documents.”  August 26th event at Main – Joni Teter and the Champions presented a slide-deck on how the City’s budget works. City Council candidates invited to this forum – O’Shea was glad to see many attending and participating. Champions have a “Shining the Light” gathering in the Boulder Creek Room on September 30th – “good momentum out in the field.” ii. Discussion of City budget/Library budget 2020 and beyond  2021 impacts with North Boulder branch library (NoBo), Full Time Equivalent (FTEs) staff positions and related new costs  City projections via Master Plan compared to G.K. Baum study iii. Commission’s role in shaping public process regarding sustainable library funding  Candidate dialogues – (see handouts.) Stemming from the “scoop on budget” presentation, great interest from current city council candidates to learn more. Request from candidates to sit down with commission and Champions presents ongoing outreach opportunities. Discussion of tracking/supporting this issue of unmet needs. 3 Library Commission Minutes September 4, 2019 Page 3 of 4 O’Shea invited Frost and Sykes Wilson to review the list and assist where desired; with all agreeable, assignments were discussed.  Council member meetings  Public involvement strategies – O’Shea wondered about the possibility of inviting facilitators Michael and Marsha Caplan (active with the Library Champions) to an upcoming meeting, perhaps in November, to provide guidance on the commission’s role in the districting discussion. Farnan would need to inquire about cost. O’Shea reminded the group that it, as a commission, is not in a position to endorse any specific candidates; however, dialog with these candidates is permissible. Per the CAO “As long as the commissioners are not spending money to support the campaign, they may meet with City Council candidates. No more than two commissioners may be present at the meetings.” Gomez asked about the acceptability of lawn signs; Phares will inquire. iv. Colorado Association of Libraries Conference 2019 (CALCON) Panel Update – O’Shea reported “great panel” shaping up to discuss public engagement strategies. c. Boulder Library Foundation (BLF) update – Sykes Wilson noted that BLF unanimously approved additional funding (the second half of the $25,000) provided to the Library Champions for campaign needs. Still working on website and onboarding the new employee. d. Updates from commissioners representing the Commission in other venues i. Alpine Balsam update – Gomez reported that City Council asked staff to broaden their scope in terms of planning what could go into some other lots near the actual hospital site. Staff was going to provide rezoning opportunities but there has been a re-focus back on the actual hospital site. e. Update on emails and phone calls to Library Commission – none. f. Review of Library Commission Master Calendar – Phares reworked this schedule to accommodate some planned commission absences in the future. She noted the inclusion of last year’s commissioner application in the packet; City Clerk Office will need any revisions submitted by October 18th. O’Shea will be absent in October; Sykes Wilson will be absent in November. Koenig still in recuperation from surgery. O’Shea asked all commissioners to review these questions and the commissioner job description for approval at the October meeting. Agenda Item 7: Library and Arts Director’s Report [1:42:04 Audio min.] a. Main Library restroom renovation project- project has hit numerous snags and the renovated facilities will not be open in time for Jaipur Literature Festival. b. North Boulder branch library project – Gomez inquired whether initial comments from Planning and Development Services were received. Farnan: yes, these are currently being reviewed - many questions for the architect to answer. Farnan noted that these are not yet publicly available. Questions about the wooden façade’s long-term maintenance. Discussion of the public art project chosen for the new branch which engages with the community in its very concept. The selection panel recommended Daily tous les jours (Dtlj) in a 6/6 vote, supported by the project management team. Dtlj’s proposal serves as a welcoming and well-integrated piece – a musical approach to the library. Prime visibility from Broadway encourages patron traffic to the 2nd floor entrance. This concept is striking and simple, engaging multiple senses and multiple participants; community collaboration opportunities seem natural. The work reflects Boulder personality. c. Civic Area restroom project – hit large snag. d. 5th Annual Zee Jaipur Literature Festival e. Public engagement resources 4 Library Commission Minutes September 4, 2019 Page 4 of 4 APPROVED BY: ATTESTED: _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Board Chair Board Secretary _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Date Date f.Follow Up: Meeting with City Council candidates g.Review of Library Commission application questions Agenda Item 8: Adjournment [1:52:15 Audio min.] There being no further business to come before the commission at this time, the meeting was adjourned. Date, time, and location of next meeting: The next Library Commission meeting will be at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, October 2, 2019, at the George Reynolds Branch Public Library, 3595 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305. 5 Date: Sept. 27, 2019 To: Boulder Library Commission From: David Farnan, Library and Arts Director Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director Subject: Review and approval of Security Camera and Privacy Policies BACKGROUND At the Sept. 4, 2019 meeting, the Library Commission accepted changes from staff on the Security Camera and Privacy Policies. Following the commission’s review, Janet Michels, Senior Assistant City Attorney reviewed the policies and advised that some additional information and revisions be incorporated into both policies. OUTCOME OF STAFF REVIEW Security Camera Policy The final revision of this policy is Attachment A. Additional changes were recommended to the public disclosure section and are shown as tracked changes. These changes align the policy language with the language in C.R.S. section 24-90-119. Privacy Policy The final revision of this policy is Attachment B. The following sections have recommended tracked changes. First paragraph: The word “guarantee,” was removed. The Library Law makes it a petty offense to disclose the information, it doesn’t “guarantee” the privacy of patron records. The statement [“may only be disclosed pursuant to subpoena…”] somewhat mischaracterizes the Library Privacy Law. The library is also authorized by the statute to “disclose any record or information that identifies a person as having requested or obtained specific materials or service or as otherwise having used the library” … “when necessary for the reasonable operation of the library”…. CRS 24-90-119(2)(a). See this link for a succinct explanation of that statute. The last sentence was modified to include this authorization. Disposing of Patron Information section: The original paragraph is a quote of the statute stating what state law requires, it does not say what the library’s practice is. It was changed to state the library’s practice. QUESTIONS FOR COMMISSION 1. Does the commission have any questions or additional changes to recommend? 2. Will the commission make a motion at the Oct. 2, 2019 meeting to approve the Security Camera and Privacy Policies as amended? 6 ATTACHMENT A. Security Camera Policy Security cameras and the associated recordings are intended to: •Promote safety and security of the staff, community members and library facilities, •Support enforcement of the library’s rules of conduct, •Discourage inappropriate and illegal behavior, and •Aid in the apprehension and prosecution of offenders. Recordings will be obtained and used in manner that is consistent with the privacy policy. Retention Security camera recordings are stored digitally on hardware under the control of the City of Boulder I.T. Department. Recordings are generally maintained for a minimum of 30 days or until system capacity is reached, at which point the oldest recordings are automatically deleted. Recordings are confidential and secure to the extent permitted by law. Typically, the recordings are not monitored or reviewed. The location of security cameras is limited to areas that do not violate a person’s reasonable expectation of privacy. If an incident comes to the attention of library staff or the contract security officers, the related recordings may be reviewed, retained, and saved for as long as necessary. Signage Signs are posted at the entrance of library facilities indicating the use of security cameras for monitoring and recording activity in public areas of library property. Liability This policy shall not impose any responsibility on the Library, its employees, or the Library Commission to protect against or prevent personal injury or loss of property. Public Disclosure Pursuant to state law C.R.S. section 24-90-119, members of the public are prohibited from viewing security camera recordings that contains personally identifying information about that identifies library users. There are very limited circumstances under which this information will be disclosed. If the Library receives a request from a member of the general public to inspect security camera recordings, the requestor will be instructed to submit a request for this information pursuant to the advised as to whether they qualify for any of the listed exceptions. Images Recordings are subject to Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) § C.R.S. sections 24-72- 2010, et alseq., and City staff will determine whether disclosure is permitted. Approved by the Library Commission on October 2, 2019. 7 ATTACHMENT B. Privacy Policy Boulder Public Library patron account records are strictly confidential. C.R.S. section 24-90-119 requires public libraries toprohibits the disclosure of guarantee the privacy of patron records except in limited circumstances established by state law. The following information may only be disclosed pursuant to subpoena, upon court order, or whenre otherwise required by lawneeded for library operations: •Borrowing, searching, or reading history •Records or information identifying a person as requesting or obtaining specific materials or services or as otherwise using the library. Library account information The following information is retained in patron library or computer use accounts: •Name, home address, and current telephone number. •Birth date or year. •Library or computer use card number. •Issue and expiration date. •Total number, not titles, of checkouts, renewal and items claimed returned. •Email address, work or business telephone number to receive courtesy due date notifications is optional. •Email address to receive the library newsletter is optional. If patrons do not bring their library card or remember their account number, they may check out items and retrieve account information with photo identification. Patrons are asked to immediately report the loss or theft of their library or computer use card to the library. Non-identifiable Ppatron information including household addresses may be provided to third parties and used for demographic analysis to inform planning and programming efforts. Patron names and information about the items patrons check out are never shared with third parties. The City of Boulder requires all vendors to ensure the protection of personally identifiable information. Borrowed items A record of borrowed library items is retained on the patron’s account so the library may contact them patrons if items are not returned. System identification numbers indicating borrowed items that were last checked out on the patron account are retained until the items are checked out and returned by the next patron. This is necessary to attribute any damage to an item to the appropriate patron. Once the next patron returns the item, the item’s association with the previous patron account is removed. 8 ATTACHMENT B. A history of the replacement charges or fines paid is maintained for a minimum of six months to provide data for disputed charges. Replacement charges are assessed after items become 21 days overdue. Items billed to the patron for replacement remain checked out on the account until the bill is reconciled. Optional library account features •Reading History: tracks an ongoing list of items patrons have checked out even after they have been checked in. The reading history begins from the date of opt-in and cannot be applied retroactively. •Search History: tracks the search criteria patrons have used to search the library catalog when they are logged into their account. •My Lists: tracks lists of items created by patrons. Disposing of Patron Information Pursuant with Boulder Public Library complies with C.R.S., section 24-73-101, Personal Information Statutethe Colorado Consumer Data Privacy Law, and renders records containing personally identifiable information irretrievable and illegible when the person identifying information is no longer needed. Approved by the Library Commission on October 2, 2019. 9 Date: Sept. 27, 2019 To: Boulder Library Commission From: David Farnan, Library and Arts Director Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director Subject: Review of draft updates to the Meeting Room and Study Room Policy BACKGROUND The current Meeting Room and Study Room Policy was last updated in 2016. Keeping with the Master Plan in the Organizational Readiness Goal to review policies every three years, staff reviewed and updated the policy (Attachment A.) Staff requests the Library Commission’s review and comment on these changes. The commission’s comments will be incorporated, and the policy will be submitted for review by the City Attorney’s Office. The final revision will be presented to the commission for consideration at the Nov. 6, 2019 Library Commission meeting. QUESTION FOR COMMISSION Does the commission have any questions or additional changes to recommend? 10 Meeting Room and Study Room Policy Approved by the Library Commission on November __, 2019. Boulder Public Library provides open access to all forms of educational, cultural and recreational information including ideas and the free expression of all points of view. In keeping with these principles, Boulder Public Library provides meeting spaces for members of the local community to present and exchange views on subjects of all kinds. Meeting and study rooms are available at no charge to all nonprofit, community and for-profit business groups, regardless of their beliefs or affiliations. Granting permission to use library facilities does not constitute endorsement by the Boulder Public Library, its staff, or the Library Commission. No advertisement or announcement implying such endorsement is permitted. Meetings, workshops, and events scheduled to occur in the library, which are not co-organized by library and arts staff and community partners, are not eligible to receive promotional or other support from library and arts staff, or to utilize use resources beyond the provision of the room and access to the equipment and furniture in the room. Please include the following statement on any/all promotional materials, including, but not limited to, signs/posters, flyers/mailings, press releases, online promotions, etc.: “This event is not sponsored by Boulder Public Library. For more information, please contact [insert your organization’s contact information]. Access to free meeting rooms is a service of Boulder Public Library.” Meeting and Study Room Guidelines Meeting and study rooms are provided during regular business hours and are available for reservation and use by patrons after library/ and arts programs, events or meetings, or library/ and arts-sponsored programs and events are scheduled. Reservations can be made online or by contacting library staff. Meeting Rooms •Rooms may be reserved for groups of 5 five people or more. •Groups are limited permitted to reservations up to 4 four hours per month. Set up and clean up time must be included within the reservation time. •Rooms may be booked up to 24 weeks in advance. •Meeting rooms may be reserved by adults 18 years or older. Youth organizations using the meeting rooms must have an adult sponsor who reserves the room and must beis present at all timesduring the reservation. •The audiovisual equipment available in each room is listed here. Groups must provide their own laptop computer or electronic devices and and are advised to bring their own HDMI or VGA cable and adaptors to connect to the meeting room equipment. The library offers HDMI or VGA cables and other adaptors for checkout as available. All ATTACHMENT A. 11 technical support is the responsibility of the group. If assistance is needed to connect to the audiovisual equipment provided, a basic training session may be scheduled with a library staff member prior to the meeting. •Groups may supply and serve refreshments in accordance with the Library Rules of Conduct. •Detailed meeting room information, including capacity and equipment. Study rooms Study rooms at the Main Library, George Reynolds and Meadows Bbranch Llibraries are available for drop-in use or by reservation. Reservations for two hours per day can be made online or by contacting library staff. Advanced reservations are accepted for a 2two-hour time limit per day. Reservations can be made up to three weeks in advance. Persons of any age are eligible to make a reservation. Detailed study room information, including capacity. Cancellations: Please cancel meeting or study room reservations you no longer need 24 hours prior to a scheduled eventthe reserved time. Reservations are considered forfeit if the individual or group does not show up within 15 minutes after the reservation time. Please refer to your the email confirmation if you need to cancel a reservation for a study room or meeting room. If you no longer have your confirmation, please call us the library to cancel your reservation. The library reserves the right to cancel programs as needed for any weather, health, or safety- related issue. Terms of Use: 1.The Library Rules of Conduct apply to all persons using any meeting or study room. 2.Groups must limit attendees to the posted room capacity. 2.3.Groups must adhere to the reservation time permitted per month in the meeting room guidelines above. 3.4.Meetings must be held during the library facility’s operating hours. Meetings must conclude 10 ten minutes before the facility closing time. 4.5.Groups using the rooms are responsible for arranging the room to meet their needs and for cleaning and straightening the room after use. 5.6.All trash, and recyclables and compostables must be deposited in the proper receptacles. 6.7.The library manager or designated staff memberee may grant permission for groups to post or distribute materials outside of the meeting room. 7.8.The event organizer must secure permission from the library manager to accept donations, charge fees or admission, or to sell items or services in advance of the event. 8.9.No storage is provided for groups using the library, and the library is not responsible for anything left in the building. 9.10. Movies shown or recordings played must have the appropriate public performance rights. Obtaining the license and all applicable fees are the responsibility of the group. ATTACHMENT A. 12 Proof of public performance rights shall be provided to the library manager prior to the event date. 10.11. The library is a public space. In accordance with our the mission, we groups are encouraged all groups to use our the meeting rooms. If the meeting is not advertised as being “open to the public,” groups using the meeting rooms have the right to limit attendance. However, library staff members cannot be expected to enforce or ensure the privacy of any meeting. Boulder Public Library, at its sole discretion, reserves the right to revoke meeting or study room reservations and privileges at any time or to refuse future bookings to groups that consistently fail to appear on scheduled meeting dates or who do not abide by the meeting room terms of use or library rules of conduct. The library reserves the right to take photographs of events for its own records and for future promotional materials. Approved by the Library Commission on December __, 2019. ATTACHMENT A. 13 Date: Sept. 27, 2019 To: Boulder Library Commission From: David Farnan, Library and Arts Director Jennifer Phares, Deputy Library Director Subject: Review of new commissioner application questions and job description memo New Commissioner Application Questions The City Clerk’s Office requests the commissioners input on the Library Commission application by Oct. 18, 2019. The questions used in the 2019 application are Attachment A. Library Commissioner Job Description A link to the Library Commissioner job description is provided with the application for new commissioners. Attachment B. is the document with a change recommended by Commissioner Gomez at the Sept. 4, 2019 Library Commission meeting. Next Steps Staff will incorporate the commission’s recommended changes, submit both updated application questions document to City Clerk’s Office by the Oct. 18, 2019 deadline, and update the job description link on the Library Commission webpage following the Oct. 2, 2019 meeting. 14 ATTACHMENT A. LIBRARY COMMISSION Annual Application 2019 Date: Staff Liaison: Celia Seaton (303) 441-3106 The Library Commission consists of five members appointed by City Council, each to five-year terms. The Commission was established in the City Charter in 1917 to provide consultation and make recommendations to Library staff and Council on the management of Boulder's public libraries and information services. Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month at 6:00 PM at one of the library facilities. Library Commission Job Description The City of Boulder believes that a diverse work force adds quality and perspective to the services we provide to the public. Therefore, it is the ongoing policy and practice of the City of Boulder to strive for equal opportunity in employment for all employees and applicants. No person shall be discriminated against in any term, condition or privilege of employment because of race, national origin, religion, disability, pregnancy, age, military status, marital status, genetic characteristics or information, gender, gender identity, gender variance or sexual orientation. The Boulder City Charter requires representation of both genders on City Boards and Commissions. Name: Home Address: Home Phone: Mobile Phone: Work Phone: Email: Occupation: Place of Employment / Retired: 15 ATTACHMENT A. Do you reside within Boulder City limits?: When did you become a resident of Boulder?: 1. What qualifications, skill sets, and relevant experiences do you have for this position (such as education, training, service on governing or decision-making boards, etc.) that would contribute to you being an effective board member and community representative? 2.Have you had any experience(s) with this Board or the services it oversees? 3. Describe a situation where you were involved with a group and had to work through a disagreement or conflict among the members. 4.List all potential conflicts of interest you might have with respect to the work of this board. 5. Have you participated in other community organizations? Please describe. How has your involvement in the community led you to applying for the library commission? 6. Have you reviewed previous library commission meeting minutes, or the recently adopted Library Master Plan document? What thoughts do you have about recent decisions and/or plans? 7. The Boulder Public Library balances traditional definitions of library services with innovation around informal learning, collaboration, literacy and 21st century skills. What's your vision for the future of our library? 8. How will you manage the public’s priorities for the library with the tradeoffs of budget, operational, technological and physical constraints? 9.Some members of the public perceive that the library has a problem providing a safe and secure environment. How do you propose to balance perceptions of unsafety with providing “free and open access” in a public setting? 16 ATTACHMENT B. Library Commissioner Job Description The Boulder Library Commission is a voluntary citizen advisory board that serves to protect and promote the mission of the Boulder Public Library. Library Commissioners, who are appointed by and are advisory to City Council, work closely with the Library and Arts Director and Library staff to develop a vision for the library and to continually review and provide advice on the everyday administration of the library. The Library Commission is the voice of the public in library affairs, and commissioners serve to represent the public interest to the best of their abilities. Serving on the Boulder Library Commission is an exciting and rewarding way to be involved in one of our most important and vital civic institutions. Role and Powers of the Library Commission The City Charter gives the Library Commission the following powers: •Represent the library to the community and the community to the library with the goal of building awareness, understanding, and support • • Adopt bylaws, rules, and regulations for its guidance and governance; •Provide advice to assist in preparation and revision of a master plan for the development and maintenance of a modern library system within the city; •Review annually the library budget prepared by the library director prior to its submittal to the city manager and make recommendations regarding approval or modification of the same; •Review periodically the director’s operational service plans and make comments and recommendations; •Make recommendations to the director and the city council on library facilities, including capital improvements, maintenance of existing facilities, and need for new facilities; •Review the library director's annual report and make comments and recommendations; and •Represent the library to the community and the community to the library with the goal of building awareness, understanding, and support •Take steps as the Library Commission may deem feasible to encourage grants or gifts in support of the library. •Oversee specific monies within the Library Fund that originate from gifts, bequests, or donations Qualifications While the Library Commission is ideally made up of a diverse array of community members with different skills, experiences, and talents, some combination of the following qualifications are ideal: •An understanding of and commitment to the fundamental services of a public library, and some familiarity with Boulder Public Library in particular •A strong desire to preserve and promote the library as a public forum for the sharing of information and ideas without prejudice •A willingness and ability to engage with the public and to understand and represent the views and opinions of diverse community members •The ability to function well in committees and group discussions, and to work in a flexible way with others who have a diversity of opinions and interests. •The ability to assess information and make important decisions •Excellent communication skills •A strong sense of legal and ethical conduct appropriate to the position17 ATTACHMENT B. • The courage to state one’s views on important issues and speak openly and directly, though always respectfully, with staff and other commission members • Some basic understanding of the broader structures of city governance in Boulder, of the issues facing the city in its continuing development, and of the place of the library within those broader contexts Requirements and Expectations Library Commissioners generally serve five-year terms. Member of the Library Commission must be willing and able to give time and talents. More specifically, members of the Library Commission are expected to: • Read distributed materials before each meeting • Participate actively in monthly meetings (usually three hours in length and generally scheduled on the first Wednesday evening of each month) • Devote at least 10 hours per month, and often more, to Commission matters • Serve on various committees or as one of the Library Commission’s representatives on the Boulder Library Foundation Board • Assume a leadership role on the commission at some point during one’s term • Attend BPL and other functions and community events, and generally be a public presence for the library within the community • Provide feedback, advice, and encouragement to the Library and Art Director, to library staff, and to the public in meetings and emails • Stay abreast of developments in the world of public libraries as technologies and service models change Please read our FAQs about what it’s like to be on the Library Commission: FAQ: What does a commissioner do? A library commissioner serves to protect the mission of the public library. The mission of the Boulder Public Library is to enhance the personal and professional growth of Boulder residents and contribute to the development and sustainability of an engaged community through free access to ideas, information, cultural experiences and educational opportunities. A commissioner is not necessarily a library patron or someone that ‘just loves to read.’ You must be active in the local community, willing and able to give time and talent to the library; at meetings, special library functions and other community events. A dedication to our community necessitates an interest in its people, recognizing their potential, understanding their problems, and respecting diversity no matter the origin, age, beliefs or background. Whether you have a life-long love of all things library, or are an activist for the civic good and public spaces, the Library commission wants dedicated members committed to giving back to the public arena. Who do we work with and who do we work for? The library commission is a voluntary board working for the City of Boulder and the Boulder Public Library. The commission works with the library director and staff providing feedback, advice and encouragement to director, to staff, to public in meetings 18 ATTACHMENT B. and emails. The commission also advises the City Council on matters pertaining to the library’s budget, services and facilities. What is the range of hours per month one can expect to spend? Commissioners spend an average of 10-20 hours / month in their role, attending monthly meetings as well as involvement with library activities and events. Two commissioners also serve on the Library Foundation. What resources do I need to read through? The following materials are essential to the role of a Library Commissioner: • Boulder Public Library Mission Statement • The Library Charter • Boulder Public Library’s Master Plan In addition, each Commissioner is expected to thoroughly review previous meeting minutes and the prepared packet of relevant topical materials in advance of each meeting. Commissioners also read and respond to feedback and concerns submitted by patrons and community members. What is the difference between a commissioner and a board member/trustee? Boulder Public Library commissioners are volunteers appointed by the City Council as an advisory body to the library director and the council. In some jurisdictions, a library board or a board of trustees governs the library system. In these jurisdictions, board members or trustees may either be appointed or elected, and the board has decision-making authority for that library. What is it like to be on an advisory commission? Advisory roles in the City of Boulder are essential positions that contribute to the stewardship of our community institutions and values. These are very political positions that require a depth and breadth of issues shaping Boulder. Advisors are an interface to the public for the institutions that they serve. These roles necessitate a willingness to advocate and be out in front. To be committed but not single minded. To work in a flexible way with others around a diversity of opinions, agendas and outcomes. 19 Commission Memo Meeting Date: October 2, 2019 – George Reynolds Branch Library Interesting Upcoming Dates (from ​ALA Website​) National Friends of Libraries Week​ - October 20-26, 2019 Friends of Libraries groups now have their very own national week of celebration, courtesy of United for Libraries: The Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations (a division of ALA). National Friends of Libraries Week offers a two-fold opportunity to celebrate Friends – promoting the group in the community, raising awareness and increasing membership and also giving libraries and boards of trustees the opportunity to recognize the Friends for their help and support of the library. See press release dated October 12, 2015, ​United for Libraries to coordinate National Friends of Libraries Week, Oct. 18-24​, which reveals: Contact ​ALA's United for Libraries​ with questions. International Games Week​ (formerly International Games Day) - November 3-9, 2019 ALA's National Gaming Day, first celebrated in 2008, focuses on the social and recreational side of gaming. Gaming at the library encourages patrons of all ages to interact with diverse peers, share their expertise and develop new strategies for gaming and learning. At the library, kids can socialize with their friends and play board and video games while surrounded by books, librarians and a real world of knowledge. In 2017, the celebration was changed from a day to an entire week. Picture Book Month​ - November The American Association of School Librarians (AASL) will celebrate the picture book during the month of November as a partner of the third annual Picture Book Month. Founded by author and storyteller Dianne de Las Casas, Picture Book Month is an international literacy initiative that celebrates the print picture book in an increasingly digital age. Contact ​Picture Book Month​ with questions. 20 1.Items from Commission (verbal) a.Update on the status of Library Champions’ efforts (Juana/Tim) i.Outreach to Council Candidates ii.September 30th Budget Event at Main b.Discussion of City Budget / Library Budget 2020 and beyond i.Based on the department detail page, it looks like funding for the library actually went down in 2020. Since the City made a point of calling out the additional library FTE for 2020, this is surprising. The library detail page shows reductions in funding in several areas (including maker space, programs and technology support) ii.It looks like sustainability has been moved out of Planning for 2020. c.Uptick in interest on Gunbarrel branch i.Emails to council from Gunbarrel residents requesting action on a Gunbarrel branch have seemingly increased momentum around said. d.CALCON 2019 Panel: Strengthening Local Relations: Library Leadership & Government Officials i.Tim O’Shea represented BPL on this CALCON panel organized by Crystal Schimpf (Colorado State Library). Other panelists included Brena Smith, Director – Lake County Public Library, and Kathleen Owings, former Trustee – Pikes Peak Library District ii.Questions addressed by panel: 1.Can you share an example of one of the working relationships you have established with local government officials? How has your board or library effectively cultivated that relationship? 2.Has your library or board experienced any pressures or challenges when it comes to your relationships with local government officials? What has your board or library done to maintain strong relationships, in light of those challenges? 3.If you had to think of just one strategy that has been particularly effective for strengthening relationships with local government officials on an individual level, what strategy would you recommend? e.Alpine-Balsam Update (Juana) 2.BLF Update (verbal; Jane) 3.Updates from Commissioners Representing the Commission in other Venues (verbal) 4.Update on Emails & Phone Calls to Library Commission 21 Formstack Submission For: Commission Contact Form Submitted at 09/16/19 3:21 PM Your Name:Mike Ellis Email:silleekim@comcast.net Message:Commission members, I've been working on learning languages for a few years, for brain health, family, community, and travel. However, BPL has struggled to find a decent way to support community members who wish to learn a language. A couple years ago, BPL signed up with Mango, a language-learning website/app that supports over 70 languages. There are several such companies out there, but Mango happens to be the one that partners with libraries, schools, and the military, to facilitate language learning among their members. It was working well for me, until BPL cancelled its contract with Mango at the beginning of this year. I was told that it was cancelled because not enough people were using it. The staff at BPL at the time directed me to some other resources for language learning, but none of those resources was serious enough for someone who really wants to learn. I finally justified to myself the cost of signing up on my own, and found that in the few months since BPL had cancelled Mango they had significantly improved their service -- better following standards, better reviews, etc. I happen to believe that there is a huge desire for such a service from BPL. The fact that it may not have been well used tells me that people just didn't know about it. I hear regularly from several other city departments (Planning, OSMP, BPR, Chautauqua, etc., via Next-door, email newsletter, direct mail, etc.) but not from the Library. I only found out about Mango in direct conversations with library staff. But we are a multi-cultural community, with a University and an aging population. Communication, multi-culturalism, inclusiveness, and life-long learning are key goals of Boulder, and of its Library in particular. People ask me all the time about resources for language learning. I used to tell them about Mango. I think if BPL were to bring back Mango AND come up with a way to let people know about this resource, it would be very popular, and would justify the cost. I request that BPL once again partner with Mango and develop a marketing plan to let community members know about this resource. Thanks, Mike Response from Tim O’Shea via email following input from David Farnan and Gina Scioscia: 22 2019-Sep-27 Mike -- Thanks for your patronage at our libraries. I agree with your assessment of the value of language language learning as a gateway to better community dialog and cultural awareness. I was unaware of the Mango offering and appreciate your bringing it to my attention. I relayed your concerns to the library Director and staff. Here's what I learned. The library did discontinue Mango with cost and usage numbers cited as the primary reasons. Library staff reached out to the Mango vendor in 2017 to ask for more robust usage stats but Mango was unable to supply them. Resources dedicated to Mango were repurposed across other language learning collection options. The only statistics Mango provided were Sessions and Avg session length and the courses used in each session. Sessions are no longer used in the State reporting requirements; they were dropped for not being a discrete enough measure of usage. Although sessions usage did show an increase from 2017-2018, we had no way of distinguishing whether this was simply potential users after a marketing event or staff showing the database or whether the actual completed lessons had increased. The avg. session length remained low, indicating few in-depth usages. Mango does not have COUNTER compliant statistical reporting. COUNTER is the recognized standard for usage reporting on library electronic databases. While Mango offered over 70 languages, only about 4-5 were used regularly—these included the popular languages included in all web apps and well represented in our online and physical materials. Duolingo by contrast is a free app, comparable to Mango in style; it is consistently a top reviewed app and received an Excellent rating by PC magazine. There are dozens of free and low-cost language learning apps available to patrons. Language learning has changed in the last decade, and more and more people learn through apps “on the go” or by audio listening on commutes. To compensate for discontinuing Mango, we built up our Overdrive collection with a significant amount of world language instruction—this allows us to offer “on the go” audio learning—which is what we heard consistently from patrons was the reason they preferred physical CDs over the Mango app—they still want to listen/learn on their commute. Overdrive now has over 16 languages represented through Pimsleur and Mango Passport editions and ESL instruction in 8 different languages. More than half of the purchased titles see turnover rates of 10 or more. We also have Kanopy, Gale Courses, and Hoopla which offer additional supporting materials such as Great Courses, Little Pim (world language learning for children), ESL video instruction, Spanish instruction for medical and EMS, and foreign films in many popular 23 languages. We are only too happy to supply audiobook/eAudiobooks that come through Suggest a Purchase for a requested languages. Since 2010 we have offered a language learning database and we have evaluated and consulted with our peers on available library products: PowerSpeak, Rosetta Stone, Transparent Language, and Pronounciator, Rosetta Stone had sold to libraries and then stopped, only to re-enter the library market through an Ebsco partnership. However, their cost is quite prohibitive even though they have brand recognition. Mango has ‘re-branded’ in mid-2019 with a new interface, and library staff indicated a willingness to reach out again to see if they have also re-invented their statistics—offering more insight into usage of the product. Additionally, in their response to your message, the Library team shared that they would be happy to discuss their decision further with the commission or patrons who inquire. Warmly, Tim 24 LIBRARY DIRECTOR’S REPORT OCTOBER 2019 MAIN LIBRARY RESTROOM RENOVATION PROJECT Contractor and subcontractor errors and poor quality work prevented the library from opening the gender specific restrooms in time for the Jaipur Literature Festival. Feedback and renewed expectations have been shared with the contractor who has given the city a refreshed schedule for completion. The current estimated completion date for the gender specific restrooms is September 30th or before, and the current estimated completion date for the all gender restrooms is October 14th or before. In spite of reoccurring schedule delays, the team is confident that the end result will be fabulous and high functioning facilities the library will be very proud to present to our community. NORTH BOULDER BRANCH LIBRARY PROJECT The project team received comments on the site review submission from staff at Planning and Development Services. In general, the comments were supportive and helpful. The project team has some follow-up work to do on the layout and construction of the site plan and additional information to gather regarding traffic and parking. The architects are being asked to provide perspective renderings or sketches illustrating street-level views. The project team is working with CAO to determine what specific construction and access easements are required for this project to proceed as planned, and follow-up with the appropriate parties will take place prior to the next public hearing. It is expected that the public hearing with Planning Board will be in either December 2019 or January 2020. The project team will be seeking project advocates from the community to be present and speak to their support for the project. If possible, the commission’s support would be very much appreciated. New schematic design pricing (cost estimates) will be received and reviewed by early November. This estimate will inform evaluation of the construction bids which will be solicited in 2020. Staff will provide more information about project next steps and the project budget during the Nov. 6, 2019 Library Commission Meeting. PILOT PROGRAM INFORMATION: COMMUNITY COURT I wanted to give the Commission a heads-up that the City of Boulder is investigating a pilot program for community court. The Municipal Court and has reached out to the library to see if we would be willing to host the program. The idea of community courts has emerged in the past several years on the east coast is intended to remove barriers of access to the courts and provide service-related placement [ie. Mental health consultations, housing consultations, etc.] instead of imposing fines, fees or jail time. The 25 municipal courts would pay for all services and recruit partner organizations to provide service-related consultations. Municipal Court staff and Judge Cook are evaluating similar services throughout the country and will likely propose plan for a city pilot in 2020. Does the Commission have any questions or concerns at this time? RECAP OF THE 5TH ANNUAL ZEE JAIPUR LITERATURE FESTIVAL An oral update will be given during the meeting. FOLLOW UP ON 2020 LIBRARY RECOMMENDED BUDGET An oral update will be given during the meeting. City Council will complete first reading of the 2020 City Recommended Budget on Tuesday Oct. 1, 2019. A link to the council meeting packet is at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/city-council/city-council-agendas-and-materials . 26