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06.26.19 HAB PacketCITY OF BOULDER HOUSING ADVISORY BOARD MEETING AGENDA DATE: June 26, 2019 TIME: 6 PM LOCATION: Council Chambers, 1777 Broadway 1. CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL / 6:00 p.m. 2. AGENDA REVIEW 3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES a. May 22, 2019 4. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION / 6:05 p.m. a. Open Comment (topics other than the Manufactured Housing Strategy) 5. MATTERS FROM COUNCIL / 6:15 p.m. a. Manufactured Housing Strategy Public Hearing – Recommendation o Staff presentation o Board questions o Public comment o Board discussion and decision b. Alpine-Balsam Area Plan – Feedback o Staff update o Board discussion 6. MATTERS FROM THE BOARD / 8:15 p.m. a. Committee and project liaison reports o Report on May Affordable Housing Experience listening session – Decision Motion to accept the report. o Affordable Housing Experience listening session ideas for follow-up – Decision Motion to make suggestions to staff for following up on topics raised in the listening session. o Discussion of future listening session topics – Decision Motion to schedule adopting a process for picking the next listening session topic and date at the regular July meeting. b. Unfinished business - none c. New business o Motion to consider potential items for the annual letter to council at each meeting - Decision Motion to set aside between 15-30 minutes at every meeting until the Council annual letter is completed to discuss topics for HAB to consider for possible inclusion in the new Council's 2020- 2021 housing work plan. 7. MATTERS FROM STAFF / 8:45 p.m. 8. DEBRIEF MEETING AND CALENDAR CHECK / 8:50 p.m. 9. ADJOURNMENT / 9:00 p.m. Informational Item: updates and education; no action to be taken Feedback: discussion of board processes and items of interest; may result in action Input: discussion and comments to shape staff work on housing issues, projects and policies; no action to be taken Decision: Vote on board processes, work plan, agenda items, etc. Recommendation: Vote on the board’s input to city council For more information, please contact the HAB Secretary at 303.441.4134, or via Email at marinc@bouldercolorado.gov. Board agendas are available online at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/boards- commissions/housing-advisory-board. Please note agenda item times are approximate. 1 TO: Housing Advisory Board and Human Relations Commission FROM: Jeff Yegian, Senior Project Manager Crystal Launder, Housing Planner Brenda Ritenour, Neighborhood Liaison DATE: June 12, 2019 SUBJECT: Manufactured Housing Strategy EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 2018, City Council requested the development of a Manufactured Housing Strategy to provide structure to the city’s efforts to support manufactured housing as an option in the community. Staff initiated the project last fall. The first phase of strategy development involved substantial community engagement to gather input and staff research of manufactured housing issues and policies. At a Feb. 26 Study Session, council identified topics for analysis. Staff analyzed those topics and developed a draft action plan, including a list of potential ordinances, all of which is available for public comment. Informed by input from the public and boards, staff will prepare a Manufactured Housing Strategy (MHS) scheduled to be considered by City Council on Aug. 20. The MHS will include an Action Plan through 2021. Questions for Discussion 1. Does this board/commission have feedback on the MHS Principles? 2. Does this board/commission have input on the proposed Action Plan? 3. Which actions should be prioritized? BACKGROUND The Strategy seeks to identify and approve a prioritized list of actions that could be implemented by the city, manufactured housing community (MHC) residents and MHC owners to preserve and expand manufactured housing options. Background information, including a 2015 Study Session memo, a 2016 Infrastructure Study and the Feb. 26 Study Session Memo, is available at the project website: https://bouldercolorado.gov/housing/manufactured-housing-strategy. In Phase I of strategy development, staff researched and compiled information on manufactured housing issues and potential actions. In addition, staff engaged with park residents, park owners 2 and members of the public to gather their thoughts on the value of this housing type, the challenges in realizing the goal of preserving and expanding it, and ideas for addressing those challenges. Phase II focused on scoping issues for further analysis based on the research and input and developing MHS Principles to guide decision-making on manufactured housing issues. Council reviewed the project on Feb. 26 and provided guidance on priorities for further developing the strategy and action plan. In Phase III, staff prepared analyses of five topic areas and possible approaches to address them: • Analysis - Pad Rent Approaches • Analysis - Infrastructure Approaches • Analysis - Licensing Approaches • Analysis - Energy Efficiency Approaches • Analysis - Land Use Approaches Based on the work to date, staff developed a proposed MHS Action Plan and MHS Ordinance Ideas for public comment and board input. Summary of Engagement Activities City staff from Housing and Human Services and the City Manager’s Office are collaborating to conduct extensive community engagement throughout the strategy’s development in alignment with the city’s Engagement Strategic Framework. As those most directly involved in manufactured housing, (MHC) residents and the owners and managers of these communities are the two primary groups for engagement. Secondary groups are members of the public and staff of local agencies that engage with manufactured housing issues. Engagement activities have included: • A Manufactured Housing Strategy webpage and two online feedback forms; • Updates to a project email list with more than 100 people on it; • Participation in Coalition of Manufactured homeowners in Boulder (C-MOB) meetings; • Interviews and meetings with owner representatives for all four parks; • Several outreach events, most with childcare and bilingual English/Spanish support; • Door-to-door flyer distribution at Orchard Grove and Boulder Meadows; and • Interviews with external agencies and city departments. More than 100 people have provided input, including community members living in all four of Boulder’s MHCs. ANALYSIS Staff from Housing and Human Services, City Attorney’s Office, Public Works, Code Enforcement, Planning, Rental Licensing, Business Licensing, and Sustainability collaborated to develop the analysis of each issue area and approaches to address concerns. To develop the proposed Action Plan, staff considered: 3 • The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan Policy 7.08 Preservation & Development of Manufactured Housing; • The MHS Principles; • Public input; • Best practices from other communities; • The recent passage of Colorado’s HB 1309, which creates a dispute resolution program, and likely legislative proposals for 2020; • Council feedback and requests from the February Study Session; and • The factors explored in the analysis such as legal context, cost, staff effort, timing, etc. The proposed MHS Action Plan represents staff’s assessment of which actions will most effectively further the city’s goals in the next two years. Continuing Actions Each of these items currently contributes to the city’s goal, is consistent with the Principles, and provides value for the investment of resources. In the current legislative environment, pursuing state legislation has great potential to further long-standing city goals and is planned to be a focus of staff’s efforts in the next months. Infrastructure Staff analysis of extending public water and sewer services into MHCs identified several formidable challenges, including substantial legal complexity and the difficulty of constructing and operating pubic infrastructure systems within the layouts of existing MHCs. The proposed actions are intended to create conditions that incentivize and support greater investment in infrastructure operations by the MHC owners. Pad Rent Stabilization Two MHC owners have expressed some interest in voluntary agreements, and the applicability of the state rent control prohibition to MHCs has not been clearly defined. The proposed approach provides time to work with MHC owners and potentially pass state legislation clarifying the city’s ability to stabilize pad rents with an ordinance. Licensing Creating a new licensing program for the four MHCs in Boulder is not recommended, as such a program would be inconsistent with existing rental and business licensing policies and practices. Adding operational requirements through ordinances and regulations and providing a Manufactured Housing Specialist to monitor compliance and support, MHC residents and owners will have a broader and more direct effect. 4 Energy Efficiency Solar gardens hold the most promise for enabling access to photovoltaic energy by MHC residents, and staff anticipates commencement of a solar garden pilot for the Ponderosa community later this year. The city, the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, Habitat Colorado, and Energy Outreach Colorado sponsored a zero energy modular (ZEM) housing feasibility study to make this flexible, energy efficient, affordable housing more available. Land Use The primary impediment to creating a new MHC is land availability and cost. Performing a parcel inventory to identify potential sites for a new MHC will support the goal of expanding MHCs. In addition, it will help focus any future revisions to the city’s MH zone. Other These ideas arose outside of the five main topic areas and would support manufactured housing as an option in Boulder. Future Actions While not included in the plan for 2019-2021, these ideas hold future promise as circumstances change. NEXT STEPS Staff will incorporate board and public input into the Manufactured Housing Strategy, including its action plan and ordinances, and present the strategy to City Council at its Aug. 20 meeting. Following council’s acceptance of the strategy, staff will incorporate the prioritized city actions into departmental work plans. Affordable Housing Experience Listening Session Report Housing Advisory Board May 22, 2019 Background At the March, 2019 HAB meeting, the board voted to provide 2-3 listening sessions during the year with the purpose of giving the public an opportunity to provide input to HAB on various specific housing topics. The listening sessions do not necessitate Council or City Manager recommendations but are intended to gather public input. The first listening session held on May 22, 2019 was focused on the Affordable Housing Experience from the perspective of affordable housing providers and affordable housing residents. All stakeholders were encouraged to express what works for them about their affordable housing experience and what challenges they still face. The HAB engagement committee worked with staff to provide outreach to invite participants. Spanish translators were available. Affordable Housing Experience Listening Session Presentations The listening session began with three brief presentations – staff, an affordable housing provider, and an affordable housing resident City staff input was offered by Jeff Yegian, Senior Program Manager, Division of Housing. With a power point presentation, Jeff provided information on Boulder’s affordable housing goals: to promote socio-economic diversity, help people who struggle, and provide sustainability. Boulder’s affordable housing program has experienced much success over the decades. Currently, Boulder’s permanently affordable housing is 7.5% of all housing. Recently, Boulder established a goal that permanently affordable housing in Boulder increase to 15% of the all housing by 2035. Ian Swallow, Development Project Manager, Boulder Housing Partners (BHP) provided a power point presentation on the perspective of an affordable housing provider. Boulder Housing Partners is the Housing Authority for the City of Boulder, although they remain an independent entity. Currently, BHP provides affordable housing for about 1400 units comprised of about 5000 residents annually. This housing is intentionally dispersed throughout the city. The metrics of affordable housing for those residents most deeply in need of assistance (generally with finances of 30% AMI or lower) are important to BHP and illustrate 100% preschool enrollment, 95% high school graduation, and 100% connection to services for seniors. Challenges for providers include: continuing to build new permanently affordable housing and to maintain older buildings, managing portfolios, and keeping up with the slew of various requirements from different government entities. Land and building costs are increasing as are regulatory requirements. Acquiring financial resources is a huge challenge. As for the residents, BHP strives to enhance BHP expertise at matching resources with vulnerable people and to build community, such as thriving community centers. Again, finding the resources to fund these efforts is a challenge. Resident Estela Mercado provided her perspective. Estela is extremely grateful for affordable housing and thinks it is wonderful. She has a few concerns: 1) It is hard to meet rent increases; 2) It is difficult for people with disabilities to open the heavy trash container lids (at Thistle); 3) Sufficient parking is an issue because students often park in housing spaces so residents have to park in the street and receive parking tickets – which, again, present a financial hardship. The Listening Session, Itself After the presentations, the board members moved to a circle of chairs and were joined by the members of the audience who had signed up to speak. There were 11 speakers in addition to the presentations. Feedback was also provided from a resident manager who had to leave early and three residents who emailed their comments. There were about 15 additional people in the audience. The atmosphere was welcoming and the personal stories were impactful. For people who wish to learn more about the individual stories, the listening session can be viewed on the Channel 8 archives through the link on the Boulder Housing Advisory Board website. Participants included a couple of affordable housing providers, as well as affordable housing home owners and renters. Affordable Housing Benefits Many/most participants expressed appreciation for listening session. Affordable housing providers expressed strong dedication and commitment to providing quality affordable housing, as well as appreciation of their residents. Affordable housing residents expressed strong gratitude for the wonderful benefits that they receive. Affordable Housing Challenges Providers challenges: - Increasing land and building costs - Massive, varied, and detailed regulatory requirements from many funding entities - Resources (i.e. money) - Concern that some residents have to move due to “asset” restrictions. This creates more in-commuters. - Having to raise rents is very troubling but costs keep increasing. - Not enough Section 8 vouchers Affordable Housing Owner challenges - Resale limitations hamper future options - Some HOA’s don’t care about the unique needs of AH owners - Hard to afford maintenance and long-term costs - Some shoddy workmanship on some homes and lack of support dealing with such problems - No credit on resale value on some upgrades - Trouble finding reasonably-priced repair people - There seem to be disincentives for long-term maintenance Affordable Housing Tenant challenges - Increases in rent costs create hardships. Every dollar is crucial to AH residents, so any extra costs are extremely challenging. Several participants raised this concern. - Parking and parking costs (in addition to Boulder Junction and sites with parking limits, some AH housing sites have adequate parking that but the spaces are taken by C.U. students, etc., so that actual tenants have to park on the street and then get tickets which are expensive on a limited budget. Parking came up several times. - Difficulty of disabled residents to open heavy and bulky trash container lids. - As children grow up, AH housing residents find that their adult children can’t afford to live in Boulder. - Mountains of paperwork frequently required by different entities, each one with slightly different requirements, are daunting. It is insulting to be asked to prove you are poor, over and over in different ways. Some streamlining would greatly help. - Need for city to require more in-depth inspections to keep owners responsible. The current inspections are not detailed enough and tenants suffer. Less than stellar conditions and the need for more landlord accountability came up several times. Tenant fear of retribution hampers their ability to act on their own behalf. - Need for residents to be able to downsize to smaller unit without having to reapply. - Need for co-op process to be streamlined and less expensive. - Need for more outreach about co-op benefits to residents and larger community. Thank you. Adam Swetlik and Judy Nogg, HAB Engagement Committee, May 28,2019 Affordable Housing Experience Listening Session Next Steps Housing Advisory Board May 22, 2019 Next Steps - This report will be sent to staff and affordable housing providers, as well as posted in our next monthly packet and on our website. - The engagement committee has solicited board feedback about the first listening session and will incorporate ideas into the next listening session. - HAB encourages staff to forward specific concerns to appropriate departments. Two examples: 1) Concerns about need for more complete inspections and the need for more landlord accountability; 2) Concerns about parking and parking costs could be forwarded to the transportation department, TAB and Boulder Junction Access District Parking Commission. - HAB members are willing to assist staff if examining possible solutions if so requested Suggestions for staff to consider - Is there the possibility of designating funds for AH residents who can’t afford rent increases? - Is there the possibility of designating funds for AH owners who can’t afford property tax increases or large maintenance? - Is there the possibility of revisiting livability standards for existing affordable housing as to fixtures, weatherproofing, etc.? Thank you. Adam Swetlik and Judy Nogg, HAB Engagement Committee, May 28,2019 Affordable Housing Experience Listening Session Feedback Form 1. How did you feel about the format of the event? (structure of speakers, physical layout, time allotment, moderator, Q&A) - Very good. No changes needed here in format. However, next time we have translators, I’d like them to speak in Spanish to offer their services. People may not have known they needed to request a translator and it would be good for us to get the content announced in Spanish. Also, I feel we need to be prepared with a plan to allow for people sitting back in the audience to come into the circle. Perhaps allow each person in the circle to speak once and then ask if others want to join the circle. Some people may not have been familiar with our “sign-up” process and may choose to join the circle – even if we have to have the first circle speakers move after each person in the circle has had a chance to speak. We may need more than one circle - I think it was generally good and made people feel welcome. I think it would be helpful to provide a little more framework/context and ground-rules for the conversation to keep it focused. In other words, what are we trying to accomplish through these (productive exchange of ideas and information, vs. venting session). Regarding time allotment, I think we should stick to the time that we say we’re going to allot. It’s respectful not only to participants but also citizens watching at home. It’s fine if it’s longer than an hour, let’s just limit the other agenda items so that the entire meeting last 3 hours instead of almost 5. I think it’s HAB’s place to listen, rather than to speak. We should have a time keeper working alongside the event moderator/facilitator who can direct the flow of the conversation and keep to the schedule. It was great to have housing providers there to contribute alongside residents. It was a real eye-opener to hear the providers discuss the risks they take to build affordable housing such as personally guaranteeing developments for $20M, keeping the rate of rent increases lower than they’re allowed and hearing about word choice such as “resident” and “home” as opposed to “tenant” and “unit” - I truly loved everything about it. From the feedback I heard, making sure we have a good moderator is very important to the process. - Overall, I thought it was a great wrap up to the process you both worked to put together. As you know I've been a little skeptical of putting our time into areas that I don't feel will result in the creation of additional housing. That said, I really appreciated the format and the feedback we received from participants. It was a well-rounded representation of the AH community. - I was pleased with this first attempt, but I think there could be a better balance of time allotted per speaker to move the process along a bit faster. It’s hard to cut anyone off who is sharing about an emotional topic. The format, specifically order and type of speakers will likely need to be revisited on a event by event basis. 2. What improvements if any do you feel would be beneficial for outreach to have either more or more diverse participation? - I can’t think of anything we didn’t do. I also think that each event will have a very different target population and we will need to continue to think out-of- the-box for each event. This event required staff input, due to the confidentiality of the AH residents. So much staff time won’t be needed for future events, I expect. - Provide more specific information about what the expectations for participants is. - I think we will establish trust and increase participation by continuing to host events like this and being committed to having a good moderator. - I still think we’re facing a combination of lack of awareness and skepticism about what we can accomplish. Just hitting PR even harder and earlier would probably help, and really finding leaders in each community we’d like to hear from would be helpful to getting people to participate. 3. Did you feel the goal of receiving feedback from an under-represented portion of the community was met? What would you like to see changed to better accomplish this goal? - I thought this was good. - Yes – this was accomplished on both sides; the email feedback was good, too. - Yes. It was a great start. Stronger outreach to targeted communities? Not sure what we did... but more in different areas? - The focus on community reminded me, and hopefully all of us, that the discussion of AH in Boulder is really one about maintaining the community we have created here...and that means not only the physical value of our surroundings, but also the human connections and diversity. Let's keep Boulder weird! - I thought this was a success overall. 4. Did you consider this a wise use of HAB’s time? Do you have another idea for a different type of event that may be more beneficial? - Definitely beneficial. I think we can also go out into the community, perhaps with a translator to the Diagonal community center (where we had our retreat) with one or two HAB members and a staff member. From this event, alone, I hope we continue listening sessions into 2020. - I think it was a good public forum for people to share their feelings, concerns, challenges, etc. on both sides; I don’t have any other ideas at this time, but will share when I do. - Yes, it was critical. A shifting point from what our purpose is to action. I would like to see us engage out in the public... farmers market, creek fest, at the City's outreach events etc. - While it was a good use I wouldn’t mind exploring having these events at a separate time outside of a regular meeting. This concept would allow only those board members who really have the time to attend to do so, and allow more flexibility for speakers to go over time if necessary. With only a few of these throughout the year it wouldn’t be an undo burden on staff time. Regardless these being taped seems really beneficial to capture the feedback from the community and allow others visibility into this new type of event. 5. Do you have additional feedback you would like considered for similar future HAB events? - No additional feedback just a heartfelt thank you to both Judy and you for championing this concept. It was not an easy process and your hard work and attention to detail was deeply appreciated. - Many thanks for that experience. Housing Advisory Board Work Plan July 24 August 28 Upcoming Items Council Work Plan Items • Subcommunity Planning update • Down Payment Program - Input • Alpine-Balsam Area Plan Public Hearing - Recommendation • CHFA and entitlement process (Q3-4) • Community Benefit (Q3-4) • Listening Session(s) HAB Initiatives Annual letter to council topic discussion Annual letter to council topic discussion HAB Business and Process Information Regional Housing Partnership update Committees Engagement – next listening session decision Projects Committees • Public Engagement (Standing) Projects/Initiatives • Community Benefit • Alpine-Balsam • Large Lots • Subcommunity Planning • Regional Housing Partnership