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12.19.18 BAC PacketBoulder Arts Commission Meeting Agenda December 19, 2018 Location: Boulder Creek Room, Boulder Main Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe, Boulder 80302 1.CALL TO ORDER Approval of Agenda 2.REVIEW OF MINUTES 3.PUBLIC COMMENT 4.PUBLIC ART PROGRAM 45 minutes A.ACTION: Donation Proposal from Downtown Boulder Partnership – Bear Hugs by Scy Caroselli, 1427 Pearl Street. B.ACTION: Donation Proposal from Mark Addison – Strength From Within by Melanie Yazzie, 16th and Pearl Street. 5.GRANT PROGRAM 30 minutes A.ACTION: Grant Reports i.Cynthia Sliker, Alliance of Artists Communities Annual Conference in Philadelphia, PA, $1,000 ii.Greater Boulder Youth Orchestras, Midori Project, $3,000 iii.Leah Quiller, American Music Therapy Association National Conference in Dallas, TX, $1,000 iv.Patti Bonnet, We’re Still Here: Boulder’s Original Natives, $5,000 B. DISCUSSION: Update on the Structure of 2019 One-time Grant for Venues / Facilities 6.COMMISSION BUSINESS 60 minutes A.DISCUSSION: Ideas for changes in application and comment/scoring process – Kathleen B.DISCUSSION: Ideas for changes in criteria for applicants who have an outstanding grant – Kathleen C.DISCUSSION: City Council discussions of Opportunity Zones – Mark 7.MATTERS FROM STAFF 10 minutes A.Questions about the Manager’s Memo – Matt B.DISCUSSION: CVB Board Position – Matt 8.ADJOURNMENT 1 CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES Name of Board/ Commission: Boulder Arts Commission Date of Meeting: November 21, 2018 at the Main Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. Contact information preparing summary: Celia Seaton, 303-441-3206 Commission members present: Mark Villarreal, Felicia Furman, Devin Hughes Commission members absent: Erica Joos, Kathleen McCormick Library staff present: Matt Chasansky, Office of Arts & Culture Manager Mandy Vink, Public Art Coordinator David Farnan, Director Celia Seaton, Administrative Specialist City staff present: None Members of the public present: Amanda Berg Wilson (The Catamounts) Type of Meeting: Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to order and approval of agenda [0:00:06 Audio min.] The meeting was called to order. Villarreal asked the group for any addendums or changes to the agenda. Chasansky indicated a need to move the decisions up to the front. Item 4 will become commission business, followed by the grant reports, displacing the other items Hughes moved to approve the amended agenda. Furman seconded, and all were in favor. Agenda Item 2: Review of Minutes [0:02:20 Audio min.] Item 2A, Approval/Review of October 2018 Meeting Minutes and November Special Meeting Minutes Villarreal asked the commission for changes or addendums regarding the November Special Meeting Minutes. Villarreal noted that there was an error in the roster of attendance as Furman was absent. The approval for these minutes will be postponed to the December meeting when a quorum can be met. Minutes from October Retreat – there were no questions. Villarreal moved to approve the minutes from the October Retreat Meeting, Hughes seconded, and they were unanimously approved. Agenda Item 3: Public comment [0.03.45 Audio min.] None Agenda Item 4: Commission Business [0.04.10 Audio min.] A. ACTION: 2018 Priorities Letter to Council – Group discussed Villarreal’s drafted letter. Villarreal noted need to incorporate Kathleen’s comments into the draft. He also questioned whether the “wordiness” was confusing. Hughes feels condensing is unnecessary but, if desired, point just the need to involve and coordinate with the Office of Arts and Culture in future grant ventures. Group discussed changes and Chasansky made edits in real time. He will confirm that Kathleen’s “tone edits” were included. Furman made a motion to approve the letter including the changes including Kathleen’s improvements. Villarreal seconded and the motion was unanimously approved. Agenda Item 5: Grant Program [0.14.48 Audio min.] A. ACTION: Grant Reports 1. Alysha Perrin, American Circus Educators Bi-annual Conference in Decatur, GA, $1,000 2. Barrio É, World Drum Jam, $10,000 (Community Project Grant 2017) 3. D Carol Taylor, American Association for State and Local History Annual Meeting in Kansas City, MO, $1,000 4. Crystal Polis, Grantmakers in the Arts 2018 Conference in Oakland, CA, $1,000 5. Emily K. Harrison, United Solo Festival in New York City, NY, $1,000 2 APPROVED BY: ATTESTED: _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Board Chair Board Secretary _________________________________________ ________________________________________ Date Date 6. HOVAB / Jennifer Heath, Imaginary Maps: Expeditions to Uncover the Typography of Apocryphal Places, $2,815 7. Parisa Tashakori, 15BICM (15th International Biennial of Poster in Mexico) in Mexico City and Xalapa / Mexico, $1,000 8. Right Relationship Boulder, Welcome the Arapaho People Home, $10,000 Villarreal asked whether there were any questions regarding any of these reports and there were none. Furman made a motion to approve the grant reports, Hughes seconded. All were in favor and the 8 reports were accepted unanimously by commission. Agenda Item 6: Public Art Program [0.18.05 Audio min.] Vink noted that on December 6th, commissioned artists Kuby and Sparks will be giving talks at CU. She encouraged attendance as this is a great opportunity to interact and learn more about these artists. Chasansky noted that Kuby’s will be the most expensive public art item since the adoption of the public art policy – this will possibly stir up some interest. Though talking points will be developed, Chasansky invited the commissioners to relay any press or public inquiry to the Office of Arts and Culture. Villarreal spoke to his comfort with the process even if not always in agreement with the outcomes; this is a process the entire community has agreed to and been involved in. He noted intention to draft potential letters to the editor in anticipation. Agenda Item 7: Discussion - Remaining Budget for the 2018 Grant Cycle [0.26.19 Audio min.] Chasansky indicated the breakdown indicating unspent funds (see packet). He noted that commission’s proposals are welcomed in this annual process although final decisions are made by Farnan during adjustment to base discussions. Staff recommendation is to place it in the certain grant categories which typically are first to be depleted (arts education grant funding, rental assistance, and administrative contingency). Villarreal and Furman noted that placing these funds within the highest demand items seemed fair. Group was comfortable with the staff recommendations with nodding approval. Agenda Item 8: Matters from Staff [0.30.25 Audio min.] A. DISCUSSION: Questions About the Manager’s Memo - Chasansky noted a correction re: the Dance is for Every Body event led by Haan. There were actually “300+” dancers who attended and had their work showcased, making this the largest yet. He invited any questions by email. B. DISCUSSION: Structure of Commission Meetings – discussion of “crunch” by the end of the meeting where there is a restricted amount of time to “do justice to each agenda item.” Villarreal and he discussed better time management. Villarreal noted that Vink usually gets the “short end of the stick” as she usually follows others. Furman: we can “self-regulate.” Hughes invited the chair to assist in timekeeping. Agenda Item 10: Adjournment [0.35.35 Audio min.] There being no further business to come before the commission at this time, the meeting was adjourned. Villarreal indicated his willingness to serve as chair again in 2019 as long as others are aware that he will be missing some planned meetings. He noted he is expecting to take over the role on the Dairy board once Furman exits. Date, time, and location of next meeting: The next Boulder Arts Commission meeting will be at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, December 19, 2018, in the Boulder Creek Room at the Main Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, CO 80302. 3 TO: Members of the Boulder Arts Commission FROM: Matt Chasansky, City of Boulder Office of Arts + Culture DATE: December 14, 2018 SUBJECT: Manager’s Update for the Boulder Arts Commission Meeting on December 19, 2018 1. Notes on the December Agenda > 4A and B, Donation Proposal from Downtown Boulder Partnership – In Attachments One and Two, please find the donation proposal submittals which will be the subject of review and approval during the meeting. Also, you may want to refresh your memory about the donation proposal procedures found in the Public Art Policy, which can be downloaded using this link, or at boulderarts.org/public-art. > 5B, Update on the Structure of the 2019 One-time Grant for Venues – Please note that, contrary to discussions at the November meeting, staff does not plan to seek a final decision about the structure of this grant until the January 2019 meeting of the Arts Commission. This will provide the time needed to hear your feedback and respond with new proposals for application and scoring criteria. In the correspondence section of this memo are emails you have received that describe individual opinions that may inform your discussion. Staff has also been asking members of the community who may be affected by this opportunity to come and speak at the meeting during public comment. > 6A, Ideas for changes in application content scoring process – Commissioner McCormick asks that the Arts Commission discuss a few issues on this topic including a) whether to publish online grant applications, scores, and comments in response to criticisms about posting the scores and comments online without context, b) contacting applicants individually for distribution of scores and comments, rather than as a group in a single document, and c) conducting individual 3-minute interviews on a pre-arranged schedule. > 6B, Ideas for changes to criteria for applicants who have an outstanding grant – Commissioner McCormick would like to revisit the discussion during the October retreat of a proposed criterion to disqualify applicants who have an outstanding grant. 2. Commission Correspondence In Attachment Four, please find copies of email correspondence received by the Boulder Arts Commission during the period between the publication of the November and December 2018 packets. 3. Liaison Reports Below please find reports from liaisons to General Operating Support Grant recipients: Report by Felicia Furman, liaison to The Dairy Arts Center In November, the Dairy began the long-awaited renovation of the West entrance, a project that I believe is definitely the result of their BAC General Operating Support grant. This final phase of the Dairy’s capital campaign will create a welcoming and functional entry on the west side of the building with an ADA accessible elevator and a kids and families multi-purpose room. The West entrance is significant because it is a highly trafficked area leading directly to the Carsen Theater, Boedecker Cinema, Boulder Ballet studios and the Parlando school of music. The construction began in November and will be completed in May 2019. The Dairy has currently raised $1 million dollars of a total budget of $1.4 million. A year ago, Melissa Fathman was hired as executive director of the Dairy. The General Operating Support grant allowed her to have more flexibility in her efforts to update or overhaul departments, systems and staff positions. Early in her programming efforts, she recognized the need for more diversity and the Outreach and Engagement Committee was formed to focus on Boulder’s Latino population, local youth and creative entrepreneurs. The committee met with key members of Latino organizations and individuals to create a plan for attracting new audiences to the Dairy. Additional 4 research created several ideas for youth events including sponsorship of a hip hop show in February with Streetside Dance and Rico, which included an indoor street party. The Dairy produced a Noche de Pena on July 28—a free event focusing on Latino traditions of music and interactions. On August 25, there was a summer art party called Immersion with over 200 attendees that attracted a creative sector population to a free event at a notable house in the mountains above Boulder. Other events with outreach into the community included sponsorship of the Latino Film Festival and the free Dia de los Muertos celebration co-sponsored with El Centro Amistad and The Dairy Honors, a ticketed event which recognized 5 individuals and an organization for their importance to the arts in Boulder. The Dairy has formalized its Dairy Presents brand to provide additional programming designed to supplement artistic content provided by the renting arts organizations that includes: Music at the Dairy, rotating Visual Art exhibitions, Kids at the Dairy arts education program, and Comedy at the Dairy along with a full slate of independent films screened at the Boedecker. These programs work with the renting organization to collaborate on connected programming that will provide greater media coverage and audience increase for each group. Earlier in the fall, the Dairy wrote a new mission and vision statement and began the process of creating a new strategic plan, which will be completed next year. Later this fall, board member Nikhil Mankekar brought to the Dairy an exciting new vehicle for attracting an entirely new audience to the Dairy. The Daily Camera spoke with Nikhil about the donation to the Dairy of their exciting Second Story Garage, an audio and visual recording studio and brand for professional bands that come through the area to perform. The Dairy would own the brand, along with their social media outlets like YouTube, including all recordings, video and audio posted on the YouTube channel which is monetized and pays for website maintenance. This is a “big deal” with potential for putting the Dairy on the national music map. Report by Felicia Furman, liaison to 3rd Law Dance/Theater Despite the loss of its co-founder Jimmy LaVita, 3rd Law Dance/Theater was able to complete their 2018 season with rave reviews and sold out houses…and plan for the 2019 season. Their 2017/18 performance season was considered a raving success. The Scen3 described a particular piece, Lost in Place, as “richly multilayered, at times filled with piercing despair and yearning, and at others giggle-inducing.” There have been many accomplishments due to their General Operating Grant. Critically acclaimed composer and musician Paul Fowler joined 3rd Law as artistic co-director for the 2018/19 season which opened Nov. 30th with a new work created by Katie Elliott and a new composition by Paul Fowler. They launched Un-Still Life, a new performance platform for emerging choreographers and artists in our community. They continued to offer Open Space, a platform for new and seasoned choreographers to share their work in a supportive environment. They are now consistently offering teen and adult choreolabs to give dancers tools to become choreographers. 3rd Law has been able to hire a rehearsal director and a part time marketing manager. They are partnering with other organizations to provide programming for low-income, at-risk or otherwise underserved communities through Title I schools in Colorado. 3rd Law continues to grow their Dance for Parkinson’s program. They now have 5 instructors, which makes it possible for Katie and Viki to reach more into the Parkinson’s community by attending support group meetings and panels given by several neurologists in the area. They added Rise & Thrive, a gentle movement class for people of all ages and abilities facing challenges with chronic disease and aging. And lastly, they are partnering with Gyrotonic® Bodhi, a beautiful studio owned by Master Trainer and 3rd Law company member Jennifer DePalo Peterson, which connects 3rd Law to an entirely new audience. 4. Staff Updates Congratulations to Adam Kuby and Michelle Sparks for a great event introducing their public art projects to the public. The Boulder Office of Arts and Culture partnered with Arts and Venues Denver to host a very successful meeting of Local Arts Agency leadership on Dec. 6. Cultural affairs directors from 21 cities were represented. The group agreed to meet quarterly. Staff met with the city’s legal team and a member of code enforcement team to discuss the impacts of regulations on professional artists, especially concerning land use regulations and home business rules that apply to artists. Work will 5 continue in developing a plan to both help artists understand the rules and processes as well as looking into long term solutions. Staff continues to support the team coordinating the Community, Culture, and Safety Tax. Staff is assessing plans for expanding the cultural asset map project to include an updated market study of arts venues. Work on this project is expected to start in the second or third quarter next year. A significant update to the boulderarts.org website is underway. > Grants and Programs for Organizations The 2019 applications, apart from the new Special Facilities Grants applications, are available at boulderarts.org. Applications are now also translated into Spanish. Please spread the word! On Dec. 11 the final Cultural Organizations Summit of 2018 was held with a training by Nikki McCord on equity and inclusion tactics for nonprofit staff and board members. The next Summit is being planned for March of 2019. The Human Relations Commission meeting at which the Indigenous Peoples Day grant recipients will be presenting final reports has been moved to accommodate schedules of the applicants; date, time, and location are TBD. The HRC also moved discussion of partnering again in 2019 with the Boulder Arts Commission on grants to their January 2019 meeting. The following Rental Assistance Grant reports were approved prior to the meeting: - Boulder Bach Festival, B Minor Mass – A Dance of Life on November 11, 2018, Venue – Macky Auditorium, $1,000 In Attachment Five, please find a current budget for the Arts Grants Program. > Public Art Program Public Art Commissioning Updates: - Diagonal Highway (Christian Muller/Totems): Fabrication. This project was initiated through Transportation prior to the new Public Art Policy and received contingency funds from CCSv1 for completion. - Civic Area Temporary Commission (Parisa Tashakori/Hello Boulder): Install complete; final text change scheduled for week Dec. 17; work anticipated for removal Jan. 2019 https://boulderarts.org/public- art/temporary/ - Civic Area Temporary Commission (Collin Parson/ Stele and Ostium): Installation complete. This work will remain on display through Spring 2019 and received unanimous approval for loan via the Standing Selection Panel https://boulderarts.org/public-art/temporary/ - Civic Area: 11th St. Spine Signature Artwork (Adam Kuby): Final Design. www.adamkuby.com - University Hill: Pre-Selection. - North Broadway (Sharon Dowell): Preliminary Design. http://sharondowell.com - Arapahoe Underpass (Michelle Sparks): Final Design/Wetlands Variance. http://michellemsparks.com - 30th and Colorado Underpass (Rosie Fivian and Ransom Beegles): Contracting. - Foothills Underpass (Carolyn Braaksma): Preliminary Design - NoBo Library: Pre-Selection - Main Library Restroom Renovations: Pre-Selection - Scott Carpenter Park: Pre-Selection - Fire Station 3: Pre-Selection - CAGID Garage Art Public Art Program: On Hold 6 Community-Initiated Projects Updates: -Bear Hugs Downtown Boulder Partnership Donation: Approval Process -Strength from Within Melanie Yazzie donation proposal: Approval Process -Nobel Circle Monument: Pre-Approval Process -Staff is working with Boulder Housing Partners for the development of 30th and Pearl Maintenance and Conservation: -Explorations for relocating John King’s Dragonfly Giraffe to Growing Gardens are underway -Bids are out for the 2019 Public Art Collection Condition Report Staff is exploring possible integrated opportunities with Open Space. Staff is exploring possible commissions for the deconstruction/reconstruction of the BCH complex. In Attachment Six, please find a current five-year program budget for public art commissioning. >Creative Neighborhoods Staff is conducting evaluation of the Neighborhood Murals project with another round of murals anticipated for 2020. Based on the success of the Neighborhood Murals project, staff is in planning stages for a commercial area murals sponsorship in the NoBo Art District during 2019. >Programs for Artists Staff has been conducting interviews with advocates for artists to follow up on expected outcomes of the Artist Census and Cultural Plan Refresh. Several aligned projects and collaborations are being discussed. Staff continues work to wrap up findings from the Artist Census data and focus groups. Staff met with CU Boulder Outreach Coordinator for the Department of Theatre/Dance to set up a pipeline to connect more information, opportunities and resources for students and the community. Staff continues updates to the Dance Bridge website and e-newsletters to the dance community. On behalf of the Office of Arts and Culture, a grant proposal was delivered by the department director to the Boulder Library Foundation for staff to collaborate with the Library Division’s programming team in the production of professional development programs for professional authors and writers. >Creative Workforce and the NoBo Art District During the Nov. 30 meeting of the NoBo Art District Community Coordinating Committee, a presentation was delivered by the Art District’s consultants which recommended a campaign to form a Business Improvement District. The Committee voted to approve the recommendations and then to form a campaign committee. This action dissolves the Coordinating Committee and city staff will no longer take part in the process. Staff continues to explore a First Friday shuttle with community partners. 7 Attachment One Public Art Donation Proposal, Downtown Boulder Partnership 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Attachment Two Public Art Donation Proposal, Mark Addison 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 The above document has been truncated. The full 42-page CV is available for download using this link. Additional information is available on the artist’s information page at the University of Colorado website. 35 Attachment Three Email posted to the City Council Hotline by Councilperson Sam Weaver From: "Weaver, Sam" <WeaverS@bouldercolorado.gov> Date: December 9, 2018 at 11:11:53 AM MST To: HOTLINE <HOTLINE@bouldercolorado.gov> Subject: [BoulderCouncilHotline] Proposed next steps for the Federal Opportunity Zone in Boulder Fellow Council Members and HOTLINE followers, In March 2018, Boulder City staff applied to have a census tract in Boulder included by the state of Colorado in the Federal Opportunity Zone (OZ) registry. The stated reasons by the City for pursuing this designation (without Council or community consultation) were to incentivize affordable housing, incentivize affordable commercial development, and to incentivize re-development of the Diagonal Plaza shopping center. These are all goals which are also contemplated by the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, most especially creating more affordable housing. This OZ designation affords investors in all development projects in those zones a very favorable tax treatment on profits occurring in those zones. Rather than explaining the pros and cons of this designation from my perspective, I will supply the following link from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy: https://itep.org/how-opportunity-zones-benefit-investors-and-promote-displacement/ In order to promote the potential upsides of this new irreversible decade-long Federal designation, and to guard against its potential downsides, I would propose that City Council have a discussion of the following strawman proposals I am advancing in this message: 1)Implement a development moratorium in the OZ zone on December 18 2)Exempt from this moratorium any housing development proposal which includes all of their inclusionary housing components on the development site 3)The moratorium duration would generally stand until each zone district in the OZ has been reviewed under the current Use Table Review project. After such review and approval of zoning uses, that zone district in the OZ would be brought out from the OZ moratorium. 4)As an example of #2 above, Council is reviewing the use tables and requirements for development in the BC-1 and BC-2 zones. Those criteria will be discussed at second reading on Dec 18, and could be finalized as soon as January or February of 2019. This means that the BC-1 and BC-2 zones in the OZ could be out of any moratorium very soon, and any desired re-development of Diagonal Plaza will not be substantially affected by this proposal. 5)Because the focus of this zone designation is around affordable housing and affordable commercial development, no market-rate office space development in the OZ will be allowed until a sub- community plan is in place. After the sub-community plan is approved, commercial office development applications could proceed. The proposed steps above are within the framework of the current Council work plan and are starting points for discussions about how to maximize the community benefits accruing from the OZ 36 designation. Our ongoing community land development is a collaboration between the residents’ desires as communicated by City Council and the private sector desires as communicated through development applications. Desired community outcomes are formulated through an iterative and on-going dialogue between the public and private sectors. While the OZ discussion will provoke consideration of City-wide goals, we will have to think carefully about how to separate what we can require in the OZ from what we want to occur across all of Boulder. Some of my hopes for development in both the OZ zone and the City in general include: 1)Create more permanently affordable housing in Boulder 2)Create more middle-income housing in Boulder 3)Create more permanently affordable commercial space in Boulder 4)Minimize displacement when residential properties re-develop. This includes permanent and temporary (construction-induced) displacement. If the OZ results in residential re-development of current medium- and high-density residential properties, temporary and/or permanent displacement is a risk to the current residents. Any loss of diversity that may result from such re-development is a loss to our entire community as a whole. 5)Implement permanent Transportation Demand Management programs for any new office space development 6)Improve (or at the least do not degrade) the ratio of housing to employment in Boulder. The presence of more jobs than housing is one of many factors that contributes to our housing affordability challenge. Thanks as always for being involved in the community discussion about how Boulder should evolve over time. We live in a beautiful and special place, and our town is filled with creative and involved residents and businesses. How we can progress towards increasing inclusiveness and equity is a critical concern for me, and that includes how we can guide development to serve our community goals. I look forward to hearing from you (and I am sure all Council members do) on this proposal. All the best, Sam Weaver Mayor Pro Tem Boulder City Council weavers@bouldercolorado.gov Phone: 303-416-6130 _______________________________________________ 37 Attachment Four Commission Correspondence From: Ken Wilson <ken.wilson@transgridconsulting.com> Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 9:12 AM To: flynvartranch@comcast.net; F Furman <ffurman@ecentral.com>; fonthead1@gmail.com; devin@devinpatrickhughes.com; ekrjoos@gmail.com Cc: Chasansky, Matthew <ChasanskyM@boulderlibrary.org>; Nancy Geyer <nancy@museumofboulder.org> Subject: Letter to Arts Commissioners from the Museum of Boulder Dear Arts Commissioners, Please find attached a letter from the Museum of Boulder regarding distribution of the new Special Facilities GOS Grants money that has been approved by City Council. I will also try to speak at your December meeting. Very best regards, Ken Wilson President of the Board of Trustees Museum of Boulder 303-999-1931 38 December 12, 2018 Mark Villareal Felicia Furman Kathleen McCormic Devin Hughes Erica Joos Dear Commissioners Members of the Board of Trustees of the Museum of Boulder have worked hard over the past six months to convince Council Members of the need for additional financial support for Boulder’s “Bricks and Mortar” Cultural and Arts institutions. We met individually with all but one Council Member and worked with Council Member Bob Yates to propose an additional $250,000 from the 2019 City budget. Council unanimously approved the additional budget item, which is now designated as “Special Facilities GOS Grants”. The money was designated by Council to be directed as General Operating Support for additional financial assistance to large institutions such as The Dairy, BMOCA and The Museum of Boulder. These organizations support a wide range of interests in the City, and as in other cities, they need support from city government. For example, in Longmont, over 70% of the funding for the Longmont History Museum comes from the City of Longmont. The Museum of Boulder is like a startup business. We have moved from a small, city owned building, to a larger building in downtown Boulder that the Museum purchased. We will be growing our membership and visitor numbers over the next few years and it will be a time of financial struggle for us as we will be more than doubling our budget from the time when we were in the smaller venue. We would ask that the Arts Commission consider this situation as you determine how to distribute the new funds in 2019. I have attached a set of grant criteria that Council Member Bob Yates drafted, along with several thoughts I have had on criteria that you might consider in your deliberation. I very much appreciate your service to the Community, having myself served for five years on the Water Resources Advisory Board and on City Council for six years. Sincerely, Ken Wilson President, Board of Trustees cc Matt Chasansky 39 Criteria for Special Facilities GOS Grants Criteria suggested by Council Member Bob Yates 1.Facilities: The organization must own or long-term lease its own program facility. The reason for this is that ownership of a facility typically comes with a full-time staff and year-round opening hours, allowing the FBC&E organization to easily leverage a grant into programs for the benefit of the community. Examples of facilities-based organizations include BMoCA (lease), Museum of Boulder (own), the Dairy (lease), Chautauqua (lease), eTown (own), and Studio Arts (lease, soon to own). 2.Uses: Grants can be used for programs, performances, and exhibits that serve the Boulder regional community. These can be used for new experiences, or for expansion or continuation of existing experiences that have already proven successful. 3.Types: Unlike typical arts grants, these grants would include programs, performances, and exhibits that are not traditionally art, although art could certainly be included. They would include any educational or engagement experience, including culture, science, art, and health. 4.Beneficiaries: The programs, performances, and exhibits would be targeted towards residents of the Boulder region (as opposed to tourists), and could be directed towards either adults or children or both. 5.Expenditures: The grants may be expended on any costs reasonably and directly incurred by the FBC&E organization to providing the qualifying programs, performances, and exhibits. This could include materials used in the presentation of the experience, salaries and employment costs of permanent or temporary employees preparing or presenting the experience, and expenses incurred in marketing and promoting the experience to the Boulder regional community. 6.Collaboration: Special consideration will be given to grant applications demonstrating collaboration on the program, performance, and exhibits with non-facilities-based organizations. For example, if a FBC&E organization proposes to put on an exhibit or program on Latino experiences, collaboration with a non-facilities-based Latino organization would be favorably received in the grant process. 7.Reporting: Any grant would require reporting on the number of people in the community served, so that the grant committee can consider whether the particular grant should be renewed in the future, and whether grants for similar projects should be made. Additional thoughts on criteria from Ken Wilson Exceptional Need: Does the organization have a particular, special need for money in 2019 due to startup costs, new exhibits, special performances, or other unusual needs that will help close a funding gap. 40 From:Chasansky, Matthew To:Seaton, Celia Subject:FW: Invitation to Home Date:Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:32:13 AM I From: Public Works Theatre Company <publicworkstc@gmail.com>  Sent: Monday, November 12, 2018 2:58 PM To: Erica Joos <erica.joos@bvsd.org>; Mark Villarreal <flynvartranch@comcast.net>; F Furman <ffurman@ecentral.com>; Click, Lauren <ClickL@boulderlibrary.org>; Kathleen McCormick <fonthead1@gmail.com>; devin@devinpatrickhughes.com; Chasansky, Matthew <ChasanskyM@boulderlibrary.org>; Haan, Mary Wohl <haanm@boulderlibrary.org> Subject: Invitation to Home Dear Boulder Arts Commissioners and staff, You are invited to the performances of Home, a student-created play based on the idea of Home at University Hill Elementary. The performances will be this Friday, November 16th at 9am and 10am in the Uni Hill gym. The play is 20 minutes, and Muse will also be playing after the play for 20 minutes. This performance marks the culmination of the Home project with Public Works Theatre Company, funded by BAC! Warmly, Sondra Blanchard 41 From:Kathleen McCormick To:Seaton, Celia; Chasansky, Matthew Cc:Mark Villarreal Subject:Re: Request: Arts Commissioner Application Edits? Date:Saturday, November 17, 2018 9:03:54 AM Attachments:image001.png image001.png Hi Celia, Matt, and Mark, The application looks fine, except perhaps you could adjust the amount of voter-approved (v in voters should be lower case) funding from $600,000 to ?? I'm not clear on whether that same funding goes forward every year, with or without Council approval, or it was a one-time voter approval. Could you update question 7, if necessary? Thanks, and have a great Thanksgiving, Kathleen On Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 1:04 PM Seaton, Celia <SeatonC@boulderlibrary.org> wrote: Hello, We are at that time of year when the clerk’s office is asking for any requested updates to the Arts Commission Application. Please find the latest draft attached, for your review. Please send any suggestions or edits by next Tuesday, 11/20, at noon. Please remember to email any feedback directly just to Matt and myself. Thank you, Celia Celia Seaton Administrative Specialist II https://bouldercolorado.gov/links/fetch/32010 42 Attachment Five Current Cultural Grants Program Budget as of December 14, 2018 GRANT CATEGORY ASSIGNED BUDGET GRANTS AWARDED FUNDS DISTRIBUTED BALANCE (TO BE AWARDED) Operational Grants Large FY2016 $ 280,000.00 $ 280,000.00 $ 280,000.00 $ - Operational Grants Large FY2017 $ 60,000.00 $ 60,000.00 $ 60,000.00 $ - Operational Grants Sm FY2016 $ 100,000.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 100,000.00 $ - Operational Grants Sm FY2017 $ 60,000.00 $ 60,000.00 $ 60,000.00 $ - Community Projects $ 80,000.00 $ 71,815.00 $ 57,452.00 $ 8,185.00 Arts Education $ 32,470.00 $ 29,400.00 $ 23,520.00 $ 3,070.00 Rental Assistance $ 18,000.00 $ 19,803.00 $ 19,803.00 $ (1,803.00) Professional Dev. Scholarships $ 17,000.00 $ 22,465.00 $ 17,972.00 $ (5,465.00) Arts Admin. Certificate Scholarships $ 10,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 8,000.00 Cultural Field Trips $ 10,000.00 $ 10,504.00 $ - $ (504.00) Equity Grant $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000.00 $ - $ - Admin / Admission Fund $ 7,235.00 $ 3,860.32 $ 3,860.32 $ 3,374.68 TOTAL $ 684,705.00 $ 669,847.32 $ 624,607.32 $ 14,857.68 There are 5 free rentals still available for the Macky Auditorium. 43 Attachment Six Current Public Art Program 5 Year Budget as of December 14, 2018 FUNDING SOURCE PROJECT/ARTIST TOTAL APPROPRIATED AMOUNT PAID TO DATE BALANCE REMAINING 2018 PROJECTED SPENDING Gen. Fund Experiments in P.A. / Jackson $ 20,000 $20,000 --- $19,000.00 Gen. Fund Experiments in P.A. / Hardy $ 10,000 $10,000 --- $1,000 Gen. Fund Civic Area Temp. / Dispersion $ 36,200 $34,390 $1,810 $16,290 Gen. Fund Civic Area Temp. / Wilkins $ 15,000 $15,000 --- $15,000 Gen. Fund Civic Area Temp. / Shlon $ 9,995 $ 9,995 --- $9,995 Gen. Fund Civic Area Temp. / Tashakori $ 10,000 $ 9,000 $1,000 $10,000 Gen. Fund Civic Area Temp. / Parson $ 7,000 $ 5,400 $ 600 $7,000 Gen. Fund Civic Area Permanent / Kuby* $ 45,000 $16,250 $28,750 $28,750 Gen. Fund Civic Area Temp. / Corridor Mural $ 26,000 --- $26,000 $26,000 Gen. Fund NoBo Mural / in selection $ 4,000 $ 4,000 --- $4,000 CCS v1 Civic Area Permanent / Kuby* $325,000 $39,000 $286,000 $48,750 CCS v1 Creative Neighborhoods / various* $ 25,000 $24,000 $ 1,000 $25,000 CCS v1 North Broadway / Dowell $165,000 $ 8,250 $156,750 $16,500 CCS v1 Univ. Hill / in selection $ 75,000 --- $75,000 $9,500 CCS v1 Diagonal Gateway / Muller* $ 81,500 $40,750 $40,750 $81,500 CCS v2 NoBo Library / pre-selection* ~$260,000 --- ~$260,000 --- CCS v2 Creative Neighborhoods / various* ~$ 25,000 --- ~$ 25,000 --- CCS v2 Scott Carpenter Pool / pre-selection ~$100,000 --- ~$100,000 --- CCS v2 Fire Station #3 / pre-selection ~$ 75,000 --- ~$ 75,000 --- % for Art Arapahoe Underpass / Sparks $ 42,000 $ 6,300 $35,700 $ 16,800 % for Art Foothills Underpass / Braaksma $ 35,000 --- $35,000 $4,500 % for Art 30th & Colo Underpass / Fivian & Beegles $ 75,000 --- $75,000 $7,500 % for Art East Arapahoe Mural / & Art Space $ 9,000 $ 9,000 --- $9,000 % for Art CAGID / on hold $ 50,000 $25,000 $25,000 --- TOTAL $1,525,695 $276,335 $1,249,360 $348,085 CCS: Community Culture and Safety Tax. *Multiple funding sources. Additional maintenance projects are not represented. 44