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06.25.18 PRAB PacketPARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD City Council Chambers, 770 Broadway, CO 80302 6:00 p.m., June 25, 2018 100 Years of Excellence Boulder Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Members 2018 Tom Klenow (Chair) Tyler Romero (Vice-Chair) Jennifer Kovarik Mary Scott Raj Seymour Valerie Yates Pamela Yugar Mission Statement BPRD will promote the health and well- being of the entire Boulder community by collaboratively providing high- quality parks, facilities and programs. Vision Statement We envision a community where every member’s health and well- being is founded on unparalleled parks, facilities and programs. Goals of the Master Plan 1. Community Health and Wellness 2. Taking Care of What We Have 3. Financial Sustainability 4. Building Community 5. Youth Engagement 6. Organizational Readiness For more information on BPRD Master Plan visit the City of Boulder web site at: https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/ parks-recreation-master-plan AGENDA All agenda times are approximate I. APPROVAL OF AGENDA (6:00) II. FUTURE BOARD ITEMS AND TOURS (6:01) III. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (6:03) This portion of the meeting is for members of the public to communicate ideas or concerns to the Board regarding parks and recreation issues for which a public hearing is not scheduled later in the meeting (this includes consent agenda). The public is encouraged to comment on the need for parks and recreation programs and facilities as they perceive them. All speakers are limited to 3 minutes. Depending on the nature of your matter, you may or may not receive a response from the Board after you deliver your comments. The Board is always listening to and appreciative of community feedback. IV. CONSENT AGENDA (6:15) A. Approval of minutes from June 4, 2018 B. Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update V. ITEMS FOR ACTION (6:25) A. Public Hearing and Consideration of a motion Approving the 2019 Expenditures from Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and 2019- 2024 Parks and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Program (CIP) VI. ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION/INFORMATION (6:50) A. No items this month VII. MATTERS FROM THE DEPARTMENT (6:50) A. Harbeck-Bergheim House Community Engagement Update B. Operating Budget Update (verbal) VIII. MATTERS FROM BOARD MEMBERS (7:10) A. 2019-24 Greenways Capital Improvement Program B. PRAB Community Engagement Updates (verbal) IX. NEXT BOARD MEETING: Juy 23, 2018 X. ADJOURN PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD 100 Years of Excellence Future Board Items 2018 January 22 • Service Delivery Update (d/i) • Public Restrooms in Parks (d/i) • Boulder County Farmers Market (md) • PRAB Letter to Council Update (mb) • Board Recruitment (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) February 26 • Boulder County Farmers Market License (a) • Boulder County Farmers Market Update (d/i) • Scott Carpenter McCarty Ditch Easement (d/i) • Updates to the Integrated Pest Management Policy (d/i) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) April 2 (rescheduled March meeting) • Boulder County Farmers Market License (a) • Agreement with BVSD Regarding Collaborative Efforts for Summer Learning and YSI (d/i) • Urban Forest Strategic Plan (d/i) • Xcel Energy Property Rights Agreement (md) • Universal Design Project (md) • PLAY Foundation Update (mb) • New Member Orientation (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) • Outgoing Member Comments (mb) April 23 • Board appointments (p) • Election of officers (p) • First meeting for new Board members (p) • Agreement with BVSD Regarding Collaborative Efforts for Summer Learning and YSI (a) • Contract for Concession Services at Flatirons Golf Course (a) • 2019-2024 CIP (1st touch) (d/i) • Amendment to the Contract for Concessions Services at Flatirons Golf Course (d/i) • Board Liaison Discussion (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 4 (rescheduled May meeting) • Urban Forest Strategic Plan (a) • 2019-24 CIP (2nd touch) (d/i) • Foothills Parkeway Bicycle and Pedestrian Underpass (md) • Asset Management Program (AMP) Team Overview (md) • Budget Update (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) June 25 • 2019-24 CIP (3rd touch) (a) • Harbeck-Bergheim House Community Engagement Update (md) • Operating Budget Update (md) • 2019-24 Greenways Capital Improvement Program (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) July 23 • Election of Vice-Chair (p) • Boulder Creek Festival Update (c) • Mobile Vending Update (c) • Scott Carpenter Follow Up (c) • Operating Budget Update (md) • Alpine/Balsam – East Bookend Planning (md) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) August 27 • CIP 2019-2024 Update (c) • Recreation Activity Fund (RAF) Sustainability and Fees (d/i) • PRAB Retreat (mb) • PLAY Foundation Update (mb) • EAB Board Follow Up (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) September 24 • PRAB Retreat Agenda Review (mb) • PRAB New Member Application Review (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD 100 Years of Excellence LEGEND Procedural Item: (p): An item requiring procedural attention Consent Item (c): An item provided in written form for consent, not discussion by the Board; any consent item may be called up by any Board member for discussion during the matters from the department Action Item (a): A public hearing item to be voted on by the Board (public comment period provided) Disc/Info Item(d/i): An item likely to become a future action item (or council item) and/or that benefits from an in-depth presentation of background, financial/social/environmental impacts, public process, staff analysis and next steps (e.g., presentation of major project initiative) Matters from Dept (md): Items that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item Matters from the Bd (mb): Items initiated by the Board that will be reviewed and discussed during the meeting but not requiring the level of in-depth analysis of an action or discussion/information item October 22 • 2018 Operating Budget and Recreation Fee Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) November 26 • Harbeck House Update (d/i) • Capital Project Update (md) • PRAB Retreat Follow Up (mb) • PRAB Goals for City Council Work Session (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) December 17 • Harbeck House Recommendation (a) • Asset Management Plan (md) • Finalize 2019 PRAB Work Plan (mb) • PRAB Community Engagement (mb) Future Board Items 2018 - continued PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD 100 Years of Excellence COMMUNITY TOUCHES - The City has recently been working on an update to the calendar of all city events for community use. Please view the calendar online for all of the latest updates for upcoming events. We are encouraging staff and the community to be aware of and use the new tool. https://bouldercolorado.gov/calendar The event list can be filtered to see only Parks and Recreation events by choosing ‘Recreation’ from the dropdown menu at the top of the page, and then clicking on the submit button. If you would like more information about any of the events, just use the link above and select the event you are interested in. Additional information will appear at the botton of the page with a link directly to the event web page. Below is a sample of what you will see, once filtered. For live links or the most up to date information, please use the link above. PARKS & RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD 100 Years of Excellence CITY OF BOULDER BOULDER, COLORADO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS MEETING MINUTES To listen to the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meetings in their entirety, please go to the following link: www.boulderparks-rec.org Name of Board/Commission: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Date of Meeting: June 4, 2018 Contact Information Preparing Summary: Sarah DeSouza, 303-413-7223 Board Members Present: Tom Klenow, Jennifer Kovarik, Valerie Yates, Tyler Romero, Mary Scott, Pamela Yugar, Raj Seymour Board Members Absent: None Staff Present: Yvette Bowden, Jeff Haley, Sarah DeSouza, Brenda Richey, Bryan Beary, Bryan Harding, Doug Godfrey, Kathleen Alexander, Jonathon Steiner, Keith Williams, Tina Briggs, Jackson Hite Guests Present: Noreen Walsh and Brian Wiltshire, City Transportation Type of Meeting: Advisory/Regular Agenda Item 1: Call to Order The meeting was called to order at 6:00 p.m. Agenda Item 2: Future Board Items and Tours Bowden reviewed upcoming community touch opportunities. These events can be found at www.BoulderParks-Rec.org Agenda Item 3: Public Participation No members of the public spoke. Agenda Item 4: Consent Agenda A. Approval of Minutes from April 23, 2018 (rescheduled March meeting) Minutes from April 23, 2018 were approved as written. B. Parks and Recreation Development and Operations Update PRAB members made the following comments about this item: • Appreciate the details provided in the report and the pictures that accompany the narrative. Agenda Item 5: Action Item A. Public Hearing and Consideration of a Motion to Approve the Boulder Parks and Recreation 2018 Urban Forest Strategic Plan Haley presented this item to the Board. Public participation was opened. No one spoke. The Board made the following comments about this item: • Question regarding how to diversify the urban forest in Boulder • Very thorough and innovative approach to community outreach in this project • This has been a very informative and educational project for the Board • The Boulder ommunity values strategizing relating tothe future of the urban forest Klenow made the following motion: Motion to approve the Boulder Parks and Recreation 2018 Urban Forest Strategic Plan The motion was seconded by Romero. The motion passed unanimously (7-0). Agenda Item 6: Discussion/Information Item A. 2019-2024 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Bowden and Haley presented this item to the Board PRAB members shared the following questions and comments about this item: • What projects will not be funded with the decrease in funding in the CIP? • Does the city plan for CIP projects beyond five years? • Would proceeds from the potential sale of Harbeck House go into the Permanent Park Fund? • Will specific details about general park improvement projects be presented to the PRAB? • Who was involved in the creation of the excellent “Summer Fun” publication? • Why is there no funding budgeted for Columbia Cemetery in 2021? • Appreciate the new concession area at the Flatirons Golf Course. • How do you determine what parts of the Urban Forest Strategic Plan do not get implemented to meet the proposed reduction? • How does the cost of the upcoming Master Plan update compare to the 2013 Master Plan update? • Appreciate the “ living within our means” approach the department has adopted and the thoughtful approach to the pending reductions. • Concern regarding the lack of recreation services in Gunbarrel. • If money becomes available, does the department have an approach to prioritizing funding for deferred projects? • How can the department benefit financially from the new businesses that have located in Boulder impacting the need for more services in the denser areas such as the Boulder Transit Center? • The department has done a very thoughtful job of addressing the recent cuts to the CIP budget. • Is there a “scorecard” that can be used to look at community demographics as a way of prioritizing CIP projects to ensure all segments of our community’s needs are being met? • Need to take advantage of opportunities to partner and maximize shared community resources with other local organizations. Agenda Item 7: Matters from the Department A. Foothills Parkway Bicycle and Pedestrian Underpass Project Update • Like the option that is being recommended by staff • Consider initiating the project after the start of the BVSD and CU school year • Appreciative of the fact that trees removed for construction will be replanted elsewhere to benefit the entire system • Proposal has a lot of flexible options • How will flood impacts be mitigated since this area is in the flood plain? • How are personal safety concers being addressed with the underpasss? • Appreciate all the work that has gone into planning for this project • Thoughtful design and outreach process for this project B. Asset Management Program (AMP) Team Overview • Does this software communicate with other systems? • What asset management software is being used by the surrounding communities? • Can the various asset management systems used by other municipalities interact with each other? • Can this system track assets by their ADA accessibility or inclusivity? • Could inclusivity be captured as a major criteria? • It would be nice to know which specific park assets are considered inclusive and be able to rate the inclusivity level of a park • Can the system evaluate the status of an entire park or site as opposed to just by the asset? C. Budget Update • Appreciative of the departments fiscal stewardship and commitment to staying within the budget Agenda Item 8: Matters from the Board A. PRAB Community Engagement Updates • Board members attended the following activities/meetings/tours: PLAY involvement at Boulder Creek Festival; YSI Art Show; What’s Up Boulder; Scott Carpenter Park ballfield; Civic Area Grand Opening; Safe Plant Exchange; Purge the Spurge event; and Harlow Platts Park. Adjourn: There being no further business to come before the Board at this time, the meeting was adjourned at 8:18 p.m. Approved by: Attested: _________________________ ________________________ Tom Klenow Sarah DeSouza Board Chair Board Secretary Date _____________________ Date ____________________ 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Ali Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Consent Agenda DATE: June 25, 2018 A. Approval of Minutes from May 28, 2018 B. Parks and Recreation Development Update The following information is intended to provide the PRAB with relevant updates on specific projects as they reach major milestones. This section is not all inclusive of all current projects and only illustrates major project updates. For a complete list of all current projects and details, please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. Planning and Design The following projects are currently in the planning and design process that involves research, alternatives analysis, public involvement and development of planning documents and design plans to guide decision making and future capital improvements. • Planning Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Asset Management Program; o Beehive Asset Management Software Implementation; o Boulder Reservoir South Shore Site Management Plan; o Design Standards Manual (previously Parks Planning, Construction, Operations and Maintenance Manual); o Engagement Coordination Committee; and o Harbeck-Bergheim House (see Matters from the Department). Construction The following projects are scheduled for construction, under construction or have been recently completed. For additional details please visit www.BoulderParkNews.org. 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 North Boulder Park Tot Track: Funding for a Tot Track has been made possible by a generous donation honoring the community's legacy regarding the Red Zinger Classic/Coors International Bicycle Classic. Launched in 1975 with a finish line in North Boulder Park, these races epitomized our community's important role in establishing pro-cycling competitions nationally and worldwide. Honoring the race, racers and the city of Boulder, the donors underwriting this amenity hope to inspire and support the next generation of cyclists. A sign will be placed on site for neighbors to view the proposed feature and location within the park. This track is very small and intended for children to practice their skills on bikes and scooters with only a few children riding at a time. • Construction Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Boulder Reservoir Visitor Services Center; o Elks Park Arbor; o Lighting Ordinance Compliance; and o Scott Carpenter Outdoor Pool. Natural Lands The following projects, focused on habitat and wildlife management in an urban environment, are currently being managed by the Urban Resources staff: • Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Restoration: The department is implementing plans for follow-up weed control on last year’s prescribed fire area at Windsurfer’s Point. In addition to weed removal, staff is performing wildlife surveys and collecting data to evaluate the effectiveness of adaptive management techniques for future burns. Staff also participated in a public meeting/information session on June 6 regarding the city’s mosquito management programs. Approximately 15 citizens attended the meetings and provided their thoughts and suggestions on the topic. Staff will continue to engage the public during the summer through outreach and neighborhood meetings. The process for the update to the city’s mosquito management program is included in this information packet memo. The most recent weekly mosquito report can be found at https://bouldercolorado.gov/ipm/mosquito-report. • Regulations and Seasonal Wildlife Closures: Volunteers submitted approximately 60 bird of concern reports between mid-April and the end of May. Activity for the species of concern (American bittern, Northern harrier, burrowing owl and osprey) has decreased this year from previous year however, 81 bird species have been observed within the study area (Coot Lake, Dry Creek and Little Dry Creek) and 70 of those are potential 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 nesting species. Staff conducted a training for the Boulder Aeromodelling Society members on how to minimize disturbance to species of concern while retrieving downed aircraft in nesting areas. • Urban Wildlife Management: Staff continues to participate on the city-wide Prairie Dog Working Group (PDWG). The group recently held its final Phase 2 meeting and staff is preparing a report of group findings and recommendations to be presented to the City Manager in early third quarter 2018. The June 5 Management Goals and Objectives document found on the website outlines the information that will be presented in the report. Staff is still looking for volunteers for the annual prairie dog census at the Boulder Reservoir. Counts are held over the course of three days each in June, July and August. Those interested in participating in prairie dog counts are encouraged to contact Melissa Reed-Eckert at Reed-EckertM@bouldercolorado.gov. Annual count information is provided to the city’s Urban Wildlife Conservation Coordinator and utilized to assist in land management decisions. • Natural Lands Projects Underway: Staff or contractors continue to work on the following projects and will update the PRAB as major milestones are achieved: o Natural Lands Volunteer Recruitment and Training; and o Boulder Aeromodelling Society coordination and site maintenance. C. Operations Update Department 2019 Budget Proposal The PRAB is reminded of the verbal update provided during the May meeting. Specifically, as part of the city's continuing efforts to contain costs, staff has developed a "fiscally constrained" 2019 budget proposal. The proposal, which must still be reviewed by the city's Executive Budget Team and City Council, considers flattening local sales tax revenues and the resulting impact on Boulder's General Fund and the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund. Staff's proposal: (1) Retains the current level of reserves across the department’s dedicated funds; (2) Assumes provision of minimum wage for nonstandard positions as previously directed by Council; (3) Reduces General Fund spending on an ongoing basis; and (4) Reduces the six-year CIP by $4.25M, requiring project delays and reductions in scope further described below. Despite staff's identified efficiencies and cost containment opportunities, it was necessary that the proposal significantly impact capital funds available for department projects. Shared with the PRAB as part of the May CIP Discussion Item, certain projects will have reduced available funding and/or will be delayed aligning spending with revenues and maintain healthy fund balances. Impacted projects, to name a few, include Valmont City Park Phase II and the number of neighborhood parks to be improved annually. These changes were also necessary as staff appreciates the implications of enhanced and improved amenities on the department’s ongoing operation. In addition, the budget proposal assumes no new programming in 2019 and may result in some service level adjustments. A more thorough budget update will be provided with 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 the September PRAB meeting packet. The public may also want to refer to updated CIP Action Item materials provided in this packet. AGENDA ITEM #__V-A____PAGE___1____ C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: June 25, 2018 AGENDA TITLE: Public Hearing and Consideration of Motions Approving the 2019 Expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and 2019-2024 Parks and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Program (CIP) PRESENTERS: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Ali Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manger EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: As part of the city’s annual budget process, departments develop a six-year Capital Improvement Program (CIP). The current CIP process is for fiscal years 2019 through 2024. Within this process, funds are appropriated for the first year, 2019. Staff has provided the PRAB with two previous agenda items related to the CIP in April and May and this item is the third and final with the requested approval. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board’s (PRAB) role in this process is defined in the Boulder Revised Code (B.R.C.), 1982 TITLE 2 GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION, Chapter 3 Boards and Commissions, Section 10 Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (d)(2) “To approve or disapprove expenditures or appropriations from the permanent park and recreation fund and forward such recommendations to the city council.” It is within this context that the PRAB is requested to hold a public hearing and provide a recommendation on the CIP to Planning Board and the City Council. After a motion is passed by the PRAB, the department’s CIP budget will then be submitted to the Planning Board and City Council for review and respective considerations and approvals. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the PRAB approve the 2019 expenditures planned from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and approve the recommended 2019-2024 Parks and Recreation Department CIP (Attachment A). Suggested Motion Language: Staff requests the PRAB’s consideration of this matter and action in the form of the following motions: • Motion to approve the 2019 recommended expenditures from the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund. • Motion to approve the recommended 2019 -2024 Parks and Recreation Department Capital Improvement Program (CIP). AGENDA ITEM #__V-A____PAGE___2____ IMPACTS: Fiscal: $4.35M. This amount reflects the total uses of funds projected for 2019 as follows: (described in greater detail in Attachment A) Fund Project Amount Permanent Parks & Recreation Fund (3300) Athletic Field Improvements $100,000 Boulder Reservoir South Improvements $1,100,000 Columbia Cemetery Capital Maintenance $106,000 Flatirons Golf Course Capital Enhancements $260,000 Neighborhood and Community park Enhancements $472,000 Parking Lot Capital Maintenance $840,000 Urban Forestry Planting Prioritization and Emergency Response Plan $50,000 Valmont City Park Phase 2 Development $100,000 Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund Total $2,928,000 .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund (2180) Recreation Facility Capital Maintenance $500,000 Urban Forest Management (EAB) $500,000 .25 Cent Sales Tax Total $1,000,000 Lottery Fund (2110) Neighborhood and Community Park Capital Maintenance $428,000 Lottery Fund Total $428,000 PUBLIC FEEDBACK: At the public hearing, members of the public will have the opportunity to comment on the proposed 2019-2024 CIP during the public hearing portion of the agenda item. The public will also have an opportunity to comment during the Planning Board’s CIP review in July and City Council’s discussions and review of the recommended budget during future public hearings throughout the year. BACKGROUND: Capital Projects CIP projects are defined as any major project with a cost greater than $50,000 for purchase or construction or major replacement of physical assets. CIP projects are potentially subject to a Community and Environmental Assessment Process (CEAP) review that evaluates any potential environmental, traffic or social impacts to Boulder residents, neighborhoods and businesses. AGENDA ITEM #__V-A____PAGE___3____ Capital Funding The department’s capital funding comes from various sources where the department either manages the fund or a portion of an appropriation in the fund. The funds include the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund, .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund and the Lottery Fund. These funding sources all have limitations on what can be spent from the specific fund. CIP Process The budget is how the city manages its assets and implements projects and programs that are chosen by its citizens through their elected representatives, City Council. The department’s budget is formulated within the context of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan that was adopted by the PRAB and accepted by City Council in early 2014. The CIP is developed in support of achieving the department’s Master Plan goals. Once again this year, staff has provided the PRAB with a “three touch” approach that included 1) discussion item presented at the April meeting communicating process, policies and procedures and definitions/criteria that guide the CIP development; 2) a discussion item presented at the May meeting to review draft projects and prioritization as it relates to the 2019 – 2024 CIP; and 3) a PRAB Public Hearing to consider motions approving and recommending the department CIP. CIP Guiding Principles To plan and prioritize capital investments, staff apply specific guiding principles based on the City’s CIP guiding principles and the department’s master plan goals. The following departmental framework is also utilized to determine and plan CIP projects and make budget decisions that are sustainable over time. These priorities are also focused on maintaining the integrity of the current infrastructure and facilities before expanding and/or enhancing programs and facilities. 1. Safety / Compliance (S) – Projects represent important deficiencies and are essential safety and compliance concerns. Project may include ongoing infrastructure repairs, replacements and/or refurbishments of park play equipment and amenities, irrigation systems, landscape and turf upgrades and facility improvements. Compliance considerations also include meeting local, state and federal requirements that are required to be completed to comply with specific regulations, such as city of Boulder’s ‘dark sky’ lighting ordinance and the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Commitment (C) – Projects that are required by law/ballot (e.g., Elks Park), are in-process of development (e.g., Valmont City Park), as part of a prior development agreement, are recommended as part of the department master plan (e.g., playground and irrigation system renovations) and/or are required to be completed within a specific period of time. 3. Efficiencies (E) – The department will consistently seek efficiency improvements in both operational and capital investments. Projects will represent important AGENDA ITEM #__V-A____PAGE___4____ operational and/or maintenance efficiencies resulting in improved life cycles, cost efficiencies and savings in resources, energy or water usage (e.g. aquatics facility repairs). 4. Revenue (R) – The department will invest in facilities and programs that generate revenues to support valued recreational opportunities in the Boulder community. Projects will enhance the department's ability to earn more revenue after initial investment and operational costs are considered (e.g. aquatics facility enhancements and athletic field improvements) and/or possible collaboration/partnerships leveraging outside funding sources. ANALYSIS: Staff have identified options for reducing spending strategically as a standard practice for this current fiscal environment and especially as it applies to the CIP. For both 2019 as well as the full 6-year CIP staff have performed careful analysis and projections for all funds that make up the department CIP. With PRAB support, staff have adjusted the spending accordingly to remain within funding projections while still maintaining a healthy fund balance for reserves. Over half of the CIP is now funded exclusively out of the Permanent Parks and Recreation fund while the remaining is funded appropriately out of the .25 Cent Sales Tax and Lottery Fund. The current 6-year CIP reduces spending by approximately $4.25M. CIP Project Revisions for 2019-2024 To achieve the strategic budget reductions, the following projects have been revised as follows: 1. Aquatic Facility Enhancements ($2.7M) Funding amounts remained the same, but delayed projects by 1 year to allow for higher priority projects to proceed first as well as allowing the design of the pool renovations to be informed in the upcoming recreation facilities needs assessment. The East Boulder Community Center Pool, Spruce Pool and South Boulder Recreation Center Pool will each be delayed by one year. 2. Capital Infrastructure Enhancements ($2.7M) Funding amounts remained the same, but delayed projects by 2 years. This project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. 3. Valmont City Park Phase 2 ($2. 3M) Delayed project by 1 year and reduced funding by $1.5M. This project will be an opportunity for a capital campaign, partner contributions or other forms of funding that are under consideration. Will likely include some combination of an adventure playground, small water feature for children, community garden, skateboard elements and shelter pavilions. 4. Boulder Reservoir Enhancements ($1.1M) Reduced funding by $1.15M that was allocated in future years for continued enhancements at the South Shore Recreation Area until completion of Site Planning this year. Funding will be considered in the 2020 CIP development next year once the site plan and prioritization by the community is AGENDA ITEM #__V-A____PAGE___5____ complete. The current funding will continue the implementation of key improvements to the south shore recreation area and redevelopment of the visitor services center. 5. Flatirons Golf Course Repairs ($3M) Moved up one year due to a priority need for new restrooms and facilities. In future years, this project will provide dredging of existing irrigation ponds within the course and design and construction of a new pro shop, clubhouse and staff office to replace the former events center that was demolished because of the 2013 flood. 6. Rec Facility Repairs ($1.5M) Reduced funding by $500K Based upon the outcomes and strategies of the Recreation Facility Strategic Plan, this project will fund the initial implementation projects outlined within the plan. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Division of Public Works that partners in the management of the facilities. 7. Urban Forest Management ($2.9M) Reduced funding by $100K in 2020 Result of the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a response plan has been developed to slow the spread of the pest and maintain a safe community from the potential hazards of multiple dead and dying trees within the urban core of the community. This project will provide funding to educate the community on safe EAB treatment, hire contractors for removal and replacement of the trees affected by the EAB to re-establish streetscapes and park areas that contribute to many of the sustainability goals of the city. 8. Operations Facility Enhancements ($1M) Reduced the project funding in 2023 by $1M. Funding will be determined in future years pending the outcome of the current operations facility assessments. Operating and Maintenance Impacts The department prioritizes capital projects based upon maintaining existing assets and decreasing the maintenance backlog of the department’s portfolio of parks and facilities. Therefore, most projects included in the department’s Capital Improvement Program will not have an impact on maintenance costs due to replacement of aging infrastructure and efficiencies associated with new and improved facilities and systems. However, as the department fulfills commitments relative to long-term planning needs such as the future phases of Valmont City Park, Boulder Junction Park or Violet Neighborhood Park in the future, the department will need to carefully design enhancements in sensitivity to the department’s O&M funding and not overburden funds with maintenance of these new facilities. Unfunded Projects and Emerging Needs In the long-term, additional funding will need to be secured to develop any new major facilities as well as improve service standards for maintenance operations and to fund deferred maintenance. The master plan includes a list of priority items to complete based on various funding levels Staff continues to evaluate deferred maintenance needs, including park sites and recreation facility needs and have implemented an Asset AGENDA ITEM #__V-A____PAGE___6____ Management Plan (AMP) to assist in capital planning and day-to-day operations. The current maintenance and facility improvements backlog, including major repairs and replacements, is significant. The department anticipates that this backlog will continue until funding levels reach appropriate amounts to accommodate life-cycle projections for the department’s assets. Key Unfunded Projects Include: • Boulder Reservoir South Shore enhancements to accommodate increased use and visitation as well as basic amenities to support the regional destination as outlined in the Boulder Reservoir Master Plan and currently evaluated through the Site and Management Plan. • The Recreation Facility Strategic Plan projected a total of $4.5 million in deferred maintenance and an additional $3 million over the next ten years in the three recreation centers. • Meeting energy compliance required by the Building Performance Ordinance. • Increased capacity, upgrades and additional facilities for youth and adult sports fields. • Expansion and enhancement of recreation centers and aquatics facilities that accommodate increased demand for lap swimming, fitness equipment and multi-use classroom space that could be expanded. • Renovation of existing parkland to meet current trends and needs for the community such as the Mapleton Ballfields given increased residential development in the area. NEXT STEPS: It is important to note that staff will keep the PRAB updated on the status of the CIP process as it proceeds to Planning Board and City Council during the summer months and ultimately upon approval. Similarly, as staff continues the final design of the key improvement projects for 2019, the PRAB will be updated on the outcome of the final scope and related costs. 2019-2024 CIP Process Time Line (Projected) Item Date PRAB Approval/Recommendation of CIP (Action) June 25 Planning Board / City Council CIP Tour July 16 Planning Board Hearing July 19 Council Study Session Aug 14 Attachments: A. CIP Project Summary Sheet 2019-2024 Estimated Total Cost2019 Recommended2020 Projected 2021 Projected 2024 ProjectedPARKS & RECREATION $ 4,356,000 $ 4,296,000 $ 4,645,000 $ 3,782,000 CIP-CAPITAL ENHANCEMENT $ 528,000 $ 852,000 $ 3,103,000 $ 1,428,000 $- $ 150,000 $ 2,100,000 $- $- $- $ - $- $- $ 575,000 $ 1,000,000 $ 428,000 $ 428,000 $ 428,000 $ 428,000 $ 428,000 $ 428,000 $- $- $ - $- Operations Facilities Capital Enhac (515330OPFA) $- $ 1,000,000 $- General Park Improvements (5152112110) $- Boulder's park system is foundational to the mission of the Parks and Recreation Department. Upon completion of the department's master plan in 2014, the department committed to ongoing park system renovations/repairs based on priority needs and asset management for all outdoor facilities. This combines individual funding for playgrounds, shelters, and ADA accessibility upgrades. The specific park that will be renovated is determined on a six year cycle through an asset management program and communicated to the public. Projects are necessary to comply with goals and commitments identified in the department’s master plan. The department evaluates and prioritizes needs based on criteria including safety and code compliance, age of the equipment, location in the city, and opportunities for efficiencies, collaboration or partnerships with other departments or the surrounding neighborhood. The current list of parks within the CIP include:2019 - Chautauqua Park2020 - Harlow Platts Community Park2021 -East Boulder Community Park2022 - North Boulder Park2023 - Martin Park2024 - Parkside ParkCapital Infrastructure Enhancements (515330CINF) $- $ 80,000 $- This project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. Currently undeveloped park sites such as Violet Park in north Boulder and Eaton Park in Gunbarrel have planned amenities that need to be implemented to meet service levels of surrounding neighborhoods. Additionally, this project will provide implementation of planned amenities at developed park sites that haven't been constructed such as restrooms, ballfields, additional sport courts and play areas. Throughout the next few years, key plans and reports will be completed for the Boulder Reservoir as well as the departmental master plan that will also outline future priorities that will be funded through this project that will enhance the existing recreation facilities.Capital Infrastructure Enhancements (515218CINF) $ 80,000 $ 1,000,000 $- This project will provide capital funding to implement enhancements at parks and facilities throughout the system. Currently undeveloped park sites such as Violet Park in north Boulder and Eaton Park in Gunbarrel have planned amenities that need to be implemented to meet service levels of surrounding neighborhoods. Additionally, this project will provide implementation of planned amenities at developed park sites that haven't been constructed such as restrooms, ballfields, additional sport courts and play areas. Throughout the next few years, key plans and reports will be completed for the Boulder Reservoir as well as the departmental master plan that will also outline future priorities that will be funded through this project that will enhance the existing recreation facilities.Based on recommendations of the 2015 Boulder Aquatics Feasibility Plan, this project provides implementation of priority indoor and outdoor pool enhancements for Boulder's aquatics programs. In 2020, design and permitting will be completed for the the East Boulder Community Center leisure pool and construction will occur in 2021. This project will be in partnership with Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) funding a variety of necessary facility repairs in the same year. In 2023, improvements will be made to the outdoor Spruce Pool and the indoor South Boulder Recreation Center pool to provide water play features for children and youth. These improvements will allow the pools to serve all ages and abilites while also enhancing priority facilites for the community.Department Total $ 4,020,000 $ 4,670,000 $- Subtotal $ 2,508,000 $ 3,018,000 $- Boulder Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program 2019-2024Run Date: 6/18/20182022 Projected 2023 ProjectedUnfunded AmountAquatic Facility Enhancements (5152185510) $- $ 510,000 $-Attachment A Boulder Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program 2019-2024Run Date: 6/18/2018 $ 100,000 $ 274,000 $ - $ - Estimated Total Cost2019 Recommended2020 Projected 2021 Projected 2024 Projected CIP-CAPITAL MAINTENANCE $ 3,778,000 $ 3,304,000 $ 1,402,000 $ 2,354,000 $ - $ - $ 130,000 $ - $ 1,100,000 $ - $ - $ - $ 106,000 $ 32,000 $ - $ 32,000 $ - $ 260,000 $ 2,300,000 $ - $ 500,000 Flatiron Golf Course Repairs (5153304150) $ - $ - $ - The cemetery is a designated landmark and requires ongoing maintenance to meet the preservation requirements associated with all the infrastructure ranging from headstones, markers, ornamental fencing and grounds maintenance. This project will provide necessary funding to complete projects as well as local match for leveraging state grant funds.The Flatirons Golf Course is the only public course in Boulder and provides a highly desired recreation amenity while also contributing to funding sources through revenue generation. The golf course has many planned enhancements to ensure playability and provide necessary visitor amenities. This project will provide dredging of existing irrigation ponds within the course in 2019 and 2024 and design and construction of a new pro shop, clubhouse and staff office to replace the former events center that was demolished as a result of the 2013 flood. The clubhouse will be designed and permitted in 2019 with constrution anticipated in the fall of 2020.Implementing the 2012 Master Plan and recent facility assessments, this project will continue the implementation of key improvements to the south shore recreation area and redevelopment of the visitor services center to provide restrooms, administrative offices, concessions area and various visitor amenities to the beach area. Future key enhancement priorities will be determined through a site management plan that is currently underway and will be complete in 2019. Potential projects include trail connections, pavilions, docks, facility upgrades and parking lot renovations.Columbia Cemetery Capital Maintenance (515330CCCM) $ 40,000 $ 32,000 $ - Boulder Reservoir South Shore (5153305020) $ - $ - $ - This project provides for the development of the next major phase of Valmont City Park, primarily south of Valmont Road. The Concept Plan for the park was updated in 2015 with community support and outlining all the major amenities and phases to be built in the future. The next phase may include an adventure playground, small water feature for children, community garden, skateboard elements or shelter pavilions. Additional parking and opportunities for enhancement to the existing disc golf course will also be explored as part of Phase 2. Final plans will be completed in 2020 to determine amenities for development as well as available funding. Constrution is anticipated in 2022 based upon availble funding and prioritization. This project also allows for increased park service to the surrounding areas of east Boulder as well as the entire Boulder community.As recommended in the department's master plan and the subsequent Athletic Field Study, staff will improve existing athletic fields and sports complexes through annual capital maintenance and renovations. Most of the improvements relate to irrigation and turf renovation, replacement of sports field amenities and improving fields. The department conducted feasibility studies and intends to design and construct priority field improvements at locations determined through the athletic field study. Specific park sites could include Stazio Complex, Foothills Community Park, Pleasantview Sports Complex, East Boulder Community Park or Harlow Platts Park.This project allows the department to focus on youth engagement and activity as indicated in the department's master plan and Athletic Field Study by providing appropriate facilities and opportunities for youth sports. Additionally, this project will provide efficiency and improvement in maintenance and operations in order to allow the department more flexibility in maintenance of athletic fields throughout the community.Subtotal $ 1,512,000 $ 1,652,000 $ - Athletic Field Improvements (5153302060) $ - $ 130,000 $ - 2022 Projected 2023 Projected Unfunded AmountThis project will provide funding to implement key recommendations of the operations facility assessment to improve existing facilities as well as increasing facilities for space needs related to production areas, material storage, office space and equipment staging. Key outcomes of the project will include renovations and expansion of existing maintenance shops, operations buildings and material/equipment storage.Valmont City Park - Phase 2 (5153303500) $ 2,000,000 $ - $ - Boulder Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program 2019-2024Run Date: 6/18/2018 $ 472,000 $ 472,000 $ 472,000 $ 472,000 $ 840,000 $ - $ 300,000 $ 350,000 $ - $ 100,000 $ - $ - $ 500,000 $ - $ - $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 400,000 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 Play Court Capital Maintenance (515218PLCT) $ - $ 200,000 $ - BPR manages approximately 20 different parking lots across the system with a current replacement value of $5.5M. Current backlog of maintenance is estimated at $2M which increases annually due to the deterioration of asphalt in poor condition. This project provides critical funding to renovate and renew existing parking lots to ensure safety of visitors and access to a variety of parks and recreation facilities. Individual parking lot repairs are prioritized through the department's asset management system and identified for construction efficiencies based on locations.The department's master plan indicates several key themes that relate to health and wellness, youth activity, community engagement and asset management. To continue supporting these key themes, the department will be providing repairs, renovations and upgrades to recreation centers. In 2016, the department completed a strategic plan for all recreation centers that illustrates implementation priority for critical projects. Based upon the outcomes and strategies of the Recreation Facility Strategic Plan, this project will fund the initial implementation projects outlined within the plan. This project is combined with funding from the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Division of Public Works that partners in the management of the facilities.Urban Forest Management (5152183100) $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ - BPR owns and manages a variety of play courts ranging from basketball, tennis, platform tennis and handball. The department asset management system outlines which courts are in need of repairs and the department uses this funding to provide capital maintenance each year to the highest priority courts including crack filling, striping, painting and replacement of hardware and infrastructure associated with the courts.Recreation Facility Repairs (5152186150) $ 500,000 $ - $ - Boulder's park system is foundational to the mission of the Parks and Recreation Department. Upon completion of the department's master plan in 2014, the department committed to ongoing park system renovations/repairs based on priority needs and asset management for all outdoor facilities. This combines individual funding for playgrounds, shelters, and ADA accessibility upgrades. The specific park that will be renovated is determined on a six year cycle through an asset management program and communicated to the public. Projects are necessary to comply with goals and commitments identified in the department’s master plan. The department evaluates and prioritizes needs based on criteria including safety and code compliance, age of the equipment, location in the city, and opportunities for efficiencies, collaboration or partnerships with other departments or the surrounding neighborhood. The current list of parks within the CIP include:2019 - Chautauqua Park2020 - Harlow Platts Community Park2021 -East Boulder Community Park2022 - North Boulder Park2023 - Martin Park2024 - Parkside ParkParking Lot Capital Maintenance (515218PKLT) $ - $ 318,000 $ - Neighborhood and Com Park Cap Maint (515330NHCP) $ 472,000 $ 472,000 $ - Boulder Parks and Recreation Capital Improvement Program 2019-2024Run Date: 6/18/2018Estimated Total Cost2019 Recommended2020 Projected 2021 Projected 2024 Projected CIP-CAPITAL PLANNING STUDIES $ 50,000 $ 140,000 $ 140,000 $ - $ 50,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 140,000 $ 140,000 $ - This project will provide funding for consultants and staff to complete a 5-year update to the department's master plan to ensure alignment of departmental programs, services and facilities to meet the needs and goals of the community. This project will likely include an updated community survey and outreach to all members of the community to analyze the mission and offerings of the department. A comprehensive historic and cultural plan will be completed in conjunction with this master plan update to provide for goals and recommendations to ensure the sustainability of the departments' historic and cultural assets over time.Forestry Emergency Response Plan (515330UFPP) $ - $ - $ - A key implementation priority in the Urban Forest Strategic Plan, this will provide funding for a comprehensive plan that identifies planting priorities for the urban forest annual planting initiatives as well as specific response protocol for emergency related events including drought, wind storms, major precipitation events and other threats to the forest canopy. The city manages over 50K trees with an assessed value of $110M annually in benefits to Boulder. This plan will ensure the maintenance and protection of the canopy and priorities for the replacement plantings. Boulder is susceptible to a variety of weather events that impact the forest including flood, fire, wind and snow. Each of these events require quick response to ensure public safety as well as limiting disturbance to trees.Subtotal $ - $ - $ - Trees are important assets to the community and provide many benefits to Boulder. In September 2013, Forestry staff discovered an Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation within the city. The subsequent delimitation survey showed that EAB was well established within a corridor in central Boulder. Over the next 15 years, EAB management, including tree removal, tree replacement, wood disposal and pesticide treatments will have a significant direct budgetary impact to the city and private residents. The loss of tree canopy will have considerable economic, social, and environmental impacts for decades. In September of 2015, an Information Item detailing the Emerald Ash Borer management plan was presented to City Council. As a result of the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a response plan has been developed to slow the spread of the pest and maintain a safe community from the potential hazards of multiple dead and dying trees within the urban core of the community. This project will provide funding to educate the community on safe EAB treatment, hire contractors for removal and replacement of the trees affected by the EAB to re-establish streetscapes and park areas that contribute to many of the sustainability goals of the city. This project will include renovation of parking areas, streetscapes, park areas and other sites to remove and replace the trees. The recent Urban Forest Strategic Plan outlined the need to increase annual tree plantings from 400 to 600 to maintain the existing canopy given the decline from EAB. This project provides plantings across the city on locations throughout Parks and Recreation properties.Master Plan Update (515218MPUP) $ - $ - $ - 2022 Projected 2023 Projected Unfunded Amount 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Yvette Bowden, Director, Parks and Recreation Department Alison Rhodes, Deputy Director Jeff Haley, Planning, Design and Community Engagement Manager SUBJECT: Matters from the Department DATE: June 25, 2018 A. Harbeck-Bergheim House Community Engagement Update Staff is currently engaging the community to discuss ideas and options for the long-term approach to the historic landmarked house now that the Museum of Boulder is moving to their new location. A full outline of information about the project and process overview can be found here. The key next step in the process is a community open house scheduled for Thursday, July 12 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. At the June PRAB meeting, staff will provide a verbal update of the project. B. Operating Budget (verbal update) 3198 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80304 | www.boulderparks-rec.org | O: 303-413-7200 TO: Parks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Tom Klenow, Chair Tyler Romero, Vice-Chair SUBJECT: Matters from the Board DATE: June 25, 2018 A. 2019-24 Greenways Capital Improvement Program (see attached) 1 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R INFORMATION ITEM FOR: ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY BOARD – June 6, 2018 TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY BOARD – June 11, 2018 OPEN SPACE BOARD OF TRUSTEES – June 13, 2018 PLANNING BOARD – June 14, 2018 WATER RESOURCES ADVISORY BOARD – June 18, 2018 PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD – June 25, 2018 GREENWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: June 28, 2018 SUBJECT: 2019-2024 Greenways Capital Improvement Program REQUESTING DEPARTMENT: Christin Shepherd – Civil Engineer II PURPOSE: The 2019-2024 Greenways Capital Improvement Program is being provided to board members as an information item. If you have any comments or concerns regarding the 2019-2024 Greenways Capital Improvement Program, please pass them along to your Greenways Advisory Committee representative. If you have questions on this material, please contact Christin Shepherd at 303-441-1889 or shepherdc2@bouldercolorado.gov GREENWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACTION REQUESTED: A recommendation from the Greenways Advisory Committee to the Planning Board and City Council concerning the proposed Greenways Capital Improvement Program is requested. Attached is information concerning the proposed 2019-2024 Greenways Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for review and consideration. A recommendation by the Greenways Advisory Committee to Planning Board and City Council will be requested at the June GAC meeting. Attachment A: Greenways 2019-2024 Capital Improvement Program Overview Attachment B: Potential Restoration, Water Quality & Trail Improvement Projects Attachment C: 2019-2024 Capital Improvement Program Summary Spreadsheet Attachment D: Greenways CIP & Proposed Project Map 1 GREENWAYS 2019-2024 CIP Departmental Overview Overview of Department Mission The City of Boulder Greenways System is comprised of a series of corridors along riparian areas including Boulder Creek and its 14 tributaries, which provide an opportunity to integrate multiple objectives, including habitat protection, water quality enhancement, storm drainage and floodplain management, alternative transportation routes for pedestrians and bicyclists, recreation and cultural resources. The Greenways CIP follows an opportunistic approach, contributing funding toward projects that are being completed by other departments or private development to meet the various objectives of the Greenways Program. The Greenways CIP also looks to leverage funds with outside agencies to move projects forward that meet more than one objective of the Greenways Program but may not be the highest priority when evaluating any one particular objective. Projects included in the Greenways CIP are typically called out in the Greenways Master Plan and are projects that Greenways staff can take the lead in coordinating. Funding Overview The 2019 annual funding distribution for the Greenways capital program is as follows: Transportation Fund $97,500 Stormwater & Flood Management Utility Fund $97,500 Lottery Fund $151,067 The total 2018 Greenways capital budget is $346,067, with an additional $105,000 in the operating budget. Historically, the Lottery contribution to the Greenways Program has been $150,000 per year. However, the Lottery contribution is now calculated as 15-percent of the total Lottery funds allotted to the city and will change each year. The 2018 Lottery fund amount was used for the 2019-2024 CIP. The Lottery Fund is based on proceeds from the Conservation Trust Fund that is distributed by the State of Colorado on a per capita basis to local governmental entities. Funding can be used for the acquisition, development and maintenance of new conservation sites and capital improvements for recreational purposes. Current Focus for Capital Planning and Projects in 2019 The focus of the Greenways CIP in 2019-2020 is on flood mitigation, bicycle and pedestrian multi-use paths and underpasses, and habitat and water quality improvements along the Attachment A 2 Fourmile Canyon Creek corridor. These improvements are also being coordinated with the development of the Violet Park site. The Greenways program has also secured additional funding through the city’s capital tax program to help fund this project. In 2021-2024, funding for these types of improvements is shown for Skunk, Twomile Canyon and Goose Creek in anticipation of future major drainageway improvements along this corridor. For more information about the timing and details of these projects, please see the Utilities - Stormwater/Flood web page: https://bouldercolorado.gov/flood/creek-projects In addition, a list of potential restoration, water quality and trail improvement projects that meet more than one Greenways objective during the next few years are included as Attachment B. See Attachment D for a map of these potential projects. Recent Accomplishments - The Wonderland Creek project construction began in January 2016. The project extends from Foothills Parkway in the south to Winding Trail Drive in the north. The project includes 100-year channel improvements, three new underpasses and replanting 1,884 trees and shrubs. The Wonderland Project is now over 90 percent complete and anticipated to be at final completion in summer of 2018 2019 Capital Projects - Fourmile Canyon Creek: multi-use path, development of Violet Park, and increase flood conveyance capacity. Project is a collaborative effort with flood mitigation, transportation, and parks. - See Attachment C for projects in the 2019-2024 CIP and Attachment D for a map of project locations. Operating and Maintenance Impacts $105,000 is budgeted each year for Greenways operations and maintenance. $80,000 of the operating budget is dedicated to habitat maintenance. The Greenways habitat crew works closely with Parks and Open Space maintenance staff to provide on-going maintenance, as well as on collaborative projects as part of the operations budget. Major drainageway improvements are maintained by the flood maintenance staff and multi-use paths and underpasses are maintained by either Transportation or Parks maintenance, depending upon jurisdiction. Unfunded Projects and Emerging Needs Since the Greenways Program is opportunistic, taking advantage of projects that are funded through other departments, there are no unfunded needs. Attachment B: Potential Restoration, Water Quality & Trail Improvement Projects Map ID Name of Project Funding from more than 1 source Protects and/or Restores Habitat Enhances Water Quality Mitigates Flood Risk Improves Storm Drainage Provides pedestrian/bicycle transportation route Provides Recreation Opportunities Preserves Cultural Resources A Pedestrian Bridge at Linden & Twomile Canyon Creek x x x B Underpass at Arapahoe & Boulder Creek x x x x C Multi-Use Path at Airport Road & Valmont Park x x x D Underpass at 26th St & Fourmile Canyon Creek x x x E Underpass at Foothills & Colorado x x x F Underpass at Broadway & Fourmile Canyon Creek x x x G Removal of EAB at Boulder Creek x x x H Park Improvements at Howard Hueston Park & Wonderland Creek x x x I Restoration Foothills to Valmont at Boulder Creek x x J Park Construction at Violet Park & Fourmile Canyon Creek x x x x x K Pedestrian Bridge at East Boulder Rec Center x x x L Pedestrian Bridge & 800' of Creek Restoration at Fourmile Canyon Creek x x x x M Park Construction at 744 University & Gregory Canyon Creek x x x N Restoration at Boulder Junction & Goose Creek x x x x x x Greenways Objectives Attachment C: 2019-2024 Capital Improvement Program Summary Spreadsheet Carry Over $ From Previous Years 2018 Lottery 610SW63100 2018 Flood 610SW63000 2018 Trans 310TR630OC 2018 Budget 2018 Budget + Carry Overs 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 1 Wonderland Foothills-28th 914,467$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 914,467$ 2 Fourmile 19th-22nd 718,828$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 718,828$ 3 Skunk/Twomile/Goose Creeks -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 300,000$ 300,000$ 300,000$ 300,000$ 4 Fourmile Upland to Violet 540,800$ 129,600$ 85,200$ 85,200$ 300,000$ 840,800$ 300,000$ 300,000$ Goose Creek Restoration 152,399$ 2017 ATB Additional Lottery Funds 46,568$ 2018 ATB Goose Creek project refund 23,000$ 5 *Restoration, Water Quality & Trail Improvements 125,708$ 21,467$ 12,300$ 12,300$ 46,067$ 393,742$ 46,067$ 46,067$ 46,067$ 46,067$ 46,067$ 46,067$ Total 2,498,770$ 151,067$ 97,500$ 97,500$ 369,067$ 2,867,837$ 346,067$ 346,067$ 346,067$ 346,067$ 346,067$ 346,067$ 2019-2024 Greenways CIP2018 Greenways Budget Projected Funding based on $151,067 Lottery Fund Projects and Map ID ! !! ! " " " " " " " "" " " " " "N M L K J IH G F E D C B A 3 4 2 1 Jay Rd 75th St28th St47th St19th StUS Hwy 3630th StP in e S tC a n y o n B v Iris Av Pearl Py Spine Rd63rd StV a l m o n t R d 9th StArapahoe Av26th StOlde Stage Rd76th StLookout Rd Lin d e n D r B r o a d w a y Diagonal Hy61st StMoorhead Av So u t h B o u l d e r R d57th StS B ro a d w a y Baseline Rd Mineral Rd Gill a s p i e DrN Foothills HwColorado AvFl a gs t a f f Rd55th StCherryvale RdFoothi l l s HyFoothills PyMapleton Av Bals am Av Folsom StTable Mesa Dr M a r s h a l l R d Ya rmou th Av S Foothills HwyPearl StLehigh St Ta b le M e s a D r Baseline Rd So ut h B o ul d e r R d63rd St63rd StBaseline Rd28th StDiagonal Hy30th St55th StBroadway75th StBroadway Arap aho e Av 28th St63rd St55th St30th StFolsom StLegend !Currently in CIP "Proposed Projects City Limits ¯ Attachment D: Greenways CIP & Proposed Projects 2019-2024 C I T Y O F B O U L D E R INFORMATION ITEM FOR: ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY BOARD – June 6, 2018 PLANNING BOARD – June 7, 2018 TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY BOARD – June 11, 2018 OPEN SPACE BOARD OF TRUSTEES – June 13, 2018 WATER RESOURCES ADVISORY BOARD – June 18, 2018 PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD – June 25, 2018 GREENWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: June 28, 2018 SUBJECT: Boulder Creek Arapahoe Underpass Art Project (Arapahoe Underpass Art project) at Boulder Creek and Arapahoe Avenue REQUESTING DEPARTMENT: Mandy Vink – Public Art Administrator, Library and Arts Department Edward Stafford – Development Review Manager, Public Works Alysha Geiger – Civil Engineer I Development Review, Public Works PURPOSE: The Arapahoe Underpass Art Project has requested a variance to BRC 9-3-9 to allow lighting of a protected waterway. While this variance is a staff level decision we are seeking input on this request from the various boards through the GAC. It is requested that each board/committee review this full report and forward any comments or concerns regarding t to your Greenways Advisory Committee representative for discussion at the June 28, 2018 GAC meeting. The project webpage is available at: https://boulderarts.org/public- art/in-progress/arapahoe-underpass/ GREENWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE INPUT REQUESTED: Input from the Greenways Advisory Committee to staff concerning the request for a a variance to section 9-3-9 of the Boulder Revised Code, 1981, to allow for the Arapahoe Underpass Art project is requested. Pending GAC input, the project team will make a decision to move forward, or not, with a formal application for a wetland variance for the art project. The Boulder Creek Arapahoe Underpass Project was previously reviewed by the GAC as a part of the Community and Environmental Assessment Process (CEAP) on May 11, 2017. After the CEAP the public art component of the project was selected using the city’s Policy on Acquisition and Maintenance of Public Art. Attached is information on a requested variance to the city’s Stream. Wetlands and Water Body Protection code. Input on this item by the Greenways Advisory Committee is being sought prior to staff providing a decision on the variance request. Attachment A: Input Request from the Boulder Creek Arapahoe Underpass Art project, summarizing the proposed project, the applicable wetland code and the requested variance from the code. Attachment B: Additional information about the public art project and the selection process provided by the office of Arts and Culture Attachment A Input Request from the Boulder Creek Arapahoe Underpass Art project, summarizing the proposed project, the applicable wetland code and the requested variance from the code. This report documents the request for input from the Greenways Advisory Committee (GAC) regarding a variance to section 9-3-9(c)(3) Table 3-1 21. of the Boulder Revised Code, 1981 (BRC), which prohibits new lighting in the wetland, stream or water body zone (high and low functioning). As provided in Attachment B, the Office of Arts and Culture initiated the commissioning of a new piece of public art for the Arapahoe Underpass along the Boulder Creek Path in 2017. The project is proposing to design and install a “caustic reflection” light installation that utilizes utilizing low temperature and low color temperature LED’s to reflect light patterns onto the ceiling and walls of the underpass. Boulder Creek is a large wetland defined primarily by the bankfull width of the stream. In its upper reaches, it is dominated by plains cottonwood in the forest overstory, giving way to the alien crack willow in the lower reaches. The streambanks are generally well protected by the roots or trees and shrubs. The presence of perennial water, dense stream-side vegetation, and its length provides abundant habitats for aquatic and terrestrial wildlife. Boulder Creek is heavily used for recreational activities, including fishing, wading, and tubing. Wetlands play important roles in supporting water supply, maintaining water quality, and supporting plants, animals, and ecosystems. Wetlands store floodwaters and they supply water to both aquifers and streams. Wetlands store and/or transform nitrogen, phosphorous, sediment, and other contaminants. Vegetation in wetlands prevents erosion and further degradation of water quality. Wetlands also provide important habitat for plants, wildlife, and other animals, and they are a vital part of many food chains. Wetland benefits are often degraded by the pressures of development and land management practices that result in stresses such as increased paving, introduction of invasive species, and urban runoff. When wetland functions are lost, cities and taxpayers are left to bear the costs -- including increased water treatment, flood control, erosion control, weed control, and diminished water supplies. Therefore, federal, state, and local governments have recognized the need to protect and mitigate for loss of wetland resources. The legislative intent of Stream, Wetlands, and Water Body Protection code, section 9-3-9(a) of the BRC, is as follows: (1) It is the intent of the city council in enacting this section to preserve, protect, restore, and enhance the quality and diversity of wetlands and water bodies. The council finds that streams, wetlands, and water bodies are indispensable and fragile natural resources with significant development constraints due to high groundwater, flooding, erosion, and soil limitations and that development activities may threaten these resources. The preservation of streams, wetlands, and water bodies under this section is consistent with the goal of wetland protection set forth in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. (2) The city council finds that many streams, wetlands, and water bodies have been either lost or impaired by draining, dredging, filling, excavating, building, channelizing, polluting, and other acts. Piecemeal and cumulative losses destroy or diminish the functions of the remaining streams, wetlands, and water bodies. (3) The city council finds that it is necessary for the city to ensure protection by discouraging development activities in streams, wetlands, and water bodies and those activities at adjacent sites that may adversely affect the visibility and functional values of these resources. (4) The city council finds that it is necessary to ensure no net loss of wetlands, by encouraging avoidance of direct or indirect impacts from activities that destroy or diminish the quantity, quality, and biological diversity of the city's water resources and adjacent buffers. (5) The city council acknowledges that much of the city was developed prior to awareness of the value of protecting streams, wetlands, and water bodies. The city council seeks to find a reasonable balance between the property owners' desire to make reasonable uses of their properties and the public's interest in preserving and protecting these important water resources. When the destruction or diminution in function of these resources cannot be avoided, the city council finds that impacts on streams, wetlands, and water bodies should be minimized and mitigation provided for unavoidable losses. (6) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent irrigation companies from altering water levels through the diverting, storage, or delivery of water under their historic water rights or owners of such rights from exercising those historic rights. (7) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent compliance with applicable state or federal statutes and regulations. (8) It is not the intent of this section to prohibit all activities within the regulated area, but rather to encourage avoidance and minimization of regulated activities within the regulated area to mitigate the impact that these activities have on streams, wetlands, and water bodies. As shown in Figure 1 the proposed project is located in the high functioning wetland area of Boulder Creek. Lighting for the Boulder Creek – Arapahoe and 13th Underpass Transportation CIP project is being provided for the path and is located in the inner/outer high functioning wetland buffer areas, which is exempt from the need of a wetland permit. This project is specifically an art project and is not for the purpose of providing lighting for the multi -use path adjacent to the creek. Figure 1 Arapahoe Avenue & Boulder Creek Wetland Limits Based on the information provided in this report the staff is seeking input from the GAC on whether or not the Arapahoe Underpass Art Project meets the intent of the variance criteria in section 9-3-9(m)(4) of the BRC which states: For publicly funded projects, a variance may be issued if the city manager finds that the project is in the community interest and part of an approved master plan or capital improvements program. The underpass project is a part of the city’s capital improvement program and public art is part of the Community Cultural Plan that was adopted on November 17, 2015. Key Issues: • Is the public art project in the community interest as stated in the variance criteria? • Should a variance be issued to allow for lighting of the creek when BRC 9-3-9(c)(3) Table 3-1 21 prohibits new lighting? Attachment B City of Boulder Office of Arts + Culture Library & Arts Department www.boulderarts.org MEMORANDUM To: Greenways Advisory Committee From: Mandy Vink, Public Art Administrator CC: Bryant Gonsalves, Boulder Creek Path Underpass Project Manager Matt Chasansky, Office of Arts and Culture Manager Date: May 3, 2018 Regarding: Wetlands Variance at Boulder Creek Path Underpass: Arapahoe and 13th Public Art Project Executive Summary In 2017, the Office of Arts and Culture initiated the commissioning of a new piece of public art for the Arapahoe Underpass along the Boulder Creek Path. This project was one of the first to be run through the updated Boulder Policy on Acquisition and Maintenance of Public Art by the City (Policy)1. As defined in the Policy’s purpose, commissioning of public art is one of many of the city’s goals: The City will acquire works of art which encourage creativity, contribute to a sense of place, spark conversation, tell our shared stories and capture our moment in time, foster the enjoyment of diverse works of art, and are thoughtfully designed contributions to the urban environment of our vibrant city. Stewarded through the selection process identified in the Policy, a Request for Qualifications was distributed for artists. 181 applicants submitted their portfolios. The selection panel and technical review committee (TRC) reviewed all applications and narrowed the group to request five proposals. From those proposals, the selection panel made a unanimous recommendation for Michelle Sparks. The project additionally received unanimous approval from the Boulder Arts Commission (Arts Commission) in July 2017, with Michelle Sparks approved to move into contracting and project design by the City Manager’s Office (CMO) on July 24, 2017. Sparks has joined the Project Management Team (PMT) to integrate her concept of caustic reflections into project design. As the project evolves from preliminary design to final design, we request review and advisory recommendations from the Greenways Advisory Committee to support the feasibility of this project, including a recommendation to the City Manager in regards to a wetlands variance for this project. Project Concept: Preliminary Design Summary Michelle Sparks, inspired by the inherent beauty and access of the Boulder Creek, will design and install a “caustic reflection” light installation that utilizes the inherent qualities of the creek flow to reflect light 1 City of Boulder: Policy on Acquisition and Maintenance of Public Art by the City (adopted December 2016; updated March 2018), https://boulderarts.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Final-Public-Art-Policy- 3.16.18.pdf?x64198 patterns onto the ceiling and walls of the underpass. This concept’s execution will be subtle, while undoubtedly tie users to place. Working with the design team, the artist will explore further aesthetic treatments to the concrete retaining walls and creek path. Lighting designs will be responsive to the environment, utilizing low temperature and low color temperature LED’s. Additionally, the project’s run time will be synched with its natural environment through an astronomical timer. Sparks’ project lighting will serve as a complement to the underpass’s required functional lighting. Sample image of naturally-occurring caustic reflections. The artist wishes to extend this effect through lighting design: Project Process Summary • March 15, 2017: Arapahoe Underpass Project abstract included in 2017 Public Art Implementation Plan and approved by Arts Commission and CMO • April 10, 2017: Project orientation meeting; selection panel and TRC draft components of Request for Qualifications (RFQ)/Call for Entry • May 23, 2017: Review of 181 applicants; 5 artists invited for proposal • June 26, 2017: Proposals reviewed by TRC for feasibility and comment • July 10, 2017: Semifinalist presentations to selection panel and TRC; Michelle Sparks receives unanimous vote by selection panel • July 17, 2017: Project process presented to Arts Commission; approved unanimously • July 24, 2017: Project memo completed by CMO to advance artist and concept into contracting • September 20, 2017: Artist received fully executed contract, issued by the City Attachments • Attachment 1: CMO Memo – Michelle Sparks Approval • Attachment 2: Arapahoe Underpass Public Art RFQ Attachment 1: CMO Memo – Michelle Sparks Approval Attachment 2: Arapahoe Underpass Public Art RFQ