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04.11.18 OSBT Packet OPEN SPACE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Wednesday, April 11, 2018 Council Chambers, 1777 Broadway MEETING AGENDA (Please note that times are approximate.) 6:00 I. Swearing in of New Board Member and Election of Officers 6:15 II. Approval of Minutes 6:20 III. *Public Participation for Items Not Identified for Public Hearing 6:30 IV. Matters from the Department A. Update on Draft 2018 Work Plan and Budget B. Ag Plan Implementation / Ag Center update 7:00 V. *Summary of 2017 Open Space and Mountain Parks Volunteer Services Annual Report and Declaration to Honor Open Space and Mountain Parks Volunteers during National Volunteer Week, April 15-21, 2018. 7:15 VI. Matters from the Board A. Master Plan Process Committee 7:30 VII. Adjournment * Public Hearing Written Information: A. Regional Trail Update: Longmont to Boulder – Jay Road Connection Alternatives Analysis B. Public Service Company of Colorado Transmission Line Replacement Project Open Space Board of Trustees TENTATIVE* Board Items Calendar (updated Mar. 27, 2018) May 9, 2018 June 13, 2018 July 11, 2018 Action Items: Matters from the Department: • Master Plan Check-in: What we’re hearing; prep for study session • Draft Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Budget • Carbon Farming Matters from the Board: • Master Plan Process Committee Update Action Items: • CIP Budget Recommendation • South Boulder Creek Flood Mitigation • Potential Property Acquisition Matters from the Department: • Funded Research Matters from the Board: • Master Plan Process Committee Update Action Items: • LOBO Trail Recommendation • Recommend approval of Master Plan focus areas Matters from the Department: • Draft Operating Budget • Visitation Study Results Matters from the Board: • Master Plan Process Committee Update August 11, 2018 September 12, 2018 October 10, 2018 Action Items: • Operating Budget Recommendation Matters from the Department: • Master Plan Update Matters from the Board: • Master Plan Process Committee Update Action Items: Matters from the Department: • Visitor Experience: Community Engagement Framework • Master Plan: Developing strategies and Community Engagement Matters from the Board: • Master Plan Process Committee Update Action Items: Matters from the Department: • CE Strategic Plan Roll Out Matters from the Board: • Master Plan Process Committee Update *All items are subject to change. A final version of the agenda is posted on the web during the week prior to the OSBT meeting. AGENDA ITEM 2 PAGE 1 OPEN SPACE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Action Minutes Meeting Date March 14, 2018 Video recording of this meeting can be found on the City of Boulder's Channel 8 Website. (Video start times are listed below next to each agenda item.) BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT Molly Davis Tom Isaacson Curt Brown Andria Bilich STAFF MEMBERS PRESENT Tracy Winfree John Potter Mark Davison Lauren Kilcoyne Jim Reeder Keri Davies Dan Burke Bethany Collins Steve Armstead Luke McKay Brian Anacker Phil Yates Deryn Wagner Chelsea Taylor Alyssa Frideres Leah Case Katy Waechter Ericka Pilcher Christian Nunes Mark Gershman Deonne VanderWoude GUESTS Amanda Jeter, Project Consultant CALL TO ORDER The meeting was called to order at 6:02 p.m. AGENDA ITEM 1 – Proclamation (00:01) Tom Isaacson read a proclamation for Molly Davis, the exiting Board Chair, acknowledging her years of service as an Open Space Board of Trustee. AGENDA ITEM 2 – Approval of the Minutes (7:20) Molly Davis moved that the Open Space Board of Trustees approve the minutes from Feb. 14, 2018 as amended. Curt Brown seconded. This motion passed four to zero; Kevin Bracy Knight was absent for this meeting. AGENDA ITEM 3 – Public Participation for Items not on the Agenda (9:00) Kathie Joyner, South Boulder Creek Action Group, thanked the Board for moving the South Boulder Creek conversations along; appreciate efforts to help get flood mitigation approved as soon as possible. Jackie Ramaley, Colorado Native Plant Society, said the Master Plan System Overview Report needed to have more information presented on natural resources throughout the report. She noted that the Colorado Native Plant society was also not mentioned. She asked that the Master Plan include some additional issues such as the data on trajectory and change from vegetation monitoring and information on needed funding to manage and sustain the system. Ray Bridge, Boulder County Audubon Society, urged the Board to be active in the development of the Master Plan. He said there were many aspects included in the System Overview Report, but it was vague regarding plant communities, native ecosystems and needed funding to preserve this system for the next 50 years. AGENDA ITEM 4 – Matters from the Department (17:50) Deryn Wagner, Senior Planner, presented on the OSMP Master Plan: System Overview Report. AGENDA ITEM 2 PAGE 2 Jim Reeder, Land and Facilities Service Area Manager, gave a presentation on the status of flood recovery on Open Space. AGENDA ITEM 5 – Matters from the Board (1:07:30) Tom Isaacson and Curt Brown gave an updated on the Master Plan Process Committee. The Board discussed the request from City Council Charter Committee regarding a suggestion to add two more members to the OSBT. AGENDA ITEM 6 – Request for a recommendation to approve the purchase of approximately 1- acre of land and the appurtenant water and mineral rights located south of 3794 Eldorado Springs Drive from Jane Ann Stengel for $5,000 for Open Space and Mountain Parks purposes. (1:26:00) Luke McKay, Property Agent, presented this item. Public Comment None. Motion Andria Bilich moved the Open Space Board of Trustees to recommend that the Boulder City Council approve the purchase of approximately 1-acre of land and the appurtenant water and mineral rights located south of 3794 Eldorado Springs Drive from Jane Ann Stengel for $5,000 for Open Space and Mountain Parks purposes. Curt Brown seconded. This motion passed four to zero; Kevin Bracy Knight was absent from this meeting. AGENDA ITEM 7 – Request for a recommendation to approve the purchase of approximately 110 acres of land, associated residences and agricultural outbuildings located at 3902 N. 63rd Street, Boulder, Colorado, together with 340.8 shares of North Boulder Farmer’s Ditch and appurtenant mineral and water rights for $5,200,000 for Open Space and Mountain Parks purposes. (1:34:48) Bethany Collins, Property Agent, presented this item. Public Comment None. Motion Tom Isaacson moved the Open Space Board of Trustees to recommend that the Boulder City Council approve the purchase of approximately 110 acres of land, associated residences and agricultural outbuildings, and appurtenant mineral and water rights, including 340.8 shares of North Boulder Farmer’s Ditch from Geneva A. Ferrera, Personal Representative of the Estate of Mary H. Wells, Deceased, as to an undivided ½ interest and the Wells Family Trust, as to an undivided ½ interest for $5,200,000 for Open Space and Mountain Parks purposes. Curt Brown seconded. This motion passed four to zero; Kevin Bracy Knight was absent from this meeting. ADJOURNMENT – The meeting adjourned at 8:00 p.m. These draft minutes were prepared by Leah Case. MEMORANDUM TO: Open Space Board of Trustees FROM: Tracy Winfree, Director, Open Space and Mountain Parks Lauren Kilcoyne, Business Services Manager DATE: April 11, 2018 SUBJECT: Update on Draft 2018 Work Plan and Budget ________________________________________________________________________ Executive Summary The purpose of this informational item is to share the preliminary 2019 Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) Department Work Plan and provide the Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT) with an overview of the citywide economic forecast, department priorities, budget guiding principles, budget policy issues, and operating and capital budget development processes. The OSBT will have an opportunity to ask questions to ensure the OSBT is prepared to review, approve and recommend the Open Space and Mountain Parks Department’s 2019-2024 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and operating expenditures, including Lottery Fund. This series of agenda items is three-fold. This month will include a staff briefing, information sharing and Q&A. In May, staff will present a draft CIP budget for discussion. In June, there will be a public hearing for the community to comment on the proposed 2019-2024 CIP. After considering public comment, the OSBT will make a recommendation. The public will also have an opportunity to comment during the Planning Board’s CIP review in July and City Council’s discussions and review of the 2019 recommended budget during future public hearings later this fall. Staff anticipates presenting the proposed operating budget for recommendation by the August meeting. Background Over the past year, the City of Boulder has seen a trend of flattening revenues from retail sales tax. These revenues represent a significant source of funds for the city and particularly the Open Space and Mountain Parks Department given the sales tax structure of the Open Space Fund. As of February 2018, city staff is forecasting a “no growth” revenue scenario and while revenue projections will continue to be updated over the next several months, OSMP will take a conservative approach to 2019 capital and operating budget development. This is especially important given the scheduled reduction and expiration of two of the three sales tax increments that make up the Open Space Fund in 2019 and 2020. In planning for these reductions, OSMP has taken a conservative budget approach for the last several years, making gradual shifts including business efficiencies and process improvements to best steward public dollars and prepare for a changing economic forecast. These shifts have included increasing contingency reserves to 20% of operating plus debt, maintaining strong fund balances, repaying debt in advance of expiring tax increments, de-obligating AGENDA ITEM 4A PAGE 1 capital carryover, and improving work planning processes to understand capital needs as we move on from FEMA-reimbursable flood recovery efforts. Based on strategies implemented in previous and current budget cycles, the department feels prepared to develop a 2019 budget that both reflects financial realities and upholds our commitment to stewarding the land system. During the 2018 budget process, OSMP focused on increased investment in stewardship activities, continued implementation of plan recommendations, and evaluation of facilities and trails condition to meet the provisions of the Open Space charter. In 2019, OSMP will incorporate findings from condition assessments to continue to address these needs. In 2018, OSMP made significant investments in work planning and project management training, ensuring that project planning and tracking was a focus of not just the budget process, but the entire year. In 2019, OSMP will continue to invest in work planning and training, utilizing new work plan software that factors in how projects align with department priorities, approved plans, and budget guiding principles to make budget decisions. Overall, while the 2019 process will make appropriate reductions to capital and operating budgets, the work plan nonetheless includes community initiatives as well as core service activities supporting the important work required to protect, maintain and support an open space system of over 45,000 acres. Projects and programs that are a part of the department’s core mission include ongoing strategic property acquisitions; conservation easement compliance; day-to-day and capital maintenance of facilities, trailheads and trails; agricultural lands management; safety and enforcement; ecosystem monitoring, maintenance and restoration; strategic and resource planning; community engagement and visitor outreach, education and events; providing media services, web-based information and social media; permitting and fees management; providing support for the OSBT; etc. While core service delivery continues throughout the year, OSMP is also pursuing community initiatives in support of Board and City Council goals. OSMP is focused on the following proposed departmental work program priorities for 2019. Many of the priorities are familiar to the Board and council since they continue to follow through on community commitments and were detailed in the recently published System Overview Report as part of the OSMP Master Plan process. Draft Department Priority Projects for 2019 • Complete Open Space and Mountain Parks Master Plan – Continue developing the plan with anticipated completion in 2019. The Plan establishes policy guidance, goals, objectives, priorities and measures of success across services and programs, and addresses overarching issues such as carrying capacity, night-time and temporal use and climate change mitigation and adaptation (From a budget perspective, the Master Plan also will generate three financial plans (fiscally constrained, action and vision levels of investment)); AGENDA ITEM 4A PAGE 2 • Continue Water and Floodplain Management – Complete work on non-FEMA flood recovery projects and administrative functions related to FEMA reimbursable projects (includes County coordination); • Preserve and Restore Natural Resources – Implement top natural resource priorities of Grassland, Forestry, and Trail Study Area plans through the formation of cross- departmental implementation, integrated site planning and design review teams; invest in funded research topics that support decision-making; continue to leverage volunteers to monitor important species; • Preserve and Enhance Agricultural Resources – Implement top priorities of the Agricultural Management Plan, including work with tenants and lessees to accomplish goals; collaborate with partners including the Boulder Open Space Conservancy to consider development of an Agricultural Center; • Facilitate Visitor Enjoyment – Continue community engagement and staff presence in the system, implement the Community Ranger model; focus on community and department relationships and interdepartmental coordination. Follow through on initiatives such as recycling/dog waste composting at trailheads and monitoring and reporting results on the Voice and Sight Tag Program; • Maintain Facilities and Amenities – Utilize data from facilities and trails condition assessments to reduce facility deficiencies and maintenance backlogs; ensure staff has an optimal, efficient working environment and appropriate facilities and equipment by developing a long-term campus vision. Campus relocation may include acquisition of land, construction of a new facility and/or major renovation of an existing facility depending on site opportunities with preference for redeveloping the Cherryvale location; • Connect People with Nature – Offer diverse and engaging opportunities for passive recreation that are based in outreach strategies and priorities; begin to assess interpretive displays for consistent messaging across the system; participate in citywide partnership efforts to expand programs and engagement opportunities; • Engage in Regional Collaboration – Partner with other agencies to leverage OSMP’s interests through strategic property acquisition, coordination of joint programs and projects, and other avenues as needed (e.g., research grants, roundtables, and regional trail efforts including Eldorado to Walker Ranch, Rocky Mountain Greenway and the Boulder Creek Path extension); • Focus on Continuous Improvement within the OSMP Department – Continue to assess and develop best practices related to OSMP’s scientific approach, data stewardship, planning and design, work plan and budget management, staff training and development, performance management, and communication and coordination internally and externally. These department priority projects, in addition to supporting core services, are informing the draft 2019 operating and capital budgets. As staff plans for 2019, OSMP recognizes the need AGENDA ITEM 4A PAGE 3 to remain flexible considering the community and City Council’s interests, as well as a department that is experiencing change. An example of maintaining flexibility includes making 2019 adjustments to budget and internal processes to meet business needs while understanding that additional adjustments will be necessary over the coming years as the Master Plan is completed. Budget Commitment and Guiding Principles While developing the above-listed priorities, staff also considered a set of Budget Guiding Principles, provided below, to support decisions regarding expenditures: Open Space and Mountain Parks is committed to fiscal responsibility and sustainability. • Judiciously generating and investing funds. • Creating, optimizing and maintaining a budget which manages debt and plans for near- and long-term futures. • Maintaining financial transparency. These principles will guide the development and prioritization of the OSMP budget and work plan: SAFETY FIRST • OSMP will first address essential safety issues for visitors and staff. PLAY BY THE RULES • Comply with all (internal, local, state and federal) laws, regulations, policies, etc. TAKE CARE OF WHAT WE HAVE • As top priority, restore and maintain valuable ecological systems, agricultural operations, trails and trailheads. • As additions are made to the system, address ongoing operation and maintenance needs. • Continue to innovate and advance efficiency in the restoration, protection, operation, investments in and maintenance of the OSMP system. Specifically, efficiencies will be sought through: ▪ Investments in regular maintenance (taking care of what we have to extend life cycle), and ▪ Reductions in resource waste and use. STICK TO THE PLAN • Actions committed to in plans or agreements should be included in either short-, mid- or long- term budgets and work plans so staff can answer the question: “When do you plan to take this action on this project?” • Strategically enhance visitor amenities, ecological systems, and agricultural operations, prioritizing projects that will best achieve resource and master plan objectives. AGENDA ITEM 4A PAGE 4 LEVERAGE OTHER FUNDING • Leverage external funds, especially long-term funding, and capacity extending the ability of local dollars to implement OSMP plans. • Continue to involve community members as volunteers to advance the departmental mission and management objectives. • Work with partner agencies to accomplish shared goals. • Take no actions which would compromise the city’s bond rating or ability to leverage debt. ADAPT AND LEARN • Advance research and monitoring to increase the likelihood of success and better integrate principles of sustainability and resilience. Budget Policy Issues Building on the 2018 budget, the OSMP budget theme for 2019 remains “Refine and Realign.” In 2018, OSMP committed to increased investment in stewardship activities with a focus on assessments and aligning staff resources to meet department needs, implemented the next phase of campus relocation by moving to an interim location while a long-term vision is developed, and signaled that the department was preparing for expiring sales tax increments in 2019 and 2020. In 2019, OSMP will submit four policy issues for consideration including revenue forecasts, development of the OSMP Master Plan, campus relocation, and an annual update on internal operations with a focus on staffing. As previously described, a policy issue around revenue forecasts will focus on the timing of sales tax expirations and flattening tax revenues with details on OSMP’s fiscally responsible approach. The Master Plan policy issue will focus on efforts to date around process and community engagement and plans moving forward, as OSBT has been briefed on throughout this project. Regarding campus relocation, since 2015 OSMP has studied its space needs and this year will move a good portion of its operations to a temporary leased facility while addressing basic building deficiencies focused on health and safety. Once staff has moved to the interim location, OSMP will shift to developing its future campus vision, giving preference to redeveloping the Cherryvale location. OSMP expects to invest in department office/work space over the next 5-7 years. Finally, OSMP will submit an annual update around internal operations and approach to staffing. Given revenue forecasts and as part of a continuous improvement ethic, staff regularly make process improvements that benefit the customer, staff and budget. This allows us to repurpose staff time and dollars to greatest department need. In 2015, OSMP completed an organizational assessment and in subsequent years has implemented assessment recommendations. In 2016 and 2017, this meant studying 100% of standard positions to ensure accurate position descriptions, market-based pay, competitive benefits, and more. The department also assessed position classifications, converting some positions which were determined to be eligible for benefits and followed city guidance on applying a living wage to AGENDA ITEM 4A PAGE 5 staff and contracted services. In 2018, OSMP assessed 11 fixed-term positions in the department, expiring four positions, converting six positions to standard ongoing based on their stewardship focus, and extending one position for two years while it continued to be assessed. In 2019, the department will focus on succession planning and finding operational efficiencies to reduce FTE given work plan and budget considerations. OSMP will focus on attrition as an opportunity to repurpose and/or expire positions in line with priorities, guiding principles, and a focus on system stewardship. Operating and Capital Budget Development Processes Key dates for the budget development processes are included below: Milestone Date OSBT Information Item (1st Touch) April 11 Budget Guidelines and Targets to Departments April 20 1st Draft CIP to Planning April 20 Budget and Revenue Update to City Council April 24 OSBT Draft CIP Discussion Item (2nd Touch) May 9 OSBT CIP Public Hearing, Discussion and Recommendation (3rd Touch) June 13 Proposed Operating and CIP Budget Submittals Due to CMO June 15 Executive Budget Meeting with OSMP TBD, June 25-29 OSBT Draft Operating Budget Information Item (1st Touch) July 11 Planning Board CIP Hearing July 19 OSBT Operating Budget Public Hearing, Discussion and Recommendation August 8 City Council CIP Study Session August 14 City Council Budget Study Session September 11 City Council Budget Consideration (1st & 2nd Readings) October 2 & 16 ATTACHMENTS • Attachment A: Current Approved 2018 – 2023 CIP • Attachment B: 2018 Operating Budget AGENDA ITEM 4A PAGE 6 City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 95 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 2ඞඍකඞඑඍඟ඗ඎ'ඍ඘ඉකගඕඍඖග0එඛඛඑ඗ඖඛ*඗ඉඔඛ 7KH&LW\RI%RXOGHU¶V2SHQ6SDFHDQG0RXQWDLQ3DUNV'HSDUWPHQW 2603 SUHVHUYHVDQGSURWHFWVWKHQDWXUDO environment and land resources that characterize Boulder. We foster appreciation and use that sustain the natural values of the land for current and future generations. In 1986, Boulder residents approved a charter that requires OSMP to acquire, maintain, preserve, retain and use open space land for the following purposes: •3UHVHUYDWLRQRUUHVWRUDWLRQRIQDWXUDODUHDVFKDUDFWHUL]HGE\RULQFOXGLQJWHUUDLQJHRORJLFIRUPDWLRQVÀRUDRU IDXQDWKDWDUHXQXVXDOVSHFWDFXODUKLVWRULFDOO\LPSRUWDQWVFLHQWL¿FDOO\YDOXDEOHRUXQLTXHRUWKDWUHSUHVHQW outstanding or rare examples of native species • Preservation of water resources in their natural or traditional state, scenic areas or vistas, wildlife habitats, or fragile ecosystems • Preservation of land for passive recreational use, such as hiking, photography or nature studies, and, if VSHFL¿FDOO\GHVLJQDWHGELF\FOLQJKRUVHEDFNULGLQJRU¿VKLQJ • Preservation of agricultural uses and land suitable for agricultural production • Utilization of land for shaping the development of the city, limiting urban sprawl, and disciplining growth •8WLOL]DWLRQRIQRQXUEDQODQGIRUVSDWLDOGH¿QLWLRQRIXUEDQDUHDV •8WLOL]DWLRQRIODQGWRSUHYHQWHQFURDFKPHQWRQÀRRGSODLQV • Preservation of land for its aesthetic or passive recreational value and its contribution to the quality of life of the community 6LQFH2SHQ6SDFHDQG0RXQWDLQ3DUNVKDVIRFXVHGRQDUHRUJDQL]DWLRQRIWKHZRUNIRUFHDQG¿OOLQJYDFDQW and new positions created in the organization. OSMP leadership has used the charter as a guide to identify CIP SURMHFWSULRULWLHVWKDW¿WZLWKLQWKH6XVWDLQDELOLW\)UDPHZRUN7KHWRSSULRULWLHVIRULQFOXGHZRUNLQJWRLPSOHPHQW the priorities of several OSMP management plans and working with partners to develop regional trails. The 2018- 2023 CIP represents a continued shift towards system stewardship and taking care of existing infrastructure and habitat preservation/restoration while gradually slowing funding to support new acquisitions. In addition, OSMP will be working on an update to the Visitor Master Plan which has been recast as the Open Space Master Plan. )ඝඖඌඑඖඏ2ඞඍකඞඑඍඟ Open Space and Mountain Parks’ CIP projects are funded from two sources, the Open Space Fund and the Lottery )XQG7KH2SHQ6SDFH)XQGDFFRXQWVIRUWKHDFTXLVLWLRQDQGPDLQWHQDQFHRIODQGZLWK¿QDQFLQJSURYLGHGE\VDOHV taxes and the issuance of long-term bonds and notes payable. Approximately 92 percent of Open Space Fund revenue derives from dedicated sales and use tax collections. There are three sales taxes that support the Open Space Fund: • 0.40 percent sales tax which has no sunset; • 0.33 percent sales tax which will be reduced to 0.22 percent on January 1, 2019 and which has no sunset; and • 0.15 percent sales tax which will be repurposed for Transportation uses as of January 1, 2020, repurposed again for general city purposes as of January 1, 2030, and expires December 31, 2039. In 2014 the department issued $10 million of its approved $33 million in bonds to support the purchase of land. ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 96 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 The Lottery Fund derives its revenue from the Colorado Conservation Trust Fund. Lottery Funds can be used for acquisition, development and maintenance of new conservation sites and capital improvements and maintenance of public sites. Annual appropriation is estimated at $355,300 with adjustments made based on revenues of the Conservation Trust Fund. &ඝකකඍඖග)඗උඝඛඎ඗ක&ඉ඘එගඉඔ3ඔඉඖඖඑඖඏඉඖඌ3ක඗ඒඍඋගඛඑඖගඐඍ &ඉ඘එගඉඔ%ඝඌඏඍග The 2018 Open Space and Mountain Parks Department capital budget includes projects that are a part of the department’s core mission including ongoing strategic property acquisitions; capital maintenance of trailheads and trails; agricultural lands management; capital ecosystem maintenance and restoration; and strategic and resource planning. After two years of VLJQL¿FDQWDVVHWDVVHVVPHQWLQFOXGLQJIDFLOLWLHVDQG trails condition, OSMP is increasing its stewardship LQYHVWPHQWDIWHUFRPSOHWLQJ)(0$UHLPEXUVDEOHÀRRG recovery projects that have been the focus of the OSMP CIP since 2013. The department's 2018 capital budget will align with the following departmental work program priorities for 2018: Open Space and Mountain Parks Master Plan or 26 03 ð • Strategic planning and implementation for the Top Priorities of West TSA, North TSA, and Agricultural Resource Management Plan; • Continue to Implement Grassland Ecosystem Management Plan and Forest Ecosystem 0DQDJHPHQW3ODQ )(03  • Continue to Improve the Visitor Experience – Follow through on initiatives such as recycling/dog waste composting at trailheads and monitoring and reporting results on Voice & Sight program; • Develop Regional Trails through strategic property acquisition, coordination with other agencies, and other avenues as needed; 2603YROXQWHHUVZRUNLQJRQÀRRGUHFRYHU\ at Doudy Draw 2603YROXQWHHUVZRUNLQJRQÀRRGUHFRYHU\ • Make Progress on OSMP Campus Vision. A campus relocation may include acquisition of land, construction of a new facility and/or major renovation of an existing facility depending on site opportunities; • Focus on Continuous Improvement within the OSMP Department - Such as to continue to assess and GHYHORSEHVWSUDFWLFHVUHODWHGWR2603¶VVFLHQWL¿FDSSURDFKGDWDVWHZDUGVKLSUHFUHDWLRQSODQQLQJDQG GHVLJQZRUNSODQDQGEXGJHWPDQDJHPHQWVWDႇWUDLQLQJDQGGHYHORSPHQWVWDႇZRUNVSDFHHTXLSPHQWDQG facilities, communication and coordination internally and externally. ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 97 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 The 2018 capital budget will allow the department to meet business needs while understanding that additional adjustments will be necessary over the coming years as the Master Plan is developed and OSMP receives LQLWLDOUHVXOWVIURPRQJRLQJDVVHVVPHQWVRIDVVHWVLQFOXGLQJWKRVHRIRႈFHVSDFHWUDLOVFRQGLWLRQDQGEXLOGLQJV structures and other facilities. Flatirons Vista after repaired culvert 3ක඗ඒඍඋග+එඏඐඔඑඏඐගඛ *This table does not include all the projects in the CIP, see fund summary and projects sheets for the full list of projects. All the map-able projects proposed for funding in the 2018-2023 are shown here. Please consult the project sheets in each department section for project descriptions, phasing and funding information. %඗ඉකඌ$උගඑ඗ඖ The Open Space Board of Trustees unanimously recommended the 2018-2023 CIP on June 14, 2017 after previous review at the April 12 and May 10 business meetings. 6FKHGXOHIRU+LJKOLJKWHG3URMHFWV 2017 2018 2019 OSMP Master Plan Portfolio OSMP Master Plan underway OSMP Master Plan complet e West TSA implementation: Mesa flood recovery West TSA implementation: Fern/Shanahan/Mesa West TSA implementation: 1st/2nd Flatiron North TSA implementation: Dagge Trailhead North TSA implementation: Wonderland Lake site plan North TSA implementation: North Foothills site plan Major trail maintenance: Chautauqua Meadow Major trail maintenance: Green Mountain West Ridge Major trail maintenance: Anenome Trail Regional trail: Boulder Creek Bikepath Regional trail: Rocky Mountain Greenway FLAP Ecological Restoration: Boulder Creek confluence Ecological Restoration: South Boulder Creek headgate Ecological Restoration: Lower Boulder Creek Strategic property acquisition according to Acquisition Plan Development of OSMP Campus vision including move to interim space Facilities maintenance in accordance with assessment results ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 98 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 (VWLPDWHG Total Cost 2018 $SSURYHG 2019 3URMHFWHG 2020 3URMHFWHG 2021 3URMHFWHG 2022 3URMHFWHG 2023 3URMHFWHG 23(163$&( 02817$,13$5.6        &,3&$3,7$/(1+$1&(0(17 $$$$$$ Emergent Lottery Projects 428,000 428,000 ----- NTSA Implementation 1,250,000 350,000 300,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 Regional Trails 480,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 W TSA Implementation 550,000 - 150,000 150,000 150,000 100,000 - &,3&$3,7$/0$,17(1$1&( $$$$$$ Agriculture and Water Facilities 770,000 110,000 110,000 125,000 125,000 150,000 150,000 Cultural Resource/Facility Restorat 527,300 27,300 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 Ecological System Maintenance/Restr 800,000 300,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 Facilities Maintenance 1,800,000 400,000 250,000 250,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 Farm Site Improvements 360,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 Major Infrastructure Maintenance 660,000 160,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000&,3 &$3,7$/3/$11,1* STUDIES $$$$$$ OSMP Master Plan Update 200,000 100,000 100,000 ---- &,3/$1'$&48,6,7,21$$$$$$ Mineral Rights Acquisition 600,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 New Property Stabilization 720,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 OSMP Campus Relocation 6,500,000 2,500,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 - OSMP Real Estate Acquisition 13,500,000 4,500,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 W ater Rights Acquisition 720,000 200,000 200,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 99 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 100 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 101 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 102 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 103 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 104 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 105 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 106 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 107 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 108 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 109 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 110 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 111 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 112 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 113 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME II | Page 114 23(163$&($1'02817$,13$5.6 ATTACHMENT A City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME I _3DJH 'ඍ඘ඉකගඕඍඖග2ඞඍකඞඑඍඟ 2ႈFHRIWKH'LUHFWRU 7KH2603'LUHFWRUV7HDPHQVXUHVVWUDWHJLFDOLJQPHQWRI2603SURMHFWVZLWKWKHGHSDUWPHQW¶VPLVVLRQDQG SULRULWLHV7KLVZRUNJURXSLQFOXGHVWKH([HFXWLYH'LUHFWRUWKHVFLHQFHDQGFRPPXQLW\UHODWLRQVRႈFHVDSURMHFW FRRUGLQDWRUDQGWKHIRXUPDQDJHUVRIWKHVHUYLFHDUHDVRXWOLQHGEHORZ Central Services 7KH&HQWUDO6HUYLFHVZRUNJURXSSURYLGHVVXSSRUWIRUWKHGDLO\LQWHUQDORSHUDWLRQVRIWKH'HSDUWPHQW7KLVZRUN JURXSRႇHUVUHDOHVWDWHLQIRUPDWLRQUHVRXUFHVDQGEXVLQHVVVHUYLFHVLQFOXGLQJ •$FTXLVLWLRQRIODQGLQWHUHVWVDQGPDQDJHPHQWRIHDVHPHQWUHTXHVWV •0DQDJHPHQWRIGDWDJHRJUDSKLFLQIRUPDWLRQV\VWHPVDQGZHEFRQWHQWDQG •3UHSDUDWLRQDQDO\VLVDQGPDQDJHPHQWRIWKH2603EXGJHWDQGUHODWHG¿QDQFLDOV\VWHPV &RPPXQLW\&RQQHFWLRQVDQG3DUWQHUVKLSV 7KH&RPPXQLW\&RQQHFWLRQVDQG3DUWQHUVKLSVZRUNJURXSHQJDJHVFRPPXQLW\PHPEHUVDURXQGWKHPLVVLRQDQG YLVLRQRI26037KLVZRUNJURXSFRRUGLQDWHVSXEOLFIDFLQJFRPPXQLW\HႇRUWVLQSODQQLQJHGXFDWLRQDQGRXWUHDFK DQG5DQJHUVHUYLFHVLQFOXGLQJ •&RRUGLQDWLRQRIWKH26030DVWHU3ODQ7UDLO6WXG\$UHDDQGRWKHUV\VWHPSODQV •9ROXQWHHUSURMHFWVDQGVHUYLFHVDVZHOODVWKH-XQLRU5DQJHU3URJUDPDQG •9LVLWRUHQJDJHPHQWHPHUJHQF\UHVSRQVHDQGODZHQIRUFHPHQW Resources and Stewardship 7KH5HVRXUFHVDQG6WHZDUGVKLSZRUNJURXSHQKDQFHV%RXOGHU¶VQDWXUDOHQYLURQPHQWE\SURWHFWLQJLWVHFRORJLFDO DJULFXOWXUDOFXOWXUDODQGZDWHUDVVHWV7KLVZRUNJURXSFRQWDLQVH[SHUWLVHLQQDWXUDOUHVRXUFHPDQDJHPHQW HFRORJLFDOV\VWHPVDQGUHFUHDWLRQDQGFXOWXUDOVWHZDUGVKLSLQFOXGLQJ 0එඛඛඑ඗ඖ 7KHPLVVLRQRIWKH2SHQ6SDFHDQG0RXQWDLQ3DUNV'HSDUWPHQW 2603 LVWRSUHVHUYHDQGSURWHFWWKHQDWXUDO HQYLURQPHQWDQGODQGUHVRXUFHVWKDWFKDUDFWHUL]H%RXOGHU:HIRVWHUDSSUHFLDWLRQDQGXVHVWKDWVXVWDLQWKHQDWXUDO YDOXHVRIWKHODQGIRUFXUUHQWDQGIXWXUHJHQHUDWLRQV 23(163$&( 02817$,13$5.6 $඘඘ක඗ඞඍඌ%ඝඌඏඍග  2SHQ6SDFHDQG0RXQWDLQ3DUNV Office of the Director &HQWUDO6HUYLFHV 5HVRXUFHV  6WHZDUGVKLS Community &RQQHFWLRQV  3DUWQHUVKLSV 7UDLOV )DFLOLWLHV ATTACHMENT B City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME I_3DJH 23(163$&( 02817$,13$5.6 'ඍ඘ඉකගඕඍඖග2ඞඍකඞඑඍඟ&඗ඖගඑඖඝඍඌ 5HVRXUFHVDQG6WHZDUGVKLS&RQWLQXHG •3UHVHUYDWLRQDQGUHVWRUDWLRQRIHFRORJLFDODJULFXOWXUDOZDWHUKLVWRULFDODQGFXOWXUDOUHVRXUFHV •7UDFNLQJDQGPRQLWRULQJRIWKHYDULHW\RIV\VWHPVDFURVV2603DQG •5HVHDUFKDURXQGYLVLWRUXVHDQGLPSDFWV Trails and Facilities 7KH7UDLOVDQG)DFLOLWLHVZRUNJURXSVXSSRUWVWKHGHVLJQFRQVWUXFWLRQDQGPDLQWHQDQFHRI2603¶VSK\VLFDO DVVHWV7KLVVHUYLFHDUHDLVUHVSRQVLEOHWRPDLQWDLQ2603¶VWUDLOVWUDLOKHDGVDQGRWKHUDFFHVVSRLQWVRႈFH EXLOGLQJVDQGRWKHUVWUXFWXUHVDFURVVWKHRSHQVSDFHV\VWHPDQGWKHGHSDUWPHQW¶VHTXLSPHQWDQGYHKLFOHDVVHWV $උඋ඗ඕ඘ඔඑඛඐඕඍඖගඛ •&RPSOHWHGÀRRGUHFRYHU\RI)(0$UHLPEXUVDEOH WUDLOVDQGKDELWDWDQGFRQWLQXHGZRUNRQQRQ UHLPEXUVDEOHÀRRGSURMHFWV LQFOXGHVFRXQW\ FRRUGLQDWLRQ  •,QLWLDWHGWKH2SHQ6SDFH0DVWHU3ODQSURFHVV FRPSOHWLQJWKH0DVWHU3ODQ3RUWIROLRSURMHFWWR VXSSRUWSODQGHYHORSPHQWZLWKDQWLFLSDWHGSODQ FRPSOHWLRQLQ •$SSURYHGWKH$JULFXOWXUDO5HVRXUFH0DQDJHPHQW 3ODQFRPSOHWLRQRIDIDFLOLWLHVDVVHVVPHQW DQGLPSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWRSSULRULWLHVRIWKH:HVW 76$DQG1RUWK76$ZKHUHDOLJQHGZLWK)(0$ UHLPEXUVDEOHÀRRGUHFRYHU\SURMHFWV •&RQWLQXHGWR,PSOHPHQWWKH*UDVVODQG(FRV\VWHP 0DQDJHPHQW3ODQDQG)RUHVW(FRV\VWHP 0DQDJHPHQW3ODQ )(03 LQFOXGLQJVWUDWHJLF IRUHVWWKLQQLQJDQGSURYLVLRQRIVXSSRUWWRWKH 6XQVKLQH&DQ\RQ)LUH •&RQWLQXHGWRLPSURYHWKHYLVLWRUH[SHULHQFHE\ LPSOHPHQWLQJWKH&RPPXQLW\5DQJHUPRGHO FRQWLQXHGWKHGHYHORSPHQWRIWKH&RPPXQLW\ &RQQHFWLRQVGLYLVLRQDQGFRPSOHWHGDSRVW LPSOHPHQWDWLRQDVVHVVPHQWRIWKH9RLFHDQG6LJKW SURJUDP •&RQWLQXHGWR'HYHORS5HJLRQDO7UDLOVWKURXJK VWUDWHJLFSURSHUW\DFTXLVLWLRQFRRUGLQDWLRQZLWK RWKHUDJHQFLHVDQGRWKHUDYHQXHVDVQHHGHG LQFOXGLQJFRPSOHWLRQRIWKH,%0&RQQHFWRU%ULGJHV DQGRQJRLQJZRUNRQWKH%RXOGHU&UHHN%LNH3DWK )ඝඖ)ඉඋග 2603 V-XQLRU5DQJHU3URJUDPEHJDQRYHU\HDUVDJR ATTACHMENT B City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME I _3DJH 23(163$&( 02817$,13$5.6 .ඍඡ,ඖඑගඑඉගඑඞඍඛඎ඗ක •5HFDVWLQJWKH9LVLWRU0DVWHU3ODQ8SGDWHDV WKH2SHQ6SDFHDQG0RXQWDLQ3DUNV0DVWHU 3ODQRU26 03 ðFRQWLQXLQJSODQGHYHORSPHQW ZLWKDQWLFLSDWHGFRPSOHWLRQLQ7KHSODQ HVWDEOLVKHVSROLF\JXLGDQFHJRDOVREMHFWLYHV SULRULWLHVDQGPHDVXUHVRIVXFFHVVDFURVV VHUYLFHVDQGSURJUDPVDQGDGGUHVVHV RYHUDUFKLQJLVVXHVVXFKDVFDUU\LQJFDSDFLW\ QLJKWWLPHDQGWHPSRUDOXVHDQGFOLPDWHFKDQJH PLWLJDWLRQDQGDGDSWDWLRQ •&RQWLQXLQJVWUDWHJLFSODQQLQJDQGLPSOHPHQWDWLRQ IRUWKH7RS3ULRULWLHVRI:HVW76$1RUWK76$ $JULFXOWXUDO5HVRXUFH0DQDJHPHQW3ODQDQG &DSLWDO,PSURYHPHQW3ODQ &,3 WRLQFOXGH LPSOHPHQWLQJSODQVWKURXJKFURVVGHSDUWPHQWDO LPSOHPHQWDWLRQWHDPVFRQYHQHGIRUHDFKSODQ •&RQWLQXLQJWRLPSOHPHQWWKH*UDVVODQG (FRV\VWHP0DQDJHPHQW3ODQDQG)RUHVW (FRV\VWHP0DQDJHPHQW3ODQ )(03 JLYLQJ VSHFLDODWWHQWLRQJXLGDQFHWRHOHPHQWVWKDWQHHG XSGDWLQJRUUHIUHVKLQJSDUWLFXODUO\WKH)(03 7KH26 03 ðPD\EHDJRRGRSSRUWXQLW\IRUVXFK JXLGDQFH •&RQWLQXLQJWRLPSURYHWKHYLVLWRUH[SHULHQFH increasing community engagement and VWDႇSUHVHQFHLQWKHV\VWHPLPSOHPHQWLQJ WKH&RPPXQLW\5DQJHUPRGHOIRFXVLQJRQ FRPPXQLW\DQGGHSDUWPHQWUHODWLRQVKLSVDQG LQWHUGHSDUWPHQWDOFRRUGLQDWLRQDQGIROORZLQJ WKURXJKRQLQLWLDWLYHVVXFKDVUHF\FOLQJGRJZDVWH FRPSRVWLQJDWWUDLOKHDGVDQGPRQLWRULQJDQG UHSRUWLQJUHVXOWVRQ9RLFH 6LJKWSURJUDP •'HYHORSLQJUHJLRQDOWUDLOVWKURXJKVWUDWHJLF SURSHUW\DFTXLVLWLRQFRRUGLQDWLRQZLWKRWKHU DJHQFLHVDQGRWKHUDYHQXHVDVQHHGHG HJ (OGRUDGRWR:DONHU5DQFK-RGHUDQGWKH%RXOGHU &UHHN3DWKH[WHQVLRQ  •0DNLQJSURJUHVVRQ2603&DPSXV9LVLRQWR HQVXUHVWDႇKDVDQRSWLPDOHႈFLHQWZRUNLQJ HQYLURQPHQWIDFLOLWLHVDQGHTXLSPHQW7KH FDPSXVUHORFDWLRQPD\LQFOXGHDFTXLVLWLRQRI ODQGFRQVWUXFWLRQRIDQHZIDFLOLW\DQGRUPDMRU UHQRYDWLRQRIDQH[LVWLQJIDFLOLW\GHSHQGLQJRQVLWH RSSRUWXQLWLHV •)RFXVLQJRQFRQWLQXRXVLPSURYHPHQWZLWKLQ 2603VXFKDVFRQWLQXLQJWRDVVHVVDQGGHYHORS EHVWSUDFWLFHVUHODWHGWR2603¶VVFLHQWL¿F DSSURDFKGDWDVWHZDUGVKLSUHFUHDWLRQSODQQLQJ DQGGHVLJQZRUNSODQDQGEXGJHWPDQDJHPHQW VWDႇWUDLQLQJDQGGHYHORSPHQWVWDႇZRUNVSDFH HTXLSPHQWDQGIDFLOLWLHVFRPPXQLFDWLRQDQG FRRUGLQDWLRQLQWHUQDOO\DQGH[WHUQDOO\ 6එඏඖඑඎඑඋඉඖග&ඐඉඖඏඍඛ 'HSW )XQG %XGJHW5HTXHVW 2QJRLQJ )XQGV 2QJRLQJ )7( 2QH7LPH )XQGV )L[HG7HUP )7(   2SHQ6SDFH)XQG 6WDIILQJOHYHOV&RQYHUWIL[HGWHUPSRVLWLRQVWRVWDQGDUGDQGH[WHQGIL[HGWHUP SRVLWLRQIRU\HDUV  2SHQ6SDFH 0RXQWDLQ3DUNV7RWDO ATTACHMENT B City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME I_3DJH 23(163$&( 02817$,13$5.6 'ඍ඘ඉකගඕඍඖග'ඍගඉඑඔ FTE Amount FTE Amount FTE Amount FTE Amount Director's Team              -      - Subtotal                  &XVWRPHU6HUYLFH         5HDO(VWDWH6HUYLFHV         5HDO(VWDWH6HUYLFHVWR*HQHUDO)XQG      -  5HVRXUFH,QIRUPDWLRQ6HUYLFHV      - Subtotal          &RPPXQLW\(QJDJHPHQW      - -XQLRU5DQJHUV      - Outreach      - 3ODQQLQJ6HUYLFHV      -  5DQJHU6HUYLFHV      - Subtotal      - $JULFXOWXUDO0DQDJHPHQW      - &XOWXUDO5HVRXUFHV3URJUDP      - (FRORJLFDO6WHZDUGVKLS      -               - 5HFUHDWLRQDQG&XOWXUDO6WHZDUGVKLS                 Vegetation Management         :DWHU5LJKWV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ              -      - Subtotal         (QJLQHHULQJ3URMHFW0DQDJHPHQW      (TXLSPHQWDQG9HKLFOHV      -  Facility Management      - 6LJQV*UDSKLFV'LVSOD\     -  7UDLOV6WHZDUGVKLS                 Subtotal         &DSLWDO,PSURYHPHQW3URJUDP ----   &RVW$OORFDWLRQ ---- 'HEW6HUYLFH----  Subtotal      Total 117.15 $ 128.40 $ 125.40 $ (3.00)  $ 2016 Actual 2017 Approved Budget 2018 Approved Budget Variance 2017 to 2018 )RUHVW(FRORJ\ 3ODQW(FRORJ\ 5HVWRUDWLRQ3ODQW(FRORJ\ :HWODQG(FRORJ\ :LOGOLIH(FRORJ\ Trails and Facilities Trailhead Maintenance &DSLWDO,PSURYHPHQW3URJUDP&RVW Allocations and Debt Service Resources and Stewardship 67$)),1*$1'(;3(1',785(%<352*5$0 Office of the Director &RPPXQLW\5HODWLRQV2IILFH 6FLHQFH2IILFH Central Services %XVLQHVV2SHUDWLRQV &RPPXQLW\DQG3DUWQHUVKLSV ATTACHMENT B City of Boulder's 2018 BUDGET VOLUME I _3DJH 23(163$&( 02817$,13$5.6 'ඍ඘ඉකගඕඍඖග'ඍගඉඑඔ )ඝඖ)ඉඋග 2603KDVDURXQGYROXQWHHUVHDFK\HDUZKRZRUNDSSUR[LPDWHO\ KRXUV7KHZRUNWKH\SURYLGHDGGVXSWRLQYDOXHHYHU\ \HDU EDVHGRQWKH&RORUDGR,QGHSHQGHQW6HFWRUFDOFXODWLRQ  FTE Amount FTE Amount FTE Amount FTE Amount 2016 Actual 2017 Approved Budget 2018 Approved Budget Variance 2017 to 2018 Personnel     2SHUDWLQJ ,QWHUGHSDUWPHQWDO&KDUJHV   &DSLWDO  &RVW$OORFDWLRQ  'HEW6HUYLFH   Total $$$  $ General      -   Lottery ---- 2SHQ6SDFH         Total 117.15 $ 128.40 $125.40$ (3.00)  $ (;3(1',785(%<&$7(*25< 67$)),1*$1'(;3(1',785(%<)81' ATTACHMENT B CITY OF BOULDER OPEN SPACE BOARD OF TRUSTEES AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: April 11, 2018 AGENDA TITLE Summary of 2017 Open Space and Mountain Parks Volunteer Services Annual Report and Declaration to Honor Open Space and Mountain Parks Volunteers during National Volunteer Week, April 15-21, 2018 PRESENTER/S Tracy Winfree, Director, Open Space and Mountain Parks Mark Davison, Community Connections and Partnerships Manager Jennelle Freeston, Volunteer and Service Learning Supervisor Kristin Weinberger, Coordinator of Group Volunteer Projects Beau Clark, Trails Volunteer Program Lead EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) Department joins communities across the country in recognizing volunteers for their efforts and contributions during National Volunteer Week, April 15-21, 2018. Every year, hundreds of volunteers aid the OSMP department in carrying out the City Charter purposes for Open Space. They help to inform the public, connect with the land through hands-on projects, and protect the resources that make OSMP a special place. In the late 1800s, volunteers built the first trails in the newly-established Mountain Parks system. For more than 100 years, volunteers have been contributing time and effort to building trails, constructing some of the historic shelters, and caring for the land. OSMP’s volunteer program has been in place since the 1980s, providing residents a way to contribute and give back to the land through stewardship and conservation as well as provide for enjoyable experiences. Volunteers greet visitors on trails, monitor wildlife and rare plants, lead interpretive hikes, restore natural habitats, pull noxious weeds, build trails, staff the Flagstaff Nature Center, assist at outreach events, and much more. OSMP volunteers span in age from 8 to 80, and some have volunteered with OSMP for decades. AGENDA ITEM 5 PAGE 1 STAFF RECOMMENDATION Open Space and Mountain Parks staff members request the Open Space Board of Trustees join them in honoring these dedicated people during National Volunteer Week with a declaration: The Open Space Board of Trustees joins the staff of the City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Department in recognizing all our volunteers during National Volunteer Week 2018. We salute the hundreds of Open Space and Mountain Parks volunteers who contributed their talents and efforts in helping the department carry out its City Charter Purpose for Open Space. This community of volunteers is an inspiration as their contributions help to protect the resources and provide for enjoyable experiences, making Boulder’s Open Space and Mountain Parks a special place. Community Sustainability and Impact Assessments •Environmental: City of Boulder OSMP is a significant community-supported program that is recognized as a leader in preservation of open space lands, contributing to the environmental sustainability goal of Boulder’s City Council. The department’s volunteers act as stewards to help preserve and protect the values of these lands. •Economic: OSMP contributes to the economic vitality goal of the city as it provides the context for the diverse and vibrant economic system that sustains services for residents. •Social: Because the Open Space land system is accessible to the community, it helps support council’s community sustainability goal - all residents who live in Boulder have the opportunity to feel a part of, and thrive in, this aspect of their community. •Fiscal: The work provided by OSMP volunteers adds nearly half a million dollars in value every year. In addition to this monetary value, this volunteer effort supports departmental priorities while also building a stronger sense of community. Engaged, educated, informed and participating citizens are an important component to the well- being of a community. Program Benefits Working with volunteers requires staff time and planning, this includes one Full Time Volunteer and Service Learning Supervisor, Two Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Volunteer Coordinators, one ¾ time Volunteer & Youth Service Learning Program Assistant, one Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Trails Program Lead and one Temporary Field Assistant are dedicated to manage both volunteer projects and programs, and over forty other OSMP staff members who work with volunteers as program leads and field supervisors. Program highlights from 2017 include: •The Ready to Work Crew joined OSMP’s Restoration Crew on two large restoration projects along Boulder Creek. Projects included: building structures to improve fish habitat, harvesting willow and cottonwood cuttings, planting native riparian shrubs and trees, and managing invasive species. This collaboration between Ready to Work and the City contributed to the City’s 2013 post-flood restoration efforts and helped the City save money on contractors. AGENDA ITEM 5 PAGE 2 •Numerous monitoring, preservation and restoration projects such as raptor and bat monitoring, native seed and plant species collection and cataloging, habitat restoration projects throughout the OSMP system. •Continued refinement of the OSMP Community Engagement Volunteer Services strategic plan to look more closely at program operations. •Contribution to the city-wide Volunteer Cooperative strategic plan and initiatives to strengthen community stewardship within the City of Boulder. •Developing the volunteer chapter of the OSMP System Overview Report. •Continuation of the Bridge House Ready to Work program o Successful completion of the successful pilot of the Ready to Work Light Pilot Program. •Continuation of the Volunteer Trail Custodian Pilot Program. •Completion of 21 trails volunteer projects which engaged 337 volunteers. •Revitalization of Outreach Host Volunteer Program to serve Chautauqua Ranger Cottage and Flagstaff Nature Center. •Continued partnership with BMA on volunteer Boulder Mountain Bike Patrol Program in which 85 volunteer patrollers connected with 2,227 visitors. Volunteer Services is thankful for all the volunteers and staff who make both short and long- term commitments towards service for our community. For more information on OSMP volunteer opportunities, please visit VolunteerOSMP.org. AGENDA ITEM 5 PAGE 3 MEMORANDUM TO: Open Space Board of Trustees FROM: Tracy Winfree, Director, Open Space and Mountain Parks Mark Davison, Community Connections and Partnerships Manager Mark Gershman, Planning Services Supervisor Kacey French, Planner II DATE: April 11, 2018 SUBJECT: Written Report: Regional Trail Update: Longmont to Boulder – Jay Road Connection Alternatives Analysis ________________________________________________________________________ BACKGROUND Regional trail connections are a priority for the City of Boulder. Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) partners with a variety of agencies to support popular community initiatives. Regional trails provide connections to the natural world and enhanced recreational opportunities while also contributing to wellness, fitness, physical and mental health, and improving the quality of life in our community. The Longmont to Boulder (LOBO) Trail is a regional trail identified in the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. The Jay Road segment is a missing link, approximately 1.5 miles in length. This section of trail would connect the city’s Cottonwood Trail to the LOBO Trail. In a January 2018 regional trails update the Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT) received information that Boulder County Transportation was leading an evaluation of potential trail alignments to provide this link, some of which are on OSMP lands, with the process to select a preferred alternative to take place this year. A consultant has been hired with both Boulder County Parks and Open Space and OSMP assisting and supporting on the project because of the potential for the alignment to be on open space. STATUS AND NEXT STEPS The project was initiated in January with the development of a draft vision, project goals, and evaluation criteria (Attachment A), and the identification of alternatives (Attachment B). One-on-one meetings to engage property owners directly affected by the project and hear their feedback have occurred. While some property specific issues were identified most property owners were supportive of the project. The first public meeting to review and comment on the draft vision, goals, evaluation criteria, and alternatives was held on April 10. The next steps will be to refine and finalize the draft documents, evaluate the alternatives, select a preferred alignment, and draft preliminary engineering and schematic designs of the preferred alignment. Written Information - Item A - Page 1 Staff will return to the OSBT with either a written update or action item, depending on whether the recommended preferred alternative alignment is on city open space. The following diagram illustrates the planning process. ATTACHMENTS • Attachment A: Draft vision, project goals, evaluation criteria • Attachment B: Draft alternatives map Project Initiation •Draft Vision, goals, and evaluation criteria •Define alternatives •Public and OSBT outreach (one on one's, community meeting, OSBT and POSAC*) Alternatives Evaluation •alternatives assessment and evaluation •Identification of a recommended preferred alternative •Public and OSBT input opportunity •Finalization of a preferred alternative Preferred Alternative •Preliminary engineering and schematic design of the preferred alignment Jan. - April May - July August *Boulder County Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee Written Information - Item A - Page 2 Longmont to Boulder Regional Trail—Jay Road Connection Alternatives Analysis Key Issues, Vision, and Goals KEY ISSUES, VISION, AND GOALS Critical Project Issues and Needs •Create a multi-use trail connection from the Cottonwood Trail to the existing Longmont to Boulder (LOBO) Regional Trail •Include considerations for both transportation and recreational uses of the trail •Consider the potential for impacts to hydrologic systems and ecological habitat •Consider the potential for right-of-way impacts •Generate a high level of community involvement •Identify adequate project funding for near-term design and construction •Consider the potential for private landowner impacts Project Vision and Goals The LOBO Trail, Jay Road connection is an off-street multiuse trail that supports comfortable regional active travel while also enhancing access for localized recreational activities and nearby transit facilities. The design of the trail maintains context sensitivity to the surrounding landscape and encourages users to be respectful of the limits of the public trail access, and private landowners’ rights to privacy. The following goals have been established to support this future vision: Regional connectivity Complete an off-street multi-use trail connection between the City of Boulder’s Cottonwood Trail and the LOBO Trail north of Jay Road. Local connectivity Maintain and improve local recreational access to the trail and access between the trail and nearby transit facilities. Comfort and safety Utilize trail design treatments that provide safe, convenient, and accessible use of the trail by all ages and abilities. Conservation Design a trail that is context sensitive, mitigating impacts to ecological and natural systems throughout the designated trail corridor. Privacy Support a trail alignment that facilitates a defined distinction of public access and private land to ensure privacy for landowners near to the trail, and encourage respect for the limits of public trail access. Feasibility Promote trail alignment that reflects the needs public, can be delivered in a cost and time-effective manner. Draft Vision, Project Goals, Evaluation Criteria ATTACHMENT A Written Information - Item A - Page 3 Longmont to Boulder Regional Trail—Jay Road Connection Alternatives Analysis Evaluation Criteria Goal Area Evaluation Question (Does the alignment…) Response Measure LOBO – Jay Rd. Connection Alignment Alternative Evaluation: Level 1 “To”- Local Connectivity Provide local access for nearby community? Number of residential units within ¼-mile street access to the trail (project walk shed) Provide a new multimodal connection to nearby transit stops? Yes/No “Through” - Regional Connectivity Have a link to the existing LOBO (also Cottonwood) Trail? Yes/No Provide a connection without extensive out-of-direction travel? Total out-of-direction travel as compared to baseline straight-line (Euclidean) distance Utilize established sections of the LOBO Trail? Distance of existing trail section unutilized Comfort and Safety Minimize roadway crossings? Roadway crossings (considerations for varying levels of daily vehicle traffic) Minimize driveway crossings? Driveway crossings (considerations for varying levels of daily vehicle traffic) Conservation Pose a potential impact to wildlife identified in the area None Nominal (can be mitigated) Unavoidable (can be mitigated) Unavoidable (potential impacts) Pose a potential impact to significant agricultural lands None Nominal (can be mitigated) Unavoidable (can be mitigated) Unavoidable (potential impacts) Pose a potential impact to wetlands and/or riparian habitat None Nominal (can be mitigated) Unavoidable (can be mitigated) Unavoidable (potential impacts) Provide a benefit or challenge to hydraulic systems? Subjective evaluation ATTACHMENT A Written Information - Item A - Page 4 Longmont to Boulder Regional Trail—Jay Road Connection Alternatives Analysis Key Issues, Vision, and Goals Goal Area Evaluation Question (Does the alignment…) Response Measure Privacy Limit the opportunity to create clearly defined distinction between private and public property Yes/No Minimize impacts to private property Number of individual land owner impacts by easements required Feasibility Provide an option that has reasonable costs associated with construction Estimated trail construction costs per mile as compared with other regional projects Include a design that is implementable in a reasonable timeframe Estimated time impacts to a completed trail in one to three years: None (Very likely completion in one to three years) Nominal (may extend design construction to three years) Likely (potential to create long-term delays beyond three years) 1This measure references “Designing for All Ages and Abilities Bikeways”, NACTO, 2017 ATTACHMENT A Written Information - Item A - Page 5 .This page is intentionally left blank.Written Information - Item A - Page 6 63rd Street PathL o n g m o n t -t o -B o u l d e r T r a il L o n g m o n t -t o -B o u l d e r T r a il Cottonwood TrailRoute Option A - 55th Street Route Option B - Pioneer Longmont-to-Boulder (LoBo) Trail Local Trail Connection Route Option E - 63rd St Route Option D - Spine Rd Route Option C - 57th Street Boulder County Open Space City of Boulder Open Space Joint City/County Open Space 00.250.50.125 Miles 119 119 JAY RD N 63RD STSPINE RDN 55TH STN 51ST STPIONEER RDWHITE ROC K C IRJAY RD N 63RD STSPINE RDN 55TH STN 51ST STPIONEER RDWHITE ROC K C IRBNSF RAILROAD Boulder White R o c k D i tch Left H a n d D i t c h City County / Attachment B: Alternatives Map Written Information - Item A - Page 7 MEMORANDUM TO: Open Space Board of Trustees FROM: Tracy Winfree, Director, Open Space and Mountain Parks Jim Reeder, Trails and Facilities Manager Bethany Collins, Property Agent DATE: April 11, 2018 SUBJECT: Written Report: Public Service Company of Colorado Transmission Line Replacement Project ________________________________________________________________________ Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) is undertaking several projects for its 9205 Eldorado – Boulder Hydro 115kV electric transmission line which will begin in April 2018 and are expected to last through October 2018. The transmission line is located southwest of the City of Boulder between Boulder Canyon Drive on the north and Eldorado Springs Drive on the south (see Figure 1.) All three projects are within PSCo’s right-of-way across property owned by the City and managed by Open Space and Mountain Parks and Public Works - Utility departments (See Attachment A). Combined, these projects will result in the replacement of 33 tower structures and nearly four miles of conductor. After recent emergency repair work to the aged infrastructure, and as further described below, the projects are essential to ensure public safety, continued electric service and structural integrity of the line and towers – many of which date to the initial construction of the transmission line around 1910. 1.Eldorado Rebuild (Rebuild Project) The twenty-four (24) structures to be replaced have been identified by PSCo as being deteriorated to a condition that warrants their replacement. The Rebuild Project supports PSCo’s need to maintain structural integrity of its electric transmission system in the area. 2.Line Capacity Project (Capacity Project) The purpose of the Capacity Project is to meet new North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Reliability Standards. NERC is the electric reliability organization for North America and subject to oversight by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This section of the transmission line is located in mountainous terrain with difficult access. PSCo performed an analysis and has determined that the clearances between the energized conductor and certain rock outcrops do not meet the NERC standards. Replacement of the five structures would support PSCo’s need to comply with those federal clearance requirements. In addition, the Project would support PSCo’s need to maintain the structural integrity of the transmission line and assure public safety. Written Information - Item B - Page 1 3.End of Life Replacement Project (Replace Project) The three structures to be replaced have been identified by PSCo as being deteriorated to a condition that warrants their replacement. The Replace Project supports PSCo’s need to maintain structural integrity of its electric transmission system. Figure 1. OSMP and Utilities have been involved in extensive collaborative consultations and planning efforts with PSCo for their transmission line replacement projects within their right-of-way and mitigating its potential impacts to City property. As part of the projects, City staff has been provided reports related to land use permitting, cultural and archaeological resources, and wildlife and habitat assessments to review. We have also participated in the drafting and revisions of their project narrative and are executing a detailed temporary license agreement for their work, which includes specific terms of access, disturbance, and reclamation. Additionally, the license agreement requires review of, and consent to, any activities occurring on the Shanahan Ranch staging area where the City holds a conservation easement. Because of the remote locations of the projects, the majority of the project work will be done via helicopter. PSCo will utilize helicopters to transport all existing and new structure, equipment and materials to each structure location. The helicopters will make approximately Written Information - Item B - Page 2 30 trips to each structure site, including the stringing of the conductor, for an approximate total for all three projects of 1,000 helicopter trips. Each trail to be crossed by the helicopter with suspended loads will have two flaggers. The flaggers will temporarily block the trail use 500 feet in each direction while the trail is being over-flown. Occasional suspended load crossings will occur over Flagstaff Road and Hwy 170 (Eldorado Springs Drive). PSCo will work with the County and Colorado Department of Transportation for authorization of these crossings. Crew access to each structure location will occur by foot, limited all-terrain vehicle or other vehicles using existing trails and City approved routes as shown on Figure 2. Figure 2. Work activities will occur from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm and will include weekends. Trail users will encounter an increase in vehicular traffic on North Fork Shanahan, South Fork Shanahan, and Mesa Trails as well as Bear Canyon Road during the project. Users will also experience intermittent delays due to helicopter operations noted above. However, longer-term closures of Bear Canyon Trail within the canyon itself are expected beginning Aug. 1, 2018 to protect the public during project activities. ATTACHMENT(S) •Attachment A: Map of Project Area Written Information - Item B - Page 3 This page is intentionally left blank. 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