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Downtown Urban Design Guidelines• • • CityofBoulder, Colorado ~~ 2002 ...,.. Acknowledgments: The Downtown Alliance This second edition of the Dotit~ntrn~~n Urhan DesiR-t Guidc~I112~5' 15 the direct result of work conducted by the Downtown Alliance, a~roup of city boards and commissions, non-profit orRanizations and nei~hbor- hood Rroups includinQ the citv of~ Boulder Planning Board; the Landmark~ Presen~ation Advisor~~ Board; the Downtown Design Ad~~isory Board: the Downtown ManaQement Commission; Downtown Boulder, lnc.: Historic Boulder: and representatives from the Whittier. Mapleton Hill, Goss Grove, and Flatirons nei~hborhoods. Formed in the fall of 1996, the Downtown Alliance was char1ed with developing a scenario that would help the city to: ~ • auide future development in a manner that maintains the down- tov~~n's li~~abilitv and is consistent with the overall "feel" of the downtown, • protect downtown'S historic character that is so closely associated with its imaae and qualitv of life, and • maintain the qualit~~ of life of surrounding neiQhborhoods and their relationship to the downtown. While this edition of the Downto-vn Urban Desigrr Guideli~res replaces the 1986 Do«•~uo~ti•n Bncrlder Urbcm Desi~n Pla~t, it draws much of it~ content from that document. The city wishes to acknowl- edge the individuals and orQanizations who produced that initial work and who implemented the downtown desi~n reviev~ process. The city also wishes to acknow~led~e the work undertal:en to implement the "interface blocks" which also contributed greatl}~ to this document. ~ther studies that contributed to this document include the 1976 Dorv~ttotivri Boulder Priti>ate Develnp»ie~tt Guidelines f'or Architecture und SiKris, the 1992 Dotiti~ntotil~n Illustrative Plan, and the 1995 draft Do«•rttotiv~t Boulder Pedestrian Streetscape Plati: Design urtd Standctrd.s. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines TableofContents Page Introduction 5 Downtown Land Use Regulations 8 Basic Urban Design (onsiderations 9 Now the Guidelines are Ora:3rized 10 The Design Review Proces_~ 10 The landmarks Preservation Advisory Board ll The Downtown Design Advisory Board Process 12 The Downtown Management (ommission Process 12 Other Boards. (ommissio~s, and (ity Departments 13 Application Submission Requirements 14 Nistory IS Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Section l: The Downtown Nistoric District I1 Section I.l Guidelines for the Preservation and 19 Renovation of local landmarks. Individually significant, (ontributing and (ontributing Restorable Buildi~qs Section I.Z Guidelines for New (on5truction and 11 Remodeling Non-tontributing Buildin9s In the Downtown ~listoric District Section l: The Non-Nistoric Area and it~ Nistoric Buildings 33 Section 3: The Neighborhood Interface Area 41 Section 4: Parking Facilities 45 Section 5: Commercial Si9ns 49 Section 6: Streetscape Improvements 53 Appendix Appendix A: toning trict Definitions 12 Appendix B: Design Review Check List 13 q '~ ~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Introduction The purpi»< <~f thi~ secon~i ~dition e,f [he D~,~+ntcn~~n Urhan D~si«n Gui~elinc~ i~ u~ ~rn~id~~ a ha~i~ ic~r und~r:tandin~_. di~- cu,;in~_. and a~se~sin_~ the ~icsi~~n yualit~ nl pr~,re~.~d pr~,er- ~ ati~m. renc~~ atic~n ~n~i nr« rc~n~iruction prujcrt. lucated ~~~ith- fn the h~~unJaric. ~~f the L)~n~nt~~~~n Hi,tc~ric Dtstri~l. the Nnn- hutnrf~ .-~rea. an~l the Int~r(a~~• .-~r~.i. :~ ~ Thrc~u~~h thr u.r ciC th~~~ «ui~lelin~~ i~ i~ anu~iP.ue~ that h~>tii pri~~ate and public prcij~~u ~~ill cn~ic~i~~~r t~~ 4,rr.er~~• an~; tll~"I:l(1Ce [~lC t~~Tltl. ti~;1~t1. Aill~ ~l`U:l~ Cf1~U':1C[~I l~l:li I11A~. ~~l~~~ll- to~~n uniyuc «ithin th~ cit~ anii th~ r~~~i~~n. Map c~f the Downt~~•n Historic Distric~. the Nc~n-Histciric Area. and thr Intertace Area .~:~~ Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines ~~ ~ 5 These guidelines are designed to support the ten strate~ies outlined in the 199Z Dnµvitoµ•n U/ustrati-•e Pla1T: 1. Assure the long term economic vitalit~~ of the downtown Downtown Boulder is the hcan of thc cit~, the va- ditional huh of citv life. Its future economic vitalitv i. c,f ~reat importance to the future health of the rit~. Thes~ ~uidelines H~ill help the cit} tn halance thr need for economic ~ itali[v with the need to maintain and enhance doa•ntown's uniyue "sense of place". 2. Establish a pedestrian district Downtown Boulder is a walkable place. The ability to w~alk from one end of downtown to the other in less than 10 minutes, and the pedesvian scale of its sidew~alks, buildin~s, and storcfronts. are kev fac- tors in what makes the downtown area different. 3. Pro~~de improved linl:s between the Downtown Boulder mall and the Civic Park The Downtown Boulder mall is one of America's premiere public places, and the Civic Park area is one of this ciry's most imponant public gathering places. By ~~isually and functionally linkin~ [hese two si~~niticant ope~ spaces, downtown's north/south ~edestrian s~~stcm w•ill he stren~thened and its urhan form clarihed. Majcir nc~rth/south ~c~ic~trian cnrridors includc yth. 1Oth, and ]]th Stre~ts: Broadaa~.. and I:~[h and 1-~th St. 4. Locate and build additional public places in the dow~ntown Opcn space is prized as one of F3e~ul~l~r~s mos[ ~al- ued assets. In addition to the expansi~e c~pen tipaces that rin~_ the cit~, numerous rreek. p;uk. and trail svstems wea~e thrc,u~*h th~ rit~. Small plazas. parks. and open areas wherc pc:e~ple ~*athrr. rest and recreate are important elements in makin`~ renval places like downtown li~ able. The~~ pro~ ide access tc~ views, create open areas in hiRher intensit} developments, and add enjo}~ment for people work- im_ or shopping down~own. ~. Design and construct streetscape improve- ments throughout the dow~ntoK~n The public ima~e created b~ the ~ isual yualitr of downto~~n's streets. sidew•alks, and landscapin~ is important. People like attractive and well cared for environments w~ithin which to work and shop. The care and maintenance of this public realm. adds ~~alu~ to thc downtown and improves public safety. 6. Maintain the historic character of the down- town area Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Aerial photo of d~wntown with Downtown Boulder mall and Civic Park Downtoun~~ historic yualit~ i, ot ~aramount imrortanre t~ its puhlic ima~>e and economic ~italit~. It i~ an atis~t t~~ pretier~e and hanl. upon. It huild~ ~ alue an~l crcates oppc~nunitie~ ior inno~ ati~c marketin~~ and adverti;ing strate~~ies. Most imPortanth~. d~~wntown~~ hist~~ric qualit~~ keep~ Bcwld~r in «~uch w ith its past and defin~s its uniyue rharactcr. 7. Expand the role of the arts [and public events] doK~nto~cn Succe~sful dow~nto~~~n~ depend nrn onl~~ on how~ the~ Ic~ok hut on tihat people can de~ there:. Social and cultural events that attract people are funda- mental to do~~nto~~~n~~ ;uccess. The role o1~ thc art~ and relate~i publie ~~entu am clc>sel~ linkrcl te~ h~~~v pec~pl~ think cif dow ntc~~~ n. i~, attracti~ ~nes;. safetti. and so~ial ~+ell bein~,. 8. Encourage residential uses adjacent to [and in] the dow-ntow~n Geatin~* livable ce~tral place~ i; a hallmark o1~ manv successful cities nation~ ide. Places w~here people li~~e as well a~ w~ork can create an attrac- tive mix ot uses that can improve public satety, increase the u,e ot altemati~e mudes of trans- ~ortati~~n. and huil~l str~~n~~ communit~~ ti~s. T'he ci1~'~ land we re~~ulations rncuura~=e h<~usins not oniv adjacent to dnuntc~~+n hut ~~ithin the do~~n- lo~cn itscif in ti~~ll desi~~ned mixcd-use pr~~iects. 9. Pro~•ide betteraccess to the downtow~n f'or alternative transportation modes Ake~ to du~~ nto~~ n~uc~~ss i~ thc abilit~ tc, mm e people comfortahl~ to and frotn the area. No ~~ne mod~ ot transpc~rtatian prrn ide~ all the ansH~ers. Rather. a strate~~ that relie~ on a halance of alter- native mocles. includin~ walkin~*, bikin~. transit. and auto i~ needed. Good urhan desi~n and apprr~priate land use plannin« ran iacilitate alter- nati~e tran,ii mode in the do~ntow~n. 10. Parking The 1 Ny' Dou~nrnu•„ /ll~csrrunre Plmr idtntilied parkin« as a needed stra[eQy, and in 19y6. the Downtown Alliance noted in A Proposal.%ot• tlre Do~r-uou~n Centrnl Business Distt-ict [ha~ the rela- tionship between alternative mode use, develop- ment. and parkin~* needs should he monitored and incorporated a5 part of the do~ ntow n's plannin~ proce~s. Downtown Urban Desiqn 6~idelines Downtown land Use Regulations ~ ~~ ~ «hen proposing a preser~~ation, renovation, or new~ construction project for the downtn.~n there are a number of working assumptions to consider: As a result. zoning districts exist ~ithin the houndaries ot~ Downtc~H n Urhan Desi~_n Guidelines and each comprise~ s unique 5et oF c<~nditions. under~o the most si~~nilicant chan~e u~hile thr RB-IE zone. uhich includes most of the Historic Area. is likel~ tn under~~c~ the least chan~~e. The foli~ti~in_~ map identities the location of thc ~:irious zonin~ districts. Fc~r example, the RB-1X zone is the area likely to (Se~ Appendix A: Zonin~ Distnct Definitions which ~Ti~es a def- initi~~n of each zone ~. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Basic Urban Design Cansiderations :x~~~~` ~~~ `~'hen proposing a preservation, renovation, or new construction project for the dow•nto~~~n there are a number of w~orking assumptions to consider: • CAGID: The Centra] Area General Improvement District enc~mpasses all of the area ccivered hv these _uidelines. ~'hile there are no parkinR reyuirements for cc~mmercial prop- ertie, in CAGID, there are parkin~ requirements f<~r residential uses. . • BID: The D~wnrown Boulder Impro~ement District pro~ides services, facilities and improvements for owners c~f real and personal property in a 3-l block area includin~~ CAGID plus conti~uous blocks to the east and west: Spruce ro Arapahoe and 8th to ? 1 st Flood zones: Much oi~ the dawnt~~wn is atf~ected h~ the Boulder Geek flood zones. Restrictions of ~~arious t}~pr: a}~pl~ and will limit w hat de~~elopment that can occur. Views: Downtou•n Boulder is blessed w ith exceptional mciun- tain views and pr~jects should he desianed to take ad~anta~c of this extraordinar~ asset. The south and west edaes of d~~wn- town offer the most spectacular views. ~ 3~ ~~ i y v......j . . __ ~ .~ ,..M._.».»..........~. . ...._~ _.~..~Y~ ..._. _....,.. .....i~..~_...__~_.._.... _ _ . . ~ ~ ';', .~r_:.,-- ~---- ~ f J ' r ~~a~- - ~~-~^'j ~ - ~~ r,e'ti' ~ , : y _ ~~` a ,, < -~.` .. ' ~.c~w - i~' ~ - i'r'7 ~ ' i r~t ' ~ ~ ' _ ~~`~ i ~ .~: r+(-.. t ,. 1~ i ~ *_ . , .. ~ . ,1-= ' . . ~ - y-' W 3 .._.. ` 7 ~ ..,,^~a'~"~ ~r ' ~./~ t -n .._. l r - ._!e+ ~ 3'.r'~' ~ ~ ; .Y:~~~J ~ LS ~ ~w. ~~~ ~~~ ~ j .w ~ . '! ~ }i Y~ .~4"°'Tt~~ _ ~ ~ . w"t. ,j ~~ f . J 'm ±~!~~ _ ~ ,~ ' - { - -~ ~ W r.' t~~3~~ ~ a~ ^ ~`?$~ +# ......: : ~' ' . ... _'1' ... . ._~~,,.y,~71Ear~ ~. ~ ._ ' =~^,~ ~ -:' - ~~~` L .~T _ " k~i :^ ~~ __r •~x -~ «~ - f- sr~~~-r ..:~t y ~ ) _ ~':+~+' -r"- ;' ~~~Y ~ ~~...r ~: _ € f _ ~ .~ i. x Lx E1raa+ul~+V ~ ~ ~ a• ~.~.~ ~'+:U~~y{~lFY Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 5un and Shade: In $uul~irr'~ cGmat~. .un an.i ~ha~~ ;~r~• im~+~~rtant t:l~[i~f~. C~~~CCiTI (~~r rn~~i.lrn~~ n~tural li~~ht in huilclm~_~. ~unn~ .icl~~~alk~ ~n thr ~~tnt~r. an~1 ,hacl~ ~rca~ in th~~ summer i. 8Il I1Tlr(~fl:llll Cl~fl>Il~ ~r~uun in Prnj~~t d~si~~n. • Cunnections ta other areas of to~+n: Buul~l~r'~ ~~ntral ar~a ~n~lucle> thrrr maf~~r a~u~i~~ ~cnt~r~: [)u~~nt~,»n B~,uldrr. tti~~ I3~,ul~lrr ~'allr~ R<«innal Center i B\'IZC' ~. un~ thr Uni~~r~in Hil! Ar~a. Cc~nne~un~~ tiir~r ar~a~ thr~~u~~h ~ ~arirt~ c>~ alt~rnau~~~ mu~i~~ an~f urhan ~ic~i~~n ~mnr~~~~m~nt~ arr un~+nrtant t~~t~~r~ in th~ir tu[ur~~ wrc~;,. ._.._... ~~'~~`.._-_ . ~. r-- i _. ~ ~ ~ -- - . r,,,; ~`~, .. . ' ~ , ~ •- , ~ _~ ~ • . ,., .. ,1-"- _ r„~` ,` 9 ~ ` * ` _' t ~ ~ ` - _ ~.~" ~ . ....-'._ , ..,.1 , ~ _ _„_ - . '~i ''~AY ~ s r ` - ' ` , I t I , ~_ ~ _~ { . ~.`` _ ,~,__" i. ~ . _ __1~+~ ' - ' .. ` ~ ~~ 1 _ , ~~ ~._^ y ~-' ~ 1 ~;_ _ "~~ ~~ '~ f~ ~ a ,... ~ ` . ~~ - _ Mf ~t ^ _ r .' _'> l.._'. ? ` ~ ~ ~~~ ~ --- ,:~----'~~ '", ',.. " -..*~-'' _ ~ + ~ , -^... t .:- •• , , ~ ~ ~. ~ .`•. ~i _~~,~~' .• ~~ ~~ ,..+Y ~~ ~ _ ` ~IowtheGuidelinesare0rganiied ~~ ~ The huidclines are organized into sis sections. The first three sections address specific ~eo~r:~phic areas of the do«ntnwn: ~~he U~»tinto~~n Historic District, the ?~ion-historic Area, and the hei~hhorhood Interface :~rea. The last three sectionc ~ddre,~ specific desi~n topics: Parkin~ Facilities, Dm~ntm~n Si~ns, and The Streetscape. \]~~.t ~~rucin~ ure c~r~*unized aruun~l ,e~eral prinri~lc guicl~lin,~ The term CODE in h~~ld Icncn intn~~iu~e~ excerpis from [he ~nu a numher ~~( °li~ll~~«-ur'~ __ui~lelinr~. i.-~p~cndi~ B~~Clen a cit~'. lanci u~~ cu~l~ t~~ prc~~id~ a~i~itic~nal r~, ulat~r~ insi~~ht that "~h~c4, lut" e~l th~ principle ,~uidelines that can b~ u.ed ~iurin`• a i. Jirc~tl~ rclatc~3 t~~ th~,~ d~si~~n ~_ui~l~line~ ~1~~~~~n rr~ir~~ ~r~~~e»~. TheDesign ReviewProcess ~~ ~ ~I~hree re~ie~ bodies are primaril~ responsihle i'c>r administerin_ these ~uidelines: the Landmarkti I'reservation Ad~isor~ lioard ~LP:1$i, the Do~nto~~~n Uesign Ad~isorc l3o~rd IUD:1B~. and the Dmcnt~~w~n ~lana~ement Commission IDti1C1. Specificall}, LP.a[3 re~~ieµs all projects located in the I)n~~~ntown HiStoric District and landmarked structures lucated out- sidc the District; DUAB re~~iew~s all projects ~r•ith a constructiun value over `~lU,UOU in the 1\on-historic .#rea. In addition, I)~IC re~~iews projects located on the Doµ•ntown Boulder mall. ticheduling a Desi~n Re~~ie~-~ Earh Is Important: 5~h~~iulin_~ a design re~~ie+~ uith the ap~rc~priat~ r~~ i~~~ h~~d~ iti tn~ r~;}~~m:ihilit~ <~f the propert~ c~~~~ner. de~eloper or their re~- r~.~ntati~e ~uch as an archit~rt. In ~*eneral a meetin~~ ,h~~ul~l h~ ~~he~fuled het~>,-e formal applirati<m i~ rnade t~~ !he cit~ ti~r a huilJin~~ pcrmit or de~clopment re~~ieu. Earl~ nrc~jcct re~ie~~ ~~~t~n rc>ult: in the resoluu,~n of desiRn issue. ~~~hich ran ,a~~ ~.iluahlc um~ oncr the pro~ect i; suhmitted t~~ ~hr cit~. \(~TE: ~lan~ archit~ct,. ~3c~eloper>. and ~~~~ncn finci it us~ful t~~ u,e thc desi«n r~~ iew ~rure~~ as a u~und[n~~ bc~ard to test idea~. Fnr example. applicant: m.~~ ~c~luntaril~ return tc~ di~~u~. chan~!e~ hefc~re makin~• ~nnnal applicati~~r +~~~ a huildinR ~: orde~el~ !-~n~nt re~i_ ~it~. For i. mlormation , h~tr [i~ ~+ _,:ed pleae~ nc tull~~ti'tn~' -~er~. Fcir DD.-~B cir LP.AB ~)~ ~-~-1 I-1 Kn thc D~1C ca ~~O;i -il?-71O0. Downtown Urban Desian Guidelines The landmarks PreservationAdvisory Board~LPAB) Process ~~ - LP.aI3 is responsible for re~•ie~ti~ing all exterior and site feature chan~es for preservation, restoration and neH construction projects located in the Dow~ntown Historic District. - Project revie«~ and compliance w~ith final LP:'~B decisions are mandator~~ for projects in the District. - In addition, LPAB is responsible for re~iewin~ eaterior and site f'eature changes to landmarked buildings in the ?~ion-his- toric Area and the !~ieighborhood Interface. - LP:1B re~•ie~ss all demolition requests i'or buildings over ~0 ~•ears of age. LPaB Desi~n Re~~iew Committee meets ~eekh Prc~ject~ are re~ ie~~ed b~ the LPAB De~i~=n Re~ ie~~ Cc~mmittee. which cnnsisu cif t~vo member~ ol the full ti~e member Bc>urd. and one Plannin~~ D~partment staff inember. The Committe~ t~~picsll~ mcct~ w~~kl~ at the Plannin« Drpartment office;. The revicti~ is relauvcl~~ informal in its procce~lin~~~. An appointment for LP.4B revieti can he made h~ c:allin« l 3U ~ ~~~ I-~~'y ~. All exterior chan_es. alteration~, remo~al or demolition of a huildin~ or site fea[ure~ in ~he Do«~n[o~;~n Hi;roric Dis[rict require a Landmark Alteration Certificate prior [o the issuance of a demolition pennit or a buildin~ permit. Routine maintenance and minor repair does not reyuire a Landmark Altzration Certiticate. It is possible to schedule a"concep[ual review" with the Committee ro discuss preliminan desi~n con- repts befure cornplete plans are revie~~ed. NOTE: Section 10-1 ~- l~ of the B~ulcier Re~ ised Code ~ B.R.C. i. 1 yH ]. estahlishes the time limit for processin« a Landmark Altcratic~n Cenihcate Iwithin Founeen davs after a cc>mplete application is filedl. A Landmark Alteration Ceniticate cannot be granted unless 1) an application i~ consid- crcd complete w~ith all of the necessarv sketches. drawin~s. pho- to~raphs or other relevant information and ?~ the applieation i~ rc~ iewe~l and ot~ficiall~~ approved hv the Landmarks DesiRn Re~ie~ Committee. A Landmark Alteration Certificate is _~rant- ed on the affirmati~~e ~~ote of all tlu~ee memhen ~~1 the Ccunmittrr. In th~ ca~e of pre~jects rcyuirin~* a Sitc Rc~ ir~. or c~th~r ~i~~elo~- ment re~ie~~. which is administered through the Plannin_~ Departmcnt. th~ Landmarks De:i~n Re~ i~ti Ccimmittee rc~ ic~ ~ the propasal and then pmcide~ a re~ommendation tc~ th~ Plannin~ Department which is incorpc~rate~ in a Plannin~~ statf memorandum. The tinal decision is made h~ the Plannin~ staff. Plannin~ Board. or citv Council. Followin« appro~~al b~~ the PlanninR staff or Plannin~~ Board. a Landmark Alteration Cenificate must he mce:ived pnor to the is,uance of a buildin~ permit. The full LPAB meets monthl~ A, ~lescrihed aho~e. a split ~ote of the Landmarks Desi~n Review~ Committee automaticallv soes forw~ard for re~~ie~~ h~~ the Tull fi~~e mcmber LPAB at a puhlic hearin~ unless the appli- cant chooses t<~ revi,e the appli~ation or ~ ithdraw it for later resubmission. The applicant may alsci appeal an~ decisic~n ot~ the Landmarks Dcsi~*n Re~ ie~+ Committee to the full LPAB for revie~. In addition. aIl denrolitiar nnd netir cn~rstructloir npplic'atio~ts nu~st he re~~ieued b~~ the ti~11 LPAB at a puhlic hearing. The decision of the full LPAB is subject to call up b~~ city Council. The full LPAB meets the first W-ednesda~~ ~f even~ month after 6:00 p.m. in citv Counril Chamhers. The Board consisu of five volunteer citv residents, includin~ design prof~essi~nals, w~ho are appointed h~ cit~ C~unciL ~ If the Landmarks Desi_n Review Committee ~ote is split or if the project im~olved new construction or demolition. the applica- tion automaticallv Roes forward for re~ iew hv the full hve mem- her LPAB at a puhlic hearin~ unless the applicant chooses to re~ ~sr thc applicati~n or withdraw it for later resubmission. The applicant may also appeal any decision nf the Landmarks Desi~*n Re~ ie~ Cammittee ta the full LP~B for rc~ icu. NOTE: On certain eiccasions. LPAB or the Desisn Review' C~mmittee mav in~ite member of thc Downtwon Desi~n Advisor}~ Board (DDABJ to act in an advisory capacity when addressin~ neu construction or remodelinR uf~ non-contributin_ buildin_s in the Downtown Historic District. In such cases DDAB~participates as non-votin~~, ex-officio memhers. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines TheDowntown DesignAdvisory Board~DDAB} Process ~~~ .~ DD.aB is a cit}~ Council appointed board consisting of fi~e Boulder citizens, se~eral of Hhom has•e professiunal experience in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and communih development. DDAB is responsible for re~~iew~in~ all exterio~roiects and site features H•ith a constr~ction ~•alue of xl(I,01111 ~r more in the Non-historic Area and the Nei~hborhood Interface ~1rea. Project re~•ie~ is mandat~~r~ while compliance Kith design recommendatiun~ -ciat result 1~rom the DDAB re~~ie« is volun::in. DDAB desion re~ie~~ is a~me-time re~~iea~ prcic~s~. Hi~~~•e~cr_ an applicant ma~ return ~c~luntaril~ tor desi~n critiyues ~, often as nrcrssar~ . DDAB rc~ irti s:~re ~~enerall~ scheduled t~~r -1 pm_ thc second Vl'ednesda~ of ever~ month. Applicau~ms must he recei~ed no later than the first W'ednesdav of e~~en~ mon[h. A de:~i~~n re~ie~~ mav be schedu;. f~~ the DDAB secretun~ hv cali~n~~ th~ Plannin_~ Departm~ at 1~0~) -~f-3'_]?. The purpose of the DDAB re~ ieu is to identif~ desi~~n issues and prc~~ ide recommendations and ad~ ice to the applirant on their de,i.~n proposal relatire to the Doti~nto~~~n lirhan Design Guideline,. VOTE: The onl~~ ~xre~ti~>n t~~ DDAB re~~ie~~ of project~ in thc non ~u~rie or interfa~e area. is for ctn~ -tures that are "localh desi,~nated landmarked builu~m_s". Ti buil~lings ;ire re~ieu~ed h~ the LPAB. In addition. the LPAB :._:. act in an ad~ison capacit~ to DD.4B on issues related to prc~ject~ that are of hi~- toric si~~nificancc hut are not officiall~ landmarked. lipim completion of a DDAB re~ ir~+, staff ncuifies the Building Department that the applicant has fulfilled the mandate~n desiRn re~ ieti . In thr case of projects reyuinng a site re~ iew~ process. DDAB tiubmits recommendations to the Planning Depanment that are incorporated in a staff inemc~randum for fur- ther decision and apprc~~ al or d~nial b~~ the Plannin~ staff. Planning B~~ard. or cit~ Council dependin~• upon the nature of the application. The Downtown Managt ~nent Commiss+~~ ~'ro~ess ~~~~~~~~ The D~IC re~~iew~s the design of projects that extend into the publi~ _.~,-ui•wa~ on the downto~~n Boulder mall such as out- door eating areas, signs, aw•nin~s and other elements. Thc DMC should he contacted reaarding construction pr~~!~~~ts that are ~n or extend intn the doa•ntown Boulder mall ri~~n.-,~f- ~~a~. ~uch as patio extensi~~n,. A.D..A. entrances. aw•nin~~s. and si~~n,. For infc~rmation on the d<i~~ntow•n Bc~ulder mall call the D1~1C a; 13031-11 ~-7300. Downtown Ur6an Design Guidelines Other Boards, Commissions, and City D~partments ~ In addition to the LPAB. DDAB, and D:~IC, the follo~i~ing cit~~ boards, commissions. and cih departments ma} need ro be contacted, or ma~~ pro~~ide helpful information about a project. • Planning and Uevelopment Services. Cit~ Plannin~_ staff i~ respimsibl~ i~c~r rec~i~in~_ recommenda- tiuna and tin~lin~~: ir<~m thc appr~~priatc LPAB. DDAB. ur DMC de,ign re~ i~w anJ incorporatinR them intu the apprnpriate staft or PlanninR Board memo~ tha[ are part oi the cit~'s de~elopmen[ re~ie~~ proces~. A"pre-application meetin~" to discuss de~elop- mcnl ~Toal~. uses, site desi_n. or other rele~ ant issues should be made t~ith th~ PlanninV Dcpsrtment pric~r t~~ enterin~_ intc~ the site re~~ie~~~ process. It i~ intended tc~ identify anv prohlems or ronccrns that Plannin~~ staff ma~ ha~e prior to the applican[ makin~_* n t~~rn~al apPlicatic~n. cit~ c~f Bcwlder to determine it a"re~~oeable ri~ht-of-«~a~~ per- mit" is reyuired fmm the Publi~ VVork~ D~~artm~nt. Fur ini~~r- matinn ~sll -~-11-;'_00. • Board of Zoning .-~-djustment and Building Appeals (BO'L- ABAI Reviews specifi~ requestti for zonin<_~ ~aricnreti and adju~tment,. • Cit~~ Forester Information on ,pecific details l~~r strect tree plantin~_. plant material~. and maintenance can he ohtain~ci fr<,m the cit~ Forester at =i-~ ] - ~-1U6. The pre-application meetinR w~ith the Plannin~~ Department is unt «.~ithstitute fnr the desi,~~n ret•ic u~ required h~ LPAB. DDAB. or DMC. Since it ma~ help an applicant to identify issues that ma~ need be addressed at the desi~n re~ iea meetin~. it ma~~ be preferable to schedule the pre-application meetin~ rirs[. Pre- application meetin~~~ ma~~ be scheduled bv callin~ the Plannin~* Depanmcnt at (~0~ )-~-l l- I 88O. • Planning Board The Plannin_~ Board is responsible for decisions related to the cin': land use re_ulations and reviews prnjects that are subject tc~ the cit~ ~s site review proress. Such projects are forwarded to the Plannin~~ Bo:ird. either by staff or throuah a call-u~ proce- dure. In eithcr case. Plannin~~ Board will review projects for their design qualit~ a~ well as their ronFonnance to the city cade an~i ~ther rclevant resulaticros. As such, recommendations and hndinRs based on these ~uidelines play a key role in Plannin~ B~~urd deliberations. ~ • Public ~i`orks Department: Revocable Right-of-~~~a~~ Permit In addition to re~ ie~ hy the DMC. am element or improvement in ch~ public ritrht-of-wa~. such as a sidewalk cafc, potted plant. handicapped ramp, or bike rack. must first be reviewed by the • Boulder Transportation Division: Transportation Planning Information on transit related issu« ~urh transit rider acti~ity and bos shelter drsi~n should be directcd to the Transportution Planning Department a[ -~-l1-~~6fi. NOTE: T'he cit~ has a fund for specific alle~~ impro~ements. VVhil~ rertain c~mditicm~ such a~ sharin<~ trash s[ora~e or utilitv he~ok ups ma} ap~l~ tc~ pri~ate propem~o~~~ners. the funds can. hc used for makin_~ property impro~ements. For inf~ormation on the allev fund call the city of Bc~uldcr Transpc~rtaticm Department -1~1-~?66. • Public Service Compan~~: ~~ehicular Street Lighting Li«ht poles arc prc» ided h~ the Publir Sen ice Compam~ and maintained hv the cir~ ~f Boulder. Contact the cit~~~s Transpartati~n Di~ ision for further assistance w~ith the selection and pro~ ision of street 1i~~htin~~. Arts Commission The rlrts Commission consists of fi~ c memhers appointed h}~ city Council. each t<~ a five-vear tem~. The Commission pro- motes and encoura~e, pro~~rams in the performin~=. visual and literary arts. For information call (30~) ~1-4113. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Application Submission Requirements ~ ~ Application reyuirements for H~ill ~ar~ dependin~ ~pon the comple~it~~ and scale of the project to be re~~ie~~ed, and the spe- cific requiremenGS of the re~~ieH•in~ bod}. In general, the applicant should pro~~ide the appropriate architectural draK in~s, sketches, and photographs of existing huildin~s and their sites to alloH the re~~ie~sin~ bod~ to full~ understand the nature and scope of the e~:terior changes and an~ sirnificant desi~n issues. I.P.~B Submission Reyuirements Fc~r LPAB Desi`_n Re~ ie~t Ccimmitte~. an a~+plicant is nyuireil tc~ fiU <~ut a Landmark :~Iterati~m C~rtiticate .a~plication and prc} ~ ide the intbmiaticm identiticd on thr applicatiun form includin~~ an initial ,cal~d sketrh plan and ele~~ation. a~ ~~~ll as phcxos ot th~ exisUn.~ huildin__ that ~~ ill h~ krpt on til~. All rele~ ani floor plan:. buil~iin~~ ,ectie~m_ and clten~~r clc~ a- ticm~ ~h~uld he illustrated at a srale sutticient u~ f~ull~ un~i~r- .land lhe pr<~~used dcsign. Prc,~idc e~tcrior ~~all ele~ations in cc~lor showin« matcrial an~1 colc~r ,elertion~. ~ C:~II che Plannin~_ Dcpartment Preyen ation oftice at ( 303 i-i-l 1- ~~9 ~ re~~ardin~~ an applicati~~n. .~p~~intments are ne~essar~ for the w~ekl~ dc,i~*n re~ ie~ srssion. ~pplication material~ shoultl hc submiu~~i in ad~ance ol an~ ,chcduled meetinV. DU:~$ Submission Reyuirements F~~r DD:~B. ten i IIJ~ ~e~pie~ nf all rel«ant iniormation listed hele~~~ must he suhmitted tn the Plannin;~ Depanment no later than close ot' husin~;s on the first ~'~'cdnesda~ of the month. one ~~eck pric~r tc~ the DD.~B m~~tine. Applications should he acll ~~r~~anized and contain sufti~ient information to allou reviewers u~ full~ understand the propo,ed building desi`~n or alteration. includin~ relecant urhan Jetii~m information such as hc,u the prc~ject fit> ~;ithin its surr~~un~lin~~ context. and hou it relates tc~ ~~iacent huildin~~s and propenies. .at a minimum. DD.aB applications should include the fol- lo~~ ing information: •.~ map illustratin~~ thc I~ic~u<m of the pr~~ject within the context c~f the di~ti ntc~u n a~ a ~ll a~ photograph~ cif the pr~jert site anel the surruundin~~ area. •.~ site plan in a clear Rraphic sryle should be presented in the ccmtext ot the city blocks surroundin~~ the project. Site hound- aries and dimensions should be clearly marked and specia] i,~ues such as flood plain. shado~s. land restrictions anJ the existin~ site conditions need to be hishli=hted. Additional information that ma~~ be required i'or DD.aB: The full~~~+in~_ additional int~~rmation ma~ hc r~yuir~d if the pro- po,al maditie. the permitted "h~-ri«ht" huilding hei~h[. nr if the project is of si~miticant complexit~ thut thc tw~o dimensicmal dr~«in«5 described ahrne do nc~t fulh• illustrate the desi~_n is~ucti: •.a ,imple mas. m~~drl it the ~re?iect i~ <~( si~~niti~ant size and rom~lexit~. ,hc~U in~~ the surrc~undin`_ ,:~mtext. Cc~le,r pers~c~~i~e skttches illustratin~~ the prc~~~~sed prc~jret and its surrc~undin_~,, fmm street le~~l. t~~ prescnt [he ~rc~ject trc~m the pedestrian'~ ~ie~pc~int. An analvsi~ of ihe shado~~ impact of th~ pro~osed pmjert is im}~c~nant, especially for pr<~jec[s on thc south sicie of dou~n- te~a n streets. D~iC Suhmission Requirements Fc,r thr D?~]C. ,~~en ~7i c;~~~+i~~ ~~f th~ ti~ll~>w~in~_ item, arc rryuirc~l tor rr~ ieti : • Tu-sca.e ele~ation dra~~ings illustratin~~ the r~yuested im~rc~~emcnt tiith exact dimens~on> alon« ai~h ~xistin~ signs. plantcrs. w~inclows. doors. stairs. patic~,, and awnin~_~ on the huildin~ and adjacent hui]din~s. To-scale drawings of the proposed enhancement which idcntitie~ sp~rific de~i_~n elcment: such as ~olors. matcrials. ancl letterin<_. ~q `~ ~ Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines ~listory ~~Y ~ The Boulder Valle~ was fir5t th~ home of Indians, primaril~ the Southcrn Arapahc~ trihe: who maintained a~illag~ near Havstack Mc~untain. Ute. Chevenne. Cornanche. an~1 Sii>u~ were c~cca- siuna] ~i~it~rs tc~ the area. Gu1~1 ~eekers estahlished thc tirst non-nati~~e settlement in Boulder Cuuntv c~n October l7. 135H ai Red Rocks near the entrancr t~~ Boul~ier Cam~on. Less than a r~rar latcr. <m Fchruan~ 10. l~~y. thc Bould~r citv T~»~n C~mpan~ ~~ as c~r~~anizccl h~ A.A. Bro<~ktiel~l. thc first presidcnt. and ~6 ~harzhuldcr~. BuuWcr eit~ de~elopea as a su~Pl~ base t~~r miners g~in~T into ihc mountuinti in scarch ot~ «<ild and sil~~er. B~~uider cit~~ resi- ~lents pru~ idcd the,c mincrs ~n ith eyui~mcnt. u~~ricul[ural prod- uet~. housin~ and transport ser~ ice~. and Ramhlin~ and drinkin~ estahlishment;. The d~~ti~nto~n section of Boulder ~~as the nucleu~ ~f the fled~lin~~ communit~. and its main thorou~hfare. Pearl Street. led into Boulder Canvon and the minin~ camps. The husiness =enerated from the minin~~ camp,. to~~ether ~ ith Bouliler~ti selection as the rounn seat in 1~i61 and the site [or the statc uni~ersit~~ in 1876, pm~~ided the found~tion for stead}~ ~~ro~tith and the erection of substantial husiness hlocks in the commercial center of the t~wn. Bu.inesse, were established along Pearl and adjc~inin_~ strcet, te, suppl~ e~en need af th~ urban communit~. local iarmer,. and minin~T camps. The dow~n- torn n expcrienced steadv «rowth after th~ 1860s. Bv 188 ~. the ~ommercial area included enterprises such a~ restaurants. Rro- cerie5, saloons and liyuor store~, lumber yards. druv srores, dr~ ~oods stores_ hardw~are stores. feed and flour srores. barbers. p~tin[ shops, and ~ailors. in addition to fraternal lodRes and the count~~ counhouse. At the cl~~sr a}'the nineteenth centur~. the establishment of Chuutauqua and the rreation of the Be~uld~r Sanitarium di~ersi- lie:~l thc local econom~~ and led to further down[own develop- ment. In 1900. a multitude of husinesses flourished in dc~wn- tc~ti~ n Boulder. Streetcar ser~ ire enabled residents in new areas of the cit~ to conveniently shop and conduct husiness down- t~n~~n. In addition, thc Denver ~ Interurban Railroad (an interci- t~ connection with Denver~ ran alon_ Pearl Street from 1908- lyl7. Durin~ the 19?Os. several new commercial huildins~ ~~ere erected~updatin~ the appearance of the dow•ntown with '_Oth C~ntury influences. Althou~h the econorny slowed durin~ the Great Depression, a f~eH ne~~buildin=s were added tc~ the ~ district, the most si~nificant of which w~as the new Boulder C~~untv Cour[house. ha~~in~ replaced the ori~ina] cc~urthouse huildin~* that burned down in 193?. Plannin~T for the improvement of Boulder he~an as early as 1 y0 ~, a hen the Boulder cin Impro~ ement AsSOCiation was c,r~~anized to pur~ue the "imprrnemcm u1 Bnulder in health. «rcx+th. cleanlines~. prosperity an~l attracti~eness," The Assuciation retained nationall~ renowned landseapc arrhitrrt Frederick La~~ Olm~ted. Jr. to prepare a ma,t~r rlan in ]yl(1 w~hich has since nuidzd Boulder~, de~~ele~pment. Sarc, DeBoer. uho ~~r~ed as Den~er's Landscape Architect. ~~as ~iired [c~ pre- pare a zonin~_ pro~osal f~~r Boulder. His 19~~ plan rreated Bc~ulder~~ first h~i~~ht restri~tiems. which limited dountcn~~n buildin~ s to 7~ fee~ and nei~hborhoocl sh~~p~ing districts tn 3~ fzet. as well as recomrnended se~en zonin~~ di~tricts. Following World War II, thc increased po~ulation of the aute~- tnobile led to the creatian of new shoppin~~ areas further from the city c~ntc:r. includin~ Nonh Broadway. Arapahoe Village. and Ba;emar shoppin~_ centers in the 1950;. This competition led to the modernization of historic storefronts downtc~wn, includin~ the application ot metal panels and precast screens to exterior facades. In 1963. Crossroads Shopping Center. a major commercial competitor with downtown was completed. However. with the purchase of thousands of acres of open space beginnin~ in 1967. the adoption of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan in 1970, passage of the buildin~ hei~ht restnction ordinance in 1972. and the residential arowth man- a~ement ordinance in 1977. Boulder he~an a period of infill and re-use of its past architectural development which continues tc~ presen~. Redevelopment ~lans for the downtown were formulat- ed bv property owners and merchants to insure the area's coniin- ued viabilitv. DurinR the 1970s, buildin~7s were restored. remc~d- cled and adapted to new uses. The Pearl Street Mall was creat- Downtown l)rban Desiqn Guidelines ~ ~' 15 cd from 1976-1~)77. promPtin~~ the return of many husinesses and the restoraticm of histrn~ic building~ to the d~u ntc~wn. Bouldcr's Histonc Preser~a~ic~n Code w~as passed in Septemher, 197-1. Thc ordinan~c is instrumcntal in prrsen~ing si~~niticant portions of our past whilc cncoura~~in~ the rehahilitation of his- toric buildin~s. Atthou~h the Down~n~+~n Bould~r Historic District w•as listed in thc National Re~ister c~f Historic Places in 1980, it was not desiRnated as a local hi~torir district until lyyy. Tc~d~~~'s Dow•ntc~wn Historic District lies w~ithin the Boulder Ori~~inal Town>itc estahlished b~~ the B~ulder cit~~ Tou n Cc~mpan~~ cm Fehruary 10. 1 K~y. Bath ' •deral and lc~cal hi~- i~~~i~ designations pr~vi~ie owncrs of ec~~ ~~ing historic huild- in: •he opponunit~~ to apply for Federal and statc ~ax inccnti~es ~. nabilitation. as well a, wai~ers from cenain prc~~ision~ c~f th~ ,: ni~~ersal Buildin~ Cc~de. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~._ Section 1: The Downtown ~listoric District ~~ The boundaries af the Dow~nto~-n Historic District, designated in 1999, generall~ conform to the boundaries of' the UuN•i:tuN~~r 13oulder .Valio~ia! Register Historic District w~hich ~~as listed on the l~iational Re~ister oi' Historic Places in 19811. The district contains the cit~'s fireatest concentration of historic commercial buildings. especiall} along Pe:~rl Street w~hich forms its central spine . These buildings not onl~~ serve as a link w~ith our cultaral heritage, the~ also establish a model for desihn qualit}. Such buildin,s are resources for education, recreation and human enjo~ment. The~ pro~~ide downto~-~n with a rich character and a human scale that are unique assets for both residents and ~isitors to Boulder De~elopment in the Do~ti•ntown His[oric District must he espe- ciall~ sensiti~c to issues of compatibilit~. Indeed, the economir sucress of the doti~ntc~u~n i~ in mam~ w~a}~s dependent ~m main- tainin~_ the historir rhararter ancl yualit~ that sct; the dc~w•ntown apart from other shoppin« area>. Tor this re~son. the preser~a- tion and rz~toration of c~lder huildin<_~s in thi: distri~t i~ of sreat im~onance. Thc Landmarks Presen ati<~n Acl~ isor~ Board. LPAB, is respon- sihlc Cc>r r~~ ieti in~~ all e_rterior ch~inges cuu( site fent~~res in pr~ser~ ation. restoration. remodel and new construction projects Ic~cated in the Dc~untc~wn Historic District. Am chanees to a huildin~~ i~r site requirc a Landmark Altrration Ceniticate prior ic~ c~~mmen~~ment. The urban design objecti~~es for the Downtow•n Historic District are to: • Preser~e and retitore historic buildin~_s. • Presene the inte~rit~~ of the historic architectural features of indi~ idual huildin~*S • Ensurr that alterations and new constructicro stren~then and maintain the historir inte~~ritv of individual huildin~s and of thc Historic Area at lar~Te~ ~ • Encc~ura~_e ne~ de~elopment that will respect and enhance the ~ i~ual charactcr. • Enhance the retail focus of the area. • Presen~e the central area ;~s a place for intensc pedestrian a~ti~ in. The greatest care must h~ si~en t~~ prescnin«. restorin«. an~i desi~nin~~ additicros to these buildin«s. • Individualk Significant Buildings Indi~iduall} siRniricant huildin«, arr thosr huilc~in~~s that are considered indi~ iduall~ eli~ible for the National Re~ister of Historic Places or lor local landmark c~esi~~nation. These huil~i- inss are rypicalh fifty vear, af ase ar older, unless the huildin« is an exc;eptional example of a more recent architectural stvle or period. Care also must be taken in preser~ ing and restorin« them, as well a~ desi~ning additions to these buildinRs. Contributing Buildings Contnbutin~ buildin~~s are those buildinns. built d~rin~ the dis- trict~5 period c~( si~Tnihcance ~] 8~8 throu<~h ] 9-~61. that exist in romparati~el~ "c~ri,Tinal" ~~mdi~ion. c,r that have heen apprcipri- atelv restored. and that clearlv contrihute to the historic si~~niti- cunce or qualiry of the area. Such buildin~s may have additions that are compatible w•ith the historic character of the oriRinal huildin~. Renc~~ations and additions should be sensi[i~e and appropnate tc~ the ori~~inal structures. • Contributing Restorable Buildings Contrihutin~ restorahle huildin~_s are those huilt durins the dis- trict~s period ot si«nificancc that havc original m~terial now covered. or building~ that ha~r experienced some alt~ration. hut still con~ev some sense of historv. Rtst~~ration ol~thesz build- inRs wo~ild ensurc their contributi~m t<~ thr historic yuality of the area e~ en thou~*h earlier aeldi[ic~ns ma~ have not heen partic- ularl~ compatihlc with the ~riRinal buildin,_s. Renovations and addi[ions shc~uld he sensitive and wc~rk tc~ recreate the ori~inal structures. ~ All huil~lin«s in thr district have bcen c~aluated for historic sig- nificance and are subject tc~ LPAB re~ iew ot exterior alterations ~~r rcmc~del. There are five categories of buildin~s: • Local Landmark Buildings These huildin~, are officiall~ desi~nated as citv of Boulder local landmark~. The~ have a~pecial character. historical, architec- wral, or aesthetir interest or ~aluc in Bould~r~s local historv. • Non-Contributin~ Buildings There are two rypes of non-rontributing buildin~s in the historic area: 11 buildin~s built dunn~T the district's period of~ siRnifi- cance that have been altered t~~ such an exrent that historic infor- mation is not interpretable and restora[ion is not possible. Such buildin~s should he evaluated on a case hv case basis to deter- mine if savins and restorin~~ them is feasible or desirahle; and, 21 buildings erected after 1946 whirh are not individually signif- icant. For renuti~atin~ these buildin~s. the ~uidelines for new Downtown Urban Design Guidelines construction and remodel of~ non-cc~ntrihutin~ huildin~ ~ NOTE: The Plannin~ Department maint~ins a file of cach appl~. See Section I.'. huildin,~ in the dc~~•ntoH~n which i~ more than ~0 vcar~ old. The afticial ln~cntan/Sunev fe~rrn, on tile indic:atr the le~~el oi tii~niticance of~ each structure u ithin the Lc~.al Dou•nt~w~n Historir District. F~r mcue information call thc Plannin.~ Department at I~U3) -1-11-:~"_'7U. ~ >. , , , „ ., r. ~ - ~ ~ ~-- ~ .,:,. ~ ~ ~---~;:,..: , Q~~~ 5~- , ~ indwitluai Lanr.tmar~ ~ ~ ,~t,r..; ~. . .. ,. .,F. . ~ ~q~~~g $t i ~ E £ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ f Q - _ ~ I ~ ~ ~~ .. ~ ~ ? . ~ ~ ~ W g,~~ gt ~ ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ `'' Gany gt•rd s o~ ~ 18 ~ ~ Downtawn Urban Design Guidelines ..... . Section l.l: GuidelinesforthePreservationand Renovation ofLocal Landmarks, Individually Significant, tontributing, ;;- andContributing Restorable Buildings ~ ~ LPAI3 reviews all esteri~r chanaes and site features, not buildin~ interiors. «'hile it is acknowledged that changes to structures in the Local Downtow~n Historic District H•ill occur over time, it is also a concern that these changes do not damage the historic building fabric and character of dow~ntown. Preserti~ation of the exteri- ors and storefronts of these buildings will continue their contribution to the unique historic character of the dow~ntow~n. Am building reno~~ation or alteration, no matter the planned use, must retain the overall design integrity of the historic building by protecting the ori~inal features and materials and respecting the traditional design elements. 1.1.1. PRESER~'E ORIGIN;~L FACADES Presenation of-traditional facade elements found on exi~ in~_ buildinRs crea[es patterns alonQ the face of the block that contributc to the o~~crall histori~ character oF the are These elements include: A. Kick plate, as ba~z to huildin,~ front~ B. First tloor display w~indows C. Recessed central entrance areas or an_]ed entrances corners D. Transoms ahove entrance d~ors E. Clereston portions of displa~ windows F. Sien hand~ G. Parapet w~alls with caps or cornices H. Vertica] windo~ patterns, shap~s. ~indow sills on '~nd floor I. Pilas[er~ and decorative brick or stone The facade elements define a buildin~'s visual qualitie~ and character. Respect the ori_inal desiQn and materia! of the buildins. Even when a buildin~Ts us~ ha, chanee it is still important to retain and/or interpret traditional f~acade elements Do not apply theme desi~ns that alter the original char~ ter such as coach lanterns, mansard desiens, wood shak nonoperable shuuers. and small-pane windows if the}' e;annot he documented historicallv. N~TE: It is not the intention of this Quideline to recreate the past if the ori~inal building facade does not exist. However, if the oriRina] facade does not exist. but documentarv evidence such as photo~raphs of the ori~inal does exist. then one recom- mended alternative is to restore thc facade. Where exact reconstruction is not practical, new simplified contemporary interpretations of the ori=inal details are possible as lon_ as the scalc and character of thc orisinal detail is retained. Preservation or restoration of ornamental cornices is particularly encoura~ed. Other important facade elements to he respected include belt courses, pilasters, window arches and frames. Adding more elaborate ornamentation than was originally found on the building facade is inappropriate. Downrown Ur6an ~esign Guidelines ~ ~` 19 l.l.l Preserve~acade Materials Ret.iin ~~ri~~inal material~ ~+herc~er pc~-.ihle throu~*h rcpair an~ n~tc~ration. A~~,id r<,nccalin~~ c~ri~~ina~ ta~ade material,. If th~ c~rieinal material h~s heen cc,~ercei. uncc~~er it if ieasibl~. If }~~~rti~m. oi th~ uri~*~nal material mu~t hr re~la~eci. use a matcri- al :imilar t~~ th~ urieinal. Brirk ~~a~ thc pr~dorninant huildin,~ matenal usecl in the J~~~~ nt~~ n. A~ c~id thr use of m~tcrial: that arc no[ ~i~uall~ rompa~ihl~ ~~ith ~he ori«inal facadr. wch a. ~hin~ metal~. mirror glass. plasti~ panel,. an~i ~in~1 ~+in~ic,~~~ cn• ~lc,~,r~. 1.1.3 Align Architectural~eaturesand ~stablish ~ Patterns With Neighboring Buildings ~ _ ~ R~,tc+rr ur rerr~ate thr hi~turir ali~_nment of architecwral fea- turc~ u ith nthrr huildin~~. ~~n the bluck. The:se linrs unif~ the ;tr«t ~i~uall~. The ali~*nm~nt r~t architectural featun;. fri~m one huildin~_ t~~ th~ n~xt. creatr: ~iwal continuit~ ane~ c,tah- lishes a ce~herent ~ isual r~mtext throuehout the dow ntciH n. Un ~ommercial buildings the~ creat~ pattern~ alon~ th~ face ~~i~thr bl~~~k that c~ntrihute tc~ th~ rnerall ~haracter of thc ama. Sc~m~ Cacadr element~ that t~~pirally ali~~n ~~ith ad~c~inin~ huildin~~s in~lu~e: • huil~iin~~ kickplate • the t<~~ and hottom height of tirst tloc,r di,pla~ Hindt~w~ • transc~m o~er the entranceHa~ • clerestor~~ portion of~dis~la}~ ~~indu~~~ • horitnn[al and ~ertfcal proportiun. of the huildin~~ • storc(r~nt and restaurant tront ~~ind~nc~ • windc~ti op~ning~ and st~ 1e5. especiall~ upper story u~induws •~i~~n han~l ahc~~e th~ street le~el • ~arapet and cornire lin~ • N~ind~a~ sills c>n uppcr (loc~r~ • r~,~,t lines an~i proporti~m~ t ~ ~ ~ ~j ---------L-------`-~ - i -~--..-._.._..._L~_,..~ _~.----~--T,--~._~. ~ ! t ~ - ~ --~- --- ---~--~------- T- -----• ------ t ~ t i~ Illu~traticm c~t Architectural Feawre AliRnment on the Block Face Zp ~~~ Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines 1.1.4 Maintain The driginal ~Nistoric line of The Building Setback ~~_~ Presenc storefront displa}~ w~indows at the sidew~alk edRe. Maintain historic recesses and e~trvwavs where thev exist. C)cc~sionally, the line at the sidewalk is retained bv the use of uthcr elements ;uch ~s planters. ceilumns or railin_s. and th~ storcfr<int is reccs~e~i. A typical recessed entryway Recessed storefront with columns at sideu~alk line Where huildin~*s are huilt to the allev ed~e. consider allev dis- walk such as outdoor dinin~~ areas, follo~ the ~uidelines for play windou~s and secondary customer entries if ori~inal materi- extensions into the ri_ht-of-w~a}~. Section 6.~. ~ als and features are not damaged. For projections into ihe side- 1.1.5 MaintainTheOriginal Size, ShapeAndProportionofStorefront ~acades And 0 enin s to Retain The ~listoric Scale And Character ~~~ ~~ P 9 ~~.: For most historir buildinQs, l; window level with solid I:ick~ pane desi~ns that divide the s nents should only be used if t and original openings. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 1.1.b Maintain Traditional Recessed ~ntries Where They ~xist ~: ~~ ~ Th~ rn~thm ~~ I'Ci'C~~~t~ tnll'.2~C~~ 1~f1 lhC till'CCI ~(~~[I"1hUlC~ I~~ 11~UQ1 ~~~nunun~ 1IlC~ f11~1~'`l~ :f1:ll"L1.lC'. T~:'~C~~c~] CIl[(t~> Il~tt7li- t~ th~ ~ntran~~ an~i Pru~w~~ ;i~~~~~r. ~~hil~ .e,rner entrie, c,n nuil~iin_~~ I~~.ate~i ~~n th~• int~r~r~u~~n~ t~l~ ke~ <treet~ ~ira~~ ~~de>- ~rian. in 1.,~• ~i~~~~r• ~~ith a I.l~~'C :STC:t ~~I _'la:. ahn~e a.uli~1 panc~i at [hr bu.~ ,urn~unu~~J h~ a raintrci tram~. .a~~n~ uniin- ~,,. ~ _.. _ _-. ~ ,_ - . i . ~^ ~ : ~ w ~ ~ r ~_ ~ r:;..:...... ! I~f1C~ Li~Ut~IL~t1 fil~l:11. hl'I~~f71 ;lIUR11~U111. i~1' ~(:11111~~~ ~lC~'; 1r.im~>. Fini:hed tram~• ii~a~ h~ m:ial .~~ith hi.i:h, an~»~~.~: ~~~ ~.iinte~i tini:h. h~n~~~er. rainted e~r ~ur~u:h~~ ~~c,i~d i• rrrlcr- ~hl~. Rr:iii~ntial t~~e d~x~r~ arr nrt a.~.} tahl~. lf .i~~:un;:n,.~- u~m c~t the cnm~> >. a~ailanic. th~ r~~~~inrncn~ic~l :ili~rn:iti~: i~ t~~ r~:tor~ th~ rntr~ . 1.1.1 Maintain The Kick Plate Below The Dis la Window ~lemen~ ~~ PY Pre,~r~e ti~~ ori~~inal ki~kplat~ ~~h~ne~er pns~ibl~. Fai' huil~- in~~~ ~iiul histc~ric.i~miticanrr iloral landmark~. in~ii~iduall~ ~i~~nit~rant. ~untrihutin<<. anci con[ribuun« rc;torahle huildin~~:~. r::t~~re th: ori«inal kick~latc lrnm cic~rum~man c~ i~cn~c. II ~,n~Tin~i intunnanon t, not a~ailahlc. d~~~lop .i ne~~ ;impliticd u~:i~~n ~hat retain~ the ~~ri«inal ~h~raeter and dimen;i<>nc ~~f ~i i.i~%plat; that ~~c,ul~ rnc~,t lik~l~ ha~e heen on the buildin~~. ZZ ~ ~ ~ For r~n~~ ati~~n~ ~+~her~ th~rr i: nc~ ducumrnt~n e~ idenct. appr~~- priate kick}~late matcrial~ are: hrick. ~aint«i ~t<~c~~i Pancl~. ct<me. and «lazrd tilc c,r ~aint~u metal in muteil [<~ne,. Ali~~n lh~ ki~l.- ~l:~te u ith [hn,c ~1 c,th~r hist~,ric buildin~~~ in th~ blci~k. Gowntown Ur6an 6esign Guidelines Rc~r•~e.l ~n[ri« in mi~i-hlcick an~i at a ~;~rner 1.1.8 Preserve The Transom And Sign Board ~eatures ~Thc u~e ~,f a clear eia~~ tran.i,m i~~rr ~l~,ur>. ~~r ~lerr,tnr~ tea- ~ur~ ~~ ithin thc u~Per run ~,f th~~ di~~la~ ~~ in~1~~~~ ~~r~a. >> m~~<i h~,tc>n~. Thi, arc~ ha~ b~en u,ed ~i,r a sisn i~r dec~raii~e elc- n~~nt. R~tain [hc ciri~~inal maierial~ an~1 pro}~c~ruun~ c~1 thr ~~p~n- ine. IC th~ framin~~ that Jchne~ thc tran.~~m ha. heen rem~~~e~i. rr-c~tcihli:h ii in a nc~~ ~~~i~_n. 11 th: mtcnc~r r~ilin~~ i~ I~~~~rr than th: tr~n~~~m ~~r :irr~:t~~r~ lir ~u~ tc~ latrr r~ncn~iu~,i;. rai,~ th: ~~~~~rr~a ~~ilin<_ ur tn,n~ th: ~~indc~~+ «~ maintain it~ hi~tc~r~cal ~1im~n~i~m~. .-~li~n tran~~~ni ~~ ~lere~t~,r~ ~~ in~iu~~ ancl tram~n~~ ~~ ith exh~r a~iia~~nt buil~in~~~ i~ ma~ntam .~ clcar Im~~ al~~n~~ thr hlncl. ia~~. R~tain in< <~ri~~mai ~haracter an~ matcn~il. ~~I ~h~ ~run~~~tn an~1 ,•I~n.tur~. 1.1.9 Preserve The Shape, Materials And Spaci~9 of Upper Windows ~~~ ~ R~-~pen/re~eal upper stor~ ~tindc~~~~ it the~ are prescntl~ hl~~~kcd. I( Ic~~terzd ceilin_~s are ncce>sar~. ~ull the ~irop~ed ~uilin~_ hack trom the ~~~indrn~. It~re-c~~~nim_ the ~~ind<~~~ i. n~~t I~a~ihlc. r~cr~ate th~ ori«inal ~~indo~i~s fram hi;torical elnrument>. If ari_inal t<~ th~ huildin~~. shuucr~ ma~ he con- .ic3cred tc~ d~fine the ori~*inal uind~~~~~pre~p~~rui~n,. :1lurntur~~ thc nri;~inu( spaciut pctttern~ nf the ~rr>>duirs. Prr.~nr thr tiindc,~~ tram~. sssh. an~7 surrc~un~i,. Repair ra~h~r than rcplace ~riRinal ~+indi,~~.: i1 repair i. not feasiblr. rc~larc ti ith ~~ indo~~ s that match the exi.un,~ ~~ in~to~+~~ ~: ~l~~.ct~ as pc~ssihl~. Siz~. t~ramc and trim matcrial. meth~d ~1 operation. sizc c~f sash memhcr~. «ind~~~~ tramr elements. an~i the pattern of di~ icled li~~ht~ ar~ im~ortant tcatures tc, replicate. .-~ historic matenal :urh a. ~~c~ud i. me~~t upprc,priate. If mul~l- ed plastic. ~ im l or aluminum re~laccments mu;t he used the~ should replicate original matenal,. finishr•. and dimensic~n~. .-~nodized. shin~. unfinishe~i metal~ an~1 al[rred dimension: are inappropriate. Gown[own Urban Design Guideline~ ~ ~ 23 L~am~lr• ~~l hi.tc~rir tran~om, anci c:lerest~~ne• E~ampl~~ ~~f t~~i~al h~,t~~ric u~~rr titur~ ~,~indrn+~. 1.1.10 Awnin s May Be Usedto Provide _~ Visual epthAndShade ~ ~ Ati~nin~s should he desi~*ned tc~ fit the - ~ront openm« i, cmphasize the~buildins'~ prc~pc~rti~ns. ~. ~ she~uld nc~t <~hscurr or dama__e impc~rtant ~rchitect.:: ._[ails. An ci~*ht i~oot clearanrr f'rom the sidetialk tc~ the awnin~> >s required. Ali~~n a~cnin~~s ti~ ith o[hen ~n thc hlc~rk. Thi~ applies particularl~ tc~ th~ he~[tom line o1 the au~nin~~. Mc~unt the top ed~c tc~ ali~n ~~ith thr t~~~ ~~l the tran~~~m c,r u~ith thr tramim_ that separate~~thr cleres[or~ section from the main displa} ~~indoa. The ~~alance ma~ he used for a sign. Operabl~ f~abric aw~nin~s are enroura~ec. '~letal a~rnin<_~s or canopies that are similar in fc~rm to fahri. a~+~nin~~s may hr appropriac~ when de~igned as an inte~~r::, part of th~ huilcl~ facade. not appcarin,~ as tacked-on addition;. Awnin~~ cc~l~ should be coordina~ed a ith the color scheme of the entire build- in~_ frnnt. Mechaniz~d au~nin~~s and awnin~s on the upper stc~- n~; are discouraRed. ~ 24 ~ F Downtown Urban Design Guidelines "rvrical aw•nin~~ on hi~tc~ric huil~fin~s Distinguish Additians to ~istoric Buildings Additions to historic huildin,*s shuulcl he suhtl~ distinRuishahle Whcn design elements contra,[ t~c~ urc~n~l~ ~ith the nri~~inal frotn the ori~inal ~ hile maintainin~_ ~ isual continui[y throu~~h the stru~ture. the addi~ion ~rill appear ~ i~uall~ incumpatihl~. u5e of desi~~n elements such a~ proportion and scale. sitin~~. Ce>n~ersel~. w~hen the ori~*inal d~si,~n i~ replicated. the additiun faca~ie ser-back. and materials that are c~f a similar color and tex- iti indistin~uishablc and the hi~toric;al e~olution of th~ huildin__ ture. hecomes unreco~nizable. A. For additions to the side of a historic build- ing, retain the original proportions, scale, and character of the main facade. P~~sition th~ addition so it is set back from thc main lacadc, and express the dif~- ftrencc hetween the orieinal facade and the addition~with a subde chan~e in color, tex- ture or materials. G ~laintain the pmpor- tions and the estab- lished pattern of upper stor~• w•indows. A new additic~n set hack from the In additi~~ns. upper floors hl~~ck face should incorporate traditional ~erticalh proponioned window openinas within a more solid facade [reatment [han the l~wer Hoc~rs. Use windows similar in size and shape to those used historically to mai~tain the facade pattern oi lhc hlork. D. '~laintain the rhythm established b}• the repetition of the traditional Z~ foot facade widths. In additions, maintain the rhythm of~ facade widths. especially for project, that extend over se~eral lots. by chanQin~ materials. panern~. reveals, building setbacks. facade portions, or by usin~ design elements such as c~~lumns or pilasters. B. Set back additions to roofs of historic buildings, in order to maintain the height of the primar~~ f'acade. New floors should he suhstantiall~ set back from thc priman facade so that the ori~inal buildin« hei~ht and facad~ are cl~:ul~ distin~uishahlc: fr~~m the neti~ uppcr floor as seen from the strcet. Illuscration of rhvthm of traditional "?5 f~od facade widths on the Block Face Downtown Urban Design Guidelines `~ ~' ZS Crpnrr st<~ries set hack from the bl~~ck face l.l.lZ SelectBuildin ColorsAppropriate - to The Area s istoric Character ~ r~ In ~~eneraL selert a colcx ,rhem~ that ~ ill ~ isuall~~ link the huildin~~ tn i~: past a, ~~rll a> tc~ ~thers in thr ;uea. Consider rul~n that are rompatihle uith th~ huildin~'~ ~rcJciminant rnatrrial. ,urh as red hrick c~r ~tc~n~. c~r ~i~~ an anal~ sis of r~~lc~r~ ~rr-existin_~ on the huildin~~ and use ~mc of the r~~lors f~~und. A. De~elop a comprehensi~e color scheme. C~~n,iJer thc huildin<< a. a ~~hc~l~ a. ~+ell a, ~ietail~ that n~ed cmph~si.. Sotter mute~l cc~lur~ es~ahlish a uniform hack~~rc~und. !n ~~cnrral. use one color on similar ~Irm~nt~ such ati ~ti ~n~irn~ framr. to shc~w that [he~ arc all part <~f the sam~ (arade. Rc;er~e hri_*htrr wlor~ t~~r small sp~cial accen[> tc~ ~mphasize ~ntn~~a~> an~i tc~ hi~~hli~~ht sp~cial stru~wral ornan~~n~aticm. B. It is not appropriate to puint unpainted brick. If thr hri~k i. alrea~i~ paintc~l. ~aint rem~~~~ii i~ prc(rrrrd. .A~uicl (+ain~ rrmu~al }~rocedur~~ that ~iama,~r th~ un«inal hrick tini~h ,uc:h a~ .an~i hlastin_~ ur cawtic chcmical~. B~fc~r~ remc~~ in~_ paint rc~nduct a test tu cletermin~ ~i~trimenial rff~rt>. If th< <xistin,~ paint on the brick i: in }~~~~~: :undition and paint remc~~ al u i11 dama~e the underlvin~ hric4,. thr bri~k sh~~ulJ he repaintcd. ~ . ~ 1.1.13 Minimize the visibility of ~IVAC units and other mechanical, structural, or electrical appurtenances ~_~ Use lo~~-protilc mechanical units anc~ elevator shafts on ro~ft<~p~ that are nc~t ~ isihle from the stre~t. If thi. is not pc~ssi hle. ~e[harl. nr screen rc~c~t[c~p equipmrnt from ~ ie~~. ~ls~~ h~ ticnsiti~e u? ~iru~, from thr upper floor~ c~f neighhorin_~ build- in_~,. Skvlights or solar pancls should ha~e (c~~1~ prc~tile~ and not h~ ~ isihle from puhlic ri~ht-~~1~-a a~ s. Thrse feature~ ,hi~uld hr installed in a manner ~ti~hich minimir.~, 1~3I118~_'~ tc~ hi~tnri~ matr- nals. Z6 ~ ~ Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines Settion 1.2: GuidelinesforNewConstructio~and Remodeling Non- .. . Contributing BuildingsintheDowntown~listoricDistrict ~_,~ ~ LP:aB is responsible for reviewing all e~terior chanQes and site features within the Downtoµ~n Historic DistricL not includin~ huildin~ interiors. The purpose of this section is to pro~~ide ~uidance for the desi~n of neµ~ construction and the renovation of non-contributing buildings in the district, in order to retain the historic conteat oi'the area while providing new~ opportunities. ~'~'hile neH• huilding design is e~pected to reflect the characterof' its own time, thereb~~ making the downtown a living district~ it is important that it also respect the traditional yualities that makes the downtown unique such as massinfi. scale, uses of storefront detailing and choice of materials. C,uidelines from Section 1.1 concerning awnings, paint color, lighting, and appurtances to buildings are also applicable to these buildings. Furthermore, architectural st~~les that directlt~ cop~~ historic huildinbs, and theme designs, such as "w~ild wesf' are not appropriate. l.l.i Incorporate Traditional Design ~lements in New Designs a~~ , ..~. Repetition of traditional facade features creates pat- terns and ~~isual ali~nmc;nts that contribute ro the c~~erall rharacter of the discrict. While these features ma~ be interpreted in new and contemporary aays, the~ ~*enerall} include the following: A. Kick plate as a base to the store front. AIiRn the heisht ~+~ith others in the hlock. B. First floc~r ~iisplay wind~~w~. Align w'ith hci~~ht of others i^ the block when others are appro- priately placed. C. Incorporate a clerestory form in the display w ind<~a. D. Transom. alien with others when others are appropriatel} placed. E. Si~n band. F. Parapet cap or cornices. G. Vertical wind~w patterns and shapes, win- dow sills on 2nd Hoor. • An_led entrances on corners. • Recessed central entrances Downrown llrban Design Guidelines ~ ~ 21 I.Z.Z AlignArchitectural ~eaturesWithThe~stablished ~. PatternsofNeighboring Buildings ~ ~ Thc alignmem of architectural fe~turcs and element~. fri~m cmc huildin~ to the next, creates cisual ccmtinuit~ and estahli:h~ti a coherent ~isu~l cantext throu~hout the do«~nto~•n. On commercial huildinRs thev create patterns alon~ the face of the blcx k that ccm- tribute tc~ the o~•erall rharacter of the area. Buil~ins facades should he desi~ned to reinforce these pattern~ and suppon the area's estah- lished ~isual character. Some farade elcment~ that tvPicall~ ali~_n with adjoinin~ huildin~s include: • building kickplates • the to~ and hottom hei~hts of first Hoor displa~ w~indc~w~~ • transc~ms aho~e entrance dc~ors. and clereston elements in displa~ tiin~ows • honr.on~al ~nd ~ertical proponic~ns of the buildin~~ • storei~runt windows, e~en f<ir restaurant ~enues • upper stor~ uindou~ openin~~ and styles • sisn band aho~•e the street level • parapee and cornice line • u•indo~~ sills on upper floors • rooti iines and propon~ons 1.Z.3 Maintain The line of Storefronts at Sidewalk ~dge And _ Orient Main ~ntrances to Open Toward The Street ~~ ~ CODE: 1~linimum percentage of lc~t fronta~e that must contain a huildin~, or buildin~s shc~uld not be less than 70~Ic in the RB-1 E. RB-2E. RB-1 X. RB-''k, and RB-3h. Such s~andard is not applicable in RB-3E. CODE: Maximum front yard landscaped setback is 0 t~e:et for buildings in the RB- 1~. RB-?E, RB-1 X and up to 15 f~eet in the RB-3E. RB-2X. and RB-3X zones. CODE: Prim:ir~ buildin_ entrance loca- tions should face the street. For commercial stvle buildin~s, if a portion of the buildins uall is proposed t~ he sct hack from the sidewalk. care- ful consideration should he: ~_i~en to maintainin~ the front line c~t the huild- in~ at the sidetialk edse throu~h the use of planters, railin~s. columns or similar f~eatures up to~an c~~crhan~in~ second Flc~or. Maintain the orivinal sethack of histonc huildin~*s. In manv cases. the huild- inR's placcmcnt on the site is an impor- tant definin~ charactenstic. For instance. the Count~ Courthouse and the Post Office ha~e an open area hctwc~n the buildin~ and the sidewalk. ~~hich ~s imp~insnt to retain. For his- torir buildin~~s that are not located at the zerc~ sethack line, place the addition hehind thc ori~~inal setback. A. Plan view of a new buildin~ aligned with existing ' buildinns. @ 4 a B. A pcirtion of a new buildin~_ set back with the huild- e in~ line of the block maintained wi[h a row of columns , to an upper Hoor. ' ? ~~ C. A ncw• buildins, on the same lot of an historic huild- in~~. set back to re~~eal the historic buildin~. ; ~; 18 ~ ~ Downtown Urban Uesiqn Guidelines TraJi~i<mal elements alisn~d 1.14 Do Not Construct ~lalf-level or Split-level ~irst _ ~loors That ~xtend Both Above And Below Grade ~~ _ ~.i __ .~ - m . ._.~, _.. _ nu~ ~_. ~; ,~ ~. ~ " ,_-t Fircr~~ . ~-~,' ' . _ ~~. - _ .w, .. '.r- ~..~.. _~ ~...~. ~..~ ;~'" _ -,-~ ~ ~- ~ ~ ~- ._ .~_,...~. ~°^~. ~y ~~J. ~aR-:~- 1 ~.'~ .,~.. ~ ~t CODE: First floor le~els should be no lower than grade level and no hiRher than ? feet abflve vrade. (Con~ideration of flood miti~ation design should be taken into account for build- ings located in flood plain areas). 1.2.~ Consider The ~ieight And Mass of Buildings :,,~ . In ~eneral. buildings sh~uld appear similar in heigh[. mass. and sc~le to c~ther huildinRs in the hi~toric arca to maintain the area's visual inte~*rit~ and uniyue character. At the same timc. it i~ important to maintain a~arietv of hei~htti t~~ create ~~isual interest. While the actuul hei~hts of buildin~s are of concern, the ~ercei~ed~heiRhts of~ huildinvs are equalll` important. One. twc~ ~nd three storv huildi~~s make up the pnmary architectural fahric of ~ [he downto~~n. with taller huildinss located at ke~ intersections. ~ A. Strive for visual interest in building fo rms. ~~~ith ne~~ c~n~tructiun. create architectural Buil~iin~ hei~~ht can shade side~~alk. durin~~ w~inter months leadin~~ to icv ~idewalks and unappeal- ing pedestrian areas. Wherever possible. new huildin«s should not shade the northern side- walk area of east-west runnin~ streets at noon on December 21 st. and should maintain view corridors. CODE: Thc allowable '`hv- right" hei~Tht is up to 35 feet. with a m:iximum heiRht of SS feet throu~h heiRht re~~ieu. CODE: The maximum "bv- risht ' numbcr c~1 stories allowed in 3~ tcct is tti o siories. CODE: Generallv, for commer- cial and residential huildin~s in °' RB- t X. RB-~ X. RB-1 E, and RB-ZE, the floor to floor hei~hts ` should be up to 1-1 feet for the around ]evel. and up to I' feet < for the second floor. CODE: In the RBl-X and RB l-E zones, principal building hei~hts for a building loc;ated on a corner lot that faces two pub- lic sveets may be increased up to 10 feet in hei~ht and up to 3 stories if: the huildin~ contains ':` no more than 3 stories above the finished Rrade: the horizon- ! tal dimensions of the third story are no greater than 50 feet alon~ the front yard street frontage hy 7d feet along the side yard street frontasc. and the venical planes of the third story are located directlv above the verti- ; cal planes of the stories below. Downtown Urban Desigo Guidelines ~ Z9 ~ ariet~~ bv steppinR back upper floors and ~arvine buildina massinR. especially on larRer sites. B. Relate the height of buildings to neigh- boring structures at the sideH~alk edge. For new structures that are si~*nificantlv taller than adjacent buildinRs. upper floors should he set-back a minimum of 1 j feet from the front facade to reduce the percei~ed heisht. Ho~vever. slender forms such as touers and dormers that extend t~»~ard to the front facade mav add ~isual ~arien and interest tc~ the set-hack area. C. Consider the eff'ect of building height on shading and view~s. Examples of setbacks on upper floors that reduce perceived heieht. mass. and scalc of huildin~s. 1.2.6 Maintain a~luman Building Scale Rather Than a MonolithicorMonumentalScale Smaller.calr huilclin~~~ an~J thr u~~~ c~f traditi~~n.ill~-si~~ci huilcl- charact~r c~~~c1~n~•nt~~~~n. Stan~i~rJ ~i~r hri~}.. unif~~nn huil~iin~• in,~ ~~~mpunent. hrl~ t~~ cs~ahli:h human ,cal~~ an~l maintuin thc ~~~inpc~nen~~. an~i ~~~n~lar~i ~~ in~iu~~ :il~. arr nx»t .iE~~r~~~natc` Illustration c~f buildin_s that look monolithir nrat t~~ huildin<~: u•ith mon detail and ~ i~ual int~rest Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 1.2.1 Maintain the Pro ortions of Storefront Windows And ~~ Doorsand~stab ished PatternofU erStor Windows E.~ PP Y CODE: For buildings locat- ed in the RB-1 E. RB-2E, RB-3E. RB-1 X. RB-~h. and RB-3}i zones, a mini- rnum of 60% of a~round floor facade Cacing a public street shall be madc of transparent -naterials, or otherwise desiRned to al}ow pcdestrians to view ac[ivi- ties inside the huildinRs. This standard shall not a~ply to residential uses that may cxcur alon~ the ground fic~r facade. ~ 1.2.8 The first floor of downu~wn commercial build- in~Ts should be primarl~ transparent. w~ith a pedestrian orienta~icm and storefront appear- ance. Upper floors should incorporate traditioo- al verticallv proportioned ~•indci~~ openinRs ~ ithin a more solid facade treatment, awnin~*s A t~~pical example of upper and lower Noor ~~indaa patterns ar~ not typically found cm upper ston~ ti~indi»~s. Use windows similar in size and shape to those used historically to maintain the (acadc pattern of the block. This is especiall~ impor[ant for project, fa~in,~ ke~ pedestrian streetc such as Pearl. 13th and 1-~th Streets. Maintain the Rhythm ~stablished b The Repetition ,,~ ~_- of The Traditio~al 25 ~oot ~acade idths. ~~ Maintain the rhvthm of facade widths, especially for pr~jects that extend over severaf lots. by chanoin~~ materials, pauerns. reveals, buildins setbacks. iacade portions, or h~ using design elements such as columns or pilasters. An illustration of the ?i foot wide pattern of downtown facades Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 1.2.9 Use Building Materials That ~lave a Texture, Pattern _.. AndScaleSimilartoThoseinTheDistrict ~ ~ ~ The use of hrick a, the priman huildin~~ matrnal is en~oura~ed tc~ reflect hi,tc~rir huildin~~ pauern~ in the c:c~mmercial d~wnto~ n. Choose arrent materi- al. ~imilar in texture and scale to c~ther~ in thc di~- tnct. Thr;e inrlude: • Brick and stcmc masonn • ~4'ood details such as w~indows • Finitih~d lumber, applied to achie~c traditional pat[crns e.~~.: hc~rizonta] sidin~ rather than diago- nal • Finished painted metal and sheet metal • Clcar or li~~htlv tinted Rlass • Ceramic tiles ~ • Brick. cla~ and ceramic pa~ers • Slate. finished metal. ~lazed ceramic and tile roofs ~ • Concrete and stone as lintels and wood or con- crete columns • Emhossed metal or corrugated metal The follow•ing materials are generall~ inaoaro- rp iate : • C<~arselti tinished. "rustic'~ mat~rial~. such a` ti~~~~~d shake,. shin«les. harn hoard or staine~l fir plyw•ood. Poorl~ crafted or "rustic" w•o~dwc~rkin~ and tinishing techniyues • [ndoor-outdc~or c:arpetin~_ or asvo-turf • Corru.~ated metal and fiber~lass. 1 unless used .parinRl~ ) • Mos, rock •"Antiquc~~ or old bnck with partial paint. mottled light ~arie~a[ed brick. o~•ersized brick and w~hite hrick monar • Ornate u•rouoht-iron. "Neu Orleans" stvle =rille and rail ~~~rk ~ • Stucco surfaces that arr hiRhl~ textured such as lhose sometimes as~oriat~d with a"hacienda" or "Mediterranean" st~ lc • EYpanded mctal • Sil~~r or cl~.ir .~n~,~lvr~i aluminuni .heet~ • Sil~er ar clear aluminum extrusions for w~indows and doortia~~s • Residential type slidin_ ~lass doors • Imitation wood sidin_~ or stone • Flat or molded plastic sheetin~ in quantities exceedin~ fi~~e square feet w•hen used as primar~ lacade materials • lmitation metal "reck work" • Plastic molded imitations of anv conventional huildin~ material • Mirror or metalized rrflective _lass • Glass block ~ 1.Z.10 Im rove Rear or Side Alley ~levations To ~nhance ~ Pu lic Access ~rom Parking lots And alleys ~~ Where buildings are built to the alley edge. consider opponunities for allev display windows and sec- ondary custamer or employee entries, if ori~inal walls are not dama_ed. Screenin~ for scr~ i~e eyuipment, trash. or any other rear-of-buildin~~ element that can be +isualh~ improved, should be desi~ned as an inte=ral part of the overall desipn. Where intact. historic alley f~acades should be preserved along with orisinal fea- tures and materials. Alterations should be sensitive to and compatible with the historic scale and char- acter of the huildin~ and area. 32 ~ ~` Downtown Urban Design Guidelines SectionZ:The Non-#~istoricArea ~. ~ The hon-Historic Area offers unique opportunities for design options and creation of ~~arieh~ in building forms. :~ focus on pedestrian acti~~it~~ and attention to massing, scale and ali~nment of building features are important design considerations. Other important design elements are l) the Non-historic Area's relationship to its surroundings, including the Historic Area, the Civic Park area, and the neighborhood interface area, 21 the pedestrian qualit~~ of the area includinfi the down- town Boulder mall, east and w~est Pearl Street, Spruce and V1'alnut streets, Canyon Blvd. and the north-south streets that connect Civic Park to the mall area, and 31 that new~ building design can reflect the character of its own time while respecting the integrit~~, scale, and massing of historic buildings in the area. Map of the Downtown Historic District. the Nc~n-Historic Area, and the Interface Area While creative interpretations of traditional desi=n elements, and and designs that reflect the character of their time. are encour- a~ed, they should be compatible with but distin=uishable from their historic nei~hbors. Architectural styles that direcUy copy historic buildinQs and theme desi=ns, such as "wild west' or "neo-chaler' are inappropriate to the character of downtown Boulder. These suidelines also discoura~e projects that create inhospitable pedestnan design, and buildinss that are inappropn- ate in scale and massin~ to their sunoundinss. The urban design objectives for the Non-Historic Area are to: • Reinforce the character of downtown as a pedestrian place by encoura~ing architectural solutions that are visually interesting, stylistically appropriare to their context, and compatible in scale and character with their street. • Svengthen the identity of downtown as a place where people feel welcome and comfortable throu~h the careful selection of buildin~ materials and human scale design. • Encourage development that complements pedestrian activity. DDAB is responsible for reviewinQ all projects wit/r a co~tsrruc - tin~~ rolue of $]0,000 or more in the Non-historic Area and the Interface area. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~` 33 Z.l ConsiderlncorporatingTraditional~acade ~lementsin NewDesigns ~~~ Rcpetiti~n and use of iraditicmal facade C elem~nts creates pan~rns and ~ isual ali~n- ments that c<~ntrihut~ to thr o~erall charae- t~r ot the historic cammercial arca. V1'hile these ieatures ma~ he intc:rpreted in ne« an~i contemporan ~a~s. the~ inrlude: .-~. Kick plate as a hase lo thc storc fron[ or res~aurant fr~ .Ali~*n thc hci~ht ~ ith othcrs w~h. . ~otisihle. ~ B. Firs~ Noor displa~ ~indc». Ali~~n Hith hei~~ht of others in the bl~~ck u•hen oth- en arr appropriatel}~ placed. Transom. Align w~ith othrn ~~•hen oth- ers arc appropriatel} placed. Sisn hand. Parapet cap or cornices. ~'enical in~ie~H patterns and shapes. D. E. F. w indow sills. G. An«led corner entrance. H. Recessed central entrances Typical t;icaJe ~lemrnts • -~ i Z.Z Consider the Alignment of Architectural ~eatures and ~ ~stablished Patterns With Neighboriny ~ `dings ~ ~ The ali~nment of architectural feawres. from one buildin~ to the next. creates risual continuit~ and establishes a coherent ~isual eontext thmu~hout the daH.. ~a~n. VVhile new~ buildin~ forms are expected. buildin~ faca~. ~hould be desi=ned to reinforce thcse patterns and support duH~ntow~n's established visual charar- ter. Some horizontal elements that tv~icsll~~ ali~n with adjoinin~ huildin~s include: ~ ~ t t ~ -L-~ - - --~-- ~ -r-------- ~ 1 ~ ~ e ~.~ ~ ~~. ~~r ~.. ~.~ y~ ~« ~~~.~ . ~ ~ t _; .»..._~.~---T--,----T-. • ~ -- • buildinR kickplate • the top and hottom heisht of first floor d. :.. w~indows • transom over the entrancew~av • horizon[al and venical proportions of the building • storefront ti~indcx~ s • windoa opening~ and styles, especiall~ uppcr storv wind~~H~S • sign hand ahove the street level • parapet and cornice lin~ • windov~• sills on upper ftoors • roof line snd proportion Illusuation ot~ Architectural Feature Ali~~nmem on thc Block Face 34 ~ ~ Downrown Urban Design Guidelines Z.3 MaintainthelineofBuilding~acadesAnd _.. StorefrontsatSidewalk~dgeinBlocks ~ ~ Buildin«s eir c~ther desi~n feature~ that are huilt up to the sidew~alk maintain a lin~ of cisual continuit~~ and pro~~idc ~~isual int~rest for ~~drstrians. II~ a portion o1 the buildin~ tiacade i, ~et bacl: from the side~~ alk, the sidew~all: cd~_e should he ~ isuallv ntaintainecl thr~u«h the usc of a linr oi columns supponin~~ upper tloc~rs c~r other featureti. such as a rhan~=e in surface texture, a line of planter~. portals. or railin~~s. } .4. Plan i~ic~i, ~ja rre~~~ bur(dr~ig alr~ncd ~ r'"""-°"'" ~ ~ ~ ~~ ' ~, i1h e.ristri:; buildn:gs. ~ ~ ~ *~~ ~ l3. A portron n~ u rie~r bi~ildiri4 ser bn~k ' tirirli rke buildin~ G~re r~% the block n,ain ~ ~~ -. ~ • ~ . : ~,~. ~ I !G(AP[f lCllfl [! /-(llf Of CD~lOlI17S 10 Qli - q ~ ! ~ iq~per.flnor: ~ t °~! _~~~ C. A rretir buildi~i~. nir tlte sunte~ lor c~f ; ~ [Ir1 17l.SIO1'i[' b[ftldrlt,t'. se! burk tn r'eti'~a! . ~ -W-~--w -~ ,r~ , , ~ ..._~ rhe lustoric bi~ildinL. ~b7aintain the orininal setback of historic build- in~s. In mam- cases. the building's placement on the sitr is an imponant derininR characteris- tic. For instance. the Countv Counhouse and the Post Oftice have an open area betw~een the buildin~ and the sidewalk a~hich is important to retain. For histonc huildi~~*s that arc not locat- ed at the zero sethack line. place the addition behind the on~~inal setback. CODE: Pnman huilJin~ entr.jnce locatiuns shoulJ ta~e thz ctreet. CODE: htinimum perrentaee of !ut frontage that must contain a bui1J- inr or buildim_~ should nut be less than 70~'r in th~ RB-1 E. RB-_'E. RB-11~. RB-~\. and RK-?~. Such standar~i is not ap~~li~ahlc in RB-±E: CUDE: With the e~ceP~iun of propenies frontin~ am~~ Canyon Boule~~ard. all othrr properties ha~~e a maximum Irun[ ~ard I:uidscaped setback that u(I teet 1'<,r huildin~> tn the RS-lE. RB-"'E. RBI X and ap to 1~ feet in thc RB- ~L•. RB-'?\. :uid RB-3X zonr,. .-~> a ma~or aner ial street of four lane,. Canvon Boulecard has a setbacl, of ?8 feet from the eenterline uf the highwa~ or'_'S feet from the lut line aJjuin- invtiu right-of-wa~. ti~hirheveris greater. 24 Considerthe~leight, Mass, and S~ale of Buildings Buildings that appcar tiimilar in mass and scale to ather buildin~~ in the area help to maintain the coherent ~isual ima~e of the doti ntow n character. At the same time. it is impc~rtant tc~ maintain a~arietv of hei~~hts to creat~ visual interest. Whilc thc artual hei«hts oi buildin=s are of concern. the per- ceieed hei~hts of buildin~*s are eyuall~ imponant. One. twn and three ston build- in~_~ make up the primary architectural fah- ric of the d~wntown, with taller buildin~s located at kev intersection~. ~ A. '~laintain visual interest in building forms. Geate arehitectural variety by steppinR hack upper floors and varvin~ buildin~ mass- in~*. esp~cially on lar~~er S][Cti. :~. CODE: Allowable "hy-righP' hei~ht is up to 3i teet, with a ma~imum of 5> feet throuQh heicht mvieN. CODE: The ma.ximum "by-right" num- t~er uf s~ones alloH ed in ?5 feet is two stones. CODF,: Generall~. for commercial and residential buildings in RB-IJi, R$-_'X. RB-lE, and KB-~E, the Hoor to floor heigh[s shauld be up tn 1~3 feet for the ground le~el. and up to l2 feet for the sernnd ftoor. CODE: In the RBl-X nnd RB1-E zones, principal buildings height for a building located on a corner lot tha[ fac:es two pub- lic streets may be increased up to 10 feet in heighc and up ro 3 stories if: the buitd- ing contains no more than 3 srories above the finished ~rade; the horizonta] dimen- sio~s of the third s~orti are no greater than 50 feet alon_ the front vard street frontage b~ 70 feet alon~ the side yard sueet frontage; and, thc vcrtical planes of the third ston~ are located directlv above the vertical ptanes of the stories below. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~ 35 Visual interest usin, ~~aried massin~ B. Relate the height of buildings to neighbor- CODE: Generally, for ~ng structures at the sideti~alk edge. commercial and resi- For neu structure; that are sivniticaml~ taller dential buildin~_s i^ than adjacent buildinRs. upper floors should be RB-1X. RB-'_X, RB- set-back a minimum of 1~ feet fram the front IE, and RB-?E, the facade to reduce the p~rceived hei~ht. floor to floor heights Hou~ever, slender forms such as t~wers and should be up ro 14 feet a~~rmer~ that extend forward ~n the frcmt facade for the ground le~~el, m~~~ add visual t~anetv and ~::~crest io the set- and up to 1? feet for hack ar~a. the second floor. C. '~laintain a standard floor to floor height. Gencraliv, for commcrrial and residential build- in~~, RB-iX. RB-??i. RB-1~ and RB-~E. the ~•mund level tlnor to Hoor hei~*hts should be approximatelv 13 to 15 feet and up tc, 1'? to I-1 feet for the second floor. This is particularl~ important in the RB-1X zc~r._ alon~ Walnut Street. It is also importar: _:~ideline fe~r com- mercial huildin~s, but not necessarilv for resi- dential buildinRs i^ thr RB- ~X and RB-3E zones. D. Consider the effect of building height on shading and views. Buildin~ heiRht can shade sidewalks durin<_~ winter months leadino to icv sideu~alks which can discoura_~e pedestrian artivit~. Where~er pc~ssible. ne~~ buildinas should maintain ~ ieti corridor~ and should not sha~lt~ ~; nonhern sideu~alk of east-west runnin« sir~ets at noon on Decemher ~ 1. c.5 Maintain a~luman Buildin S~ale, Rather than ~_~~.. Monolith~~ ~~ Monumenta Stale ~~ ~~~~~ Avoii~ ~ar~e featureless facade ~urfaces, racade elements that ar~ tamiliar to the pedestrian help establish a sense of~ sc:alc and create risual patterns that link buildin~s within a blc~ck, while allowin~ indi~ idual identity of ee:.:h huildin~~. Smaller scale buildin~s and the use of traditionallv-sized buildin~~ components help to establish human scale and maintai^ thc ch~uacter of downtown. Standard size brick, unitnrm buildin~ components. and standard windou sizes are most appropr~ate. 36 ~ ~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Anew buildin~ u ith ~ isual interest. standar~ fl~wr heieht_ and traditional facade ~_ ~ uion of huildinR~ that lock monulithic next to huildin~~ .• :in more details and ~isual in[rre.i. Z.b Create Pedestrian Interest at the Street Level A. De~~elop the first le~~el of buildings to pro~ ide ~~isual interest to pedestrians. For a nc~n-rr;i~l~ntial huil~in~~. the first flc~or strect ~~all> shuuld cc~ntain architec- tural element: that cr~atr ~ isua] interest an~i a P«lestrian street en~ imnment surh a~ ~3~~~1a~ ~indi~ti, tucin« the sideHall:. <~utduc~r ~iining arca~. displn~ cases, puhlic art inte;~ratc~l ~ ith the huil~lin~ desi~~n, and urchi~~cwral ~Irmrnt; and details that cre- a~r ~isual in~rre~~. Unacceptahlr: does not distin_uish bet~~cen u~~cr and lc~~ner floors B. Consider ho~s the Texture and Pattern of $uildinb ~Iaterials 11'ill $e Percei~ ed U,~ huildin~ materials tha[ are (amiliar in their dimension, and thai can be repeat~d. Tc~ help estahlish a sense of human ~calc use familiar buildin~ components in tra~li- tional size~. For cxample. standard size hrick. uniforn~ huildin_ a~mp~ments, and typical windoU~ sizes. help t~~ estahlish human scale. Combinins huilclin~ mstrri- al~ that can be ~ isuall~ contrasted alsu help~ tc~ achie~e ~~ense of human scale . C. liaintain The Design Distinction BetKeen lipperand Lo«~er Floors De~eln~ thr tirst t3oor facade as primarl~ trans~ar~nt. makin~~ it in~itin~~ tc~ the public. Cc~nsider u~in~T tiindc~u~s and other architer- wral tcaturrs te~ crcate a pattern that tiill reinti~rc~ the traditional Cacade rh}~thm fnund on commercial huildin~*s in the dc~un- ~c»n area. Upper floor~ _Tenerall~ are difter- ~ntiated throu~h the u,< <~f mnre solid areas than ~oids and with smaller. venically ori- rnted windows in a re~ular pattern. I ~ E ~ ~ ~ :111! , ~ ; ;_.~ ~ _.. , , ; ~ ~: ~ ^ ~ ~ .~cceptable: distin~uishcs hetw~een upper and lou~er f~onrs ~ CODE: For huildin~. loeateel in the RB-lE. RB-?E. RB-~E. RB-l~. RB-_'a. and RB- ~?~ zone;. a mini- mum of 60r~ of a~~r~und fluor facade facing a puhl~~ stre~t shall he made of transparcnt materials, or othera•ise desiRned to alloti~ pc:~ies- trians [o ~ ie~n acli~ ities inside the huildin~*s. This standard shall not appl~~ to residenti;~l usc~ that uccur along lhe trc~und tlcu~r tara~i~. Z.1 Avoid~lalflevel, orPartial Level B~sements _~ That ~xtend More Than Z~eet Above Grade ~~~ ~~~ CODE: First ~ - `~ -'~ floor le~•els -' - ~ _-_ . ~ should he no ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ : ~1 ~ '~ ~ lower than grade ; , ~ , level and n~i high- ' ~ ~ er [han ? feet ~,, - `~~ F-- ~- `•'. F'e1 F ~a . ~ ,{ ~ _-~- i ah~ve ~radc. "~ -_ ,.•-"'.-~ - : (Notc: cxccpt in ~ ..~ ~ : ~ ~• "~"E:,~~ e tlo~~d zones.) ;r=tia~°'~~=`;'~~` ` ~ 0.cceptt4l~ ii~cJ.~crz~~61e ~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~ 31 Z.8 ShadeStorefrontGlassbyApproPriate Means ~~~µ~: To pertnit ~ood ~ isihilit~ into storefront ~~indnws. and to create pedestrian interest. use aa~ninR~ or. for buildin_s with recessed first fl<~ors ~co~sider dreade~. Note: See Section 6: Extensions inti~ the puh- lic rivht-of-ti~av discussion on revo~able lease and allowablc dimensions. First Hour awnin~s prc~~ ide ~hade and ~ i~ual interest 2.9 Maintain The Rhythm ~stablished by The Repetition ~. ofThe Traditional Z5 ~oot ~acade Widths ~ ~ ~.~ Maintain the rhvthm ot~ facade widths. especially for projects A sin~le facade should n<,t exceed a maximum o1~ 75 linear feet that ex[cnd cner several lots, bv chan~~in~~ materials. patterns, lequi~alent to thr~e traditional lots). Traditional, established re~eals. building sethacks. facadc ponions. or h~ usin« desiRn breaks bet~een buildinRs. such as alle~ Ha~s. should be main- elements such as columns or pilasters. tained. ~~ - I ..... Ry ~ra--. nr E r.......~ ~~~ _._~4 ~ ~~ -r ~~- g5 . c- ,~- .~ _ t i~ T ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ 1 ~ ` i ~ i j ~'• ~ . . tu . f, t ~. 1 ~ i Illustration of the ?5 foot widc pattern of d~wntown facades 38 ~_ F Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines Z.10 CansidertheScale,Texture, and Pattern of Building Materials ~ ti:e huildin~_ materials that are familiar in their dimensions and cal ~•ind~~ sizes. hclp tc~ c:s~ahlish human s~ale. Ce~mhinin~~ that ~an hr rr}~e~ted. Tc~ hel~ e~tahli;h ~ sen~r c~t~ human ~calc;, building material~ that can hc ~ isuall~ contr„tecl al~u help~ t~~ u;r lamili~r huildin~~ compi~nent. in traditiunal size~. For exam- achie~e a sense o1 hum~n s~alc. ~1~. standarcl ~ire hrick, unifonn huilding rc>m~~ment~. anci tvpi- Z.11 Consider The Quality of Open SPace _. IncorPoratedin NewandRenovatedBuildings ~ ~~ .~. Create comfortable, safe, accessi- hle, and appropriateh~ located upen spaces to pro~-ide pedestrian interrst and con~~enience. Orirn~ ci~cn spar~s t~~ the ;un ancl ~ ieti~ s. Crcate a sense of enclosure ~~ hile maintainin~ safetv. so that open s~~cc:~ fccl likc nutdoor rooms. Prc~~ iclc sratin~~ that is useable year- rc~uncl. Placa,. c~wrtvarcls. porket park,. and terraces should br desi_*ned tu he ea~il~ accessible and comfonable f~~r a suhstantial pan of the ~ear. See Srction 6.7. K. Connect open spaces to other acti~•it~~ areas w~here people gather to sit. eat, or K~atch other people. Locatc side~alk restaurants or outdoor dinin~ arcas cm or adjacem to apc:n space~ and pedestrian routes such as ~ide~a~ks ancl grren areas. Connect shops ur oftice cntrances directly to places whcrc pcople ~ather or walk. V4'here appropnate and allowable, thc use of H~ell designed and shielded rooftop decks tor restaurants and arcess to ~~ieH~s is encoura~ed. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~ 39 :~ttrarn~~ i~E~~n spa~e~ ence,ura~e ~:c>~lc to ~ ather dc»~ nt~~wn Z.12 Reco nizeTheSpecial CharacterofThe Area outhofCanyon Boulevard CODE: Cam~on Boulevard. throu~h the dcnvntoH•n. is~a "majc~r ancrial street c~f 4 lanc~" ti•hich reyuires that buildings be ,et-ha~l: 7R leet from the ccnterline of the hiChuav or ~5 feet from thc lut line adjoinin,_ the ri_=ht-of- wa}~. whinc~~~er is ~reater. A. Emphasize the "boule~•ard" character of Can~on b~~ maintaining consistent build- ing setbacks. (See section 6.10 for Cam~on Boule~~ard landscapingl Cam cm Buule~ ar~i is one of the eitc's mos~ prc,minent avenues with its center plan[in~ titri~ and wicl~ huilclin~~ set back,. It has a uniyue character that ~li~ ides the Ci~ ic Park area from the -norc urhan Walnut. P~arl Street. and d<~wntou n Bould~r mall arcas. Dependin~~ on the hle~ck. Canyon Boule~ard ha, an urhan rharacter on the nonh side and a park-like charactrr on the south side. Nonh side buildin~s, especiall~~ bet~~een 9th and 16th streets, shoul~i iine up at the same set- back line and feature a deeper setback from Cam~on Blvd. Features such as outdoor restaurants, pockei parks, p~destrian seatin~~ areas, and roof tcrraccs and halconies on upper floors are encoura~ed alonR the south facin~ facade. ~ B. Ensure that new• de~~elopment or reno~~a- tion is in compliance with the cih's, and if reyuired, national Hood control stan- dards. The arehitccwre and use of buildinss in the arra south of Camon Boule~ ar~ difter from the urban character ~~f huildin~s alone Pearl and VValnut str~ct~. Thiti :irea~i~ directl~ affected bv the B~~uldcr Crcek flood~~a~~ whirh ran affect the location. siting, and huildin~ desi~*n of~ c<intitructi~m pr~ijccts. ~ C. Building forms compatible with the tcale and character of the area are stron~h• encouraged. A~anct~ ~~f buildin~ heiRhts and form, is cnci~uragc~l w•ith priman entrances to ~hop> anci c~ttices lacin~~ the main str~et. D. Parking should be located to minimizr visibilit~~ from the street, preferabl~• at the rear of buildings not to the building side or front. In this spccial area. focused on pedestrian w~a~ s, parks. and a unique mix of uses. keep- in~_ ~ ~ic>~ntown imu, ..~f huildin~s facin~~ onto thr s~reet is im~, -tant. ~ ~ E. Pedestrian and bic}•cle connections through the area that integrate park, creek, and sidew~alk systems are strong- k encouraged. Bikr and pedc~trian pathw•ays that connect the area internally and to surroundinC areas. and tha~ take ad~~an[ase of the park and creek svstem that run~ throu~h the area. are desir- able in maintainin~ the area's unique charac- ter. When teasible~encoura_e ri~ht-of-w~ay acces, r~utr~ throu~h properues that can link hik~ and ~+e~iestrian pathHa~~s. F. ~Vhen adapting residential structures to commercial use, respect the residential character of the building front. A~<~id alterin~~ t~acade eleme~ts such as porches. ori~inal windows, huildin« forms, and materials on the facade when adapting residrntial strucwres to commercial uses. Neu additions should be set back from the priman facade or placed to the rear ur the side ot the propert~ . qp ~ ~ Downrown Urban Design Guidelines Section3: ThelnterfaceArea ,~. ~ The Interface Area is composed of the blocks that link the core of the downtow~n to the surrounding residential neighbor- hoods. This area requires special design sensiti~~ities that m~st be addressed when commercial buildings are located adjacent to residential areas. From the nei~hborhood perspecti~e. a~ well as for the health and appearance of the downtown com- mercial area. it i, important that the residential block; adjacent to the commercial area remain sta- hle. quiet. secure. and orderly. For the most part, it i~ the impacts of the commercial area w~hich can be m~st detrimcntaf to thc residential neiahbor- hood. not the reverse. These impacts can be mini- mized throu~Th careful desi~n that emphasizes the transition between commercial and residential areas. and respects the seale and qualit~~° ol adja- cent residential uses. It is expected that throu~h thc usc of these Quidelines. as well as appropriate land use and zoninn restrictions. Reneral nei~hbor- hood "]ivabilit~~" w~ill be supported and enhanced. Good Neighbor Policy~ A~ood nei~hborhood policy has been implemented by downtown property and business owners and residents livin~ in adjacent residential nei~hbor- hoods as a positive way to communicate about issues of "livability'~ in the interface area. Its pur- pose is to establish a standard of cooperation and a code of conduct not generally addressed by existin~ law. While compliance is valuntary. the policy asks that a"Good Nei=hbor A~reemenf' between com- mercial property or business owners and surround- ino nei~hborhood residents be agreed to and signed. The policy asks owners to take action on a number of issues includin~: vash: litter: Graffiti removal: the use of alternate transportation modes by employees: employee parkin~>: noisc, animal, pest. and weed control: deliveries: and employee/tenant educatian. For information on how businesses in the interface area can participate in the Good NeiQhbor Policy call the DMC at (303 )~ 1-4000. ~ )TE: DDAB is ponsible for iewin~ commer- 1 projects within t portion of the erface Area locat- in the Non-his- ic area. LPAB is ponsihle for that -~ioo of the erface Area that ls within the ~toric Area. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 7~hc~ urb~n desi~n ubjecti~c. fur the `ei_hborhood Intcrtarc •~faintain th~~ ~ii~er,ii~ m nuiluin~ t~~r an~f .ii: an~i r~~r~~ .areas are to: a~i~~~inm~~ re•i~icntial ,hara~ter that i< imn~~n.int i~ ~ ui~ arr.: •~II:i~U(:li'C ~~n.itn. ~i~>i_n :lli~Il_ I11'.' C~l,': l\f1C1".' lll: ~ji~\CIl- ' nI~~UUC:!_~ ;1~1~~1'~~ Ifll[~:l:l~ lr~~~ll Tl~~l~:. 111_L'Ili II!'i;llf'~=. ~~~~~ l~~l\ I] ~i~Ttlfllt.'I'CI:II ^f~~ ;lnlll> rr,i:icnn~i n~i~'hhc~l"t1~1~~1~>. , auil~in,~ ~C~IL'il. ;111~1 ~UI17I11.T~L:1~ ~~'f\ 1~~ :1!'~.1~ i~G ~ul~~~~i • L•n~~~ura~•r ~cn.iti~,: .itr. huil~lm~~. an~ ~trtc~.~a~< <I~,ign tha! ~l~nti.il nci_~hh~~rh~~~~~1~. ~m~h„ize. a ei~ar di>tinruun h~tu~en hcnh rc~mmerrial and r.~i~l~ntiai ar~,i~ 3.1 MaintaintheDiverseResidential architectural Character of the Interface A rea .~. '~laintuin historic residrntial buildin~,s. :~l~h~~u~~li thr r~hahilit~tinn ~,I r~.i~lrn- lial huil~lim~. li~r uf ti~r u.~ t• P~~s.ihl~ ll~ mainta~n th~ ^tl~'hhurh~u~d~, rhar- a~t~r ancl .~ale. cum~rsicm ~,t~ hiz[nri: r~~i~i~n~ial huil~m~~. t~~ ~~~rnmrrcial ~~r nu~c~1 u~c. i. aPpro~nate ui;l~ ~~h~n th~ rr,i~~ntial u~e i• nc, lon~~rr f~a,i- hlc. Careful run:id~raticm mu:t h~ ~_i~ ~n ~~~ thr ~ ~,ual imp:~~~, a nun-re,- i~lrnuul rc~n~~ni~~n rn~~ h~~~ cm th~ surrc,undin~~ rc,idenual arca. G Commercial constructiun on a primaril~ re~idential blucl, should he de;i~,ned tu reNect a residential churarter. For c~am}~1.. a tr~,ni ~,ir~+: ,.tna~E. (~~,~ a rc~mmer~ial huil~iin~~ m a re•iu~nna': hlu~k ma~ h; de~irahf~. Carcful rnr~- ~i~icratii~n mu<t h~ ~•i~~n t~~ a~ij~.~n~ rr.,~~nie~. th; ~,~ ~rall urhan ~, ~+~_n yualit~ rl th~~ hl<~~1. un~1 th; ~ii:~racter ut thr ~urr~~un~iin_~ ar~a 13. in ~_eneral, construct huildin~~; of' three stories or less. Crcatc a he~~~ht tran:iti~~n ~~ lu~.uin~• tall~r ~~~r~i~n~ c~f huildim~. tr~~ar~l th~ dc»'ntc~~~ n. c~r Pear] Stree~. an~1 lo~~ er Puninn~ 1„cc~~~~i ~n~~ar~l wrruunclin~. r~.i~rnti:ii :u~ra,. 3.Z CreateAttractiveRearAlley~acadeson BuildingS ~acing Toward Residential Areas Tht dz~t~~n yu~li[~ c~t lhe rear facades of pl~a~an~ huil~iin_~ ~tesi~=n at the rear c~f th~ ~~,mm~rcial and mixed use huildin~~ [hat hufldin~~. ln~lude such feature~ ~ell ia:c re,ideniial zone. i~ c~t' ~~reat roncern t~ detii~_nccl huilcline entranc~,. ~~inden~~,, hal- ti~~• re>idential propcrt~ c~~~ner,. conir~. th~~ usc ~it'hi~*h yualit~ material~. Cun~idc:ratinn tnusl he gi~en to creatin~ a ~lac~ area~ ~n~l ~l~ntin_~ ~rea~. 42 ~ Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines T~h~ r.,i~~nu:u ~har;~~t~r ~~f ~h~, hi~t~~ri~ h~~mr i: ni.~intain~~.l e~~n th~~uen used ce,mmerciall~ ~.~ ~ ~ F~ j ; p 1" ~~ ~ L~ r r ~ G t V,. • i/ V r r' 'esiQr: ali . ~ ~ ~c s~. ~ . ~~ ~ ~~r aL~i~L aEt: ~ na~~v: ~ou~~ ~ ~oE ,. Dp~~~""I~~?~. ~ ~ W~~i ~~ _~E I~IPfIi Spr~~i~~ ~CCcS~ ~ 4~ ~'~°ill:i°_~. _:~Il~l~l~,:° 1',Il;': I''~.W~Tii~. . . .i~:l~:.:~_I-I', :~.'.i~1~.:1111C. ~l~]_;ln,~fllUi~~l. •`, Ill ~~~~~'r, .. Ifc~!?' lllC!?- I"~:1:- ~~il"~l~ an:: nc,r~il~~ ~~~~i~; ~1C~I~'fl~~ ~.::t.. ~~Li!l~llll_ lflli'~lil~~-. \\1T1J~~'~ :. f~.1l;i~illC~ nl.::.::Ai`.':1 !Il~ ,•~~::ntin~ c...::~~ a,~ cn~~~::~c:_::. -.. I~.iement~ :ucr. a~ t; asi: cnllecUnr, area~ snciulc; h~- ;creenec. ciesi~*nec: ~~~ ~r. inie~~r~i nar~ n'. tn. ~~~eral: nuiidin_ a:•si_i.. unc: presen: a~: atiractn:• teatur: ~+nri ~ie~~ec irurt; ati,l~ceni re,icienti:~i are:~-. 1.. I~rv~~io, adeuu~tr i~~~hnn_ in-- necie:trian~ it: a1. int:~riu~ a7'E':: 3~1°~ «~21~~> f~r~ .ecurit~_ anc C(lt?1t'tlll'f1C:. ~. Si~ield ~c~urit~• li_hti-~« irum ua~a~en: re~ia~~nn:~_ i~sc~ ~~ t'tta~ it a~~c, nu: ,ninr ir; ad.jact~ti' rewiuentta`. ~~ inc~~~•~ ,. i 1<eir~ t~~ [hr cis: Li<_n: C„ci~ . I;. ~t iier:~ pari:~n_ in alie~; niace~ car~ ne~~: t~~ ,~ pui~ii~ :ic;•. - nsl;.. nr~~~ ici~ u minimum e~~n~ i~~n: iand:~n>>:~c st~•i: net~~een tn~ oari-~in^_ are:s anc tiic~ sid:~ti~.al~. E. C~~rner huifdin_~, i~~caieu a: tii_ rurne- <f; alie~~~~~~ ane pui~i~c street~ m:n or~~~ ic-_ :: ~ i;ua; i~uf'ier t+~ nidr ~lie° pari:in~_ anc tr~~j~ ~tur.se~• ircn~~ pecic:triai: . ic~~,. CODE: reau~:.°~ ~. f~ ~~~~:~ •i~~i~: t;i:in~_i~• ~~i~~re all,~~ I!11'.'!"~C~' V.~1TI1 ~liC.!~- Tn~~~ tra;f; r~cc{~ta.ir~ ~ir: ,cr~rn:~. ~~ ~~'hp~e ~n~ ~onin = Line Runs ~iion~ ~ Stree~ o- ~o~ ~ in~. ~amm~rciai Deve opmentS~ould~espec~The~x~~~inc ~~ii~in~ ~cafe ~nd ~haracte~ o~T~e ~djacen~ Re~id°(~~i~i ~-r~~. ~~~'lilllC'~I.~~, ~~~fl~il"U:U~,-~il l)R Li I'~C1I11:1!"11`. 1'v~l~l~,'IIUa~ h~~~C~ ~Il(lU~~l ah;: Lf~;:l~ :; II.I~'lli [1':1~.111~+^ h~ I~~~:1;1I~_ lull~i' T~~~fll~~fl• : l1U~l'!Il~~? (~~ fC11C:[ I! I"C~l~~fl[1QI Ch:1r~~lC;. .~ fr(~Ilt ~31't~ tiC~- It~i1;t1"ij lt'.; U~~ti`,fli~~\~il :Lll~l It~P,~i' ~li~i[I~~1?• 1~+~~.:!1'i~ ;":~I~1:I111;S1 fl~~~,'';: li~i' ~i~illlilCf.:1:]~ U~~, '.ll iCl(11: Itl[Ci'I:A:;~ lu:3U~)Il~ l~ ~l~~li~- :11-~Ct>- f~uw~ntown Urua~i Gesian GuidelinE~ ~ 4~ 3.5 DesignStreets inThe Neighborhood InterfaceArea ~ to Reflect Adjacent Residential land Uses. ~_ ~~ Ci~n,ider the scale and character of~ the puhlic right-of~ -wa~ hct~~een resid~nual areas and ceimmercial 'ar~as. A. Create a strong residential yualih~ in the design of streei improvements at the interface of commercial and residen- tial areas. Traffir circle,_ landscaped medians, necl.-d~~ti~ns and p~~rket ~~rks are appropriate ri~ht-of-N~a~ treatmcnts. B. ~laintain the traditional curb zone betKeen the curb and the sideK~alk of no less thun four feet. S[reet tr~cs. }~lanted at ?0 tu ?U feet a~art. a~era~e ?5 foot on center. are nc<~mmended. I Sce Secticm 6, Streetscape Impro~ emcnts l. Plant Flowers, grass or oth~r li~ e Rround crn er in the curh zcme fcir the half blork that extends betwren residen- tial arcas and thr c~~mmcrcial all~~ wa~.. Rock,, ora~el. or ~~ther rock-like mat~rial en~e ~tut u!lcnrc ~l in the curh zone area. A traditional curb zone with str~et trees and arass 44 ~ ~ Downrown Urban Design Guidelines Section 4: Parking ~acilities ~ , ~ The most critical elements to consider in e~~aluating the design of parking facilities are traffic impacts on adjacent streets, building massing, urban design relationships to adjacent buildings, the location of the facilit~~ w~ithin ihe dow~ntown, its secu- rit~~, landscaping, and lighting. The urban design objectives for the design of parking facili- ties are to: • Produce attracti~e parkinR iacilities that ar~ compatibl~ addi- tions [o downtc~wn which add to, rather than ~ictract from, thc area's historic character and function. • Enhance pedestrian acti~it~~ at the sidew~alk level throu~h the usc: of retail wrap on structured parkin~ and landscape areas aroun~l surface parl:in~*. • Ensure that thc desi~~n c~f the facilitv is of the hi~hest qualit~~. 4.1 LotateSurface Parking on AppropriateSites y~~ ,~.~.. A. Locate parking facilities on blocks and streets in which the~• best serve their function without jeopardizing the pedestrian qualih~ of the downtown. Locations such as the area around Canyon Boulevard or adjacent tn the "mal] loop" are preferred. These will promote continuity of the pedestrian environment and a compact retail core. The mall loc~p is defined bv 1 lth St. Walnut St. 15th St and Spruce . B. Locate surface parking lots at the interior of the block not at corner locations. In a downtown setting corner location~ are important a~ huildin~ sites for prominent buildin~~s. Parl:ing lots on c~rners in the ~ dow~ntown area Rive the suburban appearance of cars parked in front of buildin~s. C. Surface parking lots that share a site with a building and that are to be located under a building but at grade should be placed at the building rear. Parkin~ lots under buildin_s should not extend to the street front. Rather. thev should be shielded from the street bv the front of the huildin~. In this wav lhe architectural continuitv of the street can be preserved. Parkin~ behind a huildin~ accessed from an alley is prefi;rred in order to minimize the number of curb cuts. reduce turns. and minimize pedestrian conflicts. Downrown Urban Design Guidelines `~ ~' q5 4.2 ~educ~ Visual Impatt of Surface Parking Lots ~~~ COD~: Thc cit~ code reyuires landscapin~ on the intenor and the penmeter of parking lots. Section 9-3.3--~ describes standards for screen- ing parkin~ lots from the street. screening parking lots at propeny ed~=es, and interior ~arkin~ lot landscapinQ. For example. lots a~ith fewer than I 5 ypaces (300 =ross square feet per space ) require no inte- rior landticap~n~~. Lots with 16 to 1fi0 spaces require that at le:~et tive pcrcent of the interi- or parkin~ lot con~ain land- scapin=. Lots w ith more than 160 spaces and more than one d~uhle loaded re~w of parking reyuir: ihat at Icast ten prrcent of the intenor parkin~i lot con- tain land,caping. ~ A. Subdi~•ide surface parking lots into smaller areas though the use of land- scaping or other visual elements. Plantin~~ islands for N~~wers, ground r~~~er. or shruhs shoul~ hr useei at entrances. exits. internal turns, and to separate double rows of cars. Plantin« island~ should be lar~e enou~~h to sustain proposed plant materials.~Such islands should b~ de~~~~ned to break up the expanse of pa~ement and help e;tablish the desired direction ~~f circulati~~n. Plantin~~ should t~ attracti~e, lou maintenance. and hard~ - able to sun~i~~e soot and ~as fumrs. Lan~iscaped area. should be pmtecied u ith appropnnte curhs, ed~ing. bollards, railin~s. Ic~u aall,, c~r similar elements. ~ 7'rees are the most essential form e~f ~~reener~ since they screen cars. pro~ide shadc. and framc views. A~'oid tr~_•< with loa-~~rowin~, branches or that excret :in or moisture. Use parking lot si~~ns ~ ~atible ~•ith those in ~~~neral use in the dowm~,w•n area. ~ 46 ~ ~' Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Plantin~* islands hel~ direct ~cdestrian traffic. B. ~i'here the parkin~ lot abuts a pub- !ic sidew~alk, provide a visual screen or landscaped buff'er beh+~een the sidew~alk and the parking lot. There are se~~eral ways in u~hich this ma~ be accomplished: • The buff~er ma~~ be a landscaped berm and/or planung strip, a minimum of 6 feet in width between the sideu~alk and the parkins loi, ar the width equal to the sethack ot~an adjacent huildim~ if wider than 6 feet. • The buffer area may he desioned in conjunction with a low w•all ~f a materi- al similar to adjacent huildin~s. Ideal materials for doH nto~ n tences and walls inclu~ir brick. stime. or meuil. Dc~ not use untinishcd ~~<,<~d fenres. Thr huff~er area should be planted u ith appropriate ~*round co~ ers and small trees. Decorati~e plantinRs and bermed areas are encoura_*ed to hiohlioht entranre wavs. Care should be Ri~en to ~rcxectin~~ si~~ht lines for both pedestrians ancl ~chiclc;. Materials and arch~tecwral detailim_ selected for buffers should be comple- mentary lo the character and materials of adjacent huildinas. Lov~• ~~alls shoulcl be no lar~er than -~R". CODE: The cin code rcyuires land- scaping on the interior and the perimeter of parkin~~ lots. Section 9- 3.3-~i describes standards for screen- ing parkin= lot~ from thr street. screening parkin~~ lo[s a~ propem~ ed~es, and interior parking lot land- scaping. Forexample, with re~ard to the issue minimum heioht and opaci- ty: Parking lot screeninR may include landscape features such as planter boxes, walls. or hedges in combina- tion with trecs and ~lantin_T,, but must nrovide a scr~cn a rninimum oF-~~ inches in height alon~ the full len~th of the pazkin~ lot adiacent to the street. Planted materials must provide a significant screen when fully grown that is at least 42 inches in height as measured from the base of the side- walk adjacent to the street, unless the parking lot is hi~her than the side- walk, in which case it should be mea- sured fr~m the base of the parkinD lot adiacent to the strect. Fences shall be taller than 48 inches in height. In the RB I-E. RB?-E. RB3-E, RB l- X. RB2-X. RB3-X. BMS-Ji. IMS-X, and MU-X zones, thc parking lot screenina requirement can be met by any one of the following: • Aplanting area with a minimum of a six foot width hetw~en the side- walk and the parkin= lot, plan[ed with shrubs having a mawre height no lawer than 42 inches: ' • Afence, hedse. or wall meetin~ the requirements of Secuon 9-33-6, "Fences, Hedges, and Walls," B.R.C. 1981. and of a height no lower than 42 inches and fences and wall shall be no taller than 48 inches as measured from the base of the parking lot adjacent to the streei. • Another method, if appro~ed hy the city manager, that forms a signifi- cant screen between 42 and 48 inch- es for the leneth of the parking lot adjacent to the strect. Downtown Urban Desi9n Guidelines ~ ~ 41 T'hese plantin~~s help to hide a surface parking lot 4.3 Reduce The Visual Impact of Structured Parking ~~ ~ ~ A. 1)~ -~~n parkin~ structures so that t1~: . create a~~isualh~ attractive and active pedestrian en~ ~ronment through the use oi' a retaiUcommercial wrap. All above ~*radc parkin~~ strucwr~s, in w•hich parkin~~ i~ th~ prinri- ple use, should he ti ra~ped ~ ith a tw~o ston retaiUcommercial use to shi~ld ~he facilit~ from the s~reet and tc~ make thr entire huild- ing ~ isuall~ pleasing. B. For a parking garage created as a principal use on a lot that is o~~er 20,0(NI square feet in an RB-2E, Rl3-la, RB-2l, or RB-3Ji zone, the 1'ollowing criteria apph : C. The garage wrap should be compatihle w~ith surrounding buildings. In ~*eneral, the retail/rommercial ~•rap shuuld ~c~nform tc~ the ~uidelines in Section "?: Non-Historic Area. Facade desi~n should be considerate ot~ hoth ~~enical and horizontal architectural propor- tions. windoH patt~rn~, and architectural element, e~t buildin~s in the area. Desi_n ~•ith traditional commercial fcawres. this parkin~ farilit~ has retail/commercials space~ alcm~~ th~ ~treet CODE: The buildin~ shall be set back fifteen fert from any propert} line adjacent to a public street. but not an ~1!;•~.•. for any por- tions of the building between 35 feet and 45 feet in hei~ht. The facadz of'the building shall bc set back 35 fe~~ ~y property line adjacent tu a puhlic street, but not an alley, for an~~ portions of the buildins bctwccn 45 feet and 55 feet in hei~:.. ~~ll portions of a buiidin~ abov~ thc permitted height shall also tx: rcyuired to meet th~ reyuiremcnts set forth in 5ecrion 9-4-I 1, "Site Review." CODE: The requirements fur the maximum numher of stones set forth in Section 9-3.2-I. "Schedule of Butk Requirements," B.R.C., 1y81, shall not be applied to parkin~ areas within auto par}:ing ~~ara~~es. CODE: Afirst floor retail wrap is re~uired (floor area that is used for non-parkin~ purposes). The depth of the wrap is a minimum of 2~ feet and a maximum of 35 feet: The wrap faces on all streets. except alleys. for the entire length of the buildine except for those places necessary to pmvide ingress and e=ress into the parkinQ areas. And. the space is used for retail, restaurant and ~ther pc;destrian oriented uses othcrwise pc rmitted or approved in the zonino district. CODE: Asecond floor wrap is required. The depth of the secnnd floor wrap is a mini-num of 15~feet and a max~;num of 35 feet. 1fie second floor wrap shall face on ~' ,treets, except alley> the entire len~~th of the building. And, the space is for any use permitted or approved for thc zonin_ . ~:t. CODE: The maximum floor area rati. ~on-parkin~ uses shall be 0.7: I. Uninhabitable space shall not be included in the floor area rario calculation for non-parkin~ use~. The floor area ratios set forth i~i Sections 9- i.?- I, "Scheduie of Bulk Requirements", . and y-3.2-18. "F7oor Area Ratios for RB-lE. RB-?E. RB-~E. RB-1X. RF-~X. and RB-3X Disvicts. " B.R.C. lyHl, shall not be applied to a parking garage. 44 Security And Pedestrian Cirtulation Should Be Priorities ' ._. ~ Pedestrian routes in strucwres and lots shc~uld he easil} identifi- ~i~sirable. Intenor and exterior lightin_t should be designed for able and accessed. Clear visual connections between a~~ara_e. or -.,et} as well as night-time appearance. surfa.: parking lot. and adjacent sidewalks and buildings are 48 ~ ~ Downtown Urban Desi9n Guidelines ~: Section 5: Commerciai Signs ~ ~ Commercial signs should function to identif~~ and locate businesses, promote merchandise or service within, attract cus- tomers, provide direction and information, and in some cases create visual delight and architectural interest. The urban design objectives of the Commercial Sign Guidelines are to: • Encoura~~e desiRn and sion placement that promotes downtown husincsscs while complementing downtown's character and scale. • Pr~~mote sians that are desi~ned as an inteoral yet noticeable part of a buildin~'s overall desinn. • Promote the desi~in of si~ns that are ~c~o~3 neighbors within their bl~>ck. ~ ~ • Create an overall ima~e in which a buildin~T and its signs relate to each other in hclpin~ to draw customers. NOTE: The followin~~ is meant as a supplement to the city's Si~n Code. Si~n permits. ohtained throu~*h the Plannin= Department. are required. Si~~ns that extend into the dc~H~ntow~n Boulder mall public-ri~ht-of-wa~, will rcyuire re~iew b~ thc Downtown Mana~ement Commission. For further information call the DMC (303) ~1--~U00 and the Plannin~ Depanment ( 30~ ) ~ I -3?70. ~ Si~ns on historic huildinss or in historic districts must also com- ply with "Historic Preservation" prc~~isions. Chapter 10-13 of the Boulder Revised Code. Call the Plannin~ Dept.( ~0~ )~ 1- 3'? 70. Downtown Urban DeSign Guidelines ~ ~` q9 5.1 SignsShould be Designed asan Int~gral :~:~_ Part of The Overall Building Design ~~ In ~eneral. siRns should not ohscurr imponant architectural detail~. The~ should ali«n ~cith rnhrr~ si~*n; on the hlock [c~ maintain the existin~ pattern of horiz~ntal ~nd ~~ertical facade feawres. The~ shc~uld he ~<~sitioneei t~ cmphasizc special shapes or details of thc facade. to draw~ auenti~~n to the shop entran~c. or tc~ rm~hasize a displa~ windou. When se~eral businestic~ share a huildin~_. siens should be ali~Tn~d or or~anized in a ~ircctor~. F~~llnu~in~ are ~rincipl~ si~*n tv~eti that are a~~lirahlc in thr dow ntrn~ n: A. 1~ all Signs: ~~'all siRn~ ~.tre ]imited in si~~ and clctin~d a~ projectin,~ Iz~~ than 1~ inches ire~m the buildin~. «~all si~ n~ should h~ positicined ~ithin architectural features such as the panels ~hc~~e stc~refront;. on the transom. or flankin~~ doorwa~ ~. W"all m~~unted .ien~ shnuld ali_n w~ith others on a hlock to maintain estahli;hed p:~[- terns. CODE: The total area of all ~+all siens on a face oi a build- in~ ma~ noc exceed tii~teen percent of the area of that ponion of the buit~lin~ face hen~e~n ~~round le~el and the roof line or a line tw•en[v-h~~e f~eet ahme ~*rade le~el. ~+~hichever is less. CODE: The total arca of all ual] si~*ns on an architecturall}~ distinet wall. where tw o or more such walls form a face of a baildin~. shali not exceed ~~~~entv-five percent ~f such wa[l. CODE: No part o1~ a~~all ~i~n ma~ be la:ated more than twentv-fi~~e feet above aradc le~el. CODE: No wall si~n ma~ he attached to or displayed aQainst an}~ parapet w~all that does no[ ertend around the entire p~rimeter oi the roof enclosed hy the parapet. No sian on such n parapet wall ma~ extend more than '_-~ inches above the rootelc~~ation immediatel~ behind the si=n, unless approved in site revie~.. ~ CODE: No a~all si=n ma~~ extend ~hc~ve the rcx~f line of a buildin~ cxcept as permitted on a para~t «all. No wall sian may he displayed on the wall of a mechanical raom or pcnt- house c~r other such enclosed space which is not habitat~le to thc oecupants of the buildin~. CODE: The IenQth of a wall si~*n shall not exceed seventy pe:rcent of the lenRth of the v~all or the width of the leased space of the wall on which it is located. whiche~~er ic ]ess. CODE: The sign height for w•all si~ns located within the BMS-X. MU-X. RB 1-E. RB'?-E. RB3-E. RB 1-X, RB2-X, RB3-X, and TB-E zoninR distncts shall not exceed 24 inches for sin~le lines of copy and a[otal of 32 inches for mutriple lines of copy. and any graphic symbol may not exceul 30 inches. B. Projecting Signs: Projertin~~ sign means :~ sign attached to a buildin~ and extend- in~ in ~nhole ar in part I~ inches or more horitontallv hcvcmd thc surface ot the huildin« to which it is attarhed. Projectin, siRns should be positioned alon« the tirst N~~or le~ el of the facade. Projectin~ signs ma~ takc on their c~wn special shape, or create their own svmbol within the o~erall facade desiRn. A pr~jectin~ si~n with an ori:inal shape. 50 ~ `~ ~ Downrown Urban Desiyn Guidelines «~all Si~n p~~sitioncd aho~e storefront C. Awning Signs: .Awning~ sh~ul~l he used tc~ add ~ isual interest t~ a buildinn, pr~vide shade, and add ~ ari- ery~ to the streetscape. Th~~ should he positioned to emphasize special shapes c~r detail~ of the facade, to drati attenti~n to the shop entrances or to emphasize a display windou . Awnin~~ sisns ms~ hc illustrated v,ith letters c~r svmbols. Awnin~ si~ns are strai~>htforw•ard and effective. In most cases. unly one a~~ ning si~n is allowed per buildin<_*. Aw•nin~ siRns positioned alon~ the first floor le~el of the facade shall be no less than 8 feet from [he sidewalk to the si~*n. Au~nin~* siQns in the downtown can be attached to flexible material awnin~s or fixcd maryuees or canopies that project from the buildins. Consult the city Si~n Code. CODE: Signs projectin~ over puhlic property may not project more than thirty-six inches frc~m a w~all of a buildinQ; the maximum pennissible total area for such a sian is the lesser of: ~ • 1 syuare foot of si~n area for each linear foot of frc~nta~e of the build- ing upon which such sign is dis- played; or • 18 square fcet per sign. with n<~ face of the si~~n exceedin~T 9 squ;u-e feet. CODE: Projectina si~ns must have a minimum clearance above the sidewalk of ei_ht feet and may not extend twelve feet or mare above the sidewalk nor ahove the raof line. CODE: No more than one project- in~ si~n may bc maintained per ten- ant space frontage at the ~round level of a building. The minimum horizontal distance between project- in~ signs on a building shall be ?5 feet. 5.Z UseSimpleSignstoClearlyConveya Message. Symbols ~~ Are ~asilyReadAnd~nhancePedestrian Quality. ~;, ~ A. Sign '~laterials: Si`~n materials ~hc~uld be durable and easv to maintain. A~propnate si~~n materials include painted or carved wood: car~ cd w~~oden letters: epoxy letters: ~alvanized sheet metaL• slate. marble. or sanclstone: ~~old leaf: «ilt, painted. stained. or sandblasted glass clear and colored acrylic: nron: or s[ained ~~lass. B. Illumination: Li~hting externa] to the si~*n surface with illumination dirccted toward the siQn is preferred. Extemal li_htin~ may also hi~hliQht architectural features. Internally lit signs are ~Tenerallv discouraoed because thev can form masses of li~ht u~hich. when viewed in groups, can be unpleasant. Bv coordinatin_ the li~htine intensit~~, color, sign place- ment and display~ window desi_Tn, the entire storefront can become an effective si=n. The light level should not over- poH~er the facade or other si17ns on the street. The li~ht source should be shielded from pedestrian view. The light- in~ of symbol si~*ns is encouraged. Internal li~htin~ may be appropriate where only letlers are illuminated or neon is used. Neon is acceptable, thoush restricted in size, if it does not ubscure arrhitecwral detail cir o~erly illuminate display a~in~ua~s. C. Sign Shapes: Si~ns shauld he dcsioned in simple, straight-forward. shapes that convey their message clearly. Symbols are eas- ily read and enhance the pcdescrian yuality of the down- town. D. Graphics: Letterin~ styles should he proportioned, simple, and easy to read. In most instances, a simple rypeface is preferred over a faddish or o~~erly ornate rype style. The ~umber of rype styles should be limited to two per si_n. As a_eneral rule, the letter forms should occupy not more than 75~Ir of the total siLn paoel. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines .:.~... Section 6: Streetscape Improvements ~ ~ ~. The term "streetscape" refers to the entire s}~siem of streets, sideµ~alks, landscaping, and open spaces, b~- which people circu- late through and experience the dow~ntown. Uur image of doµ~ntow~n Boulder, and the ease and sa1'et~~ »•ith w~hich we mm~e through it, is determined b~~ the qualit}~ of the streetscape. 7'he urban design objectives of the Streetscape [mpro~ement Guideline ~ire to: • Unif~~ the ~~isual imagc of~d~iwntown b~~ creating a series of puhlir sittin~ areas. ~ompletin~~ the rh~~thm of street trees and street lightin~, and pro~iding landscapin~ with seasonal color ~u other qualities of visual interest. • Creatr a pedestrian oriented en~ ironment that is safe. accessi- hl~. ~ isuall~ pkasing. and comfortahle. • Strem~then de~a nte~wn's ~ isual connections. ~'isuall~ and func- tionall~~ connect the downtown Boulder mall and Civic Park. or east and w~est Pcarl Street to the mall. • Maintain the visual unitv and historir character of the down- town Boulder mall throu~Th the use of tradi[ional materials. • Encouraae and acce~mmudate the use of alternative mode~ c~f~ transportation to get to and Crom the dow~ntown. • Maintain and presen~e historic features of the streetscape such as fla~stone and brick. • Respect and presene ad.jacent residential nei~hborhoods through the use of sensitive streetscape design. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 53 6.1 USeThe~xisting Street~lierarchyasa ~~ Basis~orDesi nin TheStreetsca e ~ .. ~ 9 9 P The concept of a street hierarch~ is hased on understandin~ ho~~ ~ arious dou ntou n streett function. For example. Canyon Boule~ard and Broadaa~ are major ~~ehicular streets. thus ltrect impro~~ements should prc~ti~le for lar~r volumes of traffic whilc hufierin~ pedestrians trom traffic imparts. Four h•pes of streets ha~e been identified: A. The do~~ntown Boulder mall 1 a vehicle-free pedestrian streetl: The downt~Hn Bould~r mall. ~hich encompass~s Pearl Street from ] 1 th to 1~th Street~. is the mos~ intensely used pedestrian ~.une in th~ do~~~ntow~n. .As a shoppin,~. festivaL and puhlic ~*ath- erin~ place it will remain a ~ehicle Cree area w•ith a unitied hrick pa~ in~ de5i~~n throu~h~~ut. Intense landscape treatments. includ- in« seasonall~-~aried plantings and coordinated street furniwrc. a~id to the pedestrian amhiance. B. Can~~on Boulevard and Broadw•a}• Imajor vehicular throu~h streetsl: Canyon Boule~~ard and Broadway accommodate lar~e volumes ol trafhr movin~ throuah the downtaw~n. Streetscape features should be desi~ned tn buffer pedestrians from traffic impacts. pro~•ide ~reater buildins setbacks and detached sidewalks with plantin~ strips hetween~the sidewalk and curb. The exception is the section of Broadwa~ between Can~~on Boulevard and Spruce Street in which attached sidewalks are needed to accommodate more intense pedestrian use. In areas w•ith dctached sideHall:s. well detii~_ned land~~apin~_ and street trees ;hnuld he pro~ ided. On C~m on B~iule~ ard. the use c,f landscaped mc:dian strip~ and p~destrian tia(e 7one~ tihould b~ desi`.:ned to minimize pedestrian/~~ehicular rcmllicts. C. 9th, lOth, l lth, 13th, and l~th Streets ~north/south pedes- trian connectorsl. Th~s~ ti~r n<~rth/sc~uth street~ rrc~vide the main pedestrian ron- n~c[ion~ het~ti•een the dow~ntc~~+n Bc>ulder mall and the Ci~ic Park. V4'here thesc streets crns: Camon Boule~ ard. w~hich is ~en w~ide. cros~walk desi=ns that ~~isuall~ link the nonh and uwth sides <~f thr b<~ule~ ard are imponant. The use c~f similar mat~rials. intersection aatewav features. landscapin~_. an~i street furniture ~~ill help ~o ~isuall~ wea~e the areas to~ethcr and pro- mrne pcdestrian ~cress betw~en these tuo imponant d~~Hntown puhlic ~a[herin~_ places. D. All other streets in the do~ nto~ n I~eneral pedestrian oriented streetsl. In nrder to creatc a unitied d<~ti ntow n ima~~e. all stree:t~ should share common feawres. At minimum. thesr should incluclc sim- ilar sideu~alk scorin` pattern,. similar pa~ in~ matenals. similar strtet trees and tree ~rates, rc~ordinate~ ~treet furniture. the inclusion of sidewalk neck dnw•ns and pedestrian safe zones, remc~~~al c~f pedestrian obstructie~ns, cunsc~lidation of streetscape elements such a~ n~~~spapcr ~~ndin~~ hoxes. similar [raftir and other directionsl si~~nuRe. and pedestrian scale street li~htin~. ~ 54 ~ ~ Downrown Urban Design Guidelines b.Z UseaBasicSidewalkDesigntoUnify The Visual Ima e of Downtown ~,. ~ 9 In most I~cations throu~hout the dow~ntc~a~n. sidewalks a~~era~e 1~ Ceet wide from curh tc~ propem line. At minimum. ~~~r~ str~et in the d~,~~ntc~wn shc~uld incorpc~rate the i~olloa•inR basic sideu~alk elements: A. Curb zone The curh zone shoulcl consis~ c>t a-i foot ti~ide area measured perpendicular from the inside of the curh that mav include thc foll~w•in~: • Brushed natural color gray concrete tooled in a'_' x ~~syuare pattern parallel to the street (not diagonal I. possiblr w~ith brick accents • Street trees in appropriatel~ sized crer «rates lsee Section 6.81 • Street elements w•hich do not interfere with people accessin~ cars parked at the curb. mail boxes, trash receptacles. hus ~ stops, t~ollards, and news racks. Basic sidewalk desi~~n illustrating the curb zone. the pedestrian zone, and the corner zonc. Note also the hasic intersection desi~n showin~~ the crosswalks and th~ intersection pa~~ing squares ~ariations In ~eneral, the pred~minate material in the dc~wnrown is brick. The use of hnck to hi~hlight the curb zone is especially appro- pnate in the blocks adjacent to the malL Other appropriate materials ma~ be used tu hi_hli~iht the curb zone include sand- stone. or the use of art work w~hich is stenciled or sandblasted into the concrete surface. However, colored concrete scored ta imitate brick is inappropriate . On the NeiRhhorhood Interface blocks that create a transition between commercial an~ residential areas, use landscape mate- rials in the curb zone rathcr than hard suriace concrete. Material; such as H~wcrs, ~rasses, or live Rround cover will hi~hli~~ht the transiticm yuality of the half blc~ck between the dc,wntc~wn and the interface areas. Rocks, ~ravel or other rcxk- like ma[crial~ are nc~t allowed in the curh zone. B. Pedestrian zone The sidewalk pedestrian rone is the area that must be kept clear for pedestrian mmement, and f~ree of all obstacles. The pedes- trian zone should comprisc thc following: • An unobstructed pedestnan area of no less than 7 feet is allowed between ~~enical ~lements such as trees or poles and buildin~s alon~ streets located outside the downtown Boulder mall. An unobtitructed pedestriun area of no less than 8 feet to 9 foot 6 inches is reqwred on the downtown Boulder mall (See section 6.~-. Downtowo Urban Desiqn Guidelines ~ ~ 55 Basir sidewalk desi~n illustrating the curb zone, the pedestrian zone ancl thr comer zone. tiote also the basic intersrction design show~ing the cruscwalks and the inter~ection pa~in~ syuares. Bru.hccl na~ural ~ni~,r ~~ra~ ~~~n~r~~~ cunl~~l ~n a ma~imutn ~~ ~ -1~,yuarr ~att~rn ~ar:~llel [~~ ~h~ ,trc~[ ~~ith hnc~, ~i~cent~. Th~~ I~~~~tii~n ~~f v« ~_r;u.~ ur ~~thcr ~i~ment: rna~ rc«ulat~ th~ esart ~imen~i~~m ~~t th~ ,~c~rim~ ~:lll~ffl. ~ ariations In ~~n:~;n ~.i~r,. .~ Ji(ic:r~nt ~c,n~rrt~~ ,~nrin_ ~attern nr .un:~., ru.it.nai w~h a. hn~4, nia~ h~ u,es t~~ run r~r~+~n~li:ular tn ~'ti~ .i~e~~al{. r~~~>tn~n i~~nr ~~: ~~tLn~i ~~ut ~~ni.:all~ tn~m thr huildm~~ ~~r nru~~rt~ Im~. ~u~L ~ar~ati~m~ ~~~~ul~i hi~~hli«ht th~ i~~~at~~m c~i :t ~~+c~ial ar~hit~~tural t~awre .u~h ~i~ an ~~ut~lunr tat m~~ arca. ~lu~u. ~~r nn~c.s~~i huil~in~~ rn[ran~•~«.i~. Bricl, mu~ al~~~ hc u,«i t~~ h~~~hli,~ht .~~~~ai u;r . arca,. C~~Inr~i1 :'cin~r~ie scor~J t~> >miwt~ hrick i• ina~~rc~pnate. Brirl, pa~ in~ u~~~1 t~~ hi~~hl~~_ht .ntran:~~. C. Corner "!_onc .~t minimuni. th; h~.i: ~~irner icmr ~,h~~ul~l in~iu~i~ tn: ti~ll~~~~ in~• ~l.m~nt.: •.-\ oede:trian ar~~ nr clzar z~,n~ th~t i. tr~: ,~, nh;~a~le. ~nc1 I~n«i u~+ ~~t~h th~ ~i~1r~~:il1. ~~~~~- tnan zimr Tiii~ arca ;hc~ulJ hr ma~i~ ~,f hru:i~c~ nawral ~~ra~ ~un~r~t~ s~c~re~l in :~ ~'~ ~';yuar~~ ~attern ~ar~ll~i t~~ thr ;tr~.t ~ nc~t ~li~,~cmal ~. The .mall~r >~c~nn_• {~aurrn i> m,ant tr ~fi.un~_ui:l, [h~ ~c~rn~r ~un~ ir~~m thr r~~t ~~t tii~ .i~i~~~all.. Oni~ ~~;cnual °r~~~ul~t~~r~" ci~n~ent..u~h a> ti~~~- nal p~~.t> ar~ allu~~r~i. all ~~th~r elernent~ ~u~h ~~ hc:n~hc~. hil.c ra~k.. n~~~:~:i~~r rarl.~. arr ~r~,i~ih- ited. • Cc,rn,r "~m~nit~ arc~~" arc i~~~at«7 at ~ith~r ~iu~ ~~f th: ~l~ar Pc~e,trian. Th~ amenit~ arca. ma~ in~ur~orate h~n~hc,. hii.~ rack.. nca. r~.i.,. an~i ,irnilar~lcm~nt~. Ti~eir.ha~~ ancl s~z~ ma~ ~ar~ drpendin~~ u~+c,n [hr u~r of a cc~rnrr nc~1.-~fo~~n. Elem~nt~ ,uch ~. h~n~he~ anel hi1.~ r:~~l:~ tihoul~l bz car~tull~ arran_~cii in an attractn~ an:! ~,:re„i- hly d:~ $~nch~. ~huuid h~ arr~ne~. ;s~ili- t~tr .~~~ ~.: int~r~,u~~n. The amrnit~ ~rc:a~ ,h~,uld h~ ma~r rf hrwh~~i nawra! "ra~ c~~ncret~ scored in ~-~~~ -1',yuare patt~rn parallel t~, th~ ~treet rn~~t dia~=nn~li. ana ma~ ha~t hrirk dctailin~~. ~~~riution~ Siiilt ~hr ~~r~entau~m n( the cun~rct~ ,ce~r~m_ pattzrn t~~ a-~~ dr~_rr~ an~~ir tn the ;[reet in a~'~ ~~~attern. Other ~ariation. ma~ in~ludr eJ~~in~~ thc ~e~rn~r am~nit~ and ~Irar tun~~ ~~~th hrick pa~cr h~n~i. wm~_ ~ darl.. t~rr;~ c:~~tta rc~i t~~ ~~~mplinient thr culc~r an~i yualit~ c~1 thc mall hri~l.. In c~rt.~in ar~a,. spc;- ~ial matrrial~ surh a~ hn~ ~r sancist;mr m~~ h~ in~nrporat~d t~~ cl~ari~ ~1~::r,: an arc:a. Drpen~ltn_~ on th~ lu,;a[inn. amenit~ area~ m~~ ~lsc~ hc u,c~ tiir }~uhli~ a:~ t~atur~.. 1OTE: ~'ariuu~~n~ frum [h~ hasir mat~nal, an~i pat- tern. mu~t he hase~l ~~n a strretticap~ plan that illu~- trate~ h~~~~ the ~ ariau~~n addti to the ~ isual unit~ ~~f thr ~in~ti n[<~« n~[rrrtuap~. adjaccnt prc~penie,. and the c~~ crall ima~r c~( the hl~~rk. ~ Gowntown Urban Design Guidelines f3riri. r~~~in~~ u~e~i i~~ hi~_hl~~~ht ~n;ran~;~ b.3 Use a Basic lntersection Design to -~ Unif TheVisual Ima eofDowntown _ ~ Y 9 Street intersections in the downtown should incorporate two basic elements: A. Crosswalks Pedestrian crosswalks should be a minimum c~f 10 ieet wide. c~nstructed of hrushed natural erav conerete scored in a? foot x ~ feu~t syuare pattern parallel ro the street. l'? inch wide conrrete suips occur at eithcr side of the 10 foot wide w~alkway scored in a I ~ inch square pattern. ADA ramps should connect the pedes- trian cross~~alk ro the corner. B. Intersection squares In ~eneral. the center area of intersections should made of the same material as the surroundin~~ street surl~aces. ~'ariations Special pavinR ma~ be used in intersection desi~ns tc~ hiRhli`*ht an imponant str~et or pedestrian connection. For example, crosswalks and intersection squares located between Ci~ ic Park and the downtow~n Bouldzr mall mav incorporate special mater~- als such as brick. Public art ma~' be inco--~orated in the surface desi~n. Special emphasis should be placed on the intersec[ion~ alon~ Canvon Boulevard from yth to l~th Stre~ets. Other ideas that add to the visual interest include the follow - infi: • Th~ use of hrick or interlockin_ concrete pavers within the 10' wide crosswalk • A special border on either side of the 10' crosswalk consistent ti~ith adjacent sidewalk features. • A concrete center area scored in a square ~Yrid pattern. • A unique pavinU pattern or desian within the center area to hi~hlight an intersection. ~ 6.4 Design ~xtensions IntoThePublic Rig Visualiy And ~unctionally Appropriate Exicnsions into the public ri~ht-of-w~a~~. such as a sidewalk restaurant, puhlic sittina area. or awnings over store uindows, can add visual interest and encouraUe public acti~ itie~ that enhance the yuality of life in downtown. They promote outdoor leisure use, pro~~ide opportunities for "people watchin_". and create a varied streetscape settin~. Such extensions are appro- priate on thc first story if the visual qualiry ot' the street is not weakened and if buildinR facades of historic si~nificance are not substantiallv altered or obscured hy the extension. Upper story ext~nsions are Renerally not appropriate except w~hen restorinR a missino historic fcature or when incorporating a traditional desi=n element into a new building. The best extensions are rharacterized by desion [hat is sensiti~•e to the huildin~s, and that empl~~ yualiry materials. NOTE: When an cxtension onto a street, sidewalk, alley or other public property is desired. an application for a rerocahle pen~iir should be made. A revocable permit is an agreement for [he use of public land. DependinR on the nawre and permanen- cv of the improvement. a lease and lease payment may be reyuired. There are two Qeneral categories of risht-of-way extensions: Extensions allowed o^ the duwntown Boulder mal1. and extension~ allowed outside of the mall. For information call Public Works Depanment at (~03 )-~-~ 1-3?00. A. Downtown Boulder mall right-of-wav extensions onl~• The boundaries of the dotinti~wn Boulder mall conform to the pedestrian area of Pearl Street which extends from l lth to l~th Streets. Permanent moditications such as buildin~~ additions which includc bay windows and similar enclosures that extend into the mall right-of-way are stron~ly discouraoed. The following criteria appl~~ to extensions allowed on the mall: • Extensions allowed alon~ the mall are limited on esch block so that the expanse of huildings is not ~isually altered. No more than ]?5 feet per block face may be used for this pur- pose. • Maximum is a]0 foot extension, measured at ground level perpendicular to the buildin~. • T'he most critical dimension in measurina the width of an extension is the area for pedestrians. A ran=e of between 8 Downrown Ur6an Design Guidelines ~ ~ 51 fcrt and y feet - 6 ~nchcs is all<~wcd b~tw'een the c~l~*e ot an extension anci an~ c~th~r ~ertical oh,trurtiun such a~ trees or pcile;. . •A ;emi-permanent railin~ nc~ less than ;O inches tall i~ reyuircd tc~ ~ictine the ~d~*e c~f~ the exiensie,n. ~ Sre section 6.5 ~ • The front an~i sides of rrt~nsie~ns shall hr perman~ntl~ unen- cli~,cc1. Nc~ kitchen eyu~prnrnt ;h~ll he installed ~tiithin the cxtensic~n. al[hc~u~h a ser~ice stati<~n ma~ h~. for example. joined to an uulJu~~r re.taurant. • All t~hle~ an~l ~huir> mutit h~ m~~~ ~hle. • Seccmd Floor Ex~ensiun~ into the mall arr inappropriate. csEnriall~ attarhe~l tc~ historir ~~r histc~ricall~ si~~nific;ant huil~l- in~*s except where hist~>ric e~ idence documents its accurac~. • Nc~+ basement level cxtensicm~ are not permitted. • Greenhouse encl.»urr~ are prc~hibited on thr puhlir ri~ht-of- ~ a~. • Th~ eatin~_ arca shaul~l he nci more than the width of the ~afe in tront oF H hirh it i. located. • Display ~~in~ie+ws thut ~xtend into the right-of-~•ay are stron~l~ disc~~ura~ed. B. Ri~ht-of-w•a~~ e~+tensions allowed along streets in areas outside of the do«ntown Boulder mall: In ~eneral. exten~ion~ c~ff the mall arc more limited in area ~han tho.< <~n [he mall due te~ ,idrw~alk width and tn:: necJ ti~r an unc~h~tructed ~edestrian ar~a. The follow•ing is a list of criteria for off-mall extensions: • Extensian~ inro the puhlic ri~~ht-of-wa~ can be up te~ 6 feet. measured perpendicular tc~ the huildin~~ c~r property line. a~ lnn~~ as it i~ ~i~tlnccl h~ a srmi-permancn~ railin~~ n~~ Ics: than ~0" tall iSer ~ec[i~m h.~l. • Th~ most critical dimension in measur~n~~ the ~~ i~th ~~f an extensinn is ~hc area for pedestnans. ?~;~~ le,s th~n 7 i~~t i~ all~~wed hetw~een the ed~e ot thc extensi~n and am <ither ~er- ural <~hstrurtic~n such a~ trcr~ c~r ~~~le~. It ne~~~san. thr c;xt~nsion should hr reduced tn tit the 7 ti~ot pedcstrian r~yuirement. • Greenhnuse enclosure~ arc prohibited on the puhlir n~Tht-c~1- wa~. • The tront and side~ oi extensic~n~ intc~ the publ~c ri~~ht-c,f-~ra~ shall br pernianentl~ unenclose~l. • N~i kitchen eyuipment shall he installed ~~ithin the cxtensi<m. nlthou=h a s~n ice station ma~ be. f~r ccample. j~~ined tc~ an outdi~or restaurant. • All [ablr, and chair~ must he m~vahl~. • The eaun~ area :h~uld he nc~ more than thr width of the cafr in tront c~~ w~hich ii ~s located. • Displa~ ti~indc,~; ~ that zxtend intc~ thr ri~sht-of-N•av are str~~n~l~ discoura~~ed. C. Extensions into the public ri~ht-of-~~~a~~ related to historic buildin~ti ~1~hcn c~e;i~~nin~~ cxten,ums tor hi~t~~ricall~ ~i«nitiran~ huildin<_~. thr ~zt~n~i~in ~hould bc distin«uishable as nc~. It shnuld not su~~_Test that it is an ori~~inal his~c~ric elemrnt. [t shc~uld. howe~~er. be~~ isualh c~~mpatibl~ ~~ ith the ~~riginal huildin~ and not dam- a~c the ori~inal svucwrc. Accuratr reconstruc[ion c~f his[orie extensions~intci the ri~*ht-c~f-~ti•a~ are appropriate option> whrre documented. .,~W... 58 ~ ~ Downrown lJrban Desiqn Guidelines ~ b.5 UselnnovativeRailing DesignstoDefine0utdoor ~~ SPaces, Such as Cafes, ~rom Pedestrian Movement Areas ~~.~ A. Railings define the boundan~ between public and pri~~ate advertisinR, :oods or merchandise shoutd be placed on thc rail- areas and create safet~ barriers for pedestrians. ins. Railin~7 desi~ns should reflect an open. transparent feel- Semi-permanent rai]inRs that can he fixed to the sidewalk are inQ. Visually closed-in railin_s that "box-in" the extensi~n are preferred. Site specifir desiRns are encouraQed that reflect not appropriatc. Bouldcr's historv. [he em ironment. or public art. No si~na~e. The downtown mall contains several different railino desi=ns. B. hlaterials such as metal rails and posts, stone or brick piers, • and w•ood may be used when properl~~ finished. Decorati~e elements incorporated into the railins desion are encourased. In ~eneral. metal surfaces should have a black enamel finish althoush colors that are incorporated as part of' a coordinat- cd color plan for the buildin~, or that are considered in the context of a work af puhlic an, mav he considered. Li~ht weight or movable handrails that may be hazardous durio~ times of intense pedestrian crowdinQ should be avoided. Chains. ropes and unsupported railin~s are unacceptable materials. Downtown Urban Desiqn 6uidelines ~ 59 b.6 CreateCor~~~rtableandAttractiveSittingAreas, =~~. i ~lazas,and~mall OpenSpaces ~ ~ Seatin~~ areas, plazas, and small open spaces should he located throughaut the downtown. They should be ea~ily accessible and comfortable for as much of the year as possihle. The usr of ~•re~und le~ el plant muterials and trees to pro~ ide shade and pedestrian scale is stron~ly encoura_~ed. All elements includin~ ~alls. trees, pa~in~, seating, pedestrian scale li~~n[in~~. and water Icatures should be desi~ned as an intc~~ral part of the o~erall sitc desi_n concep[. Example o; ,:, ~. nt~~w n ~calin~* area a. Orient seating to take advantage of views, sunshine in the winter, and shade in the summer. P.cran_e benches and other street furniture in a coherent desi~n that. in effect. creates small outdoor rooms. For example. at bus stops and sidewalk seatin~ areas ar- ~~ie benches. an work. lsndscapin~. and other elements into pleasant and comfortable pedestnan en~ironmen[s. B. Locate sitting areas, plazas, and small open spaces where the~~ will get the most use. Locate areas where downtown shoppers and workers congreeate - adjacent to a huildinR lobh~~, heavily tra~eled sidewalks. or an outdoor restaurant. When located on pn~ ate property, but ser~•in~ as public amenities, plazas and courtyards should be directl}~ connected to and accessible fro~~~ the ~ublic sidewalk. If needed. tiecurin ~ates should be eith~r an inteRral p~u-t of the desi~n ~r completely hidden from vie~• when not in use. 60 ~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines b.1 SelectStreetTreesThatAreAppropriateto ~u TheirlntendedLocationAnd~unction ~ ~ ~-. Apprnved tree list for commercial sites - For trees in grates and planting pits. All of the trees in the followin~~ chart should do tiell in a dow~ntc~wn envircmment. linless stated othcr~ ise, the~ ~~ ill tolerat~ full sun. dr~u~ht. ~ an - in~~ s<~il pH an~i will havc a rclativel~ compact crnwn. liecp in mind that the conditions of ~arious plantinR sites in the downtown will ~ar~ and ma~ need tc, meet indi~iduai landscape ohjecti~es. The purpose of this list is to help in choosinR a tree accordin~ to the size ot the plantin<_~ site. Howe~~er each site should he looked at indi~ iduall~ h~ a pro- fessional. Chart of approved tree list f'or commercial sites - For trees in ~rates and planting pits Small l~~Iaturing T~ces i~tedium 1laturing T~ees Large Maturing T~ees (Under ~~'I~lature Hei~hU (3U'-l~'Mature Hci~ht) (O~~er-~~'Mature Height) Planting Pit Size Planting Pit Size Planting Pit Size 60 Cu. Ft. Minimum ~~ 96 Cu. Ft. Minimum 3' 1 ~0 Cu. Ft. Minimum ~~ Minimum Depth Minimum Depth Minimum (-~x~x~l (-1x8x3) Dep[h (~xlOx~l Tree Grate Area Tree Grate Area Tree Grate Area ?0 Sq.Ft. Minimum -~'Minimum 3? Sy.Ft. Minimum ~'Minimum 40 Sq.Ft. Minimum 4' Minimum Width VVidth Vvidth i Spacing Between T~ees Spacing Betw•een Trees Spacing Between Trees lO~Minimum. 1 ~' l~'Minimum. ~0' '_'0'Minimum. ~~' Re~ommended Re~ommended Recommended Caliper Size Caliper Size Caliper Size 1 U?" measured 6" abc~ve ~Trade ?" measured 6" ahove grade '_~~ measured 6" abo~e _Trade Chem. Flo~erina-Pnuius pndi~s Hackberry*-Celtus occide~ttalis Ash. Green*-Fraeiii~t.s pe~r~rs~•1 - ('M~yda~ ~ I ('Prairie Pride~ ) ~~ariica 1'Marshall's seedless.' ~ 'Newport.~'Patmore.' ~ Crahapple-Mali~s spp. Honeylocust~`-Gleditsia tricarr - Coft'eetree. Kentuck~•r- ~ f FirebliRht resistant varieties and thns i~rernrrs ('Skvline~ ) G~•nu~ocladi~s drnicus upri17ht forms. 'Sprin~ Snaw' 1. ~ ~i Goldenrain~-Koelrei~terin panic - Hornbean. European Pyramidal - Hackberrv. Common~-Ce/tis ulata Carprnus bett~lus fastiRiata occidentalis Hawthorn-Cratuegus spp. Pear-P~~n~s cal(en~aaa spp. Honeyloeust*-Gleditsra trlacan - Crusgalli inermis ([hornless, ('Chanticleer~ ), pyrus ussurien- thns i~iern:is ('Shademaster,' 'Ohio Pioneer'. 'Cockspur' 1 sis, a~•oid 'Bradford'varietv 'Majestic' 1 Serviceberry-Anielanchier spp. Linden. Littleleaf - Tiliu cordutu Linden. American-Tilia anteri - ('Greenspire', 'Glenleen' ) curru ('Redmond', 'Lc«end' ) Turkish Filbert-Con~lus colurna Maple. Red - Acer n~bnun ('Northwood' i Oak. Bur*. English. Shumard. Red. Sa•amp White* - Quercus: macroc;arpa, robur. shumardii, I rubra. bicolor * Indicates drought-tolerant species. D~wntown Urban Design Guidelines ~ 61 Th~ ~ree list is desisncd 1~or rnmmercial site> ~here trer~ are [~~ hc ~larcd in pa~ed areas usinR tree ~~ratcs and plantin~~ Pit,. Du~ u~ har~lsrapr limitati~m. ~i.e. parkinR m~ter~~. spacin~~ ci~sign ma~ he mu~itied ba5ed upon rc~ieH h~ [h~ appropriat~ dcsi~_n rc~i~~~ huard. ~OTE: in general. thes< <~uidclinrs adherc thc cit~'s Desi~_n C~~mtruction Standard,. hut where~er u discrepanc~ ma~ ari,c. thc hi~*hrr standard shall he us~d. $. Descriptions of .appro~ed T~ees for Commercial Sites • Small trees iL~nJer ~~~~lawre hei~*ht~ Cherr~, Flowering - c~amplc. 'hlayda~' Trc~: ~0'-?~'hei_ht. ?0'-~U's~rrad: mc~dcratrl~ ~~~ramidal shape: Cull sun c~r pattial sha~ic: adaptable ~~at~r r~yuirement5. Crabapple - examplc. 'Sprin~_ snc~~~': '_0~-'_'~' hei~ht. ?0' spre;.ic1: minimall~ fruitin~~: nu~deratel~ O~al shape: toleratc~ drou~~ht: full sun: adapts tc~ ~rowin_ c<mditions. Goldenrain"` - ?0'-'_~'h~i~ht. 1~'-?0'sprcad: hroadl~~ ~tohe shape: _~r~~~~s ~iell in a~tiidr ran~e of soil t~~pes: tolerates drew~~ht: adaptable tc~ alkalinr ~oil and sal[ conditions: full sun or partisl shade. Hawthorn - example. 'C)hic, Pionecr'. Thornless 'Cockspur': I~'-'_'~'h~i_ht. l~'-'_0'sprc:ad: hroadl< <*lohe shape: te~leratrs droueht: tolerate~ hi~h pH and salt: dnes hest in full sun Ser~icebern- - '_~'hei~*ht. 10'-"_'0'spread: moderatel} o~ate shapc: tc~lerate~ dr~u~~ht: tolerates pH up tc, 7.0; sun or shadc • 1ledium trees ~30'- -3~'Alature Hei~_hti Hackberr~~" - example. 'Prairie Pride': -t~'heieht. 30'-~30' <~rra~l: mc~eieratrl~ p~r~midal shape: tolerates wid~ ran~~e of soil ~~~n~i~tinn~: tolerates dre~u~~ht. Honeylocust* - example. 'Skyline': 45'hei~~ht. ~0'-35'spread: moclcratel~ olohe shape: tolerates w•ide ran~_e of~ soil types: tc~ler- ate~ hi~h pH and ;alt; transplants easil~. Hornbeam. European Pyramidal. - exdmple. 'European Pvramida]': 30'--~>'heiaht. ]0'-15'spread: narrowly pyramidal: tc~lrrates drouQht once established: ~rows in clav soils: sensitive tc~ salt: adaptable to wide soil pH ~ Pear - example. 'Chanticleer': 30'--~0'heiPht. ~5'-35'spread: mocleratel~ columnar shape: tolerates drought and salt: adaptahle t~~ ~+i~ir soil pH: hardiest of all the pears. Linden, Littleleaf - example. 'Greenspire'. 'Glenleven': 45' hci~~ht, ?5'-35'spread: broadly to moderatclv pyramidal shape: ha, ~+c~or salt tolerance: adaptable to ~ idc soil pH: withstands compartion. Turkish Filbert: -3~'height. '_5'-~0'spr~ad: mu~rratei~ ~~rami- cial >hape: ~re~u~*ht tc~lerant; adaptable t~~ ~anin~~ ;oil pH: Iull ;un. Large trees i(h~r -l~'hlaturc Hri~hu Ash, Green" - ~xample. 'Marshall seecll~~,'. 'f~~wport~. -Patmnrc': SO'-60'hei~*ht. ?5'--1~'spread: mAl~~~ieratel~~ to hrc~adl~ c~~atc shapc: hi_~hl~ adaptable u~ urhan r~~nditions: toler- ant of ,alt and hi~h pH: tc~lcrates drouRht: full ,un. Coffeetree, I~entuck~~" - 7O'hei,Tht. -lil'-~O'sprea~l: mc~d~ratrl~ «luhc shapc: ~olerates alkaline soiL• tolerates drou~hr. pest-free: Iull sun. ~ Hxekberr}, Common - i0~-60'hei~ht. -~O'-iO'spread: moder- at~l~ ~~li~h~ sh:~pe: useful in difticult plantin~~ sites: prefer~ full ~un: dr~~ugh~ tulerant: ada~[~d tc~ alkaline ;~~il: salt sensiti~~. Hone~~locust* - exam~le. 'Shadema~~er'. 'Majestir': 50'-6Q' hei~~ht. ~(l'--~0'spread: mnci~ratel~ ~_I~~hr .hape: adaptahle ~•atrr- in~~ rcyuircment~ once established: preter~ full sun: tolerates alkalinc soils: t~lerates dr<~u~~ht. Linden, american - examplc. 'RedmonJ'. 'Legend': ~0'-60' hright. 30'--10'spread: modcrat~l~ p~ramidal shape: adaptable ~~aterin~~ r~yuirements oncr c~tahlished: full sun or partial shade. ~laple. Red - example. 'Nc,rthwc~c,d': -t;'_;;'hci~h[. ~5~-~5' .prca~l: moderatel~ ~lohe sha~e: salt s~nsiti~c: adaptable w~ater reyuircmenu ~~nce estahlished: can hecomr chlorotic in alkaline s~ils, prefers t~ull sun. Oak. Bur~'. English, Shumard. Red. S..amp «'hite'~' - 50'-80' hei~ht. 5O'-RO' spread: hri~adl~ c~~ ate to hmadlv ~~lohe sha}~e: adaptahlr waterinR reyuiremen[s once estahlished: prefers full sun: ada}~tahle t~ s~il conditions. h~ue~cr some species can becomc rhli~r<~tic in alkalin~ soils: tolerate~ dre~u~~ht. C. Gnsuitable Street Trees: Tree specie~ thac are ~rot to he placed in puhlic ri~~hts-of-wav inrludc: Box Elder. Cottonwood. Chinese and Sibcrian Elm. Poplar. Russian Olive. Silver Maple, Tree of Hea~~en. wllow, e~~er~recns that create sight obstructions, and clump forms or multi-stem trees. D. ~ppropriate tree locations and Tree Grates Tree s~ecies should be selecteci for their suitabilitv to the speeif- ic street where they are t~ hc planted. The following guidelines should be followed: • Lar~e trees should he Icxated alon_ Camon Boule~ard. wide ri_ht-of-w~av streets. and principal acces, streets such as Pearl 62 `~ ~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines and Walnut Street~. Lar~e trees should also he used to hioh- li~?ht corncrs, to pro~•ide c~~~~er for lar~e plazas, or as accents a~ainst the skvline. • Medium c~r lar~*e scale trees ma~ be locatecl on all other doti~ntnwn strcets. • Medium trees. w ith narrow sprcad canopies, should l~ locat- cd in narrow~ streets, tc~ till in mid-block areas, pro~•ide visual relief and scale dehnition to lar~=e ~alls. pr~~ide shade and canopieti tor sidew~alks and plaza areas. and establish lar~Te area~ of color ah~~ve eve level. • Small trees should he used to pro~id~ seasonal color and a ~~isual focal point lor special locations such as a buildin~ entranc~, corner area. sittin~~ area, bus stop, or other si~*nifi- cant area or vieu corridar. • Trees in ri~*hts-of-u~av should he maintained with a minimum head height of 8~ o~er side~~alks and 14'o~er the ~~ehicular strects. • Lo~ maintenance trees are desirahle which have low water reyuirements and can adapt tc~ the downtown em~ironment. • Install street trees in tree ~rates except at locations where they occur in special raised planters in the curh zone. in lar=e plan[ed areas that are inte~rated with a sidewalk area, and in locations wherc existin~* trees loc:ated in the curb zon~s have a root system that has pushed up ahove ~rrade where the use of a~~rat~ will injure the tree. • Maintain at least a 10 fo~t distance between trec trunk and buildin~ line. This refers to the distance brtU~een a trce anei buildin~~. not the distance necessary to maintain an unc~h- structed pedrstrian area between a tree. as a~ertical element. and a railin~ that ~ncloses a sidewalk restauraot • Tree ~*rates should he ali«ned with pa~ in~ pattern score lines and be placed w~ith careful consideration of sidewalk use. such as a sidew~alk cate ~r cunc ~uts. • Do not locate trees that will ~bs[ruct huildin~ entrances, cor- ner e isibilitv, or u•ithin any sidewalk pedestrian zones that must rcmain unohstructed. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~` 63 1tiOTE: Tree clustering for well desi~ned planting In _eneral. tree~ on a panicular strce~ shnuld be of thr s~mr sPecies to create as much ~ isual ccmnnuit~ as possible whilr. at thc same timc, pro~•idinR different trces on other streets to avofd u m~~nciculturc within the doN~ntown. H~wever. spe~ific i~~~a- tion~, such as plaza fronts and si~niticant buildin<_~ entrnn~r ways m~~ u:r a dif(erent s~ecie, to di~t~n,~uish them frc~m thr ~tan- ~l~rd ~tr~et tr~e I~~. atr~t in [he curh i~~ne. E. Tme and landscape maintenance For commerciall~ zoned propertie,, th~ maintenance of trces. tree «rates. an~i surruundin~~ harci and soft landscapin~~ loca~ed in the public ri~~ht-of'-wav should hc thc responsihilit~ o- thc pri- ~~ate propem~ o~~ner. This includcs all maintenance anci repair of landscapin~~ and trees inrludin~~ uatcrine. spra}~in~~. tcttiliz- in~. replaring plant materials/tr~e _rates. The cih pro~~ides the folloNint maintenance ser~ires: Prunin_ anci rcme~~al of street tr~rs in thr puhli~ righl-ol=ti~~. and safety inspections and consultation on svret trees that ma~ impose a health or safet~ conrern. NOTE: Authorization h~ the cit~ Forester is needed hrCc~re planun~~, pruning. spra~in« or remc~~in~_ an~ trees in the puhlir ri~*ht-of-wa~. This process enabl~s th~ Furestrv Di~ ision t~ keep an up-t~~-date tree imentory. and cnsures proper tree selection. placement, and care of ne~ an~i existin~~ trces. Reference "Protection of Trces and Plant~". Chapter 6-6. B.R.C. 19R 1. b.8 Select Ground Level Plants That Suit :, ~.-~ Their location And ~unction ~ .~~ Use landscapin~, shrubs and ground co~er to NOTE: Planters accent arcas. Belor~~ eve-level plant material: add loeated in thc pub- Szascmal color ~o the downtown. Thev can hlock lic-ri~ht-of-way views to unsightl~~ ureas and fill empty areas w~ith must recei~e a ~~isual interest. Ho~e~er. >> use such plant re-~ocuble pernrir. material in corner locations and other areas that A maintenance block the visibilit~, or block access to storefront clause ma}~ tx: w indow•~ or streetscape elements such as neu spa- included to ensure pzr stand~. parkin~ meters. ~~r mail boxes. Dc~ n~t maintenancc use _ravel or rou~*h stone in the curh zone in place responsibility. ~f _round cover. The tbllowing are plant materials and detail5: • Flowers and natural grasses ~'hene~er teasible. flo~ti~er~ and ornamen[al ~rasses should be uscd in comhination to acrent Uate~+•a~ locations and special sites. Maintenancc must be considered in the placement an~l ~esi~~n of these features. Plantin~s are preferred in natural at-~~rade planting beds rather than planter pots or other ce~n- tainers. • Plant containers and potted plants Althou~h plant eontainers and potted plants can add color and plant ~ariety to the streetscape. con- sider their use judiciously since they are fra~ile. difficult tc~ maintain. and appear temporarv. Planters ma} he lc~ated preferably adjacent to buildin~ entrance~ or as part of patio extensions. Typical planter matenals are hnished w~ood, precast concrete. and terra cotta. A maintenance-free tin- ish is preferred as are stability, sturdiness, and suf- ficient wei~ht to a~~oid ti~+pin~ o~•er. Planters must he temporar~' and mo~eable. noc attached to the sid~~~ alk. 64 ~ ~ Downtown Urban De~ign 6uidelines Tv~ical ~~r<iund covers in dc~wntown b.9 MaintainThe`Boulevard' Characterof Canyon - a Sin le Row of Street Trees on ~ither Side ofThe treet, The Building Set-batk line,,~~-F- . AndTheCenterPlantin Strip. ~ ~ 9 ~~. Cam on Boule~ ard is one of the cit~ ~~ most prominent a~enues ~ith its center plantin~~ s[rip and deep huildin~~ set ba~ks. It i~ ~,ne ot thr do~tintoti~n's major acce,s routes a, µ~ell as a link between the Civic Park arra and the dc» ntcn~ n Boul~ier mall. The tree rows and rent~r ~lantin« strip em~hasize the park like character ot :~ "boule~ ard" anci crcat~ a un~yue seme ot~ entr~~ t~~ the d~~w~nu»~n. C~onsider the foll~~~inR plant materials. details: • Tree Rows Tr~cs alon`~ Camc~n dc~ nett need to he plante~l ~ith trer ~_rates, althou_h area; that accent huildin~* entrance ~~avs~or other fe~tures such as pedestrian sittin_ areas ma~ incorporate tree srates in the o~~eral] clesisn. In ~eneral. trees anci c~ther plant muterial should he arranRed in an urhan linear pattern that parallel~ the street rather than a less formal random arrangement. To create ~ isual interest, incorporate ~rass areas. pa~~ed area~ or Rround co~en uithin [he overall desi~_n of tree rows. • Ground cover lis~ annual and perennial flower arran~~ements. or arranRements mixed w~ith natural vrasses. especially at street corners, for visual accent and cnlor. I~1aintain view~ requirements to a~oid blockinv sisht lines. CODE: Canyon Boulevard, throu~h the dow~ntown. is a "major arterial strce~ of ~ lanes" which reyuires ~hat build- in~s be set-hac~. 78 fee[ from the centerline of the highwav or ~'S fee[ from the lot line adjoinin_ the ri=ht-of-way, whichever is ~•reater. The Canvon median should be planted to enhance [he °boulevard" quality of the corri- dor. Shrubs should not exceed ?-~" in height to avoid creatin~ barriers to site lines especiall~ at intersections. Downrown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~' 65 6.10 CreateGateway~lementsat Important Downtown ~ntrance Ways ~..~ Gatewa~ elements can crcate the a~pearance o1 s~mholir en[rancr ~ta~~. Gatc~+a~ trcatment, are ot partirular imp<~rt~n~e a[ ke~ -nters~ction. ~u~h a~ thc yth. l Oth. an~3 ] 1 th Street. Broadua~. and the I~th. and 1-ith Stre:et imerse:ction~ alc~n__ Can~ un. The~ ma~ al~~+ pro~ id< <n[rance ti•a~~~ ti~ the dc~~ti n- u~~~n located alon~_ eas[ and Hesi Pearl Street, and at zither ~nci af the dc,ant~un seruc~n ~~1 Broadua~. Surh ~~atew~av~ mn~ hc created h~ a chan<< in the scale oi~ n~arhv huileiin~~s: a sense of en~l~~,urr due to huilJin« ~ethack.. street tree, anJ land~capin~~: a monument. str~etlight. or th~ acknc,~~~ledRmrnt of a special ~ ista or t~poQraphir t~cature. ~ in gen~raL Qate~~a~~ should he ~i~uall~ creati~e and inclu~i~ an elemcnt c~f sultirient hei«ht an~l mass su a. tc~ he ~~sihic h~ moti~rists. lishte~ sc~ a~ tc~ hr ~ i~ihle at ni~~ht. and ron~iruci~ei c~f hi~~h yualit~ mat~rial~ such a~ hnck. marhl~. ~~ranite. tcrra~.zu. e:onrrcte. stainles. <~r painted ,terL ro}~~er. hra~~ or gla>~. Gate~~a~~ assncia~ed aith a parurular suh-ar~a uf BoulJer shoulci he of consititrnt desi~*n. For cxam~le. ~~ate"a~ ~ t~~ de,~~n~~,H~n m~~ h~ unique to thai arca uhil~ ,~~te~tia~. at Cro,sroads shc~ulcl reHect feature, of that mall. 6.11 ~stablish Pedestrian ScaleStreetlights -~--- Alon Street ~ronta es When ~easible ~ -~__~ 9 9 Pedestrian ,treet li~~htin,~ should illuminate thc tiidewalk a~ a le~ el that i~ ~cros»tent ~ ith pedestrian acti~ iti~s rath~r than ~ehicularacti~~it~. S~ac:~n__ should be standard hut ma~ ~ar~ to uccommodate exisung ~chicular str~et lisht~ or street trees. For pedes~rian scale li~Thtin~ located in the curh zone. fix[ure~ should he the same I~''hish ati those used in other sreas ot thc cic~~ntown. When arran~~ed in a linear pattern they should be spaced approximatel~ SO tc~ 75 fciot apart. On ni~jor street~ tiuch as Broadw~a~ and Canvon. larser I S f'oot hish fixtures ma~ h~ u~~d. A custom streetligh[ tixturc that comhinrs hoth pedestrian and ~ehicular li~htinR rould he considered on such major stre~t~. Pedestrian scale li,~htin~~ ma~ alse~ he accc,m~lished ti~ith lixtures that an me~unted ~~n huildin~ s ur Ic~cat~d t~~ ~ccent architecwral or I~nd;cape fcawre,. Such tixturr~ sh~uld he desi~ned tc~ enhanc~ the o~erall architerturr ~~( the huildin,~. pro~~idr lightin~ tor pedestrians ancl not damagc historic matcrials. NOTE: Li~ht Pe~les are prm ided b~ Puhlic Ser~ ices Cc~mpan~~ and main[ained h~ the cit~ e~i' Bi~ulder. C~~~~rdination ~~~ith Puhlir S~r~ ice is an ahsolute rcyuirement. ....~.. 66 ~ ~' Downtown Urban Design Guidelines w,.._ 6.11 ~landicapped Access Should Be APproPriately Designed, Clearly Uisible ~rom Main ~ntranceway And, In General, Use The Same ~ccess Rout~s As Those Used by No~-~la~dicapped Users Where Possible A~oal of the city i~ tei m~ke the downtown ~s accessible as pos- sible. All sidewalks, puhlic-utic huildin~*s. and puhlic open tipaces should be in compliance with American Disabilities Act i ADA ) standards. All accessible desi~?n elements must conform ti~ all applicable Federal. State and Loe:al laws and codes. Ramp~ ~nd rel;~tcd elements should be mc~dest in their desian and be ~isuallv intesratrd w~ith thr cnerall buildin~~ desi~n and The ~ .~. ~: site plan. They should not appear as an uninte~rated add-on to a buildinR tacade. In most cases the principal public entrance tc~ a buildin« should also he the principal entrance for handicappcd accessihilitv. In existin~ huildinRs. where onlv ane route i~ determinecl to he accessihk, other than the principal public entrance. ~ rear or side service entrance route mav be considered. b.13 Street~urnishingsCreatea Unified -,~~~ VisualAppearance in Downtown ~- _ ~ .A unified streetscape image adds to the c~verall ~~isual quality of the downtown. Traditionall~. black metal and wood have been the materials used for street furnishin~~ in the downtown mall. In ~Teneral. install standard henches, trash receptacles. and bike stands will unify the ~isual qualit~~ of the downtown through [he use of a common colors. materials. and pa[terns. However on occasion. based upon a desi~n revieU by the appropriate eroup. street furniture miRht be designed tn create a uniyue street fea- ture. a~isual statement. nr e~en a public work of art. The fol- Ic~win~ standard street elements should be considered for the dow~ntown: • $enches The standard downtown hench is made of black metal with wo~en horizonta] snd venical strappin~T. Variations mav include henches with or without backs and with single or multiple seats. Cuntact the Downtown Mana~~ement Commission at (303) =1-~1- -1000. Varnished wood benched are charartenstic mall feawres as well. • Trash receptacles Three standard trash recepta- cles are a~~ailable for use in the downtown: a larne capac- ity black metal slat design. a small slat desion that are attached to a utility pole, and a free standins ash tray and disposal can. All receptacles are made of black finished metal. Locate receptacles at street cor- ners in hi~h pcdestrian acti~ity areas. One trash receptacle should be provided for each 1.000 square feet of sidewalk space with a minimum capacity of one cubic f'oot. Hi~h use areas such as eatinR spots I~._ ~l~^r I should dc~uhle the capacity. The use of~ a multiple receptacle system promotes recycling of glass. paper, or metal products. • Bicvcle stand The citv of Boulder standard bike rack for low~ ~olume areas is a black metal pipe. imerted "U" desiQn. For hiRh volume areas the Cora. or coat-hanger design in black metal. is pref~erred. Bike rac}s should be grouped together and arranoed in a re~ular pattern. rather than be dispersed randomly. Locate bike parl:in~ in high demand locations especially inside the mall Loop, at bus stops, or along bike lanes. Use the 199? Do~vnro~+~n Bike Plan as a~uide for locatin~ likely parkin~ areas. The Downtown Manasement Commission's travel demand man- agement pro~ram provides for bicycle parkin~ in the public ri~ht-of-way and uses the Downtown Bike Parkino Plan as the Quide for placement. To contact the DMC. call (303) 413-7300. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines 61 Simple black metal, sandstone and concrete hollards ha~~e heen the standard ~;~hich mar he u~ed in a~ariet~ c~f wavs. The` can separate pedestrian and ~~ehicular traftic, defin~ property lines. pmtect a w~ork of public art, or identify~ different use areas. In pedestrian areas bollards should be '?4-30 inches hi~h. in vehicular areas 36 te~ -1? inches hi~h. Bollards should be betwe~n 8 and 16 inche~ w~ide. When feasible. li=htinQ can he incocporated in the hollard to hi~hlieht special features or for pedestrian safety. ~ Locate boxes at nodes of pedestrian activity such as bus stops and street corners. Boxes should not reduce pedestrian or auto- mobile si~ht lines. In ~eneral. pro~~ide ~ fbot clearance to ~~ain access to the boxes. and no less than '? feet between the bo~es and the curb. • Banners and flags Banners and fla~s should be located in a manner that enhances the visual qualit~ of downtoH~n streets. Vb'hile dimensions may ~ar~, they can be attached to existin= stree~scape elements such as utility' poles. Pedestrian and vehicular clearance issues must br taken into consideration. Si~n code issues mav need to be addressed. Before con- structins an~~ banner or fla= contact the Planning Dept. for sign code issues at 303- -1-41-1880 and the DMC, at 303-~ 13-7300, for banner and fla= approval. • Kiosks, Information Directors, and "Way Finding" Signs. 1'he users of public places such as dow ntown Boulder need apprnpriate, correct and timely in(armation ro help them find their way and direct them to their destinatians. Locate informa- tion elements at key intersections to convey public information; it mav disptay a~~arietv of different types of information such as leaflets. posters, and brc~chures. In oeneral, they should be desi~ned as an inte~rated part of the overall streetscape but should not interfere with pedcstrian traffic flou~. They should be pc:rmanently fixed in place and made of sturdy materials that are resistant to ~~andalism andl wear and tear. NOTE: A revocable ri~ht-or-way pertnit is required to any per- manent installation in the public ri~ht-of-way from the Public W'orks Depanment. contact (303) 441-3200. 6$ ~ ~ Downtown Ur6an Design Guidelines • Bollards As a~eneral euideline. enrourage the use of newspaper baxes that are metal black enamel finish with white «raphics. Boxes should ~rouped toRether in a pedestal desi=n. stacked a maxi- mum of two hiah w~ith a maximum length of 8 foot. • Newspaper boxes b.14 CreateAttractive, SafeAnd ComfortableBusStops Street side hus stops should be desiQned as mini-centers that include all of the n~cessan furniiure. amcnitie~. and shelter t~~ make bus use pleasant. Bus shelters ma~ ineorporate vansit maps. hen~he~. new ~ ra~k~. hike srora~~c. surfa~e pa~ in~~. trees. lan~iscapiny~. and c~ther amenitie;. Bu~ ~hrlter desi~*n shoul~i he c~~nsistent throu~=hout thc downtow~n tc> crcatc a trunsit idcntity and ~ i~uaf unit~ . Bus shelters should he '~~isihl~ tc, pedestrians, inec~rpc~ratc clear si~~naUe. and he aell li~~hted. The~ shi~uld he ~~~::~~ ~-~.. made ofi finished. durable material~ u ith unhreakahle transpar- ent side w~alls. NOTE: The Boulder Transpcxtation Di~ i;ion. Transportation Plannin~_ should he contacted re~*ardin« thc desi~n an~l li~~~ti<m of hu; stops. 6.15 When ~easible, Create Through-Block Pedestrian Corridors ~ Between Buildin s, ~s eciall ina North South Direction ~~ 9 P Y Thruu~_h-hlock connections, such as the Ports] Buildin~~ and Dail} Camera walk~~a~~ ~h~uld be encoura~ed in lar=e pmjects ro pro- mote pedestrian circulation throu`~hout the d<~wnto~~n. Desi~n such ronnections to be interestin~_ places. not merelv hallwavs to parkin_~ lot~ c>r alle~ szn ice loadin~ areas. Thev should be handi- cap ae:ce5sihle. well li~hted. appropriatel~ landscaped. and paved in mat~rial~ compatihlr with their locations and surrc~undin« con- te~t. Opportunitics f~~r anwork or ~~ther ~~isual inno~~ations are encoura~ed. ~ ~ i ~ ~~, ,~ ~~-~--~---~ °~ ~ , ~ ~. ;~ e : ~. ~ ~ ~-° ~ ~ '~ ~~~ /^ ~.... ~ ~•~ ~- -- ,~ e^ / a h ~_ ~ ~ ~~ } ~.. • ~ ~ ~ e~ ~ ~ ~ . _ ~. ... ~,~, :~- ~ - . ~~y ~. ~ i,. ,~ a L ~ f ~ .~° ~ j ~ ~ ~ , ' ,; ~ ' ~ y ~ - _..~._ ~.. ~' ~ ' . ~.4 '.ar y _ ~.~ M ~ "~"~ d, D y ~~ . ~py . ~' . j ~f ^ ~ .. ~ f ~ ~ ~~~~ ~ a~ 7~ . ~~ P,! ~ ~ ~ ` •~, ~M9~ ~~ . 2~ E` l .: ~. ~ 2.i ~~ ... ~ Q a . Rr ~ ~,G $ s ~ ~ "" Y$ ` .~ .~p-w as ~ ~>~ ~ ~ ~ u'~ ~ ~. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ,...,.,> v. , .. d+' ' . . ~w «,.,~,,:. . . . ~ , ~". . > ., , ~.e ; ~ ~ : ~. '~'a. oF~. ; -~ : + ~ ~ ..,. - . , .. , ~m,~a..„,-~.:. .x.'~~~`aP . _ . .... :. ..... ... : . . . i"'".~„" . ... .. : _ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~ 69 6.1b Preserve ~listoric ~eatures of The Streetscape ~ J~ ~'hene~er possibl~. preser~c. restore. and reuse historic tixture, ment, should en~i~~.° that construction material~ an~ ~ietail~ are ~~( the s~reetscape. such a, a fla~~s[~ne ~:rwalk, ~~lc~he li~~ht tix- con,istent ~ith !.._ .tc~ric chara~ter. ture. or an~ other exis~ing histonc teatur~ located in the public ri«ht-of-w~a~. Such clcmrnt~ o1'ier a sense ot historic continuit~ ~ith Boulder'~ past. R~p~ir~ u~ these historir street;ca~e clr- • b.11 Upgrade Downtown Alleys as Pedestrian Access _._ RoutesAnd ~fficientCommercial ServiceAccess'~ ~ Dc~H ntc»~n alle~ s can create ~econdan pedestrian systems tu n~~ i~~ate the do~~nt~~ n and ma~ al:c~ pro~ ide an alternate means c~t a~ress tc~ shops, re,taurants and other commercial usec. Care must he ~i~en to not impede the alle~~~ priman~ sercice tunc- tion. Further. am~ impro~ement usin~ li~htin~~ should be ~iesi~ned ia not cast :~lare onto adjacent residen[ial propertieti. especiall~ in the Interl~re Area. In order to make alle~ ~~ i,ualh interestin_*, safe. and a~cessihle t<~ pcdestrians ~ ~ Use ciecorati~e pa~inR t~ identifv allrvw~~ buildinR entranc~s hv creatin_ a 1 foot w~ide brick edsin~_ as ;~ decorative element [c, define the w•idth oi alle~s and the importance of certain alle~ pedcstrian routes. and connect alleys to sidewalks. • Incorporaie pedestrian scale street li~htin~• and accent li~htin~~ to hi~hli~ht buildin~ and allevwa~ entrancc,. ~ • L~,e co~ered entrance w•avs and decorati~c si«ns to detine alle~ entrances. ~ • Incorpc~rate bollards, nl~nters, nr similar elements to identiCv pedestrian areas from ,rn ice or . ehiclc; areas: ronsolidate ser- ~i~e area~ ro hide unsiRhtl~ tra~h and rec~clin_~ hins in atcrac- ti~e coniainment desi~_n,. • Plareutilities under~raund. Im~rc,~~~l alle~~Ha~. uhi~n in~lu~i~ hrick pa~ in~~. land~~apin~~. anJ .~atin~. 10 ~~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ .~~:. 6.18 ~nrich The Downtown With Public Art ~:' ~~ ,~_ Puhlic an can enrich the downtawn experience. enhance its puhlic ima_e. and add bcaut}. But. ~hile public art can beauti t'y, it can also inspire intense public interest. Public art may be rcpresentational or abstract. It mav br uni- or multi-dimensional. humorous or sad. understandablc or pose yuesticros. It may hc activelv en~a;_in_ or a passive backdrop to puhlic e~~ents. Choosin~=, purchasing, installin«, maintaini~g, and remo~ in~ puhlic art when neccssar~, reyuires careful delib- eration and plannin~. Streetscape desi~n inrorpora[es public an tc~ create ~isuallv interestin~ and informati~e environments. As long as the artistic intention i~ understood, puhlic art mav be manv thin~s. The Arts Commission. the Downtnw~n Manasement Commission. the DDAB. and the LPAB are amon~ the Qroups io~olved in mal:in~ public art decisions in the downtown. Decisions mav address the followins, amons others: • The relationship of public art to its proposed si[e and its ~isual impact. • The ahility af public an to enhance the downtown expenence such as brin~in~ peuple to~ether. invitina public interaction. creatin« moments of visual or intellectual interest, and enhanc- in~~ thr ar~a's beaut~. • The durability of materials, maintenance and upkeep in public settin~s. • The placement of puhlic art ta terminate a vista ar ser~e ati the foral pc~int. • The human or monumental scale of artwork located alon~ puhlic streets. • Thc context and character of the area surrc~undin« the art site • The artwork'~ svmbolic and aesthetic qualitie,. • Criteria for deaccessionin~ or removin~~ arttic~rk. Review of artwork in the Downrown Historic District. with regard to the LPAB would consi~er the f~c~llc~~a~in~~ rriteria: • VVhen related to a specific landmark buildin~, the artwork should be subordinate to the overall buildin~~. • The anwork should not ahscure building elements or details. For example. a mural should not co~~er u~indows. • The artwork should not physically damaRe the buildin~~ or site. such as paint on unpainted masonry. • The artwork should be relevant to the location and not confuse the puhlic with artwork that represents a false sense uf history that can o~•ershadow or detract from the period of siQnificance of the buildin~ or district. For example, a mural of a New Orleans Street scene on a Victorian buildinn. • Historic si=ns, such as those painted on side walls. should be preserved. not eliminated. Examples of puhlic art in the dow ntow n. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines APPendixA: loning DistrictDefinitians Zoning districts are classitied accordin~ t~ the pre- de~minant character of de~ el~~pment and currem or intended use in the area. Zone~ dc:si~nated with an I~). ~uch as RB-1 ?t. mcan a rede~ elo~in~= area where there are buildin~~~ and use~ lik~l~ t<i be r~hahilitated. restored. or replaced. Z~ne~ desiQnat- c~i ti ith an e E~. such as RB-1 E. mcan an establ ished arca ~~hrrr de~elopment i~ stablz and fe~~ chan~e~ ar~ anti~ipated or encoura~~ed. Follo«in~~ are the ten ronin_* distncts lorated w~ithin the Doµ~ntoun lirhan Desi~n Guideline~ Be~un~lar~ : R13-1\: The re~~ional husiness red«elopin~* area tiithin th~ do~ntown cc~re that is in thc process of chan~~in« tc~ a hi~her intensit~ us~ w~her~ a wide ran~Tr e~f office. retail and public uses are permitted. ThiS area has the area[~,t pcnential for new de~el- <~pment and rede~elopment ~ithin the doH~n[o~~ r cure. RB-2J~: Busines~ areas pro~iding a mid-le~el tran- sitinn area between the hivher intensit~ downto~~n commercial area and surrc~undine nei~~hborhood ~ommercial streets and lc~wer intensit~ residential areas. R~tail uses are t~ pirall~ t~~und on the ~_round [~oor le~el u•ith residential or office uses locatcd abo~e the ~rc,und Ho~r 1~~e1. RB-3~: Business areas providin~ a transition area hctHecn a hisher intensit~ re_~ional business area and a lc~wer intcnsit~ residential area. Retail uses ar~ t~pically found on the ~round tlonr level with residcntial or c~~; uses located ahe~~e the _round flcx~r. RB-lE: The re=ional business are:, ~~.` the Boulder Valle~ known as the Central Business District. when a wide ran~e of retaiL nfiice, residential, and publir uses are permitted and in whirh man} struc- tures may be renovated or rehabilitated. A balance of neu~ development with the maintenance and ren- ovation of cxistin~ buildin~s is anticipated, and where development and redevelopment consistent with the established historic and urban design char- acter is encoura~ed. ~~.. ~~ ~ RB-2E: A hi~her-intensit~ trantition area bet~~ern th~ dc~ti~ntati~n and thc surroundin<~ residential arra~ ~ here a wide ran~~ ~I~ retail. c~ftice, residential, and puhlir u,es are permitted. A hetl.~n~r ~~t~ nea d« rl- cipment w~ith the maintenance and reno~~atinn of existin~~ buildin~s i~ anuripat~cl. and u~h~re cle~elupment and rede~ele~pment ~~~nsistent ~~ith the estahlished his[onc and urhan dr,i~~n character is encouraged. RB-3E: A lower-in[ensit~ iransiu~,n area hetween th~ dc~wna~~~~n and the ~urroundin~~ residen[ial areas u~here a u ide ranse ol rctail. c~l~ficc:. residential. and Puhlir uses arr pcrmitte~i. .•~ halancc of ne~ de~el- upment w~ith the maintenancc and renovation of existin~~ buildin_s is antiripated. and w•here devel- opmrnt and redevelopment consistent with the cs~ahlished historic and urhan desi~~n character it cnc~~ura~~ed. BMS-X: Bu~ine~ .:reas ~enerallv anchored around a main street tha~ .:: intendcd tc~ serve the sur- rc~unding residential nei~hhonc~~ods. It is anticipat- ed that de~elupmen[ Hill occ:ur in a pedestrian-ori- ented pattern. ~~ith building~ huilt up to the street: retail utie. on the fir~t floor: residcntial and oYtice uses ahc~~ e the firs~ floor: and u here complemen- tar~ use. ma} t~ allo~+ed. HR-1: Hi~~h density residential redevelopin~ areas in thr Prc~cess of chan~in~ f~rom a historically pre- ~leiminant]v sin«le-tamil~~charactcr and rede~~elop- ing to a primar~ use of attarhrd apartment-tvpe dc~•elopment and where complrmrntar~ uses mav he all~,a•ed. 11YR-E: Mixed density residential areas with a ~ aricty uf sin~le-f~amily, detached, duplexes and multi-family units that will tie~ maintained; existin~ structures may be reno~~ated or rchabilitated. TB-E: Transitional Business areas pnmarily used for commercial and complementary residential uscs, including, without limitation. temporary lodg- ing and oftice uses. ...~..,.. 12 ~ ~ Downtown Urban Design 6uidelines -~~. Appendix B: Design Review Check list Section l: The Downtown ~listoric District ~.. ;.. ~ ~, maintain a human buildin~ scale rather than a mc>nolithic or mnnumental scal~ maintain the proportions of storefront win- dows. doors and the established pattern oi~ upper story windows. maintain the rhvthm established h~~ the rrpetition of the traditic~nal ?~ foot facade widthti. use buildinU matenals that have a texwre. pattern ~nd~scale similar to those in the district improve rear or side alley ele~ations to enhance puhlic access from parkin~~ lc~ts and alleys 1.?.6 l.?.7 Section 1.1 Guidelines For The Preservation An~ Renovation of Local Landmarks. Individually Si~nificant. ContributinR. ~., R And Contrihutin~ Restorable BuildinRs 1.1. ] . preserve original facades 1.1.'? prescrve facade materials ].1.3 ali~n architectural features and establish patterns with neiphborin= buildin~s 1.l .-t maintain the original historic line of the buildin~T setback 1. ].5 maintain the ori~inal size, shape and pro- portion of storefront facades and openin~s to retain the historic scale and character 1.1.6 main[ain traditional recessed entries where thev exist 1.1.7 maintain the kick plate below display win- dows 1.1.8 preserve the vansom and clerestory if it f:XISIS 1.1.9 preserve the shape, materials and spacin~ of upper story windows I.1.10 awnin~s may be used to provide visual depth to the facade and shade l.l.l 1 distin~uish additions to historic buildinos 1.1.1? select huildinn colors appropriate to the historic character of the buildin, and area 1.1.13. Minimize the visibility of HVAC units and other mechanical, structural, or electrical appurtenances Section 1? Guidelines For New Construction And Remodeling Non-contributin~ Buildin_s in The Local Downtown Historic District 1?.I incorporate traditional desi~n elements in new designs 1?? ali~n architectural features and established with the patterns of nei=hboring buildings 1.~.3 maintain the line of storefronts at the side- walk edse and orient main entrances to open toward the street 1?.~ do not construct half-level or split-]evel first floors that extend bath above and helow grade 1?.~ consider the height, mass, and scale of huildin~s 1.'_.9 1.~.10 Section Z: The Non-~listoric Area 2.1 consider incorporatinR traditionaf facade elements in new desiRns 2? consider the alignment of architectural fea- tures and established patterns with neiRh- borin~ buildings 2.3 maintain the line of building facades and storefronts at the sidewalk ed=e ?.4 consider the hei~ht. mass and scale of buildin=s "?.5 maintain a human huildinR scale. rather than a mon~~lithic or monumental scale 2.6 create pedestrian interest at the street le~•el 2.7 avoid half level. or panial level basemcnts that extend more than 2 t'eet ahove grade ?.8 shade srorefront ~lass by apropriate means ?.9 maintain the rhythm established by the repetition of~ thc traditional '_'S foot facade widths. ?.10 consider the quality of open spacc incor- porated in new~ and reno~~ated buildinss 2. t 1 consider the s~ccial character of the area south of canyon boule~ard Section 3: The Interface Area 3.1 maintain the diverse residential architec- tura( character of the interi~ace area 3? create attractive rear allev facades on buildinas facin~ toward residential areas 3.3 desi~n alleys to serve as attractive routes for pedestrians, as u~ell as efficeint service access for vehicles Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~ ~' 13 ~.~ ~~here thc zonins line runs alona a street 6.-3 or alon~ a lot line, cc~mmercial de~elop- ment should respect thr rxistin~ buildin~~ scal~ and character of the a~ijacent residen- 6.~ tial area. 3.~ design streets in the nci~hhorhood inter- face area to reflect adjacent residential 6.(~ land uses. Section 4: Parking Facilities ~.~ -l.l locate surface parkin~~ em appropriate site~ ~'~ -~.'? reduce thc ~ isual impact o1~ surface park- in<_~ lots ~'.y 4.3 reduce the visual impact of structured parkin_ facilities 4.-i securitv and pedestrian circulation should hc priorities 6.10 Section 5: Commercial Signs 6~~ ~J signs should be desi~ned as an inteoral 6.1 ~ part oC the o~erall huilding desisn ~.~' use simple sians to clearly convey a mes- sa~~e. Symbols as si~ns arc easily read and enhance pedestrian yuality 6.13 Section6: Streetscapelmprovements 6.1 use the existino street hierarrhti as a basis for desi~nin~ the streetscape 6.~ use a basic sidewalk desi~*n to unifv the visual ima~e of downtown 6.~ usc a basic intersection desisn to unifv thc ~ isual imase ot dou~nt~~wn ~. ~.~ dcsign extensions into th~ puhlic ri~ht-oi- wav that are ~isualh and funrtionall~ apprnpriatr u~ their stre~t use innrnati~e railin;~ desi~ns te~ detin~ outduc~r spaces, such a, cafes, from pedes- trian mo~ement areas create co-nfe,rtahle and attracti~~e sittin<~ areas. plaza, and small o~,en spaceti with a focus cm ~~icu~s and sunshine ~elert street trees that arc appropriate to their location and function sclect ~zroun~i Ir~~el plant~ that suit their location and function maintain the "houle~ard" character of Canvon Boulevard - a sinele rov.~ uf street veet on either side of~ the street. the huildin« set-hack line. and thc center planting strip w•hich detines ~he hc~ule~ard character create ~ateway elements at imponant downrown entrance u~avs establish pedestnan scale street li~hts alan~_ street fronta~es when feasible haodicapped access should be appropnate- h~ desianed. ~isihle from the main entranceway. and in aeneral. use the same access routes as those us~d by non-handi- capped users w~here possihle install street furnishinss that create a uni- tied ~ isu~l a~~earance in d~ti~ntoti~n creatc attracti~•e, safe and comfonable hus stops 6.15 when feasible, create throu~h-hlock pedes- trian corridors between huildings, espe- cially in a north-south direction 1,.16 preserve histonc features of the streetscape 6.17 up~rade dow~nrow•n alleys as ~destrian access routes and efficient commcrcial ser- vice access 6.18 enrich thc downtow~n with puhlic an 14 ~ ~'' Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines ,:,.~ : listoflllustrationsandPhotographs ~ ~ :~. Intraduction Map of thc Doti~ntown Historic District, thr Non-his- toric Arca. and the Ncit~hh~~rhood [nterfacr Ph~n~~ of historic: huildin~_. Map of do~~~nt~~~rn landusc. zonine Ma~ cif~ CAGID and BIU hcwndar~ Ph~,t~~. ~+t~ ~~ie~~. and sctun«s in d~~a•nt~~wn Ma~ c~f D~n~nt~~Hn Hititc~ri~ Distrirt ~~ith fi~~e huil~f- ine cJ~tii~~nati~in~ identilicd Section l: The Downtown ~listoric District I l.l 1.~ 1.-~ 1.6 1.7 l.y 1.~.1 1.~.~' 1."_'.3 1.2.4 1.~.5 1.?.fi I.?.6 1.'_'.7 ~.~.x illustrati<~n ~~t t~~ical hittorir tacade w~ith ele- ments hi~~hli~hted ;uch a~ kick-plate, etc... photc~ c~l' historic srorefront facade ~~ith orivi- nal sizr. shap~. proportic>n~ hi`~hli~hted ~ photo cif the context of a historic block illustrations or of historic huildinRs an the side~all~ and set-h~ck frc~m thr sidetiall: photc~ti cif r~ce~,ed cntries in mid-blo~~; and a~ u corner photo, ~~f his~oric kick-pla~es. transom, and clerest~~riec photos ot traditi~mal upper s[ory w~indows and aw•nin~~s photo. c~f additi~ns to side of a histori~ huild- in~?. and to the root illustraticm of t~~pical historic fncadc elements hi~hli~~htrd phot~~ c~f the context of a hlock. ali~nment of architcctural features ' illu.tration of how~ to maintain the storefront line ~rith the usr of columm. etc. illustration of nc~t huildin~ first floor more than ~ feet abc~~r ~~rade phoios of setbacks on upper t3oors ro reduce percei~~ed height. mass. and scale phot~s of buildin~s that demonstratc human scale uith important elemen[s highlighted illustraticm of buildings that arc monolithic looE:ins w~ith elements highlighted phota: maintain proportions of upper and I<~wer story windows with important elements illustration of 25 foot widc ~attern of' do~~n- [own facades Section Z: The No~-Nistoric Area Map o( the Dow~ntown Historic District, the Non-his- tori~ Area. and the Interfare Area '_.I illustration of t~-pical fac:~de elements hi~h- li~~hted. fc~r nru construction _'.'_ illustraticro sho~,in~ alienment of feawres ~~ ithin th~ ~ontext ~f a bl~ck ~. ~ illutitraticm ~~f h~» tc~ maintain storefront, at sidewalk ed~*e '_.-1 photo of contemporarti buildin~s in Non-his- toric Area demonstratina perceived hei~~ht. mass. scale. ~~ia sethack of upper floor ~.-~ photo of maintainin;~ a standard floor tc~ floor hei~ht in a nc:~+ hldg. ?.5 photos of buildin~s that demonstrate human scaled elemen[, ~.5 photo of ~~isual interest features on a huildin~ at the street level '_'.6 illustration of the differenres hetween lawer and upp~r floor w~indc~us, f-eawres ?.9 illustration of a people plazu ?.10 phenos of the character areas helow~ and around Cam~on Bl~d. Section 3: The Interface Area Map of the Dou~ntow~n Historic District. the Non-his- toric Area. and thc Nei~hhorhood lntcriace 3.1 phcitos of historic resid~ntial huildin~~s next to cnmmercial huildinss in thr Nrishhonc~~cid Intcrtace 3? photo of alle~ with an attractive ~arbage stor- ase near a neishborhex~d ~ 3.~3 photo of curh zone ~rass in thc half block adja- cent to the NciRhborhood Interface Section 4: Parking Facilities 4.? photo of typical surface parkin~~ lot landscape elements 4.3 photo of rctail wrap on publir parkin~ facility Downrown Urban Desiqn Guidelines ~ )S Section 5: Commercial Signs ~.l phc~to; c,f t~~ical wall si~~n anc~ t)~pical project- ine si~n ~.I ph~tc~s of tvpical awning si:n: t~~pical sion materials, illumination. shapes. ~raphics ~.'_ phc~tos of mall and surroundings Section 6: Streetscape 6.~ 6~ illustration ot hasic sidewalk clcments includ- inQ curh rone, pedestrian zone, corner zone. and of a basic intersection desien photo ~~f a Nei«hhorhood Interiace hlock sh~wing I~ndscape material in the curh r.one 6.5 photo~ c~l~ inne~vati~~e, a[tractive railin,~ de,i,~n 6.6 photo of plaza and seatin~ arca in thc d<~ti~n- tuH n 6.7 table of appropriate trees 6.7 photos ot appm~ed tree _rate~ and ot~ ho~ trcr clusters ma~ hi~hlieht an entranceu~a~ 6.8 photos of appropriate ground ccncn in dou•n- tnu•n 6.y photos of typical Canvon Boule~ard ima~es 6.1:~ phot~~s of standard henchs, trash mce~t~rlrl. hic~ clc racks, hollards. ne~•spa~en c~~xcs, han- ners and li~hts in the do~~ntown 6.15 photo of through-hlc~ck connector and a t_ypi- cal sidewalk 6.17 ~hoto of improved allevw~a~ 6.1 H~hc~tos of ~uhlic art in the dc~w•ntow n ]6 ~ ~ Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines