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6 - Joint Planning Board and Downtown Design Advisory Board Study Session to discuss the role of the DDAB, the criteria & context ...nd also to review some recent case studiesMEMORANDUM TO: Planning Board Downtown Design Advisory Board FROM: Ruth McHeyser, Acting Planning Director Robert Ray, Development Review Planning Manager Brian Holmes, Zoning Administrator DATE: December 13`h, 2007 SUBJECT: Materials for Joint Planning Board/Downtown Design Advisory Board Meeting The purpose of this memo and included attachments is to provide background for the Boards' joint discussion regazding DDAB's role and the criteria and context for review. Staff has suggested the following topics for discussion: DDAB's role DDAB's role is described in 2-3-18 B.R.C. 1981 (Attachment A). While this section of the Boulder Revised Code specifically refers to DDAB's role within the downtown, there have also been instances when Planning Board and/or staff have referred items outside of the downtown to DDAB. Criteria for review Within the non-historic and interface azeas of the downtown DDAB references the Downtown Urban Design Guidelines (Attachment E) as the criteria for review. For those instances when Planning Board and/or staff have referred items outside of the downtown area to DDAB, they generally have been sent to DDAB either at the request of Planning Board (for discretionary review projects) or, in the case of City projects, at the reyuest of the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) division of Public Works. In these circumstances DDAB has referenced other guidelines such as the BVRC Guidelines (Attachment F) and/or the Site Review criteria (Attachment G) as needed. Examples of projects outside of the downtown Examples of these projects include: Northfield Commons, Vojta Fann, Gunbarrel Town Center, TwentyNinth Street, Ball Aerospace Boulder Campus Expansion, The Peloton, Crossroads Commons, and most recenUy the Regional Fire Training Center at Boulder Reservoir (map of example projects is included as Attachment D). n___a.u~.Y I,, ArslF Discussion of potential future role As indicated by the list above, there have been circumstances where DDAB's skills are desired in the review of projects outside of the downtown area. The benefit in doing so has lead to discussions about recognizing the role of DDAB, including a more formal role, outside of the downtown. ATTACHMENTS: A. Downtown Design Advisory Board Roles and Responsibilities (2-3-18 B.R.C. 1981) B. Summary of Downtown Urban Design Strategies and Objectives C. Map of Downtown Historic District, Non-Historic Area, and the Interface Area D. Map of Projects Reviewed by DDAB (outside of downtown azea) E. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines F. Boulder Valley Regional Center Guidelines G. Site Review Criteria (9-2-14 of the Boulder Revised Code) H. Site Review/DDAB Flow Chart lenanda Ilwm A ~ pfl03i~ ~ _ Table of Contents I. Study Session Agenda 2. Downtown Design Advisory Board Roles and Responsibilities (Attachment A) 3. Summary of Downtown Urban Design Strategies and Objectives (Attachment B) 4. Map of Downtown Historic District, Non-Historic Area, and the Interface Area (Attachment C) 5. Map of Projects Reviewed by DDAB (outside of the downtown area) (Attachment D) 6. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines (Attachment E) 7. Boulder Valley Regional Center Guidelines (Attachment F) 8. Site Review Criteria- 9-2-14 B.R.C. 1981 (Attachment G) 9. Site Review/DDAB Flow Chart (Attachment H) ATTACHMENT A Downtown Design Advisory Board Roles & Responsibilities 2-3-18 Downtown Design Advisory Board. (a) The City of Boulder downtown design advisory board consists of five members appointed by the city council for five yeaz terms, at least two of whom aze design professionals and three of whom maybe chosen without limitation. The purpose of the boazd is to encourage thoughtful, well-designed development projects that are sensitive to the chazacter of the downtown. (b) The board's functions are to: (1) Review projects for compliance with the Downtown Urban Design Plan (1986), adopted by Ordinance No. 5013, and provide comments to persons responsible for designing and developing downtown projects having a valuation of $10,000.00 or more involving the construction of a new building or exterior work on an existing building; (2) Review projects for compliance with the Downtown Urban Design Plan (1986) and provide comments to persons responsible for designing, developing, and approving downtown projects that require a discretionary development review, pursuant to chapter 9-2, "Review Processes," B.R.C. 1981; and (3) Advise and make recommendations for approval or disapproval of amendments to the Downtown Urban Design Plan (1986) to the planning boazd, the city manager, and the city council. (c) The board shall use the guidelines set forth in the Downtown Urban Design Plan (1986) to review projects in those azeas described on the "Downtown Area Map" as the historic commercial azea, the non-historic downtown area, and the interface area. (d) Projects that require a review by the landmazks boazd aze exempt from a review by the downtown design advisory boazd. (e) The board shall not involve itself in any review under title 8, "Pazks, Open Space, Streets, and Public Ways," 9, "Land Use Code," or 10, "Structures," B.R.C. 1981, unless its opinion is requested by the planning boazd or city council. (f) Prior to making any recommendation, the board shall hold a public hearing. (g) The board is not authorized to issue subpoenas. (Ordinance No. 5963 (1998)) Agenda I~ X_(2_--~ ~~1--1-. ATTACHMENT B Downtown Design Advisory Board Urban Design Strategies and Objectives In support of the ten strategies outlined in the 1992 Downtown Alustrative plan: 1. Assure the long term economic vitality of the downtown 2. Establish a pedestrian district 3. Provide improved links between the Downtown Boulder mall and the Civic Pazk 4. Locate and build additional public places in the downtown 5. Design and construct streetscape improvements throughout the downtown 6. Maintain the historic character of the downtown area 7. Expand the role of the arts (and public improvements) downtown 8. Encourage residential uses adjacent to (and in) the downtown 9. Provide better access to the downtown for alternative transportation modes 10. Parking Application of the Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Downtown Historic District • Non-Historic Area • Interface Area • Pazking Facilities • Commercial Signs Section 1: The Downtown Historic District: • The district contains the city's greatest concentration of historic commercial buildings, especially along Pearl Street which forms its central spine. These ' buildings non only serve as a link with our cultural heritage, they also establish a model for design quality. Such buildings are resources for education, recreation and human enjoyment. They provide downtown with a rich character and a human scale that aze unique assets for both residents and visitors to Boulder. Objectives • Preserve and restore historic buildings. • Preserve the integrity of historic architectural features of individual buildings. • Ensure that alterations and new construction strengthen and maintain the historic integrity of individual buildings and of the Historic Area at large. • Encourage new development that will respect and enhance the visual character. • Enhance the retail focus of the area. • Preserve the central area as a place for intense pedestrian activity. Aaenth Ifest N l0 Pi9B ~ - - f Section 2: The Non-Historic Area: • The Non-Historic Area offers unique opportunities for design options and creation of variety in building forms. A focus on pedestrian activity and attention to massing, scale and alignment ofbuilding features aze important design considerations. • Other important design elements in the Non-Historic Area: o The Non-Historic Area's relationship to its surroundings, including the Historic Area, the Civic Pazk area, and the neighborhood interface azea o The pedestrian quality of the area including the downtown Boulder mall, east and west Peazl Street, Spruce and Walnut streets, Canyon Blvd. and the north-south streets that connect Civic Pazk to the mall area, and o That new building design can reflect the chazacter of its own time while respecting the integrity, scale, and massing of historic buildings in the area. Objectives • Reinforce the character of downtown as a pedestrian place by encouraging architectural solutions that are visually interesting, stylistically appropriate to their context, and compatible in scale and character with the street. • Strengthen the identity of downtown as a place where people feel welcome and comfortable through careful selection of building materials and human scale design. • Encourage development that complements pedestrian activity. Section 3: The Interface Area: • The Interface Area is composed of the blocks that link the core of the downtown to the sun•ounding residential neighborhoods. This area requires special design sensitivities that must be addressed when commercial buildings are located adjacent to residential azeas. Objectives • Encourage sensitive design along the edge where the downtown commercial area abuts residential neighborhoods. • Encourage sensate site, building, and streetscape design that emphasizes a clear distinction between both commercial and residential areas. • Maintain the diversity in building type and size and respect the adjoining residential chazacter that is important to the area. • Discourage adverse impacts from noise, night lighting, poor building design, and commercial services on adjacent residential neighborhoods. pgenda~rtt#~ _t~ef~`_~ Section 4: Parkins Facilities: • The most critical elements to consider in evaluating the design of parking facilities are traffic impacts on adjacent streets, building massing, urban design relationship to adjacent buildings, the location of the facility within the development, its security, landscaping, and lighting. Objectives • Produce attractive parking facilities that aze compatible additions to downtown which add to, rather than detract from, the azea's historic character and function. • Enhance pedestrian activity at the sidewalk level through the use of retail wrap on structure parking and landscape areas around surface parking. • Ensure that the design of the facility is of the highest quality. Section 5: Commercial Sisns: • Commercial signs should function to identify and locate businesses, promote merchandise or service within, attract customers, provide direction and information, and in some cases create visual delight and architectural interest. Objectives • Encourage design and sign placement that promotes downtown businesses while complementing downtown's chazacter and scale. • Promote signs that are designed as an integral yet noticeable part of a building's overall design. • Promote the design of signs that are good neighbors within their block. • Create an overall image in which a building and its signs relate to each other in helping to draw customers. -moo ~ 'Q o • ' o~a° d~ ~ ~aoQo ~ o~Jo • ,r ~ . ~ Vf ' ^ ' ' ~ ,p UUU ,p°•• p \ - ~ •d ~ ~ f l' :y . • i ti . • • J • • * t v ' , , , ° ~ / ~ q. 4 7° • O , , • • ~ ~Q aoq~ _ • . . a, o ~ o o N P 1 .l ~p a ~ t q O o0 ° • <eJ ~ • • • • • • i° Interface Area Bwlding Category: n . • • • p<~ Individually Significant ~ • • • ti • ~ Non-Historic Area 1 • s " t - Q Downtown Historic District Contnbuting • o ~ Contributing Restorable Z A 200® Feet n ^ o a Q~ o Map produced Dy Me City of Boulder Planning Department GIS Lab. Map of the Downtown Historic District, the Non-Historic Area, and the Interface Area ...rr ATTACHMENT D DDAB Reviewed Projects Outside The Downtown Area z - ~ ~ w ~ ~ ~ mer Rd 'O ~ I L, / ~ ch c z C° Gunbarrel Town Boulder Center z ~ Regional Fire Reservoir , Training Center ~ \bk~u Rd ~ ° ~ ~ - ~ ~ i ~~l 1~' Li' ~ ~ ~ ~ <<,i~ ~ ! Sine`-~~ ~ d ~_i~~~ 'r~s~; - r. 4 Hil e r~ / r ~ .r' ~ ~ - ~ =-1 ~ 1 _ m" utti, ~_~1. ~ P ~ - -i ~ - i ~ J ~ ~~~i ti ~ Northfield Commons/ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Vojta Farm r irid n A ~l r N~ ~ n ~ m I mia In p ndence Rd in ° ~ rt~s~_V' - ti ;r i ~ ~ 1 _ ~ ~ 1 : ~ ~ V most R ~ - Crossroads Commons ~ ~I-' ' ~ iT ~ I ~ Mill Rd almost S ~ : B Sam v ~ i y~ . _ Reservoir I C~o~~~e F ~ on P; a ear Twenty Ninth St ~ ~r . ` S~ ° 1 ; . ~ r - __e l,,_ ~ _ - • Ball Aerospace ~ Ea i a - G I ~ : r Peloton ~ _ I ~~~i Gtor V - ; ~ I- cn ~ ~ a i 1 'F ~ f ~ I I~ - a e ine B v! _ seline , ~ tom, 4 . , _ ~ eserv , - - fir- ~ ~ ~ fJr ~ ~ °ux ~ S K J ~ i , ~ ~ U ~ i ~ ~ ' ~ < ~ ' I r ~ ~ South oulder Rd " able ` k \ J ` . `Ii ~ i r 1 1 - L ~i C ~ `L ~ ~1~~` r I y 36 ~J< fn ~ ~ ` °=%°~f~h v City Limits ; ATTACHMENT' E, ow n tow n r an esign ui a fines ~su ` sr ._x City of Boulder, Colorado ZOOZ Acknowledgments: The Downtown Alliance This second edition of the Downtown Urban Design Guidelines is the direct result of work conducted by the Downtown Alliance, a group of city boards and commissions, non-profit organizations and neighbor- hood groups including the city of Boulder Planning Board; the Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board; the Downtown Design Advisory Board; the Downtown Management Commission; Downtown Boulder, Inc.; Historic Boulder; and representatives from the Whittier, Mapleton Hill, Goss Grove, and Flatirons neighborhoods. Formed in the fall of 1996, the Downtown Alliance was charged with developing a scenario that would help the city to: • guide future development in a manner that maintains the down- town's livability and is consistent with the overall "feel" of the downtown, • protect downtown's historic character that is so closely associated with its image and quality of life, and • maintain the quality of life of surrounding neighborhoods and their relationship to the downtown. While this edition of the Downtown Urban Design Guidelines replaces the 1986 Downtown Boulder Urban Design Plan, it draws much of its content from that document. The city wishes to acknowl- edge the individuals and organizations who produced that initial work and who implemented the downtown design review process. The city also wishes to acknowledge the work undertaken to implement the "interface blocks" which also contributed greatly to this document. Other studies that contributed to this document include the 1976 Downtown Boulder Private Development Guidelines for Architecture and Signs, the 1992 Downtown Illustrative Plan, and the 1995 draft Downtown Boulder Pedestrian Streetscape Plan: Design and Standards. n?, Dawntnwn Urban Design Guidelines _V"':_ ~i dronrl~flaai ~---.~D $ Table of Contents Page Introduction s Downtown Land Use Regulations 8 Basic Urban Design Considerations 9 Now the Guidelines are Organized 10 The Design Review Process 10 The Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board 11 The Downtown Design Advisory Board Process IZ The Downtown Management Commission Process 1Z Other Boards, Commissions, and City Departments 13 Application Submission Requirements 14 History 15 Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Section I: The Downtown Nistorir District 11 Section I.I Guidelines for the Preservation and 19 Renovation of local Landmarks, Individually significant, Contributing and Contributing Restorable Buildings Section IZ Guidelines for New Construction and ZI Remodeling Non-Contributing Buildings In the Downtown Historic District Section Z: The Non-NistoricArea and its Nistorir Buildings 33 Section 3: The Neighborhood Interface Area 41 Section 4: Parking Facilities 45 Section 5: Commercial Signs 49 Section 6: Streetsrape Improvements 53 Appendix Appendix A: ioningDistrictDefinitions IZ Appendix B: Design Review Check List 13 Agenda Ilem M ~ # ~ ' .3 x'. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ..~~.troduct~en ~ _ Q The purpose of this second edition of the Downtown Urban Through the use of these guidelines it is anticipated that both Design Guidelines is to provide a basis for understanding, dis- private and public projects will endeavor [o preserve and cussing, and assessing the design quality of proposed preser- enhance the form, scale, and visual character that make down- vation, renovation and new construction projects located with- town unique within the city and the region. in the boundaries of the Downtown Historic District, the Non- historic Area, and the Interface Area. v ~a~~_ a r° a~-~~uu~? ~ P E ~ ~4 Q ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t 6 mr d °~~ops ' a~ ~ s~ 0 ~ ~ .o w ~ S y r ~ t f s GO , y Q ~"~IrbNt ~rOiYrsOe ~r ~rnliYlAY f»~ Qds•Y~IYi1~iY! j?4~W/ylYi~l~h q ~ ~ 9 „d _,,,.r,S\ w~~14e~4Rta~revl.ety4r~ttiAr Map of the Downtown Historic District, the Non-Historic Area, and the Interface Area Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Ar~!nrla Itam Ef ~n R These guidehnes are designed to support the ten north/south pedestrian system will be strengthened strategies outlined in the 1992 Downtown and ifs urban form clarified. Major north/south 711ustrative Plan: pedestrian co[ridors include 9th, IOth, and 11th Streets; Broadway, and 13th and 14th St. 1. Assure the long term economic vitality of the 4. Locate and build additional public places in downtown the downtown Downtown Boulder is the heart of the city, the tra- Open space is prized as one of Boulder's most val- ditional hub of city life. Its future economic vitality ued assets. [n addition to [he expansive open is of great importance to the future health of the spaces that ring the city, numerous creek, park, and city. These guidelines will help the city to balance trail systems weave through the city. Small plazas, the need for economic vitality with the need to parks, and open areas where people gather, rest and maintain and enhance downtown's unique "sense of recreate aze important elements in making central place". places like downtown livable. They provide access to views, create open areas in higher intensity 2. Establish a pedestrian district developments, and add enjoyment for people work- Down[own Boulder is a walkable place. The ability ing or shopping downtown. to walk from one end of downtown to the other in less than 10 minutes, and the pedestrian scale of its 5. Design and construct streetscape improve- sidewalks, buildings, and storefronts, are key fac- menu throughout the downtown tors in what makes the downtowmazea different. The public image created by the visual quality of downtown's streets, sidewalks, and landscaping is 3. Provide improved links between the important. People like attractive and well Gazed for Downtown Boulder mall and the Civic Park environments within which to work and shop. The The Downtown Boulder mall is one of America's care and maintenance of this public realm, adds premiere public places, and the Civic Park azea is value to the downtown and improves public safety. one of this city's most important public gathering places. By visually and functionally linking these 6. Maintain the historic character of the down- two significant open spaces, downtown's town area Aerial photo of downtown with Downtown Boulder mall and Civic Park ;r.~Y ray~enda Ifeca # ~P _ f~ge A r% Downtown Urban Design Guidelines Downtown's historic quality is of paramount increase the use of alternative modes of trans- importance to its public image and economic portation, and build strong community ties. The vitality. It is an asset to preserve and bank upon. city's land use regulations encourage housing not It builds value and creates opportunities for innov- only adjacent to downtown but within the down- ative mazketing and advertising strategies. Most town itself in well designed mixed-use projects, importantly, downtown's historic quality keeps Boulder in touch with its past and defines its 9. Provide better access to the downtown for unique character. alternative transportation modes Akey to downtown success is the ability to move 7. Ezpand the role of the arts (and public people comfortably to and horn the area. No one events( downtown mode of transportation provides all the answers. Successful downtowns depend not only on how Rather, a strategy [ha[ relies on a balance of alter- they look but on what people can do there. Social native modes, including walking, biking, transit, and cultural events that attract people are funds- and auto is needed. Good urban design and mental to downtown's success. The role of the appropriate land use planning can facilitate alter- arts and related public events are closely linked to native transit mode in the downtown. how people think of down[owq its attractiveness, 10. Parking safety, and social well being. The 1992 Downtown Illustrative Plan identified parking as a needed strategy, and in 1996, the 8. Encourage residential uses adjacent to (and Downtown Alliance noted in A Proposal for the in( the downtown Downtown Central Business District that the rela- Creating livable central places is a hallmark of tionship between alternative mode use, develop- many successful cities nationwide. Places where ment, and parking needs should be monitored and people live as well as work can create an attrac- incorporated as part of the downtown's planning rive mix of uses that can improve public safety, process. . Dnwntawn Ut6an Design Guidelines - rr ' Ananria Itam k lp turn Y ci/ ! l0 ©-v~n~~ew~nL~and~bl~seLRegulatian~~~~~~i fl When proposing a preservation, renovation, or new construction project for the downtown there are a number of working assumptions to consider: As a result, zoning districts exist within the boundaries of undergo the most significant change while the RB-IE zone, Downtown Urban Design Guidelines and each comprises a which includes most of the Historic Area, is likely to undergo unique set of conditions. the least change. The following map identifies the location of the various zoning (See Appendix A: Zoning District Definitions which gives a def- districts. For example, the RB-1X zone is the area likely to inition of each zone). l n _ # y ~ ~L Baru l ~1 f, f y y IIH.Ii ~55~~ ~~6. f"~ I ~ - ~r ~ ll~La r ~ ` 1 4 y - Q ury of 13oaktor Zortrq Lyarict>« A C II '1 } I I ~ =emu ~a M Agendal~#___(„~_~8 2; Downtown Urban Design Guidelines as~tcUr~an~~esign C~n~=idera~tionS - .~O When proposing a preservation, renovation, or new construction project for the downtown there are a number of working assumptions to consider. • CAGID: The Central Area General Improvement District • Flood zones: Much of [he downtown is affected by the encompasses all of [he area covered by these guidelines. Boulder Creek Hood zones. Restrictions of various types apply While there are no parking requirements for commercial prop- and will limit what development that can occur. erties in CAGID, there are parking requirements for residential uses. • Views: Downtown Boulder is blessed with exceptional moun- tainviews and projects should be designed to take advantage • BID: The Downtown Boulder Improvement District provides of this extraordinary asset. The south and west edges of down- services, facilities and improvements for owners of real and [own offer the most spectacular views. personal property in a 34 block area including CAGID plus contiguous blocks to the east and west; Spruce to Arapahoe and 8th to 2ls[ y t 1 ~ j ' 1 ; t z t ~ s 1 ~ ~ ~ 1 LL~f - ' ~ ~-~r'11 • I1rJA_t F ~ t5 4 ti• ' ~ ®L.l...lll ' ~ r ' ~ © cw.cin. eoew,r " A st.n-e~aon ~ _ n. ~ Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~liwrsia lrom I ~ n a~.,. n G- fy • Sun and Shade: In Boulder's climate, sun c, ~ _ ~~«~M and shade are important factors. Concern ~ ~ ~ , o ~ ~ for providing natural light in buildings, a g sunny sidewalks in the winter, and shady o000~ Qt = - areas in the summer is an important consid- 'tom .........4d....-*.o..,...~r O ~a t a erasion in project design. ~ ~ t o ~ _ e•o • Connections to other areas of town: ~ - ` ~ ?j; 'i ° Boulder's central area includes three major ~ t r~'1, f, t7 activity centers: Downtown Boulder, the ° - , i"C~'~.~' ~ ~ ~ / Boulder Valley Regional Center (BVRC), r'{ , , P-~•< ~ and the University Hill Area. Connecting sks \ ' i ~ these azeas through a variety of alternative ,~t~bl' r ~ a modes and urban design improvements are - r ~r important factors in their future success. -~e• p : ~ c' \l` 'mil ~ - l~ . ; ~~~i~~ines~ ~re~0°rg~~~~e~d ~ j ~M t The guidelines are organized into six sections. The first three sections address specific geographic areas of the downtown: The Downtown Historic District, the Non-historic Area, and the Neighborhood Interface Area. The last three sections address specific design topics: Parking Facilities, Downtown Signs, and The Streetscape. Most sections are organized azound several principle guidelines The term CODE in bold letters introduces excerpts from the and a number of "follow-up" guidelines. (Appendix B offers a city's land use code to provide additional regulatory insight that "check list" of the principle guidelines that can be used during a is directly related to these design guidelines. design review process). Three review bodies are primarily responsible for administering these guidelines: the Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board (LPAB), the Downtown Design Advisory Board (DDAB), and the Downtown Management Commission (DMC). Specifically, LPAB reviews all projects located in the Downtown Historic District and landmarked structures located out- side the District; DDAB reviews all projects with a construction value over $10,000 in the Non-historic Area. In addition, DMC reviews projects located on the Downtown Boulder mall. Scheduling a Design Review Early Is Important: to use the design review process as a sounding board to test Scheduling a design review with the appropriate review body is ideas. For example, applicants may voluntarily return to discuss the responsibility of the property owner, developer or their rep- changes before making formal application for a building pernrit resentative such as an architect. In general a meeting should be or development review to the city. For more information on scheduled before formal application is made to the city fora how to proceed please call the following numbers. building permit or development review. Early project review For DDAB or LPAB call (303)441-1880. For the DMC call often results in the resolution of design issues which can save (303) 413-7100. valuable time once the project is submitted to the city. NOTE: Many azchitects, developers, and owners find it useful ~~gend2 iteau <k _ k ~ s Downtown Dr6an Design Guidelines ~Tt~e=landmarks~Preserva~io=n ~{c~v~sory Board~(L~PA~B)kPFOCess - LPAB is responsible for reviewing all exterior and site feature chanties far preservation, restoration and new construction projects located in the Downtown Historic District. - Project review and compliance with final LPAB decisions are mandatory for projects in the District. - In addition, LPAB is responsible for reviewing exterior and site feature changes to landmarked buildings in the Non-his- toric Area and the Neighborhood Interface. - LPAB reviews all demolition requests for buildings over 50 years of age. LPAB Design Review Committee meets weekly In the case of projects requiring a Site Review, or other develop- Projec[s are reviewed by the LPAB pesign Review Committee, ment review, which is administered through the Planning which consists of two members of the full five member Board, Department, the Landmarks Design Review Committee reviews and one Planning Department staff member. The Committee the proposal and then provides a recommendation to the typically meets weekly at the Planning Department offices. The planning Department which is incorporated in a Planning staff review is relatively informal in its proceedings. An appointment memorandum. The final decision is made by the Planning staff, for LPAB review can be made by calling (303) 441-4293. planning Board, or city Council. Following approval by the All exterior changes, alterations, removal or demolition of a Planning staff or Planning Board, a Landmark Alteration building or site features in the Downtown Historic District Certificate must be received prior to the issuance of a building require a Landmark Alteration Certificate prior to the permit. issuance of a demolition permit or a building permit. Routine maintenance and minor repair does not require a Landmark The full LPAB meets monthly Alteration Certificate. It is possible to schedule a "conceptual As described above, a split vote of the Landmazks Design review" with the Committee to discuss preliminary design con- Review Committee automatically goes forward for review by cepts before complete plans are reviewed. the full five member LPAB at a public hearing unless the appli- cant chooses to revise the applica[iw or withdraw it for later NOTE: Section 10-13-14 of the Boulder Revised Code resubmission. The applicant may also appeal any decision of the (B.R.C.), 1981, establishes the time limit for processing a Landmarks Design Review Committee to the full LPAB for Landmark Alteration Certificate (within fourteen days after a review. complete application is filed). A Landmark Alteration Certificate carrot be granted unless 1) an application is consid- In addition, all demolition and new construction applications eyed complete with all of the necessary sketches, drawings, pho- must be reviewed by the full LPAB at a public hearing. The tographs or other relevant information and 2) the application is decision of the full LPAB is subject to call up by city Council. reviewed and officially approved by the Landmarks Design The full LPAB meets the first Wednesday of every month after Review Committee. A Landmark Alteration Certificate is grant- 6:00 p.m. in city Council Chambers. The Board consists of five ed on the affirmative vote of all three members of the Committee. volunteer city residents, including design professionals, who are appointed by city Council. If the Landmarks Design Review Committee vote is split or if the project involved new construction or demolition, [he applica- NOTE: On certain occasions, LPAB or the Design Review tion automatically goes forward for review by the full five mem- Committee may invite member of the Downtwon Design bet LPAB at a public hearing unless the applicant chooses to Advisory Boazd (DDAB) to act in an advisory capacity when revise the application or withdraw it for later resubmission. The addressing new construction or remodeling ofnon-contributing applicant may also appeal any decision of the Landmarks buildings in the Downtown Historic District. In such cases Design Review Committee to the full LPAB for review. DDAB participates asnon-voting, ex-officio members. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines .1n+mda f}am~ 1_ t3--er 1~- In ~The.l~~w~ntown~D~es~gn ~~`dv°isary~Board~tDDAtB} Pr~oce~s DDAB is a city Council appointed board consisting of five Boulder citizens, several of whom have professional experience in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and community development.. DDAB is responsible for reviewing all exterior ~roiects and site features with a construction value of $10.000 or more in the Non-historic Area and the Neighborhood Interface Area. Project review is mandatory while compliance with design recommendations that result from the DDAB review is voluntary. DDAB design review is a one-time review process. However, non-historic or interface areas is for structwes that are "locally an applicant may return voluntarily for design critiques as often designated landmazked buildings". These buildings are reviewed as necessary. DDAB reviews are generally scheduled for 4 pm, by the LPAB. In addition, the LPAB may act in an advisory the second Wednesday of every month. Applications must be capacity to DDAB on issues related to projects that are of his- received no later than the first Wednesday of every month. A tonic significance but are not officially landmarked. design review may be scheduled by the DDAB secretary by calling [he Planning Department at (303) 441-3212. Upon completion of a DDAB review, staff notifies the Building Department that the applicant has fulfilled the mandatory The purpose of the DDAB review is [o identify design issues design review. In the case of projects requiring a site review and provide recommendations and advice to the applicant on process, DDAB submits recommendations to the Planning their design proposal relative to the Downtown Urban Design Department [hat are incorporated in a Staff memorandum for fitr- Guidelines. then decision and approval or denial by the Planning staff, Planning Board, or city Council depending upon the nature of NOTE: The only exception to DDAB review of projects in the the application. ~h~ ;~to~rn~l~~~ ~~~~~°Co~r~~~in~ The DMC reviews the design of projects that extend into the public-right-of--way on the downtown Boulder mall such as out- door eating areas, signs, awnings and other elements. The DMC should be contacted regarding construction projects signs. For information on the downtown Boulder mall call the that are on or extend into the downtown Boulder mall right-of- DMC a[ (303) 413-7300. way, such as patio extensions, A.D.A. entrances, awnings, and r Downtown Urban Design Guidelines ~Ot~herBoards{~m~rss~i~~s;~~d~C1~-y~Depar~r~ent3 In addition to the LPAB, DDAB, and DMC, the following city boards, commissions, and city departments may need to be contacted, or may provide helpful information about a project. • Planning and Development Services. city of Boulder to determine if a "revocable right-ot way per- City Planning staff is responsible for receiving recommenda- mit" is required from the Public Works Department. For infor- [ions and findings from the appropriate LPAB, DDAB, or DMC mation call 441-3200. design review and incorporating them into [he appropriate staff or Planning Boazd memos that are part of the city's development • Board of Zoning Adjustment and Building Appeals (BOZ- reviewprocess. A "pre-application meeting" to discuss develop- ABA) ment goals, uses, site design, or other relevant issues should be Reviews specific requests for zoning variences and adjustments. made with the Planning Department prior [o entering into [he site review process. It is intended [o identify any problems or • City Forester concerns [hat Planning staff may have prior to the applicant Information on specific details for street tree planting, plant making a formal application. materials, and maintenance can be obtained from the city Forester at 441- 3406. The pre-application meeting with the Planning Department is not a substitute for the design review required by LPAB, DDAB, • Boulder Transportation Division: Transportation Planning or DMC. Since it may help an applicant to identify issues that Information on transit related issues such trnnsi[ rider activity may need be addressed at the design review meeting, it may be and bus shelter design should be directed to the Transportation preferable to schedule the pre-application meeting first. Pre- Planning Department at 441-3266. application meetings may be scheduled by calling the Planning Department at (303) 441-1880. NOTE: The city has a fund for specific aliey improvements. While certain wnditions such as sharing trash storage or utility • Planning Board hook ups may apply to private property owners, [he funds can The Planning Board is responsible for decisions related to [he be used for making properly improvements. For information on city's land use regulations and reviews projects dtatare subject the alley fund call the city of Boulder Transportation to the city's site review process. Such projects aze forwarded [o Department 441-3266. the Planning Board, either by staff or through acall-up proce- dure. In either case, Planning Board will review projects for • Public Service Company: Vehicular Street Lighting their design quality as well as their conformance to the city code Light poles are provided by the Public Service Company and and other relevant regulations. As such, recommendations and. maintained by the city of Boulder. Contact [he city's findings based on these guidelines play a key role in Planning Transportation Division for further assistance with the selection Board deliberations. and provision of street lighting. • Public Works Department: Revocable Right-of-Way • Arts Commission Permit The Arts Commission consists of five members appointed by In addition to review by the DMC, any element or improvement city Council, each [o a five-year term. The Commission pro- in the public right-of-way, such as a sidewalk cafe, potted plant, motes and encourages programs in the performing, visual and handicapped ramp, or bike rack, must firs[ be reviewed by the literary arts. For information call (303) 441-4113. w" Downtown Urban Desiqn Guidelines suvla Itmai @ 4c Skrw & j/ ' j ~Ap~p~i~~~~n5~ris~~~~e~~~e~~~~s Application requirements for will vary depending upon the complexity and scale of the project to be reviewed, and the spe- cific requiremeuts of the reviewing body. Iu general, the applicant should provide the appropriate architectural drawings, sketches, and photographs of existing buildings and their sites to allow the reviewing body to fully understand the nature and scope of the exterior changes and any significant design issues. LPAB Submission Requirements • All relevant floor plans, building sections, and exterior eleva- For LPAB Design Review Committee, an applicant is required [ions should be illustrated at a scale sufficient to fully under- to fill out a Landmark Alteration Certificate Application and pro- stand the proposed design. vide the information identified on the application form including an initial scaled sketch plan and elevation, as well as photos of • Provide exterior wall elevations in color showing material and the existing building [hat will be kept on file. color selections. Additional information that may be required for DDAB: Call the Planning Department Preservation office at (303)441- The following additional information may be required if the pro- 4293 regarding an application. Appointments are necessary for posal modifies the permitted "by-right" building height, or if the the weekly design review session. Application materials should project is of significant complexity that the two dimensional be submitted in advance of any scheduled meeting. drawings described above do not fully illustrate the design issues: DDAB Submission Requirements For DDAB, [en (10) copies of all relevant information listed • A simple mass model if the project is of significant size and below must be submitted to the Planning Department no later complexity, showing the surrounding context. than close of business on the first Wednesday of the month, one week prior to the DDAB meeting. Applications should be well 'Color perspective sketches illustrating the proposed project and its surroundings, from street level, to present the project organized and contain sufficient information to allow reviewers from the pedestrian's viewpoint. to fully understand [he proposed building design or alteration, including relevant urban design information such as how the • An analysis of the shadow impact of the proposed project is project fits within its suaounding context, and how it relates to important, especially for projects on the south side of down- adjacent buildings and properties. town streets. At a minimum, DDAB applications should include the foI- Iowing information: DMC Submission Requirements • A map illustrating the location of the project within [he context For the DMC, seven (7) copies of the following items are of the downtown as well as photographs of the project site and required for review: the surrounding area. • To-scale elevation drawings illustrating the requested improvement with exact dimensions along with existing signs, planters, windows, doors, stairs, patios, and awnings on the • A site plan in a clear graphic style should be presented in the building and adjacent buildings. context of the city blocks surrounding the_ project. Site bound- aries and dimensions should be clearly marked and special • To-scale drawings of the proposed enhancement which issues such as flood plain, shadows, land restrictions and the identifies specific design elements such as colors, materials, existing site conditions need to be highlighted. and lettering. l~;ntla ite~ ~ ~ °~a~e # ~ I?~ f~" Downtown Urban Design Guidelines t~~~~o~=y The Boulder Valley was first the home of Indians, primarily [he organized to pursue the "improvement of Boulder in health, Southern Arapaho tribe who maintained a village near Haystack growth, cleanliness, prosperity and attractiveness.^ The Mountain. Ute, Cheyenne, Comanche, and Sioux were occa- Association retained nationally renowned landscape architect sional visitors to the area. Gold seekers established the first Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. to prepare a master plan in 1910 non-native settlement in Boulder County on October 17, 1858 at which has since guided Boulder's development. Saco DeBoer, Red Rocks near the entrance to Boulder Canyon. Less than a who served as Denver's Landscape Architect, was hired to pre- year later, on February 10, 1859, [he Boulder city Town pare a zoning proposal for Boulder. His 1928 plan created Company was organized by A.A. Brookfield, the first president, Boulder's first height restrictions, which limited downtown and 56 shareholders. buildings to 75 feet and neighborhood shopping districts to 35 feet, as well as recommended seven zoning districts. Boulder city developed as a supply base for miners going into the mountains in search of gold and silver. Boulder city resi- dents provided these miners with equipment, agricultural prod- ucts, housing and transport services, and gambling and drinking establishments. The downtown section of Boulder was the nucleus of the fledgling community, and its main thoroughfare, Pearl Street, led into Boulder Canyon and the mining camps. The business generated from the mining camps, together with Boulder's selection as the county seat in 1861 and the site for ~ ~ y the state university in 1876, provided the foundation for steady ~~~~g=1~~ ,e~~ growth and the erection of substantial business blocks in the - commercial center of the town. Businesses were established along Pearl and adjoining streets to supply every need of the urban community, local farmers, and mining camps. The down- town experienced steady growth after the 1860s. By 1883, the ~ sj•.: commercial azea included enterprises such as restaurants, gro- ceries, saloons and liquor stores, lumber yards, drug stores, dry goods stores, hardware stores, feed and flour stores, barbers, paint shops, and tailors, in addition to fraternal lodges and the county courthouse. At the close of the nineteenth century, the establishment of Following World War II, the increased population of the auto- Chautauqua and the creation of the Boulder Sanitarium diversi- mobile led to the creation of new shopping areas further from fled the local economy and led to further downtown develop- [he city center, including North Broadway, Arapahoe Village, ment. In L900, a multitude of businesses flourished in down- and Basemar shopping centers in the 1950s. This competition town Boulder. Streetcar service enabled residents in new azeas led to the modernization of historic storefronts downtown, of the city to conveniently shop and conduct business down- including the application of metal panels and precast screens to town. In addition, the Denver & Interurban Railroad (an interci- exterior facades. In 1963, Crossroads Shopping Center, a major ty connection with Denver) ran along Peazl Street from 1908- commercial competitor with downtown was completed. 1917. During the 1920s, several new commercial buildings However, with the purchase of thousands of acres of open space were erected, updating the appearance of the downtown with beginning in 1967, the adoption of the Boulder Valley 20th Century influences. Although the economy slowed during Comprehensive Plan in 1970, passage of the building height the Great Depression, a few new buildings were added to the restriction ordinance in 1972, and the residential growth man- district, the most significant of which was the new Boulder agemen[ ordinance in 1977, Boulder began a period of infill and County Courthouse, having replaced the original courthouse re-use of its Bast architectural development which continues to building that burned down in 1932. present. Redevelopment plans for the downtown were formulat- ed by property owners and merchants to insure the area's contin- Planning for the improvement of Boulder began as early as ued viability. During the 1970s, buildings were restored, remod- 1903; when the Boulder city Improvement Association was eled and adapted to new uses. The Pearl Street Mall was creat- `_J_?.,: Downtown Urban Design Guidelirres