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5A - Public Hearing & Planning Board recommendation to City Council on the Facilities & Asset ManageCITY OF BOULDER PLANNING BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: June 23, 2005 AGENDA TITLE: Public hearing and Pianning Boazd recommendation to City Council on the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Master Plan Update. REQUESTING DEPARTMENT: Planning Department Peter Pollock, Planning Director Ruth McHeyser, Long Range Planning Manager Jean Gatza, Presenter Public Works Department Maureen Rait, Director of Public Works for Development & Support Services Bili Boyes, Facilities & Fleet Manager, Presenter EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The purpose of this meeting is to review the Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Master Plan 2005 Update and provide a recommendation to City Council regazding the plan. The FAM Master Plan Update will guide future funding, including the Capital Improvements Program (CIP). Attachment A contains the draft 2005 Facilities and Asset Management Master Plan. The Planning Board's role in reviewing master plans is to look for consistency with the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) goals and policies before the plans aze considered by the City Council. The FAM Master Plan Update will be scheduled for City Council review and consideration in August. The specific questions before the Planning Boazd aze: i. Is the master plan consistent with the goals, policies, and growth projections of the BVCP? 2. Does the Master Plan outline the BVCP Service Standazds and a plan to meet them into the future? 3. Does the plan/update describe and assess capital needs and a funding plan for them? The FAM Master Plan incorporates the applicable goals and policies of the BVCP. The plan reinforces the need for high quality design in municipal projects. It also addresses environmental sustainability goals on all levels including: proper waste management to prevent overloading the environment, selection of replaceable materials, installation of energy efficient equipment, maximizing renewable energy sources and other efforts beneficial to the environment. AGENDA ITEM # SA Pase 1 The BVCP does not outline specific urban service standards for Facilities and Asset Management; however the Master Plan includes performance measures and standards that will be used to assess progress toward delivering services and meeting the FAM goals and objectives. The FAM Master P3an describes three levels of funding for operations and infrastructure: Fiscally Constrained - Current Funding, Action Plan and Vision Plan and focuses on the major challenges related to General Fund facilities facing the city through the year 2014. The goal is to establish proven methods of facility management for our assets and promote cost-effective progams that provide safe, clean, and efficient environments for the public of Boulder and city staff. The City of Boulder Business Plan is currentTy in the implementation phase beginning with the 2006/2007 fiscally constrained budget submission. As departmental master plans and strategic plans are accepted, changes in facility maintenance, renovation, and replacement priorities will be required io support these plans and the accepted priority of the program or service; however, the fundamental approaches presented in this master plan will remain consistent for the 10-year period of this plan. FAM has chosen a 10-year period for this master plan, rather than the standazd 15-year period, due to the large number of master plans and strategic plans scheduled for completion in the next two to three years and because rivo important funding sources will sunset in 2011 (38 cent sales taac) and 2015 (.25 cent sales ta~c) and a replacement funding plan and/or a significant reprioritization of work will be needed. Key issues related to funding levels for FAM include: • Planned funding for ongoing operations and maintenance (O&M) is currently inadequate as compazed to industry standards. The plan recommends an action plan with an ongoing budget increase in 2006 to increase funding to 2.5 percent of the current replacement value (CRV) of the facility by 2014 and a vision plan to increase funding to 3 percent CRV by 2014. Planned funding for major maintenance, renovation, and replacement (MM/FRR) is inadequate as compazed to Council budget policies and industry standards. The plan recommends an action plan to increase funding to 2.0 percent CRV in 2007 and later years to keep the maintenance backlog from exceeding $4 million. It also recommends a vision plan to address eventual facility replacements and to provide funding for the maintenance and renovation of land improvements. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that Planning Board recommend that City Council accept the 2Q05 Facility and Asset Management Master Plan Update. BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The FAM Master Plan was originally adopted in August 1996. It was updated and approved in February 1998 to include all Pazks & Recreation facilities in response to City Council direction that the FAM Master Plan includes all General Fund facilities in its scope. There aze a total of AGENDA ITEM # SA Paee 2 117 General Fund facilities included in this update as compared to 372 facilities citywide. Othei organizations responsible for city facilities include: Public Works/LJtilities, Public Works/Transportation, Downtown and University Hill Management District, Open Space/Mountain Parks, and Housing & Htunan Services. The CRV of General Fund facilities is approximately $81.7 million as compazed to $320.7 million citywide. General Fund facilities measure approximately 682,000 gross square feet (SF) as compazed to 2.6 million SF citywide. This master plan is being updated after eight years of experience in operating city facilities and to reflect the changes in facility inventory caused by the construction and purchase of additional facilities, expansion of existing facilities, and the transfer of some facilities previously assigned to the General Fund to the Open Space/Mountain Pazks Department. The format of this master plan has changed significantly to take advantage of improvements in technology, to incorporate the City of Boulder Business Plan, and to implement a method to keep information up-to-date. Specifically, the city's intraweb site will host the mapping, background and administrative portions of this plan, thereby allowing for periodic updates. The major goals aad objectives of this Master Plan are to: 2014 Goals • Properly manage axisting facilities assigned to FAM by using the established Facility Management System. _ • Serve as a model for other departrnents in the management of facilities not assigned to FAM. • Assign responsibility and provide planning for the maintenance and renovation of parking lots, driveways, walkways, plazas, outdoor lighting and other land improvements that directly support municipal facilities. ~ • Promote the efficient and effective use of existing space. • Implement environmental sustainability and energy-saving improvements to support Council goals and initiatives. • Coordinate with other departments whenever facilities aze approved by City Council for construction or remodeling. • Implement programs and policies to efficiently operate facilities. • Provide funding options and recommendations for the eventual replacement of buildings. 2014 Objectives • Maintain the maintenance backlog at less than $4 million. • Responsively address ongoing maintenance and repair needs. • Maintain facilities in a safe condition and in compliance with applicable codes and regulations. . Provide for the inspection and periodic renovation of buildings and major building components when they reach the end of their expected service life. • Properly prioritize facility maintenance, renovation and replacement needs to best utilize available resources. • Provide appropriate custodial care to clean and sanitize facilities. AGENDA ITEM # SA Paee 3 Purpose of Planning Board Review of Master Plans The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) provides a general statement of the community's long-term desired future. Departmental and system master plans take the goals and policies of the BVCP and provide specific guidance for delivering city services. They establish detailed policies, priorities, service standatds, facility and system needs and capital budgeting for the delivery of services. The Planning Board's role in reviewing master plans is to look for consistency with the BVCP goais and policies before the plans are adopted by the City Council. Because of its role in reviewing the CIP, the Planning Board also reviews master plans to ensure that they identify needed improvements to meet adopted service standazds. Master plans provide the bridge between the Comprehensive Plan, service delivery, future capital needs, and the CIP. The questions that are the focus of the Planning Board's review are: 1. Is the master plan consistent with the goals, policies, and gowth projections of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan? 2. Does the Master Plan outline the BVCP Service Standards and a plan to meet them into the future? 3. Does the plan/update describe and assess capital needs and a funding plan for them? After the Planning Board's review and recommendation of the FAM Master Plan, the document will be forwazded to City Council for acceptance. The Planning Boazd's recommendations will be included in the staff memorandum. As part of the 2005 Major Update to the BVCP, the master plan and program summary in the Comprehensive Plan will be revised to reflect the newly adopted plan. FEEDBACK: Staff Master Plan Coordination Committee Staff assigned to each department meet at least quarterly to discuss, review, and comment on all city master plans being developed. The group reviewed the FAM Master Plan Update and offered approximately 30 recommendations. Some comments were related to format while others looked at stormwater management issues, planned expansion of facilities, prioritization of proj ects, and other items. FAM has incorporated these comments into the master plan. For example, FAM increased the number of performance measures to include outsourcing information, energy-efficient projects, energy savings and cost of services as was recommended by the group. Environmenta] Policv Goal Committee Review The committee reviewed applicable portions of the master plan update related to environmental sustainability on May 12, 2005. Committee members commented on the following topics: energy use, maintaining leadership in green buildings and energy conservation, achieving city goals, use of altemative energy sources, tracking building renovations and new construction in relation to meeting USGBC LEED - Silver criteria and/or other USGBC standards being developed. AGENDA ITEM # SA Paee 4 Committee members were asked if they agreed with the approach being taken in the master plan update. Overall, they indicated that they support the approach being taken. Mayor Ruzzin noted that he was glad to see the city continue with cost-effective energy retrofits. Council members also encouraged FAM to continue measuring energy use and look for ways to fund such projects. Council members suggested that staff highlight changes from the 1998 Master Plan, including major projects completed and accomplishments achieved. In response to a text-heavy draft document, Council members strongly suggested that the format be revised to incorporate additional graphics and photos and that information be packaged to better facilitate Council and customer review. The master plan update has been revised in response to this feedback. ANALYSIS: Issues for Planning Board Review: 1. Is the master plan consistent with the goals, policies, and growth projections of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan? Sustainability 1.03 Principles of Sustainability. Sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The city and counry adopt the following principles to interpret and guide the implementation of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan: • Renewable resources should not be used faster than they are recharged or replenished by the environment. • Non-renewable resources should be used with the greatest practical eff ciency, and some of those should be used to develop renewable replacements. 'Greatest practical efficiency' means a use that is technically and itnancially feasible. • Waste should not be dumped into nature any faster than nature can absorb it. • The economy is a subsystem of the environment and depends upon the environment both as a source of raw material inputs and as a sink for waste outputs. 1.04 Community Sustainability. The ciry and county recognize that the earth is a closed system, and that there are limits to the land and soil available for food production, to available water, to renewable resources such as trees, fish and wildlife, to industrial resources like oil and metals, and to the ability of nature to absorb our waste. The city and county seek to maintain and enhance the livabiliry, health and vitality of the Boulder Yalley and the natural systems of which it is a part now and in the long-term future. Maintaining the long-term health of the natural environment and the economy and community livability in the Boulder Yalley and beyond are inextricably linked. The city and county seek to preserve choices for future generations and to anticipate and adapt fo changing community needs and external influences. AGENDA ITEM # SA Paee 5 1.06 Leadership in Sustainability. The city will apply the principles of sustainability to its actions and decisions. The city will act as a community leader and steward of our resources, serving as a role model for others and striving to create a sustainable community that lives conscientiously as part of the planet and ecosystems we inhabit and that are influenced by our actions. Through its master plans, regulations, policies and programs, the city will strive to create a healthy, vibrant and sustainable communlty for future generations. 4.04 Assessment of Environmental Impacts. The community and environmental effects ofpublic and private projects shall be considered in the public decision making process. Local, state, and federal environmental review processes shall be followed when appropriate. 4.38 City Leadership in Resource Conservation. The city government shall serve as an example by continuing to improve resource conservation practices in all city operations. The city shall integrate environmental impact considerations in decision making for all ciry services, processes and facilities. The city organization shall comply fully with environmental laws and regulations and implement programs and procedures to strengthen compliance. Strict compliance with environmental standards shall be a key factor in employee training, performance review and program evaluation. Emphasis shall be placed on periodic monitoring of internal environmental practices to continually improve the city's effectiveness. The ciiy shall provide appropriate environmental training and educate employees to be environmentally responsible. 4.40 Energy-Effcient Building Design and Construction. The city shall continue its efforts to upgrade the energy e~ciency of the city's existing buildings, many of which were built in an era of abundant and inexpensive energy. The city shatl continue to improve programs assuring energy efficiency in new construction. City energy conservation programs shall be sensitive to the unique problems of low- income homeowners and renters and shall assure that programs assisting these groups are continued. The principles of sustainability listed above are addressed in the FAM Master Plan Update by: incorporating USGBC LEED criteria in all new construction and major renovation projects (1.03, 1.04,1.Ob, 4.40), through the CEAP process (4.04), and through training and operational policies and procedures (4.38). LEED criteria aze based on nationally recognized standazds that evaluate all aspects of a project to determine the overall environmental effects of the project. LEED certification distinguishes a project as demonstrating leadership in "green building" design and construction. Lessons leamed from these lazger projects aze implemented in smaller maintenance and renovation projects. In addition, the USGBC is developing other programs such as LEED certification for existing buildings (LEED-EB) and LEED certification for commercial interiors (LEED-Cn to address similaz concems in existing buildings core and shell construction, tenant finish construction and in other azeas. FAM is a PACE partner and has issued a detailed waste management procedure for all process AGENDA ITEM # SA Pa¢e 6 azeas. On larger projects, a waste management plan is required from the General Contractor before the project begins to ensure all wastes aze minimized and managed properly. The FAM Master Plan Update recommends energy-saving projects to the maximum extent possible within funding limitations. Projects include high efficiency HVAC equipment, adding roof insulation, installing computerized HVAC control equipment, and others. ~ Historic Preservation 2.31 Leadership in Preservation: City- and County-Owned Resources. The city and county shall evaluate their publicly owned properties to determine their historical, architectural, archaeological or cultural significance. Eligible resources shall be protected through local designation. Secondary structures that are part of and convey the cultural significance of a site such as a farm complez and alley structure should be retained /preserved as well. FAM works with building tenants, the Colorado State Historical Society, local organizations and professionals to ensure historic facilities aze properly identified and preserved. Facilities approaching 50 yeazs of age are examined to determine their structural integrity, historic and cultural significance, and future planned use. An assessment is typically conducted that results in the development of a long-range preservation or restoration plan. Any FAM projects with planned exterior changes to historic facilities will be reviewed by the Landmazks Preservation Advisory Board (LPAB). Design Excellence 2.42 Design Excellence for Public Projects. Public projects bear a special responsibility to e.rhibit design excellence. The city and county shall work to assure that new capital projects are positive additions to the community's architectural and urban design heritage. A design review matrix has been prepared that outlines the review process appropriate for each type of project listed in the FAM Master Plan Update. The major focus of the plan is to maintain and refurbish existing facilities. Some enhancements are planned, but these are primarily related to HVAC replacements and installation of computerized HVAC control equipment. FAM plans to match existing design elements, materials, colors, etc. when completing these projects. FAM recommends that any projects with planned exterior changes of $10,000 or more that aze not reviewed by LPAB be reviewed by the Downtown Design Advisory Board, regardless of location in the city. Several new construction projects managed by FAM aze planned in the next few years. These include construction of a new Fire Training Center and construction of the General Storage Facility at the City Yards. Significant projects may also undergo a CEAP process, as determined by the CIP approval process, and Planning Boazd approval when appropriate. 2. Does the Master Plan outline the BVCP Service Standards and a plan to meet them into the future? The BVCP urban service standazds establish minimum requirements for provision of urban AGENDA ITEM # SA Pase 7 services and are a prerequisite for new urban development. The service standards established in the FAM Master Plan relate to operation of city facilities. Although important to the community, the services supplied by Facilities and Asset Management have not been included among those identified as needed to serve new urban development. FAM has done extensive reseazch and analysis to determine recommended service standards for city facilities. In the current FAM Master Plan, the standards for Major Maintenance/Facility Renovation & Replacement (MM/FRR) were established with an associated 2% CRV annual funding level as noted in Council Budget Policy #33. In this update, FAM proposes recommended service standazds for ongoing operations and maantenance (O&M) that coincide with industry standards established by the American Public Works Association and the Association of Physical Plant Administrators. An annual funding amount equal to 2.5°lo CRV is necessary to provide this level of O&M. Currently, funding is not adequate to meet MM/FRR and O&M funding goals for all existing General Fund buildings. 3. Does the plau/update describe and assess capital needs and a funding plan for them? Master plans provide a bridge between the BVCP and the city's ~apital budget. For FAM this includes capital projects but focuses on operations and maintenance of existing resources. The FAM Master Plan describes three capital investment programs: Fiscally Constrained - Current Funding, Action Plan and Vision Plan: •"Fiscally Constrained - Current Funding" $33.0 million from 2005 - 2014 •"Action Plan" Three options ranging from $36.2 million to $38.8 million •"Vision Plan" In excess of $40.1 million There are two key issues elated to funding levels for FAM include: Planned funding for ongoing operations and maintenance (O&M) is inadequate as compared to industry standazds. Recommend an action plan with an ongoing budget increase in 2006 to increase funding to 2.5 percent CRV by 2014. Recommend a vision plan to increase funding to 3 percent CRV by 2014. Planned funding for major maintenance, renovation, and replacement (MM/FRR) is inadequate as compared to Council budget policies and industry standards. Recommend an action plan to increase funding to 2.0 percent CRV in 2007 and later years to keep the maintenance backlog from exceeding $4 million. Recommend a vision plan to address eventual facility replacements and to provide funding for the maintenance and renovation of land improvements. Completion of some projects presented in other master plans may be delayed due to capital and operational funding limitations. Examples include development of the Valmont City Park site and construction of the North Boulder Branch Library. These projects have been prioritized within their respective departmental master plans and will receive capital and operational funding as recommended by Planning Boazd and as approved by City Council. If any new facilities are constructed, FAM may be assigned responsibility for the maintenance, renovation, and/or AGENDA ITEM # SA Paee 8 replacement of these facilities. Although not a key issue in the FAM Master Plan Update, some significant changes are planned at the Municipal Service Center (MSC) including changes to the configuration of city property in the area, changes to existing buildings and construction of new facilities. The BVCP land use designation for a portion of the city yards site was changed in 2004. These changes aze described in detail in Appendix 10 of the plan. Approved By: -'~7 ~7 ~ I~~~~C~;~ ~ Peter Pollock Planning Director ATTACHMENT: A. Draft Facility and Asset Management (FAM) Master Plan Update. AGENDA ITEM # SA Pace 9 ~ TABLE Of CONTENTS 3 INTRODIlCTIOIV 3 Who is FAM? WHAT IS A FAM MASTER PLAN? How Does the FAM Master Plan Fit Into Citywide Planning Efforts? What has changecl since the 1998 Master Plan? INVESTMENT PROGRAM How is FAM Fundeci? ~ INVESTMENT STRATEGY Investment Programs lnvestment Policies llnder the current funding program Action Plan 0 Vision Plan 12 TWO KEY ISSUES 12 Ongoing Operations anci Maintenance (08.M) 13 Major maintenance, renovation, and rehlacement 15 Long-range Planning i ~ coNC~usioN of Appendices -vailable online at htt~://www.ci.boulder.co.us/publicworks/depts/disfam/ . List of General Funci Facilities and Other Facilities Where FAM Has Responsibilities . FAM Organization . List of All City Facilities . Custociial Task List . Key Definitions . Maintenance Funding Options Anc1 Backlog Forecasts . Facility Renovation 8. Replacement Schedule 0. Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities 8, Site Planning 1. Ca~ital Development Excise Tax Fund Revenues 8. Expenses 1987 - 2004 2. Ins~ection Reports, and Assessments Related to Historic Facilities ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ FAM MASTER PLAN http://www.cl.boulder.co.us/publlcworks/depts/dlsfam/ 0 ~ INTRODl1CT10N ~' The Facilities 8. Asset Management (FAM) Master Master Plan Goals and Objectives Plan focuses on the m~jor challenges related to 2 014 Goals General Fund facilities facing the city through the • Pro~erly manage existing facilities year 2014. The goal is to establish proven methods assigned to FAM by using the ~" of facility management for our assets and nromote established Facility Management System. ~ cost-effective programs that provide safe, clean and efficient environments For the public of Boulder ~nd . Serve as a model for other departments f f ili i t h in t es no e management o ac t city staff. The format of thi5 master ~lan has changed assignecl to FAM. ~ significantly since initially adopted on Aug. 6, 1996 • Assign responsibility and provide to take advantage of improvements in technolo~y, to planning for the maintenance and incorporate the City of Boulder Business Plan and to renovation of ~arking lots, driveways, implement a method to keep information up-to-date. walkways, pl~s, outdoor lighting and ~ Specifically, the city's intraweb site [ http://www. other land improvements that directly ci.bouldecco.us/nublicworks/depts/disfam/ ] will host support municipal facilities. ~ the map~ing, background and administrative portions ' Promote the efficient and effective use of of this ~lan, thereby allowing for neriociic u~ciates existing space. • Im~lement environmental sustain~bility anci energy-saving improvements to ~ support Council go~ls and initiatives. Why Da This update? • Coordinate with other departments This master plan is being updated after eight whenever facilities are apnroved by City ~ years of experience in operating city facilitie5. It Council for construction or remodeling. reflects the changes in facility inventory caused ' ~mplement programs anci policies to ~~ by construction and purchase of additional efficiently o~erate facilities. ^- facilities, ex~ansion ofexisting facilities, and the ' Provide funding options and transfer of some facilities ~reviously assigned recommendations for the eventual ~ to the General Fund to the Open 5pace 8. replacement of buildings. Mountain Parks Department. 2 014 Objectires ~ • Maintain the maintenance backlog at less than $4 million. Who is FAM? • Responsively acidress ongoing ~ The Facilities 8. Asset Management worlcgrou~ is nart maintenance and re~air needs. of the Development 8. Su~port Services Division of the ' Maintain facilities in a safe condition and Public Works Department. It was formed in 1994 for in compliance with applicable codes and the purpose of better managing city facilities. Today, ' regulations. ~'rovide for the inspection and periodic FAM directly maintains over 100 facilities worth more renovation of buildings and major than $80 million. FAM's mission is to coorciinate and building components when they reach ~ in some cases directly manage the maintenance and the end of their expectecl service life. replacement of city facilities and equipment. In 2003, • Properly prioritize facility maintenance, ~ the Facilities 8. Asset Manager ~osition was expanded renovation and re~lacement needs to ~,., to include management of Fleet Services. best utilize available resources. • Provide a~propriate custoclial c,are to ~' FAM works with Police, Fire, Parks 8. Recreation, clean and sanitize facilities. ~ Library, and other departments to determine facility ~ ~r ~!i'' ~e FAM MASTER PLAN http://www.cl.boulder.co.us/publlcworks/depu/dlsfam/ ~ What Does the FAM Master Plan Contain? • Background on FAM ancl how FAM is funcled • Policies and priorities related to FAM • An investment ~rogram of pro~osed projects within our funding limitations • Strategic actions to address key issues • Performance Measures maintenance, renovation and replacement needs and ~riorities for all General Fund facilities. FAM has also applied the principles in the City of Boulder Business Plan to determine essential, desired and discretionary priorities. FAM assists other clepartments in the management of their facilities and routinely provides information on faciliry management practices, changing laws and regulations, and maintenance of building systems and equipment. FAM also provides facility construction and project management services to all city departments. FAM uses a hybrid approach to managing General Funci facilities for the city of Boulder. This means that FAM is directly responsible for maintenance, renovation and replacement of 62 buildings (centralized approach), and at the same time, FAM is indirectly or partially responsible for providing these services in 55 buildings (decentralized a~proach). (n the decentralized approach, other departments are directly responsible for some maintenance, renovation and replacement in their buildings and FAM is only involved to the extent the department tiow Does the FAM Master Plan clesires FAM's involvement. (An agreement is Affect D~ily l.ife in Boulder? established via a memorandum of understanding • Motlels energy efficiency and new - an MOl1.) technologies - North Boulder Recreation Center Solar System and LEED Silver WHAT IS A FAM MASTER PLAN? certification • Provid fe I d ffi ' f'I' ' The FAM Master plan is the city's long-range es sa , c ean an e uent aa ities to blueprint for facility management of the city's meet public needs and uses • assets. Originally adopted in August 1996, the Coordinates municipal facility construction plan was updated ancl accepted in February projects to meet new and existing needs . 1998 to inclucie all Parks 8. Recreation facilities in Preserves historic city-owned facilities . response to City Council direction that the FAM Supports economic and cultural activities Master Plan include all General Fund facilitie5 in such as the Boulder-Dushanbe Teahouse its scope. There are a total of 1 17 General Fund ~nd the Dairy Center For the Arts facilities as com~ared to 372 facilities citywide. The current replacement value (CRV) of General Func1 facilities is ap~roximately $81.7 million as compared to $320.7 million citywide. General Fund facilities measure a~proximately 682,000 gross square feet (SF) as compared to 2.6 million SF citywide. How Does the fAM Master Plan Fit Into Citywide Planning Efforts? The FAM Master Plan fits under the broader umbrella of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP) and supports several go~ls and initiatives outlined in the BVCP including sustainability, environmental, and facilities and asset management goals. In the ~re~aration of this master ~lan, all currently adopted master plans and proposed capital improvement ~rojects (CIP) were reviewed to ensure that information related to all General Fund facilities is referenced in this master plan. Departmental master plans and strategic FAM MASTER PLAN http://www.cl.boulder.co.us/publlcworks/depts/dlsfam/ 0 ' ~ .. . ~ ` See Apnendix 1 for a list of all FAM facilities ~ See Ap~endix 3 for a list of all Ciry facilities ~ Lr~~ FAM MASTER PLAN http://www.U.boulder.co.us/publlcworks/depu/dlsfam/ ~ plans will determine the priority of ~rograms and required facilities and will address operating costs. FAM uses this information to plan and ~rioritize CIP ~rojects. This revision of the FAM Master Plan will not present detailed information on these facilities. Information is ~vailable online and in a new online map~ing tool that is on the city's intraweb. What has changed since the 1998 Master Plan? • FAM has chosen a 10-year ~eriod for this master plan rather than the standard 15-year period clue to the large number of master ~lans and strategic plans scheduled for com~letion in the next two to three years. • Two important funding sources will sunset in 2011 (.38 cent sales tax) and 2015 (.25 cent sales tax). Thus, a replacement funding plan and/or a significant reprioritization of work will be needed. • Maintenance backlog has been recluced from $5.5 to $3.5 million. • Facility conditions im~roveci from a rating of "fair" to "goocl." • In 2001, FAM assumed permanent responsibility for maintaining most major Parks 8. Recreation facilities. • In 2004, FAM began performing ongoing maintenance and custodial services at all Library facilities under a Memorandum of Llnderstanding (MOII~. This agreement has been extended through 2005. •!n 1998, FAM was responsible for 13 buildings. As of 2005, FAM is responsible for over ] 00 buildings. • ~ver $2.2 million in ener~r-saving projects have been completed since 1998. • Some facilities were reassigned from the General Fund to Open Space/Mountain Parlcs. • Privatization of services has expanded from 60 percent to 65 percent. • Several major ~rojects and major facility additions have been completed. (See sidebar on page 7 for more information.) Lr V~r'~ FAM MASTER PLAN , What Is LEED? The LEED (Leadership in Ener~r and ~ Environmental Design) Green Builcling Rating System0 is a voluntary, consensus- based national standarci for developing high- ~ performance, sustainable buildings. LEED criteria are based on nationally recognized standarcls that evaluate all aspects of a project ` to determine the overall environmental effects of the project. LEED certification distinguishes ~ a project as demonstrating leadershi~ in "green building" design and construction. Lessons learneci from these larger nrojects ~ are implemented in smaller maintenance and renovation projects. In addition, the l1SGBC is developing other programs such as LEED , certification for existing builciings (LEED-EB) and LEED certification for commercial interiors (LEED-CI) to address similar concerns in ~ existing builciings core and shell construction, tenant finish construction and in other areas. What are the Sustainability Goals? The princi~les of sustain~bility are addressed in ` the FAM Master Plan llpdate by: • [ncorporating llnited States Green Building Code LEED criteria in all new construction ~ and major renovation projects • Through the Community Environmental Assessment Process (CEAP) ~rocess ~ • Through training and operational policies and procedures • Partici~ating as a PACE ~artner ancl issuing ' a detaileci waste management ~rocedure for all process areas. On larger projects, a ~ waste management plan is required from the General Contractor before the project "~' begins to ensure all wastes are minimizeci and managed properly ~ • Recommenciing ener~r-saving projects to the m~cimum extent ~ossible within funding limitations. Projects include high ~ efficiency HVAC equipment, aclding rooF insulation, installing computerized HVAC control equipment, and others ~ ~ ~W INVESTMENT PROGRAM How is FAM funded? FAM's annual o~erating budget of approximately $3.2 million is primarily funded by the General Fund (Fund O10 - approximately $2.8 million in 2005). Approximately $400,000 annually from the .25 cent sales tax fund (Fund 1 18) for maintenance ofsome Parks 8, Recreation facilitie5. FAM also receives approximately $450,000 per year from the Capital Develonment Excise Tax Fund (Fund 110) to complete growth-related ~rojects. The remaining budget resicles in Funci 1 18. Funding for FAM anci how FAM uses the funds is ~rovided in the gr~ph on ~age 8. FAM charges individual projects directly for proje~t management time (PE) and associated ~roject NPE costs. It should be noted that two funding sources that ~rovide funding for FAM are scheduled to expire in the next 10 years and will need to be replaced with other funding sources, or additional reductions in service levels will be necessary. Specifically, the .38 cent sales t~c that provides a~proximately ] 0~ercent of the revenues for the General Fund in 2005 will expire in 201 1. The .25 cent sales tax which provides a~proximately $400,000 annually to FAM for maintenance of Parks 8. Recreation facilities ex~ires in 2015. The .25 cent sales tax was a~proved in 1995 by voters to be collected for a period of 20 years for various Parks 8. Recreation initiatives. Looking ahead, the extencied .15 cent sales tax which ~rovides a~~roximately $85,000 annuatly to FAM for MM/FRR will expire in 2024. FAM also manages two internal service funds 1.Equi~ment Replacement Fund (Fund 640) for the replacement of capital equipment citywide (individual item value of >$5,000). 2.Facility Renovation 8. Replacement Fund (Fund G50) for facility renovation and replacement projects costing more than $3,000 and for other projects that have not been accounted for in any other ciry CIP. rrent cost of constructing a facility ancl uivalent to the insureci replacement value. Ma~or Projects Completed from 1998 to Present: • Pearl Street Mall rehabilitation and restroom replacement • North Boulder Recreation Center (NBRC) reconstruction and installation of solar hot- water system • Atrium builciing rehabilitation anci HVAC re~lacement • S~ruce Pool replacement • Preservation oE BMoCA in partnershi~ with the Colorado Historical Society • Y2K implementation and upgrades to electrical systems at fire stations and the Public S~fiety Building • Rehabilitation of Fire Stations # 1 ancl #2 Major facility additions to the General Fund: • Acquisition of the Dairy Center fnr the Arts • Acquisition of Tom Watson Park • Acquisition oF Valmont Butte Mill • Construction oF Foothills Community Park • Construction oF Boulder - Dushanbe Teahouse • Construction of Fire Station #7 • NBRC new addition How are Facilities funded? majority oE FAM's funciing comes from the eral Fund to ~rovide services tv facilities. General Fund also recovers the cost of ~iding services from restrictecl funds, ~r~rise funds and other funds through a allocation process. This process assures each fund pays its sh~re of costs for use of LVU~ INVESTMENT STRATEGY Investment I'rograms The FAM Master Plan presents three investment ~rograms based on clifferent levels of funding: the Current Funding (Fiscally Constraineci) Plan, the Action Plan and the Vision Plan. These programs implement the policy direction of the Master Plan at the three funding levels. Investment Policies Current Funding (Fiscally Constrained Budget Plan) The Current Funding ~rogram reflects an investment strategy fixed at current funding levels and assumes no increases in funding will occur through 2014. FAM currently manages facilities using the Current Funding program. Estimated funding through 2014 is shown in Ap~endix 8. The Current Funding ~rogram has less funding for Operations and Maintenance (08.M) than the other two options. This translates into a reduction in service levels. In addition, this has resultecl in using a portion of funds intended for Major Maintenance/Facility Renovation 8. Replacement (MM/FRR) to sunplement 08.M funding when essential needs arise and when proUlems are found that need to be correcteci at an early and less expensive stage. In order to ~rioritize needs with limited funds, facilities have been categorized as either essential or non-essential. Essential Facilities will be maintained to industry standard service levels. The remaining facilities will be maintained at a level below industry standards commensurate with available funding. Equipment in non-essential facilities will increasingly be maintained using a method known as "breakdown maintenance" where the equipment is operated until the problem becomes severe enough to place the equipment out of commission and in a deferred maintenance status until funding is ~vailable. This a~proach is not sustainable and will lead to an increased maintenance backlog and degraded facilities. ~' FAM MASrF,R General Fund, _„ $2, 800, 000 Investment Strategies Current Funding: fiscally constrained business plan (where we are tociay}. Current funding levels allow Essential Facilities to be maintained at industry standards (2.5 percent CRV) and other buildings to receive less maintenance (1.75 percent CRV to 2.49 percent CRV, based on available funding). There are ap~roximately 30 Essential Facilities in the General Fund. Action Plan: additional funciing so that the 2% CRV goal for MM/FRR (major maintenance / Facility renovation and re~lacement) and the 2.5 ~ercent CRV goal for 08.M (operations and maintenance) are realized by 2014. The Action Plan ~rovides industry standard levels oF inaintenance (2.5 percent CRV) at all facilities maintaineci by FAM. Vision Plan: same as the Action Plan except the goal for Q8,M increases from 2.5 percent CRV to 3 percent CRV. The Vision Plan ~rovides funding for ideal levels of maintenance (3 ~ercent CRV), primarily surface finishes, signage, etc. at city facilities. It also ~rovides adequate levels of maintenance, renovation and replacement for land improvements ancl expected growth. ~ Under the Current Funcling Program: • Surface refurbishment schedules have been extended to their maximum limit (10 years or more). • Implementation of Phases I and II of the Munici~al Servi~e Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Plan will occur. This is considered to be the minimum amount of modifications necessary to continue efficient operations at the MSC. Funds will be ~rovided by the sale of lanci and by the Capital Development Excise Tax Fund. • Fourteen facilities would be maintained and imnroved, i.e., New Britain Building HVAC re~lacement and Fire Station #4 rehabilitation. • Two facilities to be replaced or refurbished: Main Library PI~ Refurbishment and Stazio Tensile Canopy Fabric Replacement. • Two facilities to be constructed, i.e., Fire Training Center anci General Storage Faciliry Facilities necessary to sustain the most r core of city services, such as ~ublic health safety, and/or com~ly with federal or ~ Action Plan The Action Plan represents the next best step towards reaching a sustainable level of maintenance, renovation and replacement in existing General Fund facilities. Action Plan: • Raises existing 08.N1 service levels to coincicie with recommendecl industry standards. (This level of service corresponds to 2.5 percent CRV annual funding.) • Increases MM/FRR funcling to the service standards acce~ted by City Council in 1998 (2 percent of CRV). • Kee~s the maintenance backlog below $4 million. (This amount of backlog re~resents the transition ~oint where the city's General Funcl facilities would no longer be rated in "good" condition overall but would be rated in "fair" condition.) • Implements all phases of the Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Plan. Funds will be primarily provided by the sale of the 6.6-~cre parcel, supplemented Backlog accumulation of uncorrected or defei ciencies that represent a liability (in C 5ical ancl Rnancial terms) for a faci ~e items include maintenance deficienc ipmentorsystemsoverdue forre~lacem~ Future maintenance items, plan acements and efficiency improvements Action Plan Funding Options Option 1: Slowly increases funding levels each ye~r until the CRV goal is reached in 20]4. rn 2: [ncrease funding to the recommendeci in two smaller steps -- $90,000 in 200G and )00 in 2010 for 08.M; $2G2,000 in 2007 and ,000 in 2012 for MM/FRR. ~n 3: Increase funding to the recommended in one large step -- $180,000 in 2006 for anci $525.000 in 2007 for MM/FRR. F/~M MASTER PLAN http://www.d.bouldecw.us/publlcworks/depts/dlsfam/ 0 Glen Huntington Bandshell b P b ~ y u lic Works/Transportation and lJtilities funds. To construct a Recycling and Storage Muntcipal Service Center (MSC) Faciliry at the Municipal Service Center in FaciliHes and Site Plan ~ 2008, the project would be entirely funded by the Capital Development Excise Tax Fund (Fund 1 10). The Recycling anci Storage Facility ph~e 1 is schecluled for completion in the 2005 ~ would address the issue of insufficient and to 2006 timeframe. !t involves the subciivision, improper storage space. The facility would be rezoning and sale of a 1.8 acre parcel located approximately 5,200 square feet anci include immediately south of the area leased to Eco- ~ eight large storage bays. The proposed facility Cycle, sale of the 2. t acre Park-n-Ride pro~erty would be designed to use space efficiently, ~long Pearl Parkway, anci the purchase and use have an environment suitable for storage of of a~~roximately 4.66 acres of lanci adjacent to = records with longer retention requirements the Yards. (dust, temperature, and humidity controls), and would establish an area to segregate phase 11 is planned for completion in the 2007 ~ abandoned items recovered by the city to 2009 timeframe. It includes the relot.~tion of until they can be characterized and properly Eco-Cycle to a new site, cieconstruction of the t disposed. Former Boulder Emergency Squacl builciing and • Two facilities would be maintained and construction of additional city stor~ge. improved, i.e., Carnegie Li~rary preservation ~ and Flatirons Pro Shop im~rovements. ph~e 111 is scheduled for completion in the 2010 • Two facilities may be demolished, i.e., Forestry to 2014 timeframe. It includes sale of the 6.6 Complex and The Edge Building. acre parcel along Pearl Parkway and the possible ~ • Two facilities may be replaced or refurbished, f~urchaseofadditional land. Purchaseofadditional i.e., Fire Station #6, BMoCA Elevator ancl ADA land and construction ofany additional facilities is Restroom Installation. conce~tual at this point and will de~end largely ~ • Two facilities may be constructed, i.e., on the amount of funding available after the land Wildland Fire Cache ancl Additional Fire sale/~urchase transactions are finalized. Major Ap~aratus Storage. facilities needed include: aciditional covereci ~ Vision Plan storage, contractor staging area, light ~ole The Vision Plan will take longer than 2014 to storage, multi-use asphalt pad, ~nd additional ~ support financially. This is reflected in Appendix 8. materials storage. The Vision Plan includes the Action Plan and See Appendix 10 for more information. would also: Z • Reach desired service levels of 08JV1 (3 percent CRV) when funcling is available. T'he 3 percent CRV annual funding level wvuld increase service levels to optimum industry standards. The largest ~ component of this level of service would be restoring surface refurbishments to a 7-year schedule. • Maintain the 2~ercent CRV t~rget for MM/FRR. • Implement a maintenance, renovation and replacement progr~m for land improvements. FAM recommends funding be provided as part of the replacement/extension of the .38 cent sales tax in ~ 2010 or 201 l. • Identify land improvement needs, funcling options , future funding neecls and options related to ~ eventual building replacements when they reach the end of their expected service lives • One facility may be maintained and improved, i.e. , Mustard's Last Stand ADA Improvements. • No facilities would be replaced or refurbished. ~ • New facilities may be constructed, i.e., Fire Station #8. FAM MASTER PLAN http://www.cl.boulder.co.us/publlcworks/depts/dlsfam/ ^ ~ ~ COMPARE INVESTMENT PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE CURRENT FUNDING PLAN ~ ACTION PLAN VISION PLAN ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ • Essentiai Buildings - perform all preventive and corrective maintenance. • Non-Essential Buildings - only perform preventive and corrective maintenance on health and safety systems. • Surface Finishes - minimal operations and renewal. City Council Accepted _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Service Level ~~ Buildings Land Improvements • Essential Buildinas - perform industry standard level of preventive and corrective maintenance all buildings. • Non-Essential Buildings - perform industry standard level of preventive and corrective maintenance all buildings. • Surface Finishes - limited operations and renewal at 10 / • Essential Buildings - perform opUmum levels of preventive and corrective maintenance in all buildings. • Non-Essential Buildings - perform optimum levels of preventive and corrective maintenance in all buildings. • SurFace Finishes - full funding for operations and replacement at seven year intervals. --- --------- - ~!~~ Buildings Land Improvements $6.7 Million Buildings -~a~ Land Improvements ~ s~mp~e payoacx wui ~e compie~ea. • Current Services - not sustainable ~ with present building inventory • Administrative Functions & Staff Training - sub-standard ~ ~"' ~ $2.5 to $4.3 Million` "depends on how soon lundirtg can ' $2.5 to $4.3 Million or less ~a~ Buildings Land Improvements Buildings Land Improvements be • Current Services - sustainable with present building inventory. Some gruwth accommodated. • Administrative Functions & Staff Training - industry standard • Current Services - sustainable; can meet planned needs related to growth identified in other master plans. • Administrative Functions & Staff Training - optimum ~ ~~/~O KEY ISSUES o F- 1. Ongoing Operations and ~ Maintenance (08.M) - Planned funding is inadequate as compared to industry standards. The 08.M program includes: preventive maintenance on building systems and support equipment; surface refurbishments (carpet, paint, etc.); corrective maintenance needed to restore systems and equi~ment to operation within their designed service life; and normal facility operations such as unlocking buildings, room occu~ant signage, key services, etc. The current funding levels for operations and maintenance are inadequate. This situation has occurred due to increasing operational needs and reduced funding levels. The condition and appearance of facilities is expected to worsen in the future if actions are not taken to restore funding. Increased Operational Needs • Construction and acquisition of additional space such as: the ~ addition to the North Boulcler 3.5 Recreation Center, purchasing the Dairy Center for the Arts, 3.0 ~urchasing the Valmont Butte Mill, accepting Tom Watson Park, construction of Foothills 2.5 > Communiry Parlc, etc. ~ ~' •Ex~anded securiry systems and 2.0 o processes for staff and vendors ~ including installing physical °; 1.5 barriers, installing card access ~ systems, implementing security t.o ~olicies and procedures, etc. • Increased focus on indoor air quality, waste management, wildlife management, stormwater management, as well as other environmental initiatives, concerns and Standard o.s 1 JS% 1.75% 1.75% - ~ CRV CRV CRV o.o Current Action Vision ` Funding Plan Plan Operations 8, Maintenance funding O~tions Service levels and associated funding at 2.5 ~ percent CRV proposed in the Action Plan • Recommendeci inclustry standard levels of 08.M. • Recommend the Action Plan be supporteci with additional resources as they become available. • The maintenance backlog will be kept below $4 million. • Recommend extending or re~lacing sales tax- based funding sources when existing sources sunset. Issues identified in the Vision Plan and the eventual need tor additional funding. • The long-range facility replacement plan is t outlined in Appendix 9. • FAM will be working with other dep~rtments ~~ on identification and ~.ssignment of responsibility for maintenance, renovation and replacement ~f lanci improvements. Corrective Maint.! Desirable Sys Preventive Maint./ Desirable Sys. ~ Corrective Maintenance/ Ess Sys ~ ~.v~ FAnn Ten percent cost increases per year are in highly technical fields. programs. • Increased ener~r costs including electricity, natural gas, diesel fuel and gasoline. • Higher costs to contractors and vendors for labor and building materials averaging 5 percent to 10 percent ~er year. Building material costs rose sharply in 2004 due to increased global dem~nd for these products. Reduced Funding Levels Funding levels far 08.M were reciuceci in 2002, 2003 and 2004. In 2004 alone, FAM's 08.M budgetof$2,37G,240was reduced by $473,OOOwith $85,000 being restored through 2024 by continuation of the .15 cent sales t~c. The net reduction of $388,000 equates to a reduction of ap~roximately 16.3 nercent of FAM's tot~l budget for onerations and maintenance at a time when 08.M costs are rising 10 percent annually. Specifically, in 2005, 08.N1 funding levels are 2.33 percent of the CRV of General Fund facilities as compared to a recommended service standard corresponding to 2.5 ~ercent CRV. Without action to restore funding, 08.M funding levels are exnected to drop further due to cost increases. ~ Current funding: Because current funcis are insufficient to fully fund all of the ongoing 08JV1> the 08.N1 needs have been nrioritized. Llnder the Current Funding program, all hreventive and corrective maintenance will be performed on essential systems in both essential and other buildings. Service levels will decrease ' steadily until only the essential buildings receive all maintenance and all other buildings will receive only maintenance essential systems. ~ Action Plan: Additional funds identified in the Action Plan would restore funding to the 2.5 ~ercent CRV goal as soon as possible. All preventive and corrective maintenance of L essential and desirable systems would be performed in all General Fund buildings to meet the industry standard (2.5 ~ ~ercent CRV). Vision f'lan: The funding necessary to increase 08.M funding to an optimum level of 3 percent CRV would be ~ provided. This would increase service levels to ontimum industry standards. The largest component of this level of ~ service would be restoring surface refurbishments to a 7- year schedule from a 10-year replacement schedule. fi , - 2_ _Major Maintenance, Renovation and Replacement (MM/FRR) - Planned funding for ._ _ ~~ _~' _ __ J !' J___t_' _a'_J'_J_ ~ Major Maintenance Major maintenance is the o~erational component of the MM/FRR program and includes those repairs that are above and beyond normal 08.M expenses. It provides for corrective maintenance and replacement ~ of facility system components where the cost oFeach rep~ir exceeds $3,000 per repair (excluciing surface refurbishments). ~ PLAN ~ Chautauqua Dining Hall Facility Renovation and Replacement Facility Renovation and Replacement makes u~ the capital renewal component of the MM/FRR program. It ~rovides: • scheduled ~redictive renovation and re~lacement of builc~ing systems and components when they reach the end of their expected service life; • space renovation5 due to reorganizations and other organiz.ational changes; • improvements required by codes and regulations; • may provide nartial Funding for the eventual addition, replacement or demolition of existing facilities due to age, obsolescence or increased Cd~dCl~/ IleeC~S. ~ ~ V ~ 0 ~ c v ~ v a 1.75% 1.75% 1.75% o.s ~RV - - CRV CRV ' o.o , _ -- Current Action Vision Funding Plan Plan Mafntenance / Facility Renovatfon 8. Realacemen (MM/FRR) Part of the Vision Plan is to identify and quantify land improvement needs and to develop a funding ~lan for them. The funding go~ls in this master plan do not include all the maintenance, renovation and replacement needs for land improvements such as parking lots, swimming pools, ball fields, sidewalks, exterior lighting and other assets. FAM is currently working to inventory these assets and develop maintenance and renovation plans that meet industry standards. This project is being coordinateci with Parks 8, Recreation Dep~rtment, Public Worlcs/Information Resources ~nd other departments to develop similar plans for landscaping, playgrounds, irrigation systems, etc. This effort is now possible due to the city's advanced GIS ca~abilities and with the cooperation of the County Assessor's Office. The goal is to provide a Web-based, comprehensive listing oF ~II assets (land, land improvements, buildings, and building systems) for each General Fund site. This ~roject should be completed in 2007. Reduced Funding Levels The current funding levels for major maintenance, renovation, and replacement are inadequate. • This situation has occurred due to budget reductions in 2002 and 2003, increasing mainten~nce res~onsibilities and by using a portion of funding for MM/FRR for 08.M. • In 2003, the MM/FRR budget was reduced by $1 18, 500. • Funding levels in 2005 for MM/FRR are at t.78 ~ercent CRV as compared to accepted service levels corresponding to the 2.0 ~ercent CRV annual funding target est~blished in Council Budget Policy #3.3. • Debt service on three facilities (Public Safety Building in 2006, 1992 section of the Main Library in 201 1, and East Boulder Community Center in 2012) will be retired and Funding for renovation and replacement will be needed Library Main Branch ~J~~ F. ~.o ~ ~ ~ as noted in Council Budget Policy #3.4. Currently, only major maintenance needs at these three facilities ~re funded while the debt is being ~aid off. The result of these reductions will be an increase in the maintenance backlog. • Without additional funding, the MM/FRR program will be funded at 1.64 percent CRV in 2Q07, and funding will decrease to 1.40 percent CRV in 2014. • The maintenance Uacklog is ex~ectecl to Maintenance Backlog increase from a~~roximately $3.5 million in 2005 to approximately $6.7 million in 2014. A maintenance backlog of $4 million corresponds to the transition point where overall condition Due to inadequate funds to maintain all facilities, rating of General Funci facilities goes from "goocl" the MM/FRR needs have been prioritized. to "fair." A maintenance backlog of $8 million • Current Eunding: The essential facilities will corresponds to the transition ~oint where the be m~intained to Council accepteci service overall condition rating of General Fund facilities standards, and the remaining facilities will be goes from "fair" to "poor." maintained at a level below service standards commensurate with funding available. • Action Plan: Adciitional funds would return MM/FRR funding levels to approximately 2~ercent CRV as soon as nossible. The backlog would be maintained ~t between $2.5 and $4.3 million. • Vision Plan: This plan would begin provicling the funding necessary to imnlement a long-range faciliry replatement program to address facility replacements to the year 2050. New federal and state regulations are antici~ated that will need to be implemented and ~ossibly back- fitted into existing facilities. For example, the new ADA requirements, currently under review, may require installation of elevators in all Essentia~ f~~cilities and FloodpE~ins government-owned multi-story buildings. Some "Essential Facilities" are currently located in The MM/FRR funding level of 2 percent CRV is the floocinlain such as the Municinal Building, the designed to maintain, renovate and replace ~ustice Center and Fire Station #3. These facilities facility systems/components at recommended should be relocated or flood-proofed to withstanci intenrals noted in the service standards. The ~ S00-year flooci event as recommendecl in the funding can also assist in funding eventual ~Om~rehensiveFlooclandStormw~terMasterPlan. facility replacements or to supplement Colorado Recommended funciing inclucles establishment of Historical Society grant funcling; however, it is ~ sinking fund for eventual facility renlacements not adequate to entirely fund the replacement or ~ncl/or flood-proofing, supplemented by one or restoration of larger facilities. During the period more capital improvement bond issues. covered by this nlan, no large facilities are due for replacement or restoration; however, many large facilities will require replacement or restoration in the years aheacl. See Appendix 9 for details. Long-range Planning FAM has developed a long-range plan (2015 to 2050) that quantifies these needs. FAM recommends that a sinking fund be establisheci to partially fund eventual facility replacements, su~~lemented as necessary by a capital replacement bond issue. This is outside the sco~e of this master nlan but will be part of the ~~~. FAM Vision Plan in the future. Facilities will be replaced as they become obsolete or in need of significant ~ re~air. Essential facilities will receive the highest priority for funding. ~ coNC~usiorv FAM is ~roceeding with the fiscally constrained ~lan until such time as the city's financial condition ~ improves. .~ Facility conditions could erode in the years to ~ come. CIIRRENT PERFORMANCE MEASIlRES • 08.M and MM/FRR prioritization will be implemented according to funding provided resulting in the outcomes described and charted. • Any increases in sales t~c revenues in the upcoming years should have a portion dedicated to addressing the existing facility needs. • Significant funding shortfalls are expected in 2012 (when the .38 cent sales t~c 5unsets in 201 1) resulting in a reduction of revenues to the General Fund of ap~roximately 10 percent. • In 2015, an additional source of revenue (.25 cent sales t~c) sunsets, resulting in a reduction of greater than 50 percent maintenance funding for Parks 8. Recreation facilities. A replacement funding mechanism is necessary to offset the loss of revenues. ~ FAM anticipates that only a~ortion of the funding necessary to implement the Action Plan will be available during the period of this plan, particularly 2012 through 2014. FAM will continue to quantify the Vision Plan needs. • Maintenance backlog • Facility Condition [ndex ancl associated ~ condition rating (good, fair or poor) +•~ • Percent of outsourcing • Building area maintained (square Feet) ~ ~ ~ 200G - 2014 PERFORMANCE MEASIIRES ~ 1. Continue to measure maintenance backlog 2. Continue to measure Facility Condition Index ~nd associated condition rating (good, fair or poor) 3. Continue to measure building area maintained (square feet) 4. Current Replacement Value oF facilities 5. Cost of Services ($/SF) in each program area. (08.M, MM/FRR, custociial services) 6. Energy projects completed each year and estimateci annual cost savings 7. Amount of ener~y used and cost at each facility annually ~ 8. Continue to measure percent of outsourcing ~ ~ ~ * ~ a~ J ~ ~ FAM MASTER A~II ~ ~ ~ Table of C on~ents ~ ~ , ~ ~ ~ ~ i~r ~ ~ ~ ,~. ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ! List of General Fund Facilities and Other Facilities Where FAM Has Responsibilities FAM Organization Custodial Task List lnspections Reports and Assessments Related to Historic Facilities Ciry ol Boultlar 2005 PropMy Schetlule Shaded areas are FAM recponc~bllity ShatledereasareFAMresponsiblllty ~ OCA. ~. Fu~d AsoiDefa:. FAM 08M a57215 ~ OIO ~ ~~.1uo~~ . .., .Y Energy 352236 010 ~,i,1oU5 ., r ~. Parks OflM Custotllal All GF 352237 35323H FAM MM 3333~1 Facillty R8R 010 010 O10 070 ~,t~'iou5 ~~;~un= ~:,i2005 ~:i.1nn~ ~ . . 4~ui`.7s~~ ~2 .. - PSR MM 352232 178 i~t,=7n5 < - . Ree 08M 352737 La 718 '.:1i2oa5 ,.:z °'- nAmarlwd ' F~dNtyi F~cN1lyWma BL~.~ FT ~ YwrBulik 8acklog FCF ~ 400%BWkNnpV~lw ~Jan.2006 . . fP~rBquw Foof ~ ~~r ~ ~ _ ~ easee on 200a 5 ti08.670.00 Actuals 32~,<46.00 E 20~,152.00 S 82.308.00 <O~,OOO.DO 203,N48-00 S 208.126.00 252.386 37,3QB 141.872 157,BG7 ~ .. .~ 5 2.a2 S 8.82 $ tA2 S t.32 001 I Munic~ I BuilEln 23.fi57 1951 $ 62.000 243% 5 z.55<.468 S 107.98 C,ENERAL FUN[l ~ 57,70.5.19 50.5.13717 NA ; 33,501,67 j2$,$i~t:lE ~~~ :~;'$~4.~ NA NA No W2 Munia l Service Center'A" 34,971 19fi8 5 20?50 O65% $ 3.210.547 S 91.8~ PUBLIC W ORKS ' Trens 8 Utilitios S 84,506.54 558,947.20 NA S 49,i83.33 ~.ans! Ufn Trans ~ U~ii NA NA No 003 MuniCi f SemCes BWltlm "B" "~ 17F. 1994 $ 10,0~0 0.77% '~ 1 IW Si:; S 51 42 PUBLIC WORKS i rrana 8 Utilit~es s 80.840.57 E15,820.57 NF I rans ~ Uhl irans ~ Uhl . rans ~ Util NA NA No WO InsGenler ~6.3l2 1957 5 12,000 0.85% ~~.at~3.~'i7 5 86.fi2 GENERALFUND NA °&R S 718,900.90 P&R YA 574.1~.pT . j//:1Q.6'19 9,361:28.. No 006 Panc Cenva OfllceBUikin 20,910 1973 S 465.300 19.77°w $ 2353.985 S 112.58 GENERAL FUND S SQ.527.29 537.91~.18 NA S~ 29,BC7,08 ST3.S39.85 t23,539.86 NA NA I No I 007 Ma~~~e~ance8uildin 6,D2t t957 5 d2,500 13.40% S 317.239 S 52.69 GENERALFUND 5 1G,56B25. ~ $7,918,51 NA S 8.538.82 ~ 53.17?.3$ 53.172.39 NA NA No I OOB New Biitain 17,852 5971 $ BOB.565 52A2% S 1.554,723 $ 11222 GENERAL FUND E 33,-07222 fi8,?1i.71 NA $ 19.839.Bd 315.514.23 575.54~.23 NA NA I No I 009 MAINLiBRARY 61,760 1961 $ 356.750 2.fi8% $ 13295.744 S 156.86 GENERALFl1ND ~iDra~y Li~~aiy NA L~~iaiy 5732,%7.M _, NA NA Np 071 Ra iwlas Li~ra ~~~.37~ 1968 $ ~9.500 2.S74e +?7 ~:"~ S 110.64 GENERAI Fl1ND ~iGrary LiMary NA ~Orary S» 474.28 $1 t!74-28 Nn NA I No I Ot2 BLDR MUSEUM UF CONTEMP Ans 10.2J0 1906 $ 205,900 26.16% $ ~88,939 S 76.92 GENERAL Fl1ND Tenant Tenant NA Tena~: §7,968.39 57,869.39 NA NA V¢s II 073 Carn e ~i0ra 5,610 1906 5 45.000 6.Sfi% $ 685.580 f 12227 GENERA~ FUND LlArery ~ihrary NA ~0rniy EB,BSS.Bp $8.855.80 NA NA v¢~ II, 015 MeaaowsL~Dra 76~2 7988 $ 30.000 #DIV/0! S ~ 5 - LEASED from Pnvate Owmu Llbrary LiMary NA LiDrar~ , , ~ g0.W NA NA ' No ~ 016 PuW{c Salet Bid . - 1968 § 6.000 0.05% 5 ~~ ~~„-. ~~.i_- g 23J 33 6ENEHAI FUND Pdice Pollce NA Pobcc 5778.8~27 ~ , ,,, _ NA NA i No O~E PuDiic Salue Sror e BI ~."~'~:: 7990 5 - D.00°6 $ 77.e9 GENERAL FUND Poii~e Police NA Poi~ce $3.890b3 _ 53.890.83 NA NA No ~i 01~ GUNBARREL Radlo ShaCk Twr;Ant 240 1986 0.00% $ 63,1g5 § 2fi3.32 GENERAL FUN~ aol~~e Potlce NA Pobcr SB31.96 ~ S&31.98 NA NA No ' 019 Chau~2~ .ia Ratlio S~aGk T~.vr/Anf 100 1968 O.CO% S 29.831 5 29A.31 GENERAI FUNU Pnlicc Policq NA Pohcr §Y98.31 5398.3T NA NA NO . 019 Flrc Slation C2 4,751 7959 S 6~].000 10.14 % S 59i.&6c' S 124.55 CENERAL Fl1ND f 11,48282 Flre NA Flre f5,878.58 $.418.88 NA NA No ~ 020 Flrc Slaliw, ft1 7.947 1957 $ tl,5(10 0.86°ro S 5tl9.037 S 12a 75 GtNEiiAI FUND S 19.188.77 Flfe NA Flre 39,89tl.31 59,890.$) NA NA No '~. 021 Fire S~a~iw+#3 6.160 t96n S 65,000 8.d~% $ 7ti1.23a 5 124.55 GENERAL FUND S 1~.885.13 Flre NA Fire $7,6Y1.34 57,67Z.34 NA NA No '', 022 F~ire vla[io~ ka 2.000 1gg7 $ 41,StiU 21 d7% $ 22I,228 $ ~ 10 61 GENERAL FUND s 4.&R.B~ Fire NA Fire 52,212.28 E2212.28 NA NA No ' 02J Flre Sla~ion k6 3,435 1919 S 83,SOU 15.52% S 427,d33 $ 124_55 GENERP.L Fl/NO § 8.300.39 f ir,. NA Fire $A.278.33 ~ E4.TT8.33 NA NA NO '', 024 Flre Sln~ion tt5 3.622 1992 $ 6,000 f.13~ S 530,190 $ 14fi.38 GENERAL FUNG S 8,T52.26 ~i~= NA Flre $5,3p1.90. §5,301.90 NA NA No ~ 025 wesl5gma Center ~~i.1Hb 197a $ 266.Za7 t4.8a% 5 t ~'~J,~(i?. E 110.86 GENERAL FUNO 99,178.9T . ~ S ~535.761.02 NA 11~i:; 577,9f5.88 517.945.68 NA NA ~ No II 026 Chimren, Youm, 8 Fami1 Services Center 5.215 1963 0.00% S 605,900 $ 118.18 GENERAL FUND . S 72,807.82 ~ 55,882.18 NA S 7,394.O1 Sg,p ~9.pp $B,p$9.00 NA Hn ~ No ', 027 7Te E4 e 1.ppp 1953 $ 2,000 2.17°k S 92.159 92.1B GENERAL FUND f ~.: $;.~~5.12 Tmant NA _ ~.~:~7.59 5921.59 NA NA No I~ 029 Chautau ua Auditonum 18,038 1898 0.00% $ 1.263.289 $ 78.78 GENERAL FUND . . .. NA . . _ . Tenant ._._ TenaM Tenant . . . ... . NA 512,632.89 . 7ana~i N.4 Yes I~ 030 Chaulau ua Dim Hali 5,326 7898 0.00% S 6d0,688 $ 120.29 GENEftAL FUND NA Tenant Terant Tenant NA y8,90f>.gg T¢nanl NA Yos ~i 032 Chauteupue AcaEamlc HaN _ 3,460 7900 0.00% $ 387,173 $ 111.90 GENERAL FUND NA Tenant Tenant __ __TeneM NA 43,871.73 Tenanl NA Yes ~, AppenOiz 7 Cily ol Boulder 2005 Prapeny Scl~eOUle Shatletl anaa are fAM reapomlbiilty ShadeaareaoareFAMre6ponalblifty OCA FwM AtofDat~: FAM 03M 352235 Ot0 '~.'liu' E~xrgy 152238 Of0 +ill2oo-. Perks 08M 352217 010 ~Il!luu5 Cu~todlal All GF G8R MM 354178 FAN MM 35IN7 FaGlllty R&ft 352194 010 010 D10 /18 fitiZU05 'ItrlW* ~~irtoo'~ ii1R005 Rec 08M 352Y33 11B ~It120D5 Landmarketl FacIIHy 4 FaUlhy N~m~ BLDO. SQ ~ Ypr 6ultt Backlop FCI 7001~ BWbinq Vilu~ ~~ ~~S • Mr Spwn F~ Osmor i11y.870.00 Based on 2004 Actuals 321448.00 201.152.00 5 62.308.06 Sa~1.l;UGih; i 03,84800 $ 208.178.OD u7J P: N E lu ~~'h~.l~~,~ f,VOU 14f~i S I~t.15C 1 io^~: $ ~.. ~3 S 'S -~ ~CN[RaL FUND NA PSR P8R P&R NA 57.976.13 P8(i NA No ~~s-i I~Iar Fak.~rU~. <.%~6 19ti1 r5 :1Ut T /y`!. '$ >~l:?~ S .i7atf :,FNt~tnliuNl~ NA PdP PdR P8R NA SSgp.2g P&R NA No 035 BAN~ SHELI 650 1930 O.W`W $ 213.935 $ 329 13 GEN[RAL FUND NA 7&R P8R P8R NA $2.139.35 P8R NA V¢y 036 EGp~ Fmc Park Shelter 360 1930 $ 0.00% $ 88 47$ $ 92.16 GENERAL FUN~ NA NA PSR G8R NA $~$6.73 P&R NA No 037 Eben Fine V'ark ResliWms 400 1930 $ 161,000 194_9B% $ 82,583 $ 1W.4B GENERAL FUN~ NA P8R V8R P8R NA $B25.B3 ~'SR NA Nu 038 Salber Pa~A Mamteiiance BIA 7,125 1974 0.00% 3 74.068 § 65.84 GENERA~ FUND NA P8R PSR P8R NA $T40.88 PSR NA No 038 Salher Park Meetin HaU 2.400 1978 0.00% 5 289.626 $ 120.68 GENERAI FUND NA P8R P8R P8R NA 52,8~.26~ . . 5I,886.78~. j9,161,47 No 03B Sa~oar Park Sheltw Roof G00 1976 0.00% 5 13,185 $ 32.91 GENERAL FUND NA NA P&R P8R NA $t3t,g5 v8k Nn ryo 039 PeanS~rcetMallReslroans fi58 2001 U.00% $ 292411 $ 444.39 GENE(tALFt1N~ Nn PSR s 5,689.33 P8R NA §2,924.i1 §2.824.1t YA No 040 TantraPa~kSlm 3,062 1964 § SB.SOD 30.13'Y $ 146,181 $ 83.42 GENERALfUND NA P8k s 28.382.21~ P8ft NA 5/.941.81 L1.961.81 NA No Pa2 Park O atbrts 5,56< 1989 0.00% 5 338.088 5 B0.76 GENERAL FUN~ NA P&R { 47,93g,18 P8R NA 53.980.88 $3,380.88 rva No 052 Foros 2.300 1985 0.00% S 151,617 5 65.84 GENERALFUND NA P8R .S 79.818.82 P8R NA 57.514.27 51.874.p7 NA No 053 SouN BowCar Recree~bn Conter 27.319 1973 S 11,300 0.39°b S 2,886.853 S 105.87 GENERAI FUND NA P&R r~a v8R NA SZB.8B8.51 S28.BBB.53 SJ6,020.92 No OS< Nprlh Bpultler Rc+credlpn Canter 82,t(8 2002 0.00°m E 9.589.179 S ~05.67 GENEML FuNO NA P8q na c8R NA f66,891.79 585,697.79 $87,98~.73 Nn 055 Eas~ BoWder Rec.~Senbr Contr 55,OA' tg97 $ 47,800 0.71% 4 n.afi~ ~i1ii $ ~7t.01 GENERAL FUND >. 46.5HN~.S3 P8N NA P8R r,,, O5fi Ma Ie~on Cuncession5 890 1977 S 11.500 9-07% $ 116.504 $ 11768 GENERAI FUND NA Tenant NA iend~~ NA 51.185.04 si.18$.04 51,30$.3/ Nil O58 MaroecMFbusn 2.500 1900 $ 70.500 10.719o S 858,290 $ 263.32 GENERALFUND N.4 Tenant f 21,540,02 ~enarn NA ig,~.yp Sg,$g$,9p NA ~ 059 StazioBallFrefd~Resvooms 2.800 1989 $ 8,500 240% 5 354451 S 116.59 GENERALFUND NA P8R rvA ~~BR NA 53,54a.5t ;J,564.51 53,691.88 N., 059 Stano 6alNielAS Mantenance 5.000 1997 $ 3,500 0.55% S 632.418 S 126.59 GENERAL FUND NA P&R NA P8R NA 58,329.48 SB,329.J8 58,592.65 h~o 059E Sfaz.o Ba111iaiA iensile Ca 6.000 1992 U.00`W S 189.903 5 31.65 GENERAL FUND NA NA NA NA Na 51,889.02 5~,899.0P 57.911.18 h~~ O60 POtl laD 2,585 1924 $ 35.P00 14.77% S 23]p41 S 92?i GENERAL FUN~ NA P&R NA P&R NA f7.370.61 $2,370.41 $3.382.03 ~~.. OG7 A SCOTT CARPENTER PARK LOCKER ROOMS 5,886 19fi3 $ 84 160 10.89% E `~89 Ufi3 S 100.08 GENERAL FUND NA PdR NA V8R Wl 55,890.63 f5,890,83 E7.7fi0.B7 N~~ fNil B SCOTT CAHPENTER PARK FILTER BUILDING 500 1983 0.00% $ fi5.625 S ~71.25 GENER4L FUND NA P&R NA NA NA SB58.25 SB56.2$ ~$9.26 N~~ 061 E SCOTT CARPENTER ATNLETICS OFFICE 1,052 1g53 $ 2,500 2.33% $ 101,2Z5 $ 101.93 GENERAL FUND NA P&R NA P8R NA E1.072.25 $7.072.I5 $1,3A7.p8 N~_ O61F SCOTTL'ARPENTERAIMLETICSSHEO 100 1995 0.00°~ $ 1.880 $ 18.80 GENER4LFlINL` NA P8R NA NA NA 518.00 ~'&li Na N~~ O61 M SCOTT CARPENTER PRESS BOX 650 2001 U.00'~ 5 82 d59 $ 126.BB GENERAL F'UNU NA P&R NA P8R NA Eb24,58 582<.58 $857.04 Nn O62 S rucoPOOI Bat~ HousaiFiltoi 1.810 1961 S 40,000 7679% $ 2J8.290 $ 137.65 GENER4L NNG NA PdR NA P8R NA $2.382.90 fY,392.gp $7.38g.6a N:. 063 BOULDER RESERVDIR SECwiI 81 . 800 igq6 $ 4,000 5<7% $ 73,931 $ 9241 GFNERhL FUNO NA P8R P6R P8R NA s73B.31 5739.31 NA 4u 063 BOULDEF RESERVOIR Gate Hau% 290 1971 0.00% $ IB 483 5 9G 41 GENERAL Fl1NO NA P8R VSR P5R NA Et81.8S 51N.&I !vA Y;i 063 BOULDER RESERVOIR CaicessBth 7.Y3'i 1984 S 10.500 2.65% 5 103.25 GENERAI. FUNU NA P&R PBR PSR NA $3,958.57 53,95&57 NA Nu 063 BOULDER RESERVOIR Guard Hut 360 1984 5 2,000 d.g9% 5 d0,105 5 111 10 GENERAL FUNO NA P8R PBR P&R NA $107.0.5 56p1.05 NA No W3 BOUL~ER RESERVOiR Manna &. 1,J20 7984 $ 9.000 1.73% 3 »3,~et 5 13~ 65 GENEf2AL FUN~ NA P&R P&R P8R NA %1,T37.81 51,737.81 NA No 063 BOUL~ER RESERVOIR Maintenance BIO 3230 7984 D.00% 5 253,5~9 5 78.49 GENERAL FUNO NA P8R a8R adR NA 52,535.19 5~,535.19 NA No 0fi9 LATH SHEO 1 260 7972 0.00% $ 13.230 S 10.50 GENERAL fUN~ NA NA P6R NA NA 5/32.30 5732.90 NA No OfiB FL4iIRONS GO~F Pro Sh 3.125 1985 0.00'% $ 364,841 S 123.15 GENERAL fUNO NA P8R PBR P8R NA 1'SG Pek NA No 089 Flallruns Gdf Meinlanence BIO . 2,025 1971 0,00% $ 118,823 S 58.68 GENEftAL FUNO NA P8R P8R P&R NA V&R PgR NA No 071 Flal~rons Gdt Irri alron Pum ouse 150 1985 0.00% 8 7,876 $ 5).1B GENEfiP.L FUND rvA F'SR aBR NA NA PgR P8R NA nb 072 FL4TIRON GOLF Stora GOHICa 5.000 1978 0,00% 8 265,876 f 53.18 GENERAL FUND rvA i~BR V8k v8K NA P&R P8R NA nb t15 FIee~Sermces 74&'i~~ 1989 8 3.500 0.14% rs~i~ii5~; g 100.99 PUBLIC WORKS ~ FLEE7 f 90.0.57.85 553,987.57 NA S 35.239~.09 Fieoi Fleet NA NA Nu 119 S~ucePa~kin Slrucn~re 142000 lggp 0.00% S 5,850,829 5 39-79 ~UHMD uUHM~ Si.B1<.36 NA ~UHMD D~HMD GVHMG NA NA No 182 Alnum 71392 1971 $ 1200U 0.88% $ 1 371,277 $ I10,66 GENERAL FUND s 29.9~4.25 ~ S 18,BB1.i4 NA f 17,5~.89 517,712.7 1 313.712.71 NA NA No 168 Fire ilalnl Can[of 0 1989 NOIV/Of $ - I GENERAL Fl1ND Fiie Assoc Fr~~ Ay~n~-, NA Fiie Fsso.: f iie Atinnc j0.pp NA NA No 171 BOMB ~ISPOSAL & STORAGE 100 1988 0.00% S 32.973 S 329.13 GENERAL Fl1ND P~lice NA NA NA $329.1 3 ~29.1J NA NA No 172 MustarOS Reslauianl 757 t954 S 75,000 752fi% S 99.86o S 131 65 6ENERAL FUND 7cnan; ienani NA 7a~a~~~ E99D.8 0 5980.60 NA rvA nb 194 VIOLET aVFNUE OWFLI.ING 1,800 1948 0.00% E 768,745 E 92.41 GENERAL FUND F~iiti Fire NA NA 51.683.~ 5~ , NA NA No 195 Munici el Si.v~cc Ganiur Caiwash 7994 S SW U374o S 185b57 S 168.47 PUBLIC WORKS ~ FLEET 5 2,Bfi~.88~ Fleel N.4 Fleet FI~~ I lmi NA NA ryu 201 Easl8uulaci Pla Pavilliun 2.40D 1991 000% 5 221,793 S 92 a1 GENER4L f"UND NA NA P&R NA NA P8R ryA NA No 202 Parksi~e Picnii~ aaviil~icii B00 1970 0.00% S ~9.748 E 32.9t GEnERA~ FUrvG NA NA P8R NA NA P&R NA NA No ~ ~ r . .r -- ~ ~. ~ ~w r ~ ~r ~. ~ .. ~. .~ ~. ~ :; o,.,.~a,x, , ~~ Gty o~ BoulCer 2005 Property Scheduta Shadetl areas are FAM reaponsiblllty ShadetlarBasareFAMresponsl0111ty FAM 08M Enerpy Parks OdM Cu6totllal All GF P8R MM Rec 08M OGA 352215 351238 352237 352238 FAM MM 352341 Facllfty RdR 352232 35Y433 Landma~lwtl Fund Ot0 O70 Of0 O10 010 070 178 118 A~MDBN' i~lii+ ~;1!LUVS 1l1ROU5 1l1:2D05 t!1~2005 `!1!200`. '„100`~ ti1;2Q05 _. S..z' ~t_.~.a.x€.k , ,a.;'~ ~x°C'~n'~u'~x ;S?~ S~o:.r=:`~'"~.`~ f<.:` , . w.. . _ ... - F~cNNy M~ 15 ~ ReGllty Nsm~ . ~s cnl~,~r 61D6. SQ FT 7.2fiG Year bulll 9~7 Bscklaq iJ.00D FCI .bO'~~., ~~1L BWidlnp Y~1w Jan.Y0o6 5 1.255.312 t 4v 84~ Foot 5 17'2'.i! ~~ Based on 200< 5 609,87000 Aduals $ 327,4a6-DO $ 207.152.00 $ a62.30800 S ai;t On(;.DU 5 203.84800 S ZOB.126,00 GENEHi1~Fl1ND Couh CouA NA Courl l,ourt 512.553.12 NA NA No 116 Da~r CEN7Ek FOR 7HE ARTS 33.16G 19~1 S 14.50D 0.37% $ 9,929.966 $ t t8.32 GENERAL FUN~ Tenant Tenant NA 7enarn .. ~~ ~$99.299.88 E3H,Y39.B8 Na. N/+ No 277 717 Hailow Platls Sun ShHtbi Harlo~.v vlans N~arm~n Hut ~100 500 19]3 1985 0.00°k 0.00% $ 13,ifj5 S 32,919 $ 32.91 $ 65.A4 GENER4L FUNU NA NA P&R P8R NA P8F NA NA Ik~ GENERAL FUND NA NA P&R P8R NA f~&R NA NA No 218 Ara ehoe Ria e Rcnic Snc~tei 600 1971 S 6.500 3291°h $ 19.748 $ 32.91 GENERAL FUND NA NA P&R P8R NA P8R NA NA No 219 South Boulaer Rec. Ce~iter Stora e 200 1993 0,00% 5 10.635 5 53.78 GENER4L FUND NA NA P&R NA NA P8R Nn NA No 725 Chautau ua Trdie Sb 216 ig00 0.00"+b 5 28,a37 S t3t_65 GENER.4~ FUND NA NA P8R P8R NA P8R P8R P8R Ves 227 Atlv¢nlure Pr m St e Builtlin s 7fi0 1990 0.00% $ 3,699 $ 10,28 GENER4L FUNU NA NA NA NA NA P8R P&R P6R No 230 Goof ~aku Rvsiroom 120 1992 0.00% $ 32.079 S 286-82 GENERAL FUND NA NA P8R PSR NA P8R NA NA No 233 POLICE ANNE%- UNI NILL ilDIV/0! GENERAL FUND Pd~ce Pollce NA Pdlce Police Police NA NA No 235 C~autau ua Stone Nbor 600 1898 0.00% 5 t8.710 $ 27,85 GENERAL Ft1ND NA NA P8R 7&R NA a8R NA NA Ves 236 C~auta ua Picnic Shelter 1.200 1898 D.009o 5 39.496 S 32.97 GENERNL FUND NA Tenanl Tenanl 7enam i ~.nant P8R NA NP. Y~ 238 Bouitlor ~ Dushanbo teanouse 9.187 1958 $ 5,000 ~,31% E 1.601,139 5 503.34 FAM pef GENERAI FUNU FAM par ~oase 7onanl NA 7enam FAM per leeae deese NA NA No 139 PleasemVlewMalnlcv~anceS~eC 200 199~ 0.00% S 10.128 $ 50.W GENERALFUND NA PSR P&R P&R \A ?8ft NA NA No 739 PleasantVlewRestfooms 330 1992 E 4.500 7.18% S 62,683 $ 189.89 GENERALFUND NA P8R PSR PSR hA ~38,93 f928.8.7 ~' ~~¢135.11 Na 2d0A IHM RECREATION BUILDING 1.522 1985 $ 5 500 3.61% $ 752.200 5 100.00 GENERAL FuNO NA P8R $ 13,113.iE P8R NA 53,950.00 NA No 2408 I6M WAREHOUSE BUIL~ING 5,200 1985 0.00°a $ 3F>0.000 5 - GENERAL FUND NA PSR E a,B0324~ P&R NA y3,500.00 NA No 240C-0 IBM SiORAGE BUILOINGS dpp 7985 S 9.250 A625% $ 20.000 S - GENERAL FUNO NP. NA S 3.448.b~ NA NA ~ $1,200.iJ0 NA No 240E IBM IRfiIGATION PUMP OUILDING 120 1985 0.004o E 70,000 S - GENERAL FUND NA P8R ~f, ~~ 7,033,8Z NA NA . S8U0.(q NA No 242 FireSlanonp7 5.081 2000 $ 6.000 0.81% S 743,759 5 146.38 GENERALFUND f~'~:12,R7~•ffi:~ Fire Na F~re .~R7'pF87.B9 $1,43T_59 Na NA No 1a3 Valmom Stora e 30,434 t965 0.00% $ 627.981 5 2~.63 GENERAL FUND NA P8R P8R P8R NA PSR NA NA No 245 Sa~ Juan tlel Centro Mnex 600 #DIV/O! $ - 5 GENERAL FUNO Poliw Pdlce NA Police Pdlce POlice M1U NA No 248 M el Pines Clu~ Fbuse 18,500 19a8 5 38D,000 21.52 % 5 1.7fi6.G22 S 95.46 GENERAL FUND NA 7enarn Te~+a~t 7~ynt P8R G8R Na NA No 249 Echa hquse 4,253 0.00% $ 692,711 S 775.85 GENERAL FUND Tonan~ 7enanl NA Tonant 7onanl Tenant NA NA No 250 Foolhilistiia~nl.fauul 2.182 2000 0.00% $ 681.200 S 312.19 GENERALFUNO N~ P&R :j.°~.M;dQp;?~g~ P&R NA -. ~~Tl;81Z.00~ ~.,: ~,872AU NA No 257 ROSevlew 0.00% $ 501 pOIVlO! GENERAL FUNO NH P&R P8R P8R NA P8R NA NA No 257 Valmon~ 8utle MIII #~IV~O! SO pDIV~O! OSMP ~ General Fund + PW Vtiliti~ ~ 570,000 NA NA NA Laler La~cr NA NA No 264 Fira Trainm Centai #DN/0! GENERAI FUN~ l atar La~m NA later Laler LafBr NA NA No 27,~. Valmom P~~rM Haw Watcr P~m. hcu.s. l51 G005 0~,)(i".. $ Ni ~~2 G ne=r;~i Funa vA vC(2 PRR NA Wl ~'RP PSR Np No 301 PIONEER CEMETERY NA #DIV/D! 6ENERA~ FUNO NA P8R P8R NA NA P8R PSR NA 302 Heartl~n Plaza #DIVID! SO S GENERAL FUND NA T¢nanl Tenant Tana~t NA P8R P&R NA No 303 13TH STREET PLAZA 1993 0.00% $ 203.908 VDIVIO! GENERAL FUNO S - Alrium NA P8R $4,07$.17 i0.078.77 NA NA No 306 MUNI PLPJA 1998 0.0090 $ 99pg3 § 70.84 GENERAL FUN~ $ 17,5.'78.39 Mum NA P8R E1,9B$.88 57,988.88 NA NA No 307 L~brar Plaza 7961 $ 15,000 74.40% $ 104.180 5 20.83 GENERALFUND { 12.082.118 ~N~arv NA P8R 52.OB3.20 E2.083.70 NA NA No 409 410 LIBRA(tV i MUNICIPAL BLDG. PARKING R7AINLI6RARYSOUTHPARKING NA NA $ 90,OW O.W% 22.81% E 215,75~ $ 39d,647 pDIV/0! pDIV!0! GENERAL FUNO NA ~~.98 NA NA k,315.00 $d.315.00 NA NA No GENERAlFL1ND NA L~~brary NA NA $7,692.93 E7.892.93 NA NA No 411 NEWBRITAINPARKING NA 00090 $ 110.135 NOIV/D! GENERALFUN~ NA NA NA NA f2,'d(12.@9 52,202.89 NA NA Na 412 PARH CENTRAL PARKING NA 0.00% $ 91,778 pONlO! GENERAL FUND NA NA NA NA ~ Tt.835.57 ~~ E1.B35.57 NA NA No d13 MA~NLIBRARVWESTPARKING W+ 0.00'Yo E 22.945 qDIVlO! GENERALFUND NA NA NA NA $45g.g9 Hbg.89 NA NA No ApPOMiz 1 Ciry o( 9ouider 2005 Propany Schedule ShaMtl area9 ara FAM responnlblllty ShadadareuareFAMreePonslblllfY OCA PuM! Mo/Da1a: FAM O&M ]522]5 O7D . ,. Energy 152238 O10 ' ~ .. Parks 08M 75YY17 010 ~ ;i~'~1~: CustoClnl 352278 O10 ..ic~i~~ All GF FAM MM ]52341 FacIINy RSR 010 010 '~1;ii~il~ ... n, V8R MM 352233 118 .,~..~~i. RBC 06M 3522~3 718 i.~.~~i Landmarketl F1ctIHy 7i F~c1111y NWM 9L~fi.30 ~ Yw Bu4H Backlop FCI 100%BuIWIrqV~lw ~+~ 2~6 Sv~rBqwro F~ Ov~nyr 609.B70W Based un 2IXU nctuals 321A6fi00 20i,i5z.D~~ S 1~i~1.,iu~U+i ~gaU1.[N~UOD S 03.848.W 208 ~'t6,00 I Jt0 WESiSENIURI:ENTEHPARKiN[~ NH i U.W'?~~ i S 1111.7t5J I NUIV,fI! I ~iENEkALf11NL) NA NA NA NA E2.B15.BB $'1.816.88 NA NA No 475 ATRIUMPAftKING NA U.00'?o S 50,988 AUIV~D' GENERALFUND NA NA NA NA 57.019.78 51.019.78 NA NA No at6 MAIN1ENAfJCEBLDCG PARKIN~ NA 000% E 18,356 »DIV~U' GENERALFUND NA NA NA NA E387.t2 5387.72 NA NA No a17 qEVNOLDSl18RARVPARKING NA 000% § 69,83< pDIV~O~ GENEf7ALFUND NA NA NA NA 51,376.88 51,378.68 NA NA No JiB PubiiCSafCi Bld~ F'arkin NA 000% S 582.793 K~IV~O~ GENERALfUND NA PdICe NA NA 571.855.88 511,855.68 NA NA Np 419 FIRF STATION pi PARKING NA 0.00'Y E 22_945 k[IIV~U' GENERAL F11N0 NA NA NA NA j458.89 $45y.$9 NA NA No 420 FIRE STAiIC)N Nl VARKING NA 0.00°d~ § I1 472 YUIV~O' iiENERAL FUNO NA NA NA NA 5229A5 5229.GS NA NA Np 421 FIRE STATIGN k3 PARKING NA 0.00% S 11 d72 #[JIV~U' GENERAL FVND NA NA NA NA 5Y19.45 E229.d5 NA NA No 422 FIRE STATION IXS PAqKING NA 0.00% $ 10.356 +lDIV~O~. GENERAL FUND NA NA NA NA y,787.12 $~7.~2 NA NA No 423 FIRE STATION k5 VAF2KING NA O.OD`k $ 22.9a5 kC)IV~O~ I~ENERAL FUNU NA NA NA NA f458.89 fC58.89 NA NA No 424 EAST BOULDER REGREATIpN CENTER PARKING NA O,OD`k S 326,9ti1 GENERAI Fl1NU NA P8R NA NA ryq VqR NA NA No <27 IR~SCLNTERPARKING NA S 80,000 52.83% 5 157,434 $ 637 GENERALFUND NA P8R NA NA NA E3,028.68 NA NA No 428 NOR~H BOULUER RECREATIONCENTER PARKING NA 0.00% S 2A7.802 S 6.37 GENERAI FUND NA P8R NA NA NA f6.956.W PSR NA No d29 SCUTT CARPENTER PAPKING NA 0.00% S 98,089 GENERAL FUND NA P8R NA NA NA F~xit PgR NA No G30 SOU7H BOUI.OER RECREA710N CENTER PARKING NA O,bO% 5 ~33.078 S 6.37 GENER4LFUND NA NA NA NA NA §2,9E1.58 P8R NA No <31 SPRU~E POOL PARKING NA 0.00% 5 57,762 S 6.37 GENERAL FUND NA NA NA NA NA S1,1Q.23 P&R NA No 432 SALBERG PARH PARNING NA 0.00°A S 57,J62 GENERALFUND NA P8R NA NA NA PBR NA NA No 433 A-B NEW PARKS SHOP PARKING NA 0.00% $ 54.593 GENERAL FUND NA N&ii NA NA NA I~SR NA NA Na 434 h1ARLOWPLAITSVAKNING~JOSPACES NA U.00% $ 87,189 GENERALFUN~ NA NA NA NA NA f'dN NA NA NO d3S MAVLETON BALLFIE~D PARKING - 50 SPACES NA 0.00% S 114,723 $ 6.37 GENERAL FUNO NA NA NA NA NA u,294.~ P5R NA tJo 478 STAZIO BALLFIELDS 8 MAINTENANCE PARKING L(J7S -:5W SPACE NA 0.00% S fiB8.3~8 S 6.37 GENERPL FUNO NA PSR NA NA NA 573.786.78 P8R NA Np J97 FIATIRONS PARKING NA 000% E Sd.175 GENERALFUND NA NA NA NA NA V$R NA NA Np 498 FiRE STATION p7 PARKING NA 000% S 28.681 S 6.37 GENERAL FUNO NA Flie NA NA . ~79.62 E57J.62 Nn Nn f~W 439 PIf.ASANT VIEW PARKING NA 000% S ~537.M150 GENERAI FUND NA P6R NA NA NA . N~+ VA No 511 SKATE BOARUPARk 1997 0.00% E vy.7y5 5 lUtiU GENERAIFUND NA P&R PSR P&H NA . V Na ~vP No 512 Sc:oM1(:ai enterPOOI 1963 0.00°ro $ 1.575.CKK1 #f~IV~O~ GENERALfUND NA P8R NA P&R NA $~JW 515 OOO.W 5~0 00000 No 514 SVRUL'E POO~ 2001 0.00`W E ~.050 Wo zDIV~O~ GENERAL fUND NA P6R NA P8R NA $i10G . $15000.00 . S70 W0.00 No ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ n,....,..~ix 1 ~ City of Boulder Facilities & Asset Management Frank Bruno City Manager Maureen Rait Director of Public Works for Developmert & Support Services Jim Arnold Fleet Maintenance Supervisor 5tacy Ludwig Admin. Asst. (.75 FTE) Wendy Testa Facilities Coordinator Glenn Magee Architectural Project Mgr. Jahn Frazer Bill BOyeS I Financial ~ Manager Mark Koschade Facilities & Fleet Library Manager Maintenance Supervisor I Scott O~kes 8ill Hutson Sam Veucasovic Facilities Coordinator Project Management Asst. Mark Brunner Vicki Ross Fred McClain Patrick Morrow Jacobe Royers Ed Kothe Steve Dougiass (Parks FTEI Facility Maintenance 8 Operation s Page 1 of 1 Revised 10/13/2004 Appendix 2 r~ ~~ t~ r~ ~~ ~~ c~ ~: t ~:~ r t r ~ r~ r~ ~~ r i t~~~ ~~ City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule , Facility Facility Name I Number Address ~ Hyperlink Shortcut 13TH STREET PLAZA 303 177013TH STREET I 13th St PIaZe 63RD WATER TREATMENT CLARIFIER 075 B 63RD & THE DIAGONAL 63rd Water Treatment Clarifier 63RD WATER TREATMENT MAIN BUILDING 075 A 63RD 8 THE DIAGONAL 63rd Water Treatment Main Buildin 63RD WATER TREATMENT RAW WATER 075 C I 63RD & THE DIAGONAL 63rd Water Treatment Raw Water 751h WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (21) 094 A-U ', 4049 75TH STREET 75th Waste Water Treatment Plant Blda A r,DVENTURE PROGRAM STORAGE BUILDINGS 227A-0 ~, 5200 PEARL STREET Adventure Pro fefil StOfB e BUlldlfl S AIRPORT PARKING LOT 425 3300 AIRPORT RD AlfpOft Pafkiflq LOt AIRPORT PROPERTIES (21) 173 A-T 3300 AIRPORT ROAD ~ AIRPORT RUNWAY 8 TAXIWAYS (4100X75) &(4700X3 426 3300 AIRPORT RD I AIfpOrt RUnWaVS and TBxiwayS ANGEL PINES CLUB HOUSE 248 5706 ARAPAHOE AVE. Afl el Pines Clubhouse ANGEL PINES POOL I 519 5706 ARAPAHOE AVE Anpel Pines Pool ARAPAHOE RIDGE PICNIC SHELTER ~~ 218 ARAPAHOE & FOOTHILLS PKWY ATRIUM 162 1300 CANYON BLVD. AtfiUm BUlldln ATRIUM PARKING 415 1301 CANYON Atrium Parkina AXELSON I 159A-G ~ 6821 NORTH 55TH STREET AXEISOfI I AXELSON 11 160A-E 6559 NORTH 55TH STREET AX21SOf1 II AXELSON 111 205A-H MONARCH RD & 55th STREET ~ AX21SOf1 III BANDSHELL 35 I 1212 CANYON ! 68f1dSh211 BETASSO HYDRO ELECTRIC FACILITY 73 1094 BETASSO ROAD Betasso Hvdro Electric Facilitv BETASSO WATER TREATMENT 074A-C 1094 BETASSO ROAD Betasso Water Treatment BLUEBELL SHELTER 8 RESTROOM 045 A-B BLUEBELL CANYON Bluebell Shelter & Restroom BOMB DISPOSAL 8 STORAGE 771 N. 26TH STREET BOfllb DIS OS21 & StOfe e BOOTON TREATED WATER STORAGE TANK ; 508 LEE HILL ROAD Booton Treated Water Stora e Tank BOULDER DUSHANBE TEAHOUSE ~238 1770 13TH STREET Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse BOULDER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART 12 1750 13TH STREET Boulder Museum of Contemoorarv Art BOULDER RESERVOIR CONCESSIONS AND RESTROOMS , 063 A 5100 N. S1ST STREET Boulder Reservoir Concessions & Bath House BOULDER RESERVOIR GATE HOUSE 063 E I5100 N. 51ST STREET ' Boulder Reservoir Gate House BOULDER RESERVOIR GUARD HOUSE 063 B 'S100 N. 51ST STREET Boulder Reservoir Guard House BOULDER RESERVOIR MAINTENANCE BUILDING 063 D 5100 N. 51ST STREET Boulder Reservoir Maintenance Buildinp BOULDER RESERVOIR MARINA BUILDING 063 C 5100 N. 51ST STREET Boulder Reservoir Marina Buildinp BOUIDER RESERVOIR SECURITY BU~LDING 063 F 5100 N. 51ST STREET Boulder Reservoir Securi BUlidlfl BOULDER VALLEY RANCH ~120A-I 3415 LONGHORN DR Boulder Vallev Ranch BOULDER VALLEY RANCH PARTY BARN (SILVER NICKEL) 41 3700 LONGHORN DR BUCKINGHAM CAMPGROUND RESTROOM 229 ABOVE ELDORA '~~ BUCklfl ham Cam round Restroom 1 Appendix 3 City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Facility I Facility Name ' Number Address Hyperlink Shortcut BUCKINGHAM PARK RESTROOM 50 LEFf HAND CANYON BUCkifl ham Park Restroom GAGID PARKING LOT k1 ~ 403 sTH a wn~NUT ' CAGID Parkino Lot #1 CAGID PARKING LOT it3 404 14TH & CANYON CAGID Parkin LOt #3 ~1775 14TH ST. CAGID Pefklflq LOt #4 CAGID PARKING LOT #4 ~405 _ CAGI~ PARKING LOT #5 I406 ~1745 14TH ST ~CAGID Parkina Lot #5 ~ 'CAGID Parkin LOt #7 CAGID PARKING LOT #7 ~~~407 ~'~ 15TH & PEARL CAGID PARKING LOT #8 408 BROADWAY & SPRUCE CAGID Parkinq Lot #8 CARNEGIE LIBRARY 13 1125 PINE -Ceffl@ql2 LibfBfV CATHEDRAL PARK RESTROOM 228 _ FLAGSTAFF ROAD _~thedral Park Restroom CHAUTAUQUA ACADEMIC HALL 32 900 BASELINE Chautauaua Academic Hall CHAUTAU~UAAUDITORIUM ,29 '~900BASELINE ~iChautauauaAuditorium CHAUTAUQUA DINING HALL 130 900 BASELINE Chautauqua Dininq Hall CHAUTAUQUA DWELLING 31 9008ASELINE ~ Chautauaua Dwellinq 236 ~~0 BASELINE CHAUTAUQUA PICNIC SHELTER Chautauaua Picnic Shelter _~_ CHAUTAUQUA RADIO SHACK '18 BY CHAUTAUQUA RESERVOIR ' Chautauaua Radio Shack CHAUTAUQUA RANGER WTTAGE 49 627 KINNIKINIC I Chautauqua Ranaer Cottaqe CHAUTAUQUA STONE ARBOR 235 900 BASELINE I ChBUteUqUB StO~B AfbOf CHAUTAUQUA TREATED WATER STORAGE TANK 1503 ~OLDENROD DRIVE ~CheUteU4U8 T~28ted WBte~ St0~8Q2 TBf1k _ CHAUTAUQUA TROLLEY STOP 1225 BASELME ROAD ~ Ch8Ut8UqUe Tf011@Y StOp CHEMICAL STORAGE BLDGS. Ot0 A-B 5066 PEARL STREET Chemical Storaae Buildlinp 124 A-L I66 SOUTH CHERRYVALE ROAD CherrWale Oqs Center'A~ CHERRYVALE OPS CTR (VAN VLEET) ` -~- - CHERRYVALE PUMP STATION 76 6050 BASELINE _ I Che~NVeIB PUrtip StetlOn COOT LAKE RESTROOM 230 COOT LAKE OFF 63RD I COOt L2k@ R@StfOOfTI COUNTY SEAT (MALL RESTROOM) 39 ~ 1305 PEARL ~ PBBfI S1 M811 RBStfOOfil CRIMINAL JUSTICE CENTER __ 215 1777 6TH STREET ~, Cfiminal JUStICB C2ntef DAIRY CENTER FOR THE ARTS '~216 I2590 WALNUT STREET D81 Center for the Arts DEVIL'S THUMB TREATED WATER STORAGE TANK 1504 HARDSCRABBLE DRIVE Devils Thumb Treated Water Stora e Tank DORAN HOMESTEAD (2) I209A-B ISOUTH BOULDER RD ~ ;EL DORADO SPRINGS DRIVE _~ DOUQhtY DBbekB~ DUflfl HOUS@ DOUGHTY-DEBAKAR-DUNN HOUSE ~ EAGLE HORSE BARN ~ ;227 NORTH 5157 STREET '~ EAST BOULDER SENIOR CENTER 055B 5660 SIOUX DRIVE , EaSt BOUId2r SeniOf Centef EAST BOULDER PLAY PAVILION 201 5610 SIOUX DR. ~ East Boulder Pla PeVlliOn EAST BOULDER RECREATION CENTER 055A ssso sioux ~ttive East Boulder Recreation Center _ EAST BOULDER RECREATION CENTER PARKING 424 '5660 SIOUX DRIVE East Boulder Recreation Center Parkina EBEN FINE RESTROOM ~37 205ARAPAHOE ~Ebefl FIf18 RBStfOOfil EBEN FINE SHELTER ~~ ~36 2Q5 ARAPAHOE ~ Eb2f1 FIf12 Sh81t0i _ _ ECHO HOUSE 249 929 MARINE 'i EChO HOUSB 2 Appendix 3 t~ i! 1~ !~ [! 1 I t ~ 1 l t 1 t~ !! E ~ f 1 ! ~ ! ~ 1~ t i~ I!~ r~ ~~ r~ r~ ~~ r~~~ r~ r r t~ ~~ f ~ r~~~ t ~ t~ t i[ i ~ r City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Facility Name Facility ~ ~ Number Address ' Hyperlink Shortcut ELLISON PROPERTY (FIRE CACHE) 148A-D 6003 NORTH 51ST STREET Ellison Propertv FELL GARAGE 211A-8 VALMONT & 76TH STREET Fell Garaae FIRE STATION #1 PARKING 419 ' 2441 13TH STREET Fire Station #1 Parkin FIRE STATION #2 PARKING 420 2225 BASELINE Fire Station #2 Parkin FIRE STATION #3 PARKING 421 1585 30TH STREET : FI~2 StBtlOf1 #3 Pefklflq FIRE STATION #5 PARKING 422 4365 19TH STREET Fire Station #5 oarkinq FIRE STATION #6 PARKING 423 ~5145 N. 63RD STREET Fire Station #6 Parkin FIRE STATION NO. 1(MAIN) 20 ~ 2441 73TH STREET Fire Station #1 FIRE STATION NO. 2(BASELINE) ; 19 2225 BASELINE ROAD Fire Station #2 FIRE STATION NO. 3(30TH) 21 1585 30TH STREET Fire Station #3 FIRE STATION NO. 4(TOEDTLI) 22 4100 DARLEY Fire Station #4 FIRE STATION NO. 5 24 4365 19TH STREET ' FI~E StBtlOll #5 FIRE STATION NO. 6 23 5145 N. 63RD STREET Fif2 StatlOn #6 FIRE STATION NO. 7 24 i 1380 55TH STREET Flfe StatiO~ #7 FIRE TRAINING CENTER 168 970 LEE HILL ROAD Fire Trainin Center FLAGSTAFF AMPHITHEATER @ STONE SHELTER 305 FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT Flaastaff Ampitheater at the Stone Shelter FLAGSTAFF AMPHITHEATER (SUNRISE CIRCLE) 1304 FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT FI8 staff Am itheater at Sunrise Circle FLAGSTAFF HALFWAV HOUSE 48 FLAGSTAFF ROAD FIe taff Haliwa HOUSe FLAGSTAFF J.C. (WOOD) SHELTER 46 FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT f FLAGSTAFF MAINTENANCE RESTROOM 051 B , FIAGSTAFF ROAD Fla staff Maintenance Restroom FLAGSTAFF MAINTENANCE SHED 051 C FLAGSTAFF ROAD FIe staff Maintenance Shed PLAGSTAFF MAINTENANCE SHOP ~, 051 A FLAGSTAFF ROAD FIe taff Maintenance Shed FLAGSTAFF PARKING FEE STATION 199 I FLAGSTAFF ROAD AT PANORAMA PT. FI8 S~Bff Pefkifl Fee Station FLAGSTAFF STONE RESTROOM 57 FLAGSTAFF RD. NEAR HALFWAY HOUSE , FLAGSTAFF STONE SHELTER 47 ' FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT (NATURE) CENTER 22P FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT FIe staff Summit Nature Center FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT RESTROOMS (2) ; 191 A-B FLAGSTAFF SUMMIT FI8 taff Summit Restrooms FLATIRONS MAINTENANCE SHOP 69 5706 ARAPAHOE Flatirons Maintenance Sho FLATIRONS PARKING 437 5706 ARAPAHOE AVE. FIBtI~Of1S GOIf COUfSe Pefkifl FLATIRONS PRO SHOP - CART CHARGING 68 5706 ARAPAHOE Flatirons Pro Sho FLATIRONS PUMP HOUSE 71 5706 ARAPAHOE FletlfOflS PUfil HOUS2 FLATIRONS STORAGE/OFFICE 72 5706 ARAPAHOE Flatirons Stora E& OfflCe FLEET SERVICE CENTER 115 5064 PEARL STREET Fteet Service Center FOOTHILLS NATURE CENTER ' 145A-D 4201 NORTH BROADWAY Foothills Nature Center FOOTHILLS PARK MAINTENANCE SHOP 250 800 CHERRY AVE Foothills Park Maintenance Shoo FORESBERG OFFICES 247 7315 RED DEER DRIVE Foresberp O~ces fORESTRY COMPLEX 52 5300 PEARL STREET FOfBSt COfil I8X GEBHARDT LOAFING SHED 224 NORTH CHERRYVALE ROAD '~ Gebhard Loafina Shed GREEN MOUNTAIN LODGE 044 A OFF FLAGSTAFF ROAD iGreen Mountain Lod e 3 Appendix 3 City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Facility Name I Facility Number Address Hyperlink Shortcut _ _ GREEN MOUNTAIN RESTROOM 044 B OfF FLAGSTAFF ROAD Green Mountain Restroom GREGORY CANYON RESTROOM 229 GREGORY CANYON Greaorv Canvon Restroom GUNBARREL RADIO SHACK 17 GUNBARREL HILL Gunbarrel Radio Shack GUNBARREL TREATED WATER STORAGE TANK 507 BOULDERADO DRIVE Gunbarrel Treated Water Storaqe Tank HARBECK - BERGHEIM HOUSE 58 ~2os EuCUG Harbeck Ber h8ifll HOUSE HARF HOMESTEAD ~ 153A-E 100 S. CHERRYVALE RD. HARLOW PLATTS PARKING (40 SPACES) ~434 'I 1580 GILLASPIE Harlow Platts Parkinq HARLOW PLATTS SUN SHELTER 217 B '~, VIELE LAKE HARLOW PLATTS WARMtNG HUT 217 A '~ VIELE LAKE Harlow Platts Warminq Hut HOGAN PROPERTY 143A-G 7226 S. CHERRYVALE ROAD Hoqan Propertv IBM IRRIGATION PUMP BUILDING ~~240E ~ ~N. 63RD STREET & DIAGONAL AVENUE IBM Irriqation Pump Buildinq IBM RECREATION BUILDING 1240A ~,N. 63RD STREET 8 DIAGONAL AVENUE IBM Recreation Buildinq IBM STORAGE BUILDINGS ~240C-D IN. 63RD STREET 8 DIAGONAL AVENUE IBM StO~e B BUlldlfl S IBM WAREHOUSE BUILDING 2408 IN. 63RD STREET & DIAGONAL AVENUE IBM Warehouse Buildinq IBM WASTEWATER LIFT STATION I509 DIAGONAL HIGHWAY IBM WeSt2Wet2f LITt StatlOn IRIS CENTER I4 3t98 BROADWAY IfiS C2ntBf IRIS CENTER PARKING 427 3198 BROADWAY Iris Center Parkinq IRIS PUMP STATION 83 3575 IRIS AVENUE Iris Pump Station JOHNSON PROPERTY 206A-D 6430 NORTH 55TH STREET JOhfISOn PfOpeftV KAUFMAN BARN 8 MiLK SHED 223A-B JAY ROAD & 75TH STREET _ __- Kaufman Barn and Milk Shed ___ _..___ -- ___ _ KNAUS PROPERTY ~'~,161A-E 8696 LOOKOUT RD Knaus Prooertv KOHLER RES. PUMP STATION / HYDROELEC. PLANT 078 A-B 1901 DARTMOUTH AVE. KOhIBr ReS PUmD StatlOn & HVdrOeleCtfiC Plant KOHLER TREATED WATER STORAGE TANK 506 DARTMOUTH AVE. KOhle~ Tf@8t@d WBtef StOfe e Plant KOLB FAGLITY 1154A-E 3986 NORTH 75TH STREET KOIb FeCIfIN LA ESTRELLITA (PATIO ONLY) '302 1740 BROADWAY __ L8 EStfBlll~B P8t10 __ LAESER HOUSE 8 GARAGE i014A-B 1117 PINE Laeser House & Gara 2 LAKEWOOD GARAGE ~084 B IN E. OF NEDERLAND _ LekBWOOd G8f8Q8 LAKEWOOD HOUSE 084 A , N.E. OF NEDERLAND Lakewood House LAKEWOOD PUMP HOUSE ~084 C ~N.E. OF NEDERLAND Lakewood Pumo House LAND MANAGEMENT CENTER ~ 137 A-C 1405 S. FOOTHILLS HIGHWAY Land Mana ement Center LATH SHED 64 ''~5300 PEARL ST. , Leth Sh@d LEWIS PROPERTY 169A-J 1195 NORTH 75TH STREET LBWIS Pf0 ert LIBRARY / MUNICIPAL BLDG. PARKING 409 10TH & CANYON Librarv & Municipal Parkinq LOUESBERG BARN 222 JAY ROAD 8 NORTH 51ST STREET i Louesbera Barn MAIN LIBRARY (NEW) 009 B 1000 CANYON BLVD __ ' M81l1 LIbfBN N@w __ MAIN LIBRARY (OLD) 0.375 1000 CANYON BLVD __ MAIN LIBRARY SOUTH PARKING 410 11TH & ARAPAHOE Main LibfaN SOUth Pafklnq _ __ MAIN LIBRARY WEST PARKING 413 9TH & CANYON ,Maln LlbfafV WeSt Pafkinq _ MAINTENANCE BLDG. PARKING ~416 1720 13TH STREET '~ M8if1tef18f1C@ BUlldlfl Pe~kin 4 Appendix 3 t~ l I 1 1 !! 1 1 {! i~ 1 1 1/ l 1 {~ t~ 1~ t~ { I i~ (! f I ~ 1 i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ f ~ ~ ~ r 1 f ~ r ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ i r ~ r ~ r ~ ~ ~ r ~ [ t i i City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Facility Name Facility Number Address Hyperlink Shortcut MAINTENANCE BUILDING 7 1720 13TH STREET M8if1Y2f18f1C@ BUIIdI1lO MALL POP JET FOUNTAIN 520 ' 14TH B PEARL Pearl St Mall Poo Jet Fountain MAPLETON BALLFIELD PARKING - 50 SPACES 1435 2900 MAPLETON AVE Ma~leton Balifield Parkina MAPLETON BALLFIELD STRUCTURES 056 A-B 2900 MAPLETON Ma leton Ballfield Structures MAPLETON BALLFIELDS (3) 517 30TH & MAPLETON Maoleton Ballfields MARSHALL LANDFILL GROUNDWATER TREATMENT ~, PLANT '82 1600 SOUTH 66TH STREET ' M8fSh811 Letldflll GfOU~d Wet2~ Tf20tf1lBflt PlBflt MARTIN PARK SHELTER 34 3264 EASTMAN Martin Park Shelter MATERIALS STORAGE SHED 234 5050 PEARL STREET Materials Storaae Shed MAXWELL RESERVOIR PUMP STATION / HYDROELECTRIC PLANT i 77 ' 3715 WONDERLAND HILL DRIVE ' I MBXWEII R2S8NOIf PURI Station 8 H droelectric Plant MAXWELL TREATED WATER STORAGE TANK '' 505 LINDEN AVE. & WONDERLAND HILL ' MeXW211 Tf@8t2d WetOf StOf80e Te(lk McGILVARY CABIN & OUTHOUSE 213A-B TOWHEE 8 SHADOW CANYON TRAILS MEADOWS BRANCH LIBRARY 15 4800 BASELINE ROAD Meadows Branch Librarv MESA RESERVOIR SHELTER 8 OUTHOUSE 232 MESA RESERVOIR Mesa Reservoir Shelter & Outhouse MUNICIPAL BUILDING ~,1 1777 BROADWAY Municioal Buildinp MUNICIPAL PLAZA 306 '~~ 1100 CANYON BLVD Municioal Plaza MUNICIPAL SERVICE CENTER'A' 2 5050 PEARL STREET MUf11Cl al Service Center Bld A MUNICIPAL SERVICE CENTER'B' 003A-C 5050 PEARL STREET MU~ICI al Service Center Bld B MUNICIPAL SERVICES CARWASH 195 5050 PEARL STREET Municioal Services Carvvash MUSTARDS RESTAURANT 172 ~ 171g BROADWAY Mustards Last Stand NEW BRITAIN 8 1101 ARAPAHOE AVE. N2W Bflt81f1 NEW BRITAIN PARKING 411 1101 ARAPAHOE : New Britain Parkin NEW PARKS SHOP 42 5200 PEARL STREET N2W PBfkS ShOD NEW PARKS SHOP PARKING 433 A-B 5200 PEARL STREET New Parks Sho Parkin NORTH BOULDER PARK SHELTER / RESTROOM 33 ; 800 DELLWOOD North Boulder Park Shelter & Restroom NORTH BOULDER RECREATION CENTER 54 3170 BROADWAY North Boulder Recreation Center NORTH BOULDER RECREATION CENTER PARKING 428 3170 BROADWAY North Boulder Recreation Center Parkin ORDELL HYDROELECTRIC PLANT 81 38000 BOULDER CANYON Ordell Hvdroelectric Plant PARK CENTRAL ~, 6 ~ 1739 BROADWAY ' Pefk CBflt~81 Bld PARK CENTRAL PARKING 412 BROADWAY 8 ARAPAHOE Park Central Parkinq PARKSIDE PICNIC PAVILION 202 3529 FOLSOM Parkside Picnic Pavilion PEARL STREET PARKING STRUCTURE / POLICE i ANNEX - DOWNTOWN 247 1500 PEARL STREET Pearl St Parkin Structure 8 Police Annex PIONEER CEMETERY ! 301 9TH & PLEASANT Pioneer Cemetarv PLEASANT VIEW MAINTENANCE SHED 239B ~380547TH STREET Pleasant View Maintenance Shed PLEASANT VIEW RESTROOMS 239A '380547TH STREET Pleasant View Restrooms PLEASANT VIEW SOCCER FIELDS 518 JAY ROAD Pleasant View Soccer Fields POLICE ANNEX- CROSSROADS 244 28TH STREET 5 Appendix 3 City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Facility Facility Name ~ Number II ~~246 POLICE ANNEX-NORTH BOULDER Address Hyperlink Shortcut NORTH BROADWAY Police Annex North Boulder _ POLICE ANNEX - SAN JUAN '~ 245 SAN JUAN DEL CENTRO - VALMONT RD. I POLICE ANNEX - UNI HILL ~233 13TH STREET I POIICB Af1f1eX Ufllv@fSItV HIII POTTERY LAB (OLD F~RE STATION) 60 ~o~o nUROFtn '~, Potterv Lab _ PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE HOUSE 510 1ST 8 PEARL STREET 'i PfeSSUfe RBdUCinq VaIVe HOSe PRIVATE RESIDENCE 2774SF 8 700SF BARN (SOLD IN 2000) 237 A-B ' 2455 SUMAC AVENUE ~ PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 016A-B 1805 33RD STREET ' I Public SafeN Buildinq PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING PARKING 418 1805 33RD STREET ~PUbIiC Saf2tV BUlldlnq Parklnq RANDOLPH CENTER - CAGID LOT #2 ' 166 ian N. BROnownv Randoioh Center CAGID Lot #2 REYNOLDS BRANCH LIBRARY 11A 3595 TABLE MESA DRIVE Revnolds Branch Librarv REYNOLDS LIBRARY PARKING 417 3595 TABLE MESA DR. RBYf101dS Llb~erY PBfkiflp ROLLING ROCK OUTBUILDINGS 210A-B ROLLING ROCK ______ RTD STRUCTURE - CAGID LOT #6 116 1400 WALNUT (PARKING ONLY) RTD Structure CAGID Lot #6 SALBERG PARK MAINTENANCE BLDG. 038 A 3045 19TH Salberq Park Maintenance Buildlinq SALBERG PARK MEETING HOUSE & PUBLIC RESTROOM 038 B , 3045 19TH '~ SALBERG PARK PARKING 432 3045 19TH STREET I S81b8fq Pefk Pe~klflq _ SALBERG PARK SHELTER 03B C 3045 19TH i Salberq Park Shelter SAM'S PUMP HOUSE 147 : 799 S. CHERRYVALE RD~ SAWHILL POND RESTROOM 231 'NORTH 75TH STREET Sawhill POnd ReStrOOm SCHNEIDER PROPERTY 149A-C '5881 NORTH FOOTHILLS HWY SChnBid@f PfOp2ftV __ SCOTT CARPENTER ATHLETICS OFFICE 061 E i30T ~A&H PAHOE _ SCOt~ CBfpQll~2f A~hIB~ICS ONICB SCOTT CARPENTER ATHLETICS SHED 061 P I30TH & ARAPAHOE Scott Carqenter Athletics Shed SCOTT CARPENTER BALLFIELD ~~ 513 I30TH 8 ARAPAHOE Scott Carpenter Ballfield SCOTT CARPENTER PARK BATH HOUSE -061 A 30TH & ARAPAHOE ~i SCOtt CBfpB(1tB~ Pe~k Beth HOUSB _ SCOTT CARPENTER PARK FILTER BUILDING '061 B 30TH & ARAPAHOE Scott Carpenter Park Filter Buildinq SCOTT CARPENTER PARKING '~429 30TH & ARAPAHOE I Scott Caroenter Parkinq SCOTT CARPENTER PLAY PAVILLION I061 G 30TH & ARAPAHOE Scott Car enter Pla PeVllllOfl SCOTT CARPENTER POOL 512 30TH & ARAPAHOE Scott Caroenter Pool SCOTT CARPENTER PRESS BOX 061 H 30TH & ARAPAHOE SCOtt CO~p@flt@f PfBSS BOX _ SCOTT CARPENTER SKATE PARK 515 30TH & ARAPAHOE Scott Carpenter Skate Park SIWERLAKEBUILDINGS OSSA-E ISIWERLAKE ~I SIIVBfLek2BUlldlflq5 SINGLE FAMILY HOME 194 i 1888 VIOLET _ ~ FSinqle Famiiv Home __ __ SOUTH BOULDER OUTDOOR STORAGE BLDG. I219 1350 GILIASPIE '~ _ SOUTH BOULDER RECREATION CENTER ~ 53A 1350 GILLASPIE '~ SOUth BOUIdEf RBC C2flt2~ SOUTH BOULDER RECREATION CENTER PARKING 3a o ,~350 ~i~uaSPie ~South Boulder Rec Center Parkinq SPICER HOUSE 152 i7763 BASELINE ROAD SDICef HOUSE ~ SPICER OUTBLDG 139 ~~7763 BASELINE ROAD ~ S icer Out Buildin 6 Appendix 3 1 ~ f 1 f, 1 i 1! f I 1~ 1~ t f i 1 !! 1 i !~ !! 1! t~ 1 1 l i f 1 ~ t~ i~ ~~ ~~ r~ t~~ ~ r i r ~ r~ t~ r i~~ r~ s ~ t~~~[ ~ City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Facility Name Facility Number I Address Hyperlink Shortcut SPRUCE POOL 514 2102 SPRUCE STREET '• SDfUCB POOI SPRUCE POOL BATH HOUSE / FILTER ROOM 62 ~2102 SPRUCE STREET ~SqNC2 POOI BBth HOUSe & Filt2f ROOm SPRUCE POOL PARKING 431 2102 SPRUCE STREET ; S ruce Pool Parkin SPRUCE STRUCTURE - CAGID LOT #9 119 2033 11TH STREET & 1102 SPRUCE ~ SpfUCB StfUCtUfE CAGID LOt #9 STAZIO BALLFIELD RESTROOMS & CONCESSIONS 059 A-C 12445 STAZIO DRIVE Stazio Balifields Restrooms & Concessions STAZIO BALLFIELD TENSILE CANOPY 059E '~2445 STAZIO DRIVE iStazio Balifield Tensile Canopv STAZIO BALLFIELDS & MAINTENANCE PARKING '~, LOTS - 300 SPACE 1436 2aa5 S7nzio oRive ~ Stazio Ballfields & Maintenance Parkin LOtS STAZIO BALLFIELDS (7) 'S16 2445 STAZIO DRIVE '~ SteZlO 8811f1@IdS STAZIO BALLFIELDS MAINTENANCE BUILDING ~059D ,2445 STAZIO DRIVE STENGAL BARN 166 4038 EL DORADO SPRINGS DR. ' STOCKTON CABIN 1 214 SHADOW CANYON ~ SUITTS PROPERTY 207A-C '~ NORTH CHERRYVALE RD '~ SUIttS PfODEftV SUNSHINE HYDROELECTRIC PLANT ' 80 '~451 SUNSHINE CANYON ISunshine Hvdroelectric Plant SUNSHINE SHELTER HOUSE ~~i 144 ~SUNSHINE CANYON ~, $Uf15hIf1B $h81fBf HOUSB TANTRA PARK SHOP 0 4 ~,585 TANTR4 DR. 'TBfltfe PBfk ShOD TELLER FARM 1 156 '9000 VALMONT Teller Farm THE EDGE (CHINOOK CLUBHOUSE) 27 i 1301 ARAPAHOE AVE. ' ThB Ed B Chinook Clubhouse THE MEETING PLACE 163 iCROSSROADS MALL TRAIN AT CENTRAL PARK 511 IBROADWAY & CANYON Train at Central Park UHGID PARKING LOT #1095 402 I 1095 14TH ST. j UHGID Pefklfl LOt #1095 UHGID PARKING LOT #1205 401 I 1205 PLEASANT ST. I UHGID Pafkinq LOt #1205 UTEINDUSTRIALPROPERTY 208 i 255975THSTREET ',UtelndustrialProoertv VALMONT STORAGE BLDG. 243 5325 VALMONT RD. ; V81RlOflf SfOfB 8 BUlldlfl VARRA PROPERTY 212 SOUTH 63RD STREET ~ VIELE PROPERTY 155A-E ~ 3 S. CHERRWALE RD. ~ WATT- WEBB PROPERTY 151A-C 8395 BASELINE ROAD ' Wetf Webb PfOD@!tV WEST SENIOR CENTER PARKING 414 909 ARAPAHOE West Senior Center Parkinp WEST SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 25 909 ARAPAHOE West Senior Citizen Center WEST VARRA CONCRETE BLDG 157 HWY 93 West Varra Concrete Buildino YOUTH SERVICE CENTER 026 A-B 2160 SPRUCE ~ YOUth S@NIC@ C8flt2f 7 Appendix 3 ~ .. e. CUSTODIAL TASK LIST r Lobbies Se rvices to be performed daily M ^ Containers for waste materials will be emptied and refuse taken to disposal ~ including outside entryway containers ^ All open surfaces of furniture will be damp wiped clean '~ ^ Magazines will be neatly arranged +~ ^ Fingerprints will be removed from moving enhyway glass and partition glass ' ^ Tile floors will be dust mopped to remove dirt r ^ Tile floors will be wet mopped ^ Carpeting will be vacuumed "~ ^ Upholstered chairs will be vacuumed .~ ^ Exterior entrance doors will be secured " GeneralOffice w Areas/ Bookshelf Areas Services to be performed daily " ^ Containers for waste materials will be emptied and refuse taken to disposal ,,, ^ Special attention will be made to remove soda spills and rings on tables ^ Remove fingerprints and smudge marks from all interior door and partition ~ glass ~„ ^ Police areas around trees and plants to remove dead leaves ^ Tile floors will be dust mopped to remove dirt ~ ^ Tile floors will be wet mopped ~ ^ Open azea of carpeting will be vacuumed ^ Lights will be turned off as directed w. ^ Doors will be secured upon completion of our work ~ Se rvices to be performed weekly ,,,, ^ Light fixtures will be high dusted ^ All open surfaces of desk tops, furniture, window ledges, two-drawer filing ~ cabinets, counters and other 30" high horizontal surfaces will be damp ~ dusted ^ Upholstered chairs will be vacuumed as needed vr ~ Services to be performed every three months ^ Bookshelves will be high dusted ~Yr Conference Rooms Services to be performed daily ~ ^ Containers for waste materials will be emptied and refuse taken to disposal '~"r ^ Conference tables will be wiped down and disinfected. ^ Upholstered chairs will be vacuumed as needed "~ o Chairs will be low dusted and neatly arranged .~ ^ Carpeting will be vacuumed ^ Remove fingerprints and smudge marks from all interior glass "~ ^ Lights will be tumed off as directed r ^ Doors will be secured upon wmpletion of our work r, ~ ~ Appendix 5 CUSTODIAL TASK LIST Services to be performed weekly ^ All open surfaces of desk tops, furniture, window ledges, two-drawer filing cabinets, counters and other 30" high horizontal surfaces will be damp dusted Auditorium Services to be performed daily ^ Police aisles to remove debris ^ Carpeted areas will be spot vacuumed as needed ^ Stage areas will be dust mopped as needed ^ Stage areas will be spot mopped as needed Services to be performed weekly ^ All open horizontal surfaces of will be high dusted ^ Chairs and miscellaneous items will be high & low dusted ^ Carpeting will be vacuumed thoroughly Kitchen-Break Services to be performed daily ^ Containers for waste materials will be emptied and the refuse taken to place of disposal ^ Start dishwasher when dishes and detergent are loaded. ^ Sinks will be cleaned, disinfected and scoured so there will be no hard water deposits ^ Microwaves will be cleaned inside and out ^ Drinking fountains will be cleaned and disinfected ^ Tabletops will be cleaned, disinfected and soda rings removed ^ Chairs will be low dusted and neatly arranged ^ Floor will be dust mopped to remove dirt ^ Floors will be wet mopped ^ Open area of carpeting will be vacuumed Services to be performed weekly ^ Vending machines will be damp wiped clean Services to be performed every three months ^ Clean and disinfect refrigerators. Services to be performed as needed ^ Walls around trash cans, light switches and fronts of counters and cupboards will be cleaned to remove all drips, spills and fingerprints. Corridors Services to be performed dally ^ Drinking fountains will be cleaned and disinfected ^ Carpeting will be vacuumed 2 ~ Appendix 5 `~ • r r r .. CUSTODIAL TASK LIST ~ ~ Stairways Services to be performed daily ^ Police stairways to remove debris ~ ^ Hard surface floors will be dust mopped to remove dirt ^ Hard surface floors will be wet mopped as needed ^ o Carpeting will be vacuumed as needed +~ ^ Clean and disinfect door hardware and push plates. "` Services to be performed weekly .~ ^ Sweep all stairways corner to corner ^ Metal/Wood handrails will be damp wiped '! ^ Carpeting will be vacuumed thoroughly ~ Elevators Services to be performed daily "` ^ Elevator doors and panels will be damp wiped ., ^ Clean and disinfect push button panels ^ Carpeting will be vacuumed ~ ,., Services to be performed weekly ^ Elevator tracks will be cleaned and vacuumed *~ ^ Fingerprints and smudges will be cleaned from all surfaces r Restrooms Se rvices to be performed daiiy .. ^ Containers for waste materials will be emptied and refuse taken to disposal ~ ^ Minors will be cleaned and polished ^ Sinks will be cleaned and disinfected ~ ^ Countertops will be cleaned and disinfected ^ Surfaces of toilets and urinals will be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected " ^ Bright work will be cleaned and polished ,,., ^ Surfaces of showers will be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected ^ Tile floors will be swept " ^ Tile floors will be wet mopped and disinfected _ ^ Dispensing units such as towel, facial tissue, toilet tissue and soap containers will be refilled from your stock 'F" ^ Wipe down and disinfect doors, light switches, and handles. ^ All repair items and requests for supplies will be reported by the Quality ~ Control Manager r ~ Services to be performed weekly ^ Low dust all horizontal surfaces to hand height; including sills, molding, "~ ledges, shelves, frames, ducts and heating outlets ^ High dust above hand height; including sills, molding, ledges, shelves, "~ frames, ducts, and heating ouUets ~ ^ Dispensers will be cleaned ^ Remove fingerprints from doors, frames, light switches, kick and push '" plates, handles, etc. r w. ~ ~ .. Appendix 5 M ` CUSTODIAL TASK LIST ~w Services to be performed every 2 weeks ^ Tile walls will be damp wiped ~ ^ Partitions will be cleaned and disinfected ~ Services to be performed every three months ~ ^ Corners and edges will be detailed ~+ ^ Clean and dust HVAC vents ~ All Areas Services to be performed daily ~ ^ Carpeted areas will be spot cleaned as needed ^ Cardboard left at main garbage disposal area will be broken down and ~ recycling taken to appropriate disposal r o Upholsteted chairs will be vacuumed as needed ^ Walls will be spot cleaned as needed ~ ^ Restock paper products as required. ~.e Services to be performed weekly A ^ All open surfaces of window ledges, tops of partitions, tops of four-drawer ~ filing cabinets, tops of picture frames will be high dusted ^ Chairs and miscellaneous items will be high & low dusted ~II ^ Vinyl furniture will be damp wiped clean as needed ~„ ^ All carpeted areas will be vacuumed thoroughly a Hard surface floors will be dust mopped .~ ^ Hard surface floors will be wet mopped ~ ^ Recyclable containers will be emptied and refuse taken to appropriate disposal r~ Services to be performed monthly ~ o Remove fingerprints from doors, frames and light switches ~ ^ Venetian blinds will be dusted r Services to be performed every three months ~ ^ Edge and detail corners of carpet ^ Edge and detail comers of tile "° ~ r ~ r ~ MA ~ 4 Appendix 5 ~ A r ., r " KEY DEFINITIONS ALPHABETIZED r ~ ALTERATIONS Changes to the interior arrangement or other physical characteristics of an existing facility or " installed equipment so that it can be used more eFfectively for its cuttently designated purpose or adapted to a new use. Alterations may include work referred to as improvement, conversion, ~ remodeling and modernization. r BACKLOG '~' An accumulation of uncorrected or deferred deficiencies that represents a liability (in both ~ physical and financial terms) for a facility. These items include: maintenance deficiencies, equipment or systems overdue for replacement, regulatory non-compliance deficiencies, etc. "^ Note: Future maintenance items, planned replacements, and efficiency improvements are not .- part of the backlog. " BUILDING MAINTENANCE .. Work needed to preserve or restore building components to allow continued use. This definition encompasses any actions intended to prevent failure or inefficient operation as well as those '"' intended to wrrect (either through repair or replacement) failures or inefficiencies once they ", occur. It also includes housekeeping and custodial work. '"" CONDITION ASSESSMENT ,,, The practice of inspecting facilities to identify deficiencies or conditions requiring correction, renewal, or replacement. Scheduled inspections are also done as part of routine preventive +r maintenance. Condition assessments may be done for: ~ L Identifying deficiencies and preventive maintenance needs. 2. Facility capital improvement plans or alterations. .. 3. Determination of the current replacement value (CRV) of a facility. ~ CURRENT REPLACEMENT VALUE (CR~ .. The CRV is computed by multiplying the current construction cost per square foot (SF) of the building times the gross square footage of the building. ~ ,., CRV = SF cost X SF ` The square foot cost for each building is assigned by the Facilities & Asset Management (FAM) ~ work group and is based on the actual construction costs paid during recent projects. If no recent projects of a representative type have been undertaken, FAM contacts private architectural firms "" and builders to determine the average constmction costs of a particular type of building. FAM ~,~ also contracts with professional real estate appraisers or insurance companies to determine the value of existing buildings. r Note: The CRV for existing buildings is determined using standard real estate valuation methods ~ for replacement of the building and does not include: demolition costs of existing structures, site 4 work and excavation, land, landscaping, parking, furnishings, phone and utility installation, or development fees. However, these items must be taken into account when estimating the '~ construction costs of new or replacement facilities. ~ f+ r ^ ~ Appendix 7 KEY DEFINITIONS ALPHABETIZED ~ _ A ~ DEFERRED MAINTENANCE ~ Work that must be postponed as a result of inadequate planning and/or funding. Examples include: roof replacement, HVAC system replacement, and window replacement. Deferred ~ maintenance items adds to the backlog of maintenance and repairs. ~ EMERGENCY WORK .r Unscheduled work requiring immediate attention and consists of correcting failures which constitute an immediate danger to personnel, security incident, or may likely cause property ~' damage. Among the more common emergency jobs are natural gas leaks, electricity outages, ~ loss of refrigerant, and water leaks. ~ ESSENTIAL FACILITY .~ A facility necessary to sustain the most basic core of city services, such as public health & safety, and/or comply with federal or state laws. ^ r FACILITY CONDITION INDEX (FCI) ~ FCI = Cost of Deficiencies / Current Replacement Value expressed as a percentage. ,~ HOUSEKEEPING wr Work performed on a repetitive basis to maintain the appearance of a facility and to keep it in ,,,,, compliance with Fire Safety codes in relation to storage of equipment, egress routes, electrical panel access, etc. w HVAC Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning. ~ LIFE-CYCLE COST (LCC) ANALYSIS ~ Review of the long term, or life-cycle, costs involved in maintaining building components and ~ renewing building components. Life-cycle analysis is an economic evaluation tool for choosing between alternative building investments and operating strategies over a given time period in ~ equivalent economic terms. w MAINTENANCE "'~ The upkeep of property and equipment, work necessary to realize the originally anticipated ~ useful life of a fixed asset. Maintenance includes periodic or occasional inspection; adjustment, lubrication, and cleani~g (non-janitorial) of equipment replacement of parts; painting; "' resurfacing; and other actions to assure continuing service and to prevent breakdowns. Maintenance does not prolong the design service life of the property or equipment, nor does it ~ add to the asseYs value. However, lack of maintenance can reduce an asseYs value by leading to ~' equipment breakdowns, premature failure of a building's subsystems, and shortening of the asseYs useful service lifetime. Types of maintenance include: ongoing maintenance, preventive A maintenance, and repairs. r ~ ~ r Appendix 7 ` ~ r ~ ~ *' KEY DEFINITIONS ALPHABETIZED ~ M MAJOR BUILDING RENOVATION Renovation of a building where the total combined area of any addition combined with the ~ remodeled azea of the existing building equals the original building area. This definition is used to define when the LEED-NC standard for building construction applies to renovated buildings. ~ For example: If a 12,000 SF building were to be renovated in total, it would meet the criteria for ~ renovation using the LEED-NC criteria. If 6,000 SF of the original building were to be renovated in combination with a 6,000 SF addition, it would also meet the criteria to be !` renovated using LEED-NC criteria. If 6,000 SF oFthe original building were to be renovated in ~ combination with a 5,000 SF addition, it would not meet the criteria to be renovated using LEED-NC criteria. ~ .-. ONGOING MAINTENANCE Non-repetitive, scheduled, non-emergency, routine maintenance. Examples include: painting, " replacing light bulbs, repairing roof leaks, replacing broken glass, graffiti removal, making minor .. adjustments such as door closers. Services provided in response to service calls by building occupants, but not emergencies. .. .,,,, OPERATIONS Include routine, non-maintenance activities necessary for a facility to be used by the public and ^~ tenants. Examples include: moving services, keys / access control, locking and unlocking ,,,, facilities, flag replacement, equipment repair, fire/security monitoring, phone/cable services. ~ PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE ~ Repetitive, scheduled, non-emergency, routine, recurring maintenance. An example is inspecting electrical generator units, recording performance, and making minor adjustments. REPAIRS (Also referred to as Corrective Maintenance) ~ Repairs are the actions necessary to restore non-functioning systems or components to normal ... operation by replacement of parts/materials that have deteriorated by action of the elements or usage. Repairs may be needed to respond to emergency situations or may be non-emergency in ~ nature. .. RENOVATION ` The replacement of 50°/a or more of a building system or component (lighting system, HVAC ~ Unit, Chiller, Emergency Generator, etc.). A renovation may include equipment overhaul or replacement of one or more components of a building system. Example would be overhaul or "' replacement of one HVAC unit. ,.~ REPLACEMENT "" The replacement of 100% of a building system (HVAC System, Roof Replacement, Emergency GeneratodControls/Distribution System). Replacement is normally scheduled when a system or ~ component reaches the end of its useful life. Example would be replacement of an HVAC ~ system including all HAVC units, chillers, and control systems. .~. r ^ Yr a ra Appendix 7 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Backlog Options ~~,ooo,ooo $6,000,000 $5,000,000 ~ $4,000,000 rn ~ Y V R m $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 ~- ~ ~ ,- ='" ~ - -- _ ~~ __ - _ ~-- - I _, -_ -- _ -_ , ~ - -- -- - __ .a ---- -_ __ . . . I __ . __- _ .. , ~ __ . .. . ~ . ~ ~~ . . .. .~ ~ . . . . ~ i ~ i 's . ; 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Year - Maximum Backlog Target Plan to Council August 2004I - Fiscally Constrained Plan I -Action Plan Gradual -Action Plan 2 Step Action Plan 1 Step 3 Appendix 8 1 D 0 E F G H I ~ ~ ~ 2005 Approvad Plan: August ZOOA StuOy Session 2 Sf31l2005 3 4 OCA Y004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 201D Lo end 5 6utlgai mueasetl by ~ ~~ translened 9 352235 $ 0 757 fi09 870 ~ 7 Irom352341. AOdltionalluneingul ~~ ~.,.,M,~ni . 58 S , S 7 3,8 0 $ 7a2870 5 742.870 S 742,870 S )42.870 ~ 70 ~ 352236 ~ e~~zryymym~ 8 341,000 5 391000 $ 3-ti,[lOn y 341WO S 741.000 5 341,000 $ 341,000 i t 352137 N c~aum S 312.604 $ 327.a46 $ 32t sa6 S 321 446 $ 321.446 $ 321,446 $ 32t 446 ~ ~'~y? °,~' ~~ BudgalreOuCedDy ~ ~.~ .~ ~ ~~ Iranslerredlo ~:' `; .' n 352235, Resrore ~~~ l0 3523at ~~ ~ x ~ '~ budgel for Mall Restroom loen AAdit~onal luntlmg 14 fi 3.52347. rna~~~c~ $ 993.764 S 861,308 g 1,203.J08 S 1,203,308 $ 1,203.708 0l~ .. ~~begnnmg ~. 15 7oWl GF (O10) f Y,779,940 S 274a,505 S 3,073,SD5 S 7,217.505 f 3,21),SOS S 3.]77,503 S 3.277.505 tfi 17 18 Nxre~«rna~n~ ~ 197,511 $ 203.848 $ 203.849 5 203848 S 203.848 $ 209,84& S 203,848 19 ~ ,_...,. . '. NaHO o~nyMam; $ 202,064 $ 2DE.126 $ 208,12fi S 108.776 S 208,126 $ 208.726 $ 208,126 ~0 ToteIP8R~118) f 399,975 E i7~,B70 f 417,97~ f 411,97I S <1t.971 S 471,974 S 411.974 21 ZZ GrendToWl' S 3,179,915 S 3,156,479 S 3,M5479 5 3,629478 S 3,629,179 S 3,679479 S 5629479 23 24 25 5 .,;3~2~ ~~ , $ 1.797,(i75 $ 1 Oti7.i56 5 ~ 223,156 S I,JG7,156 5 1 407,156 S 14~I,15fi $ 14p7156 Goallnuease0 ~ . ~ . ~ br FRR tor 26 27 2%CRV Goal for MM/FRBR $ 1,262,742 8 1.716,847 5 1,37fi,847 S 7 193.736 5 1.493.736 5 1,493,736 $ 1,493,736 Public Salely BMg. pilterence ~ . . ~ . ~ i ~ . , . . .. . 28 29 )0 E5limaled BacFing al End ol Vear § 3,265 170 S 3,574 861 $ 3.128,552 5 3,615 132' ~ ' Goal to kee backl B udl lo or 1855 Ihan 54M 31 Componenta af 7Y. GOAL 32 MM ~802.8(IB 802.809 802.809 802.809 802.809 802.809 Goal increasee ~ .~~ for FRR lor 73 i FR7iH 574,038 574,038 690 927 fi90.57.7 690,927 690.927 Publ~c Salely Blag 34 TOTAL 1,376,847 1,376.847 1.493.736 1,493,79fi 1 q93,736 1.493,736 35 36 MM Components Only 37 fAM~I710i 3B P&R~718) 544.SR6 253.223 54958fi 253223 549.,~'i86 253,223 Sa9,586 253223 549,586 253,223 599.586 253.223 39 TOTAL JO 802.809 602.809 802,809 802,809 802,809 802.809 91 P8R ONLY I 142 MMP8R1~781Goai 253,223 253,223 253,223 253 225 253223 253 223 43 MM P8R ~ I 18~ Auua~ '1(i.i,8~1tl 203848 20~ Wttl , 203,648 209,848 . 103.da8 46 ANNUAL UNDER FLINOE^ 45 6 06M Funding Sourres: sszz3s tcF~ iszz~7 ,cF~ 352233iP8Ri ~.U94.rlt, 1.139.442 1272p42 t.272442 1.177,442 t.272.4n2 ~.1;'.'d.i7 47 2.5°i, CRV Goal lor 08M g 1.195,444 S 1,220,289 $ 7 220.289 $ 1,220,289 $ 1.J20,li+v $ 1 220.289 S ~':.'U.289 48 DRlere~~ce ~.._ $ 52,153 $ 52.153 ~ d9 ~ 261% 261`90 50 S1 52 .TS,°~?ti`'T~§" ~.~x:~ . R`. S - 8 - S > ....F~st . :s5;:..~~ ~a4+4~: ~ S 5 '` 53 . _ -Atld~li~n t4 tut'URM S S i~. f - 5 5 $ S . S1 55 TOTAL Adtlilions 5 - $ ~ $ 173.OD0 S 184.000 $ - $ - 5 . 56 Adenional Annual Amounl NeeDeC to Meet Ga~ls ' ~ ~ ~ 57 56 No1es. 59 Operaiing Amoums an0 Goals ~n 2006 antl 9eyoM are m 2005 Dollars: NO CPI Increase fi0 GOAL Amuunis DO NOi include lanA Improvemems 61 Giantl Total'~ inclurle~ srs ~.6; omer FAM opeinliny OCAs ~fi2 - - 63' o~i-y~i ~I £'i~[i n[~i~ ~i ~~tt~ t.i L~;~tS 64 ' iw $1$6~ ppD in 20061a 363341 for Matl R04lroom Ioan :~` ~ --- 65 66 { 67 , addilinnal on-yulny furi~;~~iy ~I 55;13,l.lOp in?.Ollri fo 352L"u5 ~- 1Kldifiunaton.yoinyf~nyuin9~l51BG,UUUin2W7to.3523it ~~"%.E~'~''',~-"~-',~'.;'~`,~ atlditiun;~FOn-Guinu~~~~*:~1ui~1~F,.13K4F.c~yniiiinq-i2ii(171urpubLc38fe(yBWg.FHBR 60 69 70 Funtling Source Nores: 0.15 Cen1 Sales Tan ~GF ~ Sunsels at ihe EnA of 2024 71 0.38 Cent Sales 7;~~ ~GF ~ Sunseis at ihe End of 20~ t )2 ' 0 25 (;ent SaleS Tan PBRJ Sunsets al the Ena of 2015 AppanO~. 8- Backlog x~sVlan [o Councd Aug 04 Appentlix N ~ ~ ~ ~ w^i r ~ ~ ~ w~ r~^y ~ Nr ra ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A 6 C D E F G H I J K L M n 7 2005 Master Plan Upda[e - Piacally Constnined Plan 2 5I37/2005 3 q OCA 2000 7005 2006 I007 2008 2009 Y010 Y011 2012 2013 2071 Le end 5 Butlgei mcreased oy ~- ~.. . - vanslerrei7 g ~'~ 352335 .~,~,,,,~ $ 580,157 5 609,870 S 609.870 5 609.870 $ 609,870 5 609,870 $ 609.870 S 609,870 $ 609,8J0 S 609,870 $ 609,870 Irom352341. 10 ~;, 35').'23b ~. e~~.~y~nym~ $ 341.000 $ 341.000 5 3d1,000 S 341.000 $ 341.000 5 341,000 $ 3d1,000 $ 341.000 $ 341000 S 341,000 $ 341,000 77 ]51237 ~~~,.MM $ 312.604 S 321.446 5 321.446 $ 321,4d6 $ 327 44fi S 321.446 5 321,446 $ 321 A46 $ 32t 446 $ 321,446 $ 321,446 Bu4ge1 retlucea by .. ~~~~ ~ Irensferred tu ~ `-~ 352235 Resiwe - ~~~~"m352341~~~ ~ ~q . 3~,, $ 993764 f 863,308 S 1.019.309 S 1,019.308 $ i.013,308 E 1.079.308 $ 1,019,308 $ t,Ot9,308 $ 1.~19.308 $ 1.019,308 6u4getlorMaOfiestroomiaan, ~5 ~ Tolal GF(010~ S 2,7i9,94D S 4,744,505 f 2,900.505 S 2.900.505 f 2,900.505 S 2,900,505 f I,900,505 f 2,900.505 S 2,900,505 S 2,900,505 f 2,900,505 1fi 1~ 7g vaamr~,orrn„~~i S 197.9t1 S 203.848 $ 203.8d8 $ 203.848 5 203,848 $ 203.848 S 203.848 $ 203,848 $ 203,848 $ 203,848 S 203,848 7g - - .."~. psau ' S 202.064 5 208,126 $ 208.126 $ 208.12ti 5 208.126 $ 208.726 $ 208.12fi 5 208,126 $ 208,12fi $ 2Q8,126 S 208,126 _ __ _ Zp ~~ Tata1PSR ~718~ f 399,975 S 411,974 S 477,97/ S 4t1,974 5 l11.9'7d S 411,974 S 411,974 S 477,974 3 411,974 f 411,974 S 411.974 21 2z GrantlTaGl' f 7179,915 S 3,156,479 { 3177,479 S 3,3t2,479 S 3,112479 f 337P478 S 3,312C79 3 J~t7,479 S 3,313J79 f 3312479 S 3,312,479 23 24 ZS ' ~ fii'' ~ ~ 5 1,191.675 $ 1.~6~,156 $ 1.723.156 5 1223.156 i 1123.156 S 1,223.156 5 1,223.15fi 8 1223.756 $ ~,22:i.156 S 1,223.756 5 1223.156 ' ~ ' ' ' ~ Goal nc. eascKf . ~ ~ in FRR for Pubiic Salely Bitlg Goalincreased ~ ~ -= in FRR for Mam ~i~rary (New AOtliton~. Goal mcreased . ~ . ~ .. , . In FRR lor 2fi 4X CRV Goa1 tor MMIFRBR 1.2fi2 742 5 1,376.847 5 1,376.847 S 7~93 736 5 1 493736 S 1,493,776 5 1,493.736 S 1,553 485 S 1 687.131 S 7 747J95 5 1,747.795 EBCC 27 Di/ference .. . . . ~ .. ~ ~ -' ~ .. - . ~ . . .. 28 29 ~ .. ~ . . . ... ~ . . 30 Eslima[etl Backl a~ End of Year 5 3.2fi5170 E 3,574,861 I $ 3,728,552 "- ~~~ ~ ~ ~. ~' ~~ ' -~ '.', ~" '~' ~'- ~~~ ~. ~~ ~- Goai lo kee backl ual lo or less Ihan 54M 31 Compo~wnta at 2%GOAL 32 MM B02,B09 802,869 602.809 802.809 802,609 802.809 802.809 802.809 802,809 802.809 Goal increasetl ~~ ~- - . ~ . ~m FRR lor Public Safely Bldg. Goal increased .~. . I in FRR lor Main Library INew AdAnnn~ Goal inr.reasetl ~~,~ ~- in FRR for 33 FRBR 574,038 574,038 690.927 690927 690,927 690.927 690.927 756,433 823,OB7 823,097 EBCC. 34 TOTAL 1,376,847 1.376,847 149:473H 1493,736 1,493.736 7,493.756 1493736 1559.292 1.625,906 1,625,906 35 .. _ __ __. 36 MMComponentsOnly ` 37 FAM(O10) 545.S8ti Sd9.5Bfi 549,SB6 549.586 549.586 549.586 549,58fi 5~9,SBfi vt9,586 . 549.586 38 P8R(11B) 253,223 Z53,223 253223~ 253223 253223 253,323 253,~3 253,223 253.223 253,223 39 TOTAL 802.008 802.8~9 802,809 802809 802.809 802,809 802,809 802,809 802,809 802,809 40 I 41 P8R ONIV ~ ' 4P 43 MM PdR 17181 Goai MM V&R 11181 P.c'u21 ~ 253,223 2C384d ' ~ . 253,223 103,H48 253223 203.848 253,223 103,A48 253223 2C3 84P 253,223 fU"s tYlil 253223 203.648 253.223 203.848 253.223 203.BJ8 253,223 2U3,tl4B 44 ANNUAL UN~ER FUNDEO ' ~ ~ ~ 45 6 08M FunOing Sourc¢a: 354235IGF~ 352ti7 ~GF~ ~-~: 35223l1P&R7 5 ,094.625 S 1 1;75.a42 1,139442 1.139.34? 5 .139.443 $ .139492 S .139.442 S ,139.442 5 .139A12 5 139.442 S ,135.4a2 47 2.5%CRVGaalforOBM $ 1,195.dd4 $ 1220.289 $ 1,22o,289 5 1.2202fl9 5 t.220288 3 1.220,289 5 112D,269 S ~269.101 5 1.319,055 S t,919,865 $ 1~15,865 48 D~I/erence .' . . . . . .. . ~ ~ .. ~ 49 50 51 . ~ . , . . . . . . . . 52 $ - S - S - 3 - 5 - S - S - S ' S - S - 5 - i 53 .. ~ .. _.. T,M' - `-.: -,_:. . . ,,L• _ :., ~ ~ ~ $ 5 S $ _ S 5 S - $ , b _ S . S . ' 54 _ ,, TOTAL Adaitions $ . S . b - 3 - S - S - $ - $ - 5 - S ' S ' . 55 ~ 56 Atlditional Annual Amount Needed to Meet Goats ~ ~ ' ~ ~ '~~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ "' ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - -- 57 ~. 58 Notes: - ~ 59 Operaling Amounts and Goals m 2006 arM Beyontl ere in 20b5 Dolfars: NO CPI Incre ase - , 60 GOAI Amounls DO NOT Incl~da ~ana Improvements . . ~ '~~61 G~~indTUtal'~~inrlutless~x'b~olherFAMc,peralinyOCAs - ----~---~ ----- - -- -- --, 62 _ -. _. - . ~ . - , . ', 63 on-~oing muve of 51fi0 OG~ Ircin 2i)04 [0 2005 ~ . , I - . . I ba ~ae t~ss,t~ou's1 ~ m aszxt: ia C~5 addillonal un-goiny need of 411fi.e8& beyimm~g in 2007 tor PubU C Safety BWg fRBR _ ,_ - . - 66 adtldional on-yoing neeu of §65.506 beginning ~~n 2012 for Main L iMary - rcew additwn FRBR. __ . 67 addlllonai on-quiny neetl uf $66 ti5a oeyinning ~n 2013 tor EBCC FRBR -_ . 68 ' ' 69 Funtlfng Source Notes~. ., , , . . . ~ 70 D~SCe~ISaiesTas(GF~SunselsatiheEntlof2024 ._____ , -- - - ~7 -.~ ~.38 Ce~~ Saies Tax (Gf ~ Surisets at the En0 0/2611 ,.~~.-_..,~_~,._....,oeo~...,....,~~.,~a,.c..n.,~~n~c i _~ - i --- -- - -~ ~ V J K l M ry 2 ] 1005 Me~ler Vi~n ~ptlau -AC~lan Plan: Gretlu~l lncreau 51311]005 ~ aCA P 2005 I006 200t ZOOP 1009 2U10 1011 ]0f1 t013 1016 Le np S ~ ' ! I 8 Jy. -~•~setl by'~~ ~ ~an5lerrcd 9 tS ~~ 15-^ f~ - 13 1 Atltl~lionalNrul~iiy . nna~ato~ 1~ _ ~ .-•u~ . i.. w. S 584.15/ . ~.. .U Mam S ]41000 S fi09 B)o E ~1.~~~;i ~. 5 6]9,911 . :~i" 5 609.961 i 5 d]0,011 S 690,05! . .. . ~ ~'~.~. i= ~ . f >10.105 c ~ S 1]O,i51 . . ~ - ~ 5 150.199 ~ ~ S ))0,1d6 S I80,19] 'r~ T<li a~ ~ . 11 V in 1 S . . , , , . ;. ~ ~ ' .. ~~~. i ~ , I~ . : ~ir~,,:i ~! i. ~.;'.~ I> i.",..,.. ._..., . n 3 2&M S ~. ~. ._._ ..ii ._ i1~: _ .. i~.. • IS ~~~. .~ 4 ~,i . .:F ~ I~ . ... ~ ~' ~ ~ ~ 1 Fi.l] otluceUbV .. : a»feroJ4~ ~ "'S Peslo~o~ n :1S23A1 1 ~ ~ ~ t ~ y- InMeUresvo~nwan Mtlto.e Artang 14 . ~~i"iJ~ , ~i ~ § 9g~ /54 ( f 865 5t H t ~cy ~o ~ aMl Wlnr years 10 ~uaJ a 15 ~ . ~ , , ~ . i ' ; , g,5pg 5 1.084.8LB 3 1.150,{b8 S 1,216,QE8 5 1,38t.6R8 S +.saiaoe S 1,~12 ]BB S t.d18,366 S 1,S43.B(Y ~ 1F ~ ulal Gf (010~ S 2.)]9,BM +~.50. f ~ ~ S S!lo,55T 5 3.OOti.1/9 S ~,091,90G 3 3.>>~~,J]] S 1,263.060 3 3.3i9.68'/ ~ S ].e3d.lte S ].sty,5et S J,GO5,561 f~ ~8 ~ .„ ~~ .a.~~ S i9%91~ . 1 E 203,Hi5 3 201648 E 20].N4B 5 10lBdB 5 20J848 5 1036a0 S 20].618 b 203,818 5 103.84H 4 2~3&1B 9 ~ r . .. Q ~ ~~ N= i S 2020c< 6~ S IOB,t16 3 108126 E 20B 12e 5 10H ~26 5 10B t26 $ ~pB.i]6 S 20&,t7Fi $ 208,12fi $ 2q9.t26 S 2~~H 126 Z~ 21 TOla1P6R1118) f )68.9]5 S {11.91~ S ~11.9]{ S A11,9~1 S i11.87~ S ~11.91~ S /11.8T~ i ~11.911 3 ~11.9I~ f ~11.9~~ f 911.8]< zl Grana Total• 3 9,tI9.915 3 3,156,d]9 5 ],333.528 S 1,91B,151 f ],SOJ,180 { 3,589,M1 f ;.BIS.ON S 3,Tfi0,fi61 S J,Bd6.188 S 3.9]1,915 S 4,011.541 23 ~1 ~5 ~~ _ ,_ __,. ~ 5 t~9~5~/S 5 1~cl=Sn 5 ~2~:>>5fi $ ienai, S ~3S4J1o 5 I.nt9896 S iaeSni61 5 t.SSto5c 5 '.6~tibsti h GP]2~o ~b t.ai/Xh Gva~ increnseo ~ ~ ~~ in fRR lor i'vblic Selety 6Mg Goal innea.u~<I n FPR for Me~n Librdry ~New Auonun;~ 26 2. CRV Gwl br MNIFRBR 3 ~ 261.I4I S ~!/6 B4? 5 I i-rc Pa/ { 1,493,]~6 ) t nN) /J6 S ~.a95 /Jti 5 t J9.3 I36 S ~.SS3 ae5 f 1,681,1J1 f 1.1~I,]BS S /a! ]95 Go~ivK.easeJ ~~ ~~ ~~ifRPl~.~ EBCG 1/ Dnia~en.~ . ._ . .... . 5 0 18 N 2 00° ~ 30 E>ti~~ieli~J bai:kie n~ En~ of Y,~,; $ 3.265,1 ]0' S ~ Sia,A61' 4 ].~2P 552' S :i~i S5<~. [wTi ~c F W~ matel Se 31 Cempa~wnieofl;GGOAI 31 MM BO?.eOB 802.H~19 802609 e0~,B08 802,869 802.BW 8p2.B09 802,BAB eQ2869 801.908 G~uvlinc~uusetl ~ ~ ~~~fRkliv Pu~iir.5aletyBlily Gcw~ncreaseo in FRR liu Main LiMOry ~N~w A~J~luri i 37 FRBP. S1JO~P ~1.+~~'.~a 5 680.9]i ~ ti90,91/ 690,92/ n90.9[/ 69V92/ ]S6.<]7 8t1.091 P23.OB] Goai mcrau~a~ n~ ~kF ~~~ EBCC ]9 TOTAL 1]16B41 1.3i5 n.>> ~ i!e 1.493,]l6 149].I)6 1¢971;ifi i a91 ~-i~ ~',54.A~ 2ti We 1 62S,BOE l5 J6 NM Campomnu Oniy l/ ~AM~r~~~~, ,y.9.`vBG i9v~aUi .Se9Sb5 sf9S86 SC9S8ti ]4b4Rfi 5.15.SNti ~~9,SPti SA4~9fi SqP.~iBfi 'fA ]v P8R(118) TOTAL 253223 B02 B09 163223 802809 2532Z3 802 00A I53.2]3 807 809 251ZCd 2532i3 153R29 253,I23 253.227 253,Z27 nn , . . 802. 9 802809 P01,809 Ba2~A 842.809 802.809 Nxa ou~r d'1 MMF'8WIt1BIGua1 253.22J 2l3,2'<:i 2531'13 25312) 153 12J 153 229 2]] 223 253 223 ISJ 123 253 223 ~" A !.IA1:'hfi;i L11N HF (03&f9 F.19 20Jtld9 F19 . ~O:1BYN . 1U3.&ib . t()JBAA , ~.3.%IA , u.f1Y1A . M1NJ8 4 pNNIlA ~E UN~EC 4ti 6 08MF d g5ures, 1 f ~ 1'{ 'fdR~. I ~i 1.094d25 ~ II)Hda2 •!nA ~ IS 119!r,18J } 1,219,63U V ~ i S 1.1-f I~-- $ t1_ ;'+ ~.2]ullt 1299,B1P ~3iV.B65 ~] 2). CNV uoai ~or o&M S 1.1954J4 S '.22( 289 S 1 ~~n 2tl9 b :H ~.11U [tl9 S 1 22U.28B 5 ~'tT.-2F9 & '~ 1 3:!t b ~ ~115.Nfi5 E 1]~9 BFS 5 ~..31y B65 49 d9 L`~~I„~~ i~~« . ~ S 0 :'v0° SO S1 .1 ~'.:~... a ....:','MCb@P~b:~6oq5E*tor~MMF&RR . - E 3 S• . _y(f~ S . ~y: ' ~ '~y;.~~'S9p;"S _ ~ ' :~.~.~~B5f 560 ;,i-~ - SB0~S. 6fi50Q ' 8 :an:65 Ts 79 SI ~ ~ ~ . ,, , . i, . „c; , f A<}~81k~~aioBi ~aA _ S ?O.PtY S Z170tl~ S 10,047 ~~S' n10a~ 8 20.Oi1 S 20pa> S 20 Ut% £ X1.p43 S ~2fl OM17 `^~ 1h , , I^ p'. ~~~.i ~~~~, - - g ~ S ?,O~A/ § Bi.62r S B56Ti E B`vb2~ E P6,62/ f 85.62~ S A~.>C,z~ 5 B5.62J S 85626 ~. ~~~ Aa~~i~ai~ai Niii~,~i~~.l,iwu~~: Nr~.~~ie,: ~.~, M~.~~i ~.~.~.: S 11.128 S 111.8ffi) , S ~~ hN Nola u a. C~~,nrei~ny Amuunis arxl G~»Ir ~n?OW ai~tl Beyon~,~re ~n Ip05 Qollan: NO GPI Incre,iuu fi0 Gtl4l Arein~ii:~s Dl] NOT Iri~l:~,le t..~n~1 Ir...~~!~rvc;~i: nts -1 .ii~l ~ . ..._. i.iial ,~~ ~ . „R,_ F.2 ~A [ nyc ~A -~p~¢$F3tIXX1 .llkiEl f5riiibrM1<allRrsl~w~n~lon~~ . . a5 Odlni~~. ~ n~~ai~iv M~, t-•~i,~.~-w~b ~ ~rin3 xyei ~.,r..avVOr~DN ~ _ . 55 . 'NUn2if~n~Jiryn~UMIFRRbeyirwl~9~in2~l11W »~nlWJlm}IeJOttol~~'kCf2VUy ;014.~:"'• '~;~> ~ fil - . aUAlnanel or~-yu~ii y ~~~.e~ ~f 8 t i ti 8N4 cuginn~~ ~i~~. [00 ]!W P~wlii~ Sa!x~y Bldg FRBR n~ T~I~tiponrl «i yc~niy r~eiJ ~~~ SPS.SU6 beginniny in 1U12 Wr Mani lrhr~ry - new aWilion iRBR. a tl~~6onai un-yoniy i~e~d nl SN6.664 Oayinniny i~i 20t~ (or EBCC F.ZRR i0 ~I F /. 0 undl~y5au.ceNOtes: h ~ S i ~ I3 l t i ci~~ des .~v IGfI Sui~si~ta ai il~~~ Ei~~,1 ~~I 1i11,: : 38 Cant ~xics Tax {6F~ Sunseln a~ ~lr~ Ei,A u1201 I ]A ~ I .2~ C~~~~ Snie. fTa (P6Ri Su~i.uia ui iiii~ EiiA uI G015 Appentlix B. Bn~:wioy aislu~oa+~ F'iai~ Ci~,ail~~xl FP-snd ~ N . ~ _ ~ ~ ~ ~ _ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _ _ ~ ~ I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~^ r a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~^ ~ s ~ ~ ~ a~ ~ 0. B ~ D E F G H J K l M N ~ z R005 M~sfn Plan I1pAab ~ AcHOn Plsn: Two Sbps snuaoos s a ocn zoa zoos 2ooc too~ zooe zoos za~o zoii zoiz mia aai~ ~. .~a s ~ ~ BudgetinueasMl~y~ ~ trans+anM ~ ~ Iram 3521/1. On~gang atltliGOnal funtlm5 9 . 35L2J5 - ~,~n~ $ 580.15] S 609,8]0 f 700.W1 5 ~'.+~I(~H1 5 ]00,081 5 ]00001 f. 780;]93 S ]4U,393 $ 790.293 $ 190,29J 5 790293 . . ioreaUa ~~~~ ~ 10 lS~i'lfi ~ ~ . p S 181 ~00 5 :Sdt c~[ti~, .. i SC1.UpU S 361 000 5 .14t q')0 5 1M1I.000 S 3al OW S l41.IHq S 3St 000 11 ' l52257 ... ,i 5 313,604 S l'11 a4~. : . _ l2t Oa6 $ 32~ 666 5 ~2t a¢6 b ]2t,6a6 8 3I1496 S 321 44fi 5 i2t 466 - - Buogat rnaucetl ny antl ~ an5fertflA ia 352235 Res:are '0 352]JI - ~ ~ dMge~ for Ma rasnpom ~ n On.yo~ng '"F! atln[wnallurq~nA . lareacn,a 14 ~ S 953.]64 S 88].JOB E 1.~t9.J4B S t.]81.621 '.> '.181fi2] S f2B16~] S 1,281,62] S ~.281.62T S t.5ql.`!41 S 1.54394~ . .. 15 ToIa~GF~010~ S 2,119,p10 3 Y,]M,505 5 ].999,It6 5 3.253035 S ~,IS3,Ol5 S 3,259,0]5 E 1,3,J,2~7 f S.J91,~4] f 7,805.587 S 1,605,36] f 3,805.S6T 16 t] 18 i'6uwo~n~a~~~i S ~~1.Y11 S 203049 5 2038atl $ I03,868 5 20J.898 5 2U3B68 5 103B48 5 20:f(f4N 5 20].808 5 203,Ba8 S ]f13,8aH 19 '.. . _,,, ,- . enp ~ 5 2C~O6i 5 LUtl~26 5 208,126 $ 1Dtl,~1G 5 206.12fi 5 LOR.126 5 2[l~t~fi 5 1(~.~26 $ 208.f26 5 20tl126 F 2D8.11ti IU TOla1F8R 11181 S ]89.9]5 f <11.971 S /11pi~ f 111,9]{ S 111.9T< f <11,916 S I11.Bld { ~11.97~ S 4/1.9]4 S 611.911 S ~11,91d 21 22 GranGTOtaI' f ],t19,915 S ],156A19 f ].902.690 S 1,665,009 5 3,685,009 f 3,665,U09 3 3.)55.1Y1 S ],]55.3t1 S ~.Ot],5~1 f 4,01T.St1 5 •,01),56t 23 21 ~ 25 R u n9: rt~a.. 35236, (Gf'y u '' :i`[?';! ~PBHi 5 ~'~91 6~5 $ ~ Uri].15F $ i,1[3 t5b 5 ~ ati5 a'S 5 ~?H5 i~5 5 ~ JES ~~5 S ~ 4&5.4]5 $ t 4tl5 A]5 I S ~ i4l ~BS 5 +.lu~.t95 5 i l~l ~Y5 Goel inUeaseE in FNR br Puol~r. Saiety 61ag Goai increasan in FItN la Main ~~D~ery ~New Aadironl Goei Increasetl ~ ~ ~. .. m FRR lor 26 I%CRVGwi/orMM/fR6R S ~,lfilli2 5 1316&6] $ t316N6~ S 7.~917M $ t.693.)36 5 1491.736 $ 1.491,~36 S 1555<H5 S 1,881.13/ f 1,741.]95 $ i.la];55 EBCC 27 qtlerence ~ ~~~ ~~ 5 ;8.16!~ 5 (tl2ti11 5 (8.161) E (B,261) $ IG8J10) 5 665tic S 0 5 p 28 29 1 Yy".~ 1.99% 1 99% ~ 99% 1.1~tl~~ 2 W°~o 100Y 30 EsfimaledBeckl atErMG~'e.. 5 (~.C65.1]0 $ 3.57a.861~ $ J)1859Z 5 (3.']E.B13 S 7,]65.0]d 5 J,153J35 $ 3,161,5%) S J.fl<`JbUF. 5 i3.]62.94I~ S ~'s1E29421 $ ],'lti7912 Goqlrokee Uackl e ualloalecslnan541 3~ Compomn~eotIXGOAL 32 MM Bp2.809 B~2.B09 l102.B09 802,8U9 80~.809 802.809 tl02.809 BD2609 B02.BUB BU18f19 Goal~ncreesea~ - infMRbr PuWic Salety Bltlg G~al increasea. in FNR tar Main Library (~w Atltli:on) Goai ~ncreaseJ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ in FRR br 33 FRdR 574.UJ8 5]4.U38 3 890,971 69(1.y7] 690.921 69G92] tiJ;l`lL1 S 758.933 S 82]09] N23,091 EBCC 34 TOiAL 1.776.lN7 1.l]6.&Il 1 99] )SEi t C9:3.136 f 693,13fi 1 69~ )~6 +. 9~I:i.]:1Fi I 559.242 1 625,906 1 E25.906 }5 36 MM ComOOnants Only 3] 3d fANi~10f Pgft~ii8} Sa958G 253 S SJ9.586 .. Y63'~-3 5495+i[i 253 23 54Y5815 I53.233 5495Bfi ~253.723. 5455@6 253223 $d9,58ti 253.223 Sa95256 253.2~3 56v,5Afi 253277. SA958fi .253,223 :1y TOT11L 802.809 802.803 802,809 H02.BUH B02.BW 602.BW BUP,908 802.808 80].808 804.809 a0 4~ P6RONLY - u2 MMPBNfittl7~1 251.223 T53.P23 253.223 253.2~3 293223 ~253223 Y53:123 253,Z23 25J723~ 253.P23 03 MMPbN~~~,~~~;qctu.ai 20]84H 24)R48 1p3.9Ee 20].908 20?,PAB lU:itl4N 2D'3848 203048 10JIt6E 2D3,Ba8 4< ANNLlA~ UNDER FUNOEO d5 6 6M FuMing ou as. 352235 f~~ rc 's52.3"/lGF~ . :3512'!!(FBtif uy4,tl25 ,i;fl.i42 ~225.6`3 ~2."roSY ~229.65~ ~,229.653 S ilt5B65 i3i9B55 i,J~5,865 15~4865 ~319d65 0] ].5%CRYGOaIfor06M 5 ,tv5~:16 5 t.l1V.Ld5 S 1.120.1tl~ 5 '~2202tiy 5 t,1201Nb 5 ~12(1,2Ny 5 i.220.2HJ 5 i.2ti!i.1i)t E ~.319.865 5 t315865 5 ~,J1y,Hti5 49 D~Marenca ~ 5 0 45 2 50No 50 . . . . . . .. . . . 5~ 52 S - 5 S ' t : 5 - 4 . 5 . 5 - ~. ..a,Y~i$~g•. g . g :~ ..~ . .. 53 - -., .:p B~' ku.Od1A 5 5 '.S ~ ~ 90111 a . . 5 5 90,Zt2 S S S 3 54 TOTwLAa~iLOns 5 ~ 5 S W)1++ > 26Z.~19 5 ~ . - 5 Yti111 $ S 26~,320 5 - S - 55 56' Atltlimnal Annual Amwn; NeeopO ro Meet Goai 91.315 S (t 1.2+6) S 66 fi65 S 0) 5 ~0 5~ SH 59 Natac: - Operaung Amounts in 204ti ar~tl fleyoMl are m 10U5 OMlars: IJO CPI Increase 60 GOAL qn~oui~•s DO NCIT IriclWe Land Imprwemenu - - fi1 6L Gnn~'i~ITI'~.ncl~tlesnu~N~otnarFAMOperaungOCAS ' - 6i on~pcinq ma~e <^ $ltip Uop ~r.~ni tp..y ~a 2op<_ ' . ' tia 65 t~IlemI1580D0 1di6-lo.i5,2?31WrMipli6Nrwmlu9Yt . ; . ---- "" - -. onyuingatld ilunain} ~i~ Z~~nle ~nce~i20(1G~ tl201l:oreucY~,~1.5%CNVIeYeI~ '•y -~ ' I 66 6) l prt~goin9TdRNOne~M1mtiti~girtn9iWF'RRin7.'Wlaid2D32~rore2cha2.J°ip.CH4lQUeiby'1({i<, „~T.l~..,~,~~}~ - . . -- aqtlivona«n-~oing neF~i ~1511 ti+:tla UeA~nn~ng.n 100] for PuMic 5s1ery B1tlg f H8ft - 68 atltlioo»a~ ~~n~g~~~,G neerf cf 565 5[Hi oaginning ~r.2G'~1 fw Me~n Library - new atltlnpn F(ifl(t ~ ~ 6'J -__ atlili•i~n~~ nn~~o~nV ~~Fh ~~~>h~ E1i3 Dey~nninq in 20t31o~ EBCC FR6R .. ]G - ___'_ _ ._ _ ... ._- _ _- _ _ - -- _- li FunEingSourroNalea: ]2 ti t5 t:en:5aies Ta. IGF i 5unsels at the Ena W T02a ]5 U 3E1 Cen; Sates I:~. (GFI Sunsxis a! Lt~e EM of I011 la (t.15 CenlSale.~: TaK IPBH) Sunse~s a~ tM1e Entl W 2015 AppeMiK E- BaCklag %ISAGIIOn Plan 2 SIepS Appendia B A B C ~ E F G H J H L M N ~ 30Y5 M~a1~r Flan UpOab ~ AQlon Plan: Om Tlm~ Rpu~ct ~i 2 51]ifI005 ' ] 4 OCA 700/ Z00`. 1006 7001 Z008 ]W9 IU10 I011 101t I01] t01~ le entl 9 bgetincreaseO ~y t~:+~s~erreif Ircm 352Y1 ~ Adtlil~onai ongang aatliiionai Nnoi 3512J5 ~~ i, r.~_ 5 58I1.15] f 609 8]0 S 190,193 S vu 1'~ i S ~B0 25] 5 1Y~ 1'3! 5 ~'JU.1'JJ 5 1YU.[9] 5 ~~1,2'l] S 1HII.IYJ S 'l9U.24J ~ ~ ~u mainia~n ~ ~ ~0 3s2256 e~uytiW~~~ 5 Yl i WO i cn'it) y _ ~ .-i 5 301 WO b :S/t WO 4 391 000 S 361 UW 5 YI1,OW S Mt oW 5 J<1.Oaa I1 :ti121I i.~!sMn S :1126(I4 5 :r2t a;~, y , .~ . I ~. .,-, 5 311 ea6 E 321666 $ 3214C4 5 321 446 $ ]Z1 N6 S l11946 5 :121406 - ~ ~ Bungei rewur.ea oy ~ ansfertetl m `r ' ~ - ~ 35L1J5 Hes~nre ~ ~ InJ5C;a1 ~u0get la Ma~l resVOOm ionn Atldi;inna~ on~qo~ng d ;y~,.~, ~'~ Fy'~~„y~ ~~ ~ ~ o~rn3~~"ic:~ S `JY~.)bd S Bfi],308 f 1,OS9.JOB S 1,5/3,946 S ~.54J.946 S I.SC3.9e8 E ~.`~~b<fi 5 15d'JY46 8 1543.946 5 1583.'.YIB 5 1.SYJ.946 lun~uy iomainiair~ ... ~5 , ToIaIGF~~10) 3 2.779.9t0 f ]?M,505 5 l.Ob0.928'~. S :f.605.566 S 3,805,Sfi8 f 1,605,566 S 7.605,566 f 3,BD5,588 f D,605,568 S 1,605,566 f ].fiU5,566 16 tI ~g ~~,~. S 1919~1 S 2U3144A b 1UJ,baB 5 tUJ.Bad 5 LU~,N48 S 1036CB 5 203,N4tl S 203.NC8 3 1U:1,1{6B 5 203Wd 5 '1G3&18 ~9 : . - NW:nn~..~M~Ma,~~~ ; 1U[(Ni4 5 2U8,12fi 5 20tl,116 5 10d,126 S 208,126 S 108,126 S 2t79,116 5 2U8i2e S 208126 5 LU8.126 5 llltl,llti 20 TotaIPBR 1~~8) S 399,9T5 S t11,97d S 011,9T~ f 011,91{ S 111,97~ f 117.97{ S At1,91< f 611.91~ f ~~~,9~~ f 111,916 f 011,9'/9 21 22 GrantlTOtal' f ].1~9.915 f 7.756A~9 f 3,692,902 S ~,Oti,5,0 S ~.01T,5~0 f /.077,5{0 3 ~,011,5{0 f 4.011.540 S 6,01~,Sd0 S l.017,5~0 3 ~,Ot],5~0 23 24 T~mmrtp . ' ~ 25 ."''.,?3 e ~?3+N I!GF~a ~~2 jP.BR];;~' ~ 5 1.19~ 6]5 5 t llfi] 15E; 5 ':1'~ t~4 $ ,'41.1?a 5 i~Y?.i9a $ 1.]<I.1Y4 S 1.iC1.15i $ 1.~4~ "/JM1 8 + Ii].]~J4 $ ;.I~].]YS b './3/.~y5 ~ ~ Gcaiinc.e~a.wtl ~ri FIiFEICr Pu01ic STle~y Bltlq (:a~l ~ni:rnasenl ~ in GFiH f~~ Ma~n LiD~ary IN.w 4~rlitun~, ~~xl in~~~asa0 in FHk I~• 26 2Y.CRVGwIbrNMfFRiF S 1L6L.142 5 ~.Jlti.en] $ +,3~tiea] { t.~yy738 S 1J93,IJ6 5 1.9H3,IJ6 S 1.193.~38 S 1,553.9tl5 f 1.681131 f 17{1.795 $ ~,i61,i96 t5t:c: 2) O~flerence '~ ~ ~ 5 25E.058 5 154115B 5 I54,058 5 ^.54058 S 19a.)W $ ~M1,~iSS 5 0 5 (0) 1y 2:f6k 1.34% ?31°~e 2:14% 1.25°m 'lUH% l(lOk 200`X• 29 30 EsLmetedBackl atEnoolve~ 5 J165,1'!u 5 ]5]JEIti1~ 5 ~{.~Ztl.551 5 iJa)4a44 5 J.220d36 S ~1d6ti,7~8 S 1.i1],:f20' S ~2518.011 5 j145~.:i1~1 5 j1J51.:i4tl 5 1i51.J49 Guni~n.ee{~1>ackio e~ _ an$li 31 Compomn4 of 1X GONL 3T MM H0P.809 BU2.809 801.609 B02.BOB 602.808 B02,B99 802.909 8028W e0Y.B0J 802.808 Geal ~nuxeseC ~ in FHH lu~ PuWK Salety Bldg Coei inr~easM in FRR Icr Me~n l~Mary (New PAdN~~ Goalincreaieo ~ ~~ -m FHR br ;f! FRBk 574,038 51aU39 f 890.9R] 69091] ti90H2] 69092] tiyU.JI1 S 758./33 f 873,017 52J.~U~ EBCC 7n TOTAI t J78.8<7 t.3t6,Bnt i 453 ~'sti i 84;f /]6 1~9] 136 1,19~,)]8 +<9J ~:t(S 1 55Y 1Jl t.f,25.9p6 ~ 5~59(M 35 I 38 MM Compoi»nla Only ;f~ fAMiulu) 6a9.fiP6 5~1589 SUn431 n1N.'t~i 6u19~d u55,ti55 1i95ati1 !1:~.~ila ]2'~11tl _~~I :itl PdR1118~ 253223 J83J5:2 7138d6 2W,N41 l98.iJ5 30b,080 J20aD8 ~7321J 331'12C 3:IJ't'td TOTAL BO7,899 836.911 B6B.318 903051 9J911] 97e,160 ~ 015,909 1 fl!i6941 105G,4d2 1(i564a1 411 I 61 PSH DNLY 23 263~ J52 886 2"/3 2819~1 'L962JSI 308 0&4 JZ0908 37:5 110 37932~ 22a 3:i'1 61 A'~1 irIMPBR(Iiel(aa~ ' F'6H i i tn14~^.u~i ' LSJZ [li f Y.iN . E(I'.4 H<Y . 20l itdb tU3 dJU :OS.N4tl , 1t1:1 N4N uJ N4N , tL'J BJN 103 N4F . '~~ 1.1~iN J ANNUAL UNDEHFUNUEO 45 . n6 06M Funtlinq $purcec', 15L1]5(GF) 3511;i1 ftiF I 3521'.~3;P5k~ ~uY4H15 ~59.a42 1,319,885 t'~1NtlU5 t~~yHLS ~ b ~.l19tl(f5~ i;it.~,tlti5 1.3i'J,B(15 i.119.866 ~,3t9,065 ~,3i9.Nri5 n~ 25°.aCFVGOai~or06M 5 i.tY5J6a 5 1%~.289 $ ~,220,289 5 ~,11~i,2hY 5 1L1U1HV 5 ~~202L'41 5 ttLULtlV 5 ~.J64.tt~i 5 ~.11Y.865 $ 1,3i9.Bfi5 S 1,319,665 ' 4tl D~tierencP ~. S 995]6 5 9e Si6 5 vU',rti 5 i1J.5~5 ~ 5 95.SI6 5 5~.163 5 !1 $ q S 0 ay 110% 2 ~0'+a ~]J°,6 2 lG'Sa 11L`°rc 2 6'U% 1 SOYe ! 5046 L 50°re 50 5~ 51 ;~''.~A~2M. ~ . 5 S - S -~;:~~a~AF.~~ 5 ~ 3 S ~ 3 ~ 5 - 5 ' S ' -_.x ~y'S}'p SJ ,.. '~. ' ~ PdaXOnslu ~ eIMOBM 5 $ ~~i~. 1tl0,F2~7~ 5 5 $ 5 b 5 S - S 5a TOTALAtltliLOns 5 $ - S 16042.) 5 5I<h7P S ~ S ~ S S ~ S - S ~ 5 55 Slf AtltliLonal Ann~al Amwn; Needad to Mero~ Goa~ ' S 1`~M1, I 15~ S 35] fiJ6 S 353,63a b l53 63C S 95] ti30 5 245 U'/J S dtl dfi4 $ ~0 S 0 57 5& Nobs: 59 Opere:~nq Prr~~un~~. in LOtHi ann Beyond a~e in 7005 OaHxs: NO CPI Invsxse 60 GOAI ~~ - ~t.5fJ~1N~t li~ ~. _ :almprovements 161 . . ....... . .. .. . . Gr~i~~if,ra i.~i..~.s~~,,,~~rl~n~~~r.i..~.ratirv~OCO.s ti2 R~ uoinV ~': - ~•.~~11J5 ~ Ua ... 3156WOki20flfit 3523u11wfdaiq~':~! -.x ' .~y~,~ f5 n~gnxg:Wd ~a~u~~~l tllqM11ainte egin2W6~ arnUm25°qCHVI elthrdlghZ014 _ :~ r• n pn..tjtwt9 tld~m~e4luptlul9 m MJNFRH in 2U@T't&.ine~ 2 096 GIiV brll d+la~9R247'i',5,~ "3~ae4.~ '. ti] admuunai onqoriig neetl oi 5t tE.88b Ge9imm~g in 1~fU1 tw Puoi+c Salery Bltlq. FH3H ~ tiN &dei4onni cn goii~a neetl cl yh5.50fi taginning in 11I121or hN~n Liurary ~ ne.rv aUtlii~on FNBk 69 eddl~0lialan-poingneetlol$6'5,GtidAegi~rningin2flt'JtwEBCCFHftN - 1U 1' FuntllnBSourcaNOWS. . ~2 0 15 Cen:Saies Tax (GFi Sui~sets at ~ne ErM ~f ill[4 )7 U:iU t;en! Sa~e~ ~fav ~GF~ Sunw~s a[ vie EM o1 ]011 'I< 0 25 (;ent Sa~es T.aF IPNft1 Sunseu rt me Ene o12(115 AGPen~ia &- 9ar.kloW nsACLOn Vien Aii ~ ~ _ _ ~ 4PGxnaiv H , ~ _ _ ~ _ _ _ ~ ~ ~ _ ~ _ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ! ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i A ~ ~ !~ .4 6 C ~ E F G H I J N L M N 1 2005 Mas[ar Plan Updete - Vislon Plan 2 5131f$QOS 3 4 OCA 700! 2005 3006 2007 YOOB 2009 3010 2017 2012 4013 4014 Le end 5 Butlgetmcreasetl by ~ ~. . ~~-~ transferrea Irom 3523a~. Atltlilionai on-gmngatldieonal funtling ~ ~~~~. to malnla~n 3.0 - ~ ~ . ~ 9 352235 rn~.~.~,;,•,na,m S 580.15I E fi09.870 S 934,T7A S :334.77a S 934.774 $ 934,774 3 934.77C 8 934.774 $ 934.774 S 934.774 5 9J4.774 ' 70 95223n raci~nrtnergyMgrm $ 341,000 $ 7~31.OU0 ~ ~ 5 3»` 0!i~' S ~:4+ f!il.^. $ 341.000 $ 341,000 S 341,000 S 341.000 $ 341.000 $ 341.000 E 341.000 11 5i2737 ~. ~ vxHUSmM S 312,60:7 ~ i~ .~.+,:.ti~ 5 :f; ~ cai: - :,':'t..^,.1r, :_ 321 4a6 $ 327.446 $ 321 446 S 321 4a6 $ 321.446 $ 321 a46 S 321 446 ~ ; I I I BUtlget reducEtl by ~. ' ~~ . Irar~v(erratl lo ~,,- I 352235. Restore ~ ~ la 35?"sat ~ ~~~ r ~;~._~~~ ~'* ~ ' . ~ I butlgel br Mall restroom ban Addrt onal or -goiny 14 Maianna•~icF $ 993,76a ' ~ ~ S 863,7~8 ~ ; 1,079,30B S 1,543,947 ~ t,5C3,947 $ t.5s3,947 $ t.543947 S 1,543,9a7 $ t,543,947 S ~.543,9a7 $ t,543947 luntlFng . - bmainlan ~ .. ~ 15 Tota1GF~070~ S ],7T9.940 ~ 2.7a4,505 8 S 3,225p09 E 3.ISG.~48 5 ~,750.048 S 3,750,0/B S 3,750,048 f 3,750,018 f 3,750,068 f J,750.048 f 7,750,048 16 17 18 ~_-p,'.- VeAt~e~orMa~i $ 197,911 $ 203,&t8 $ 203,898 5 203,848 S 203,848 $ 203,848 $ 203.B4B S 203848 $ 203,848 5 203,B4B $ 20]B98 19 . ~.~ ~~"§52233` i;,'y;,°,2.,~'-'^;` veaonoin Me~m S 202,064 $ 208,126 $ 208.126 5 208.t26 S 208.t26 $ 208,726 $ 208.72fi S 208.t26 $ 208,126 b 208.12fi S 208.72fi 20 Totel P8R (718~ S 398.975 S 411,97~ S 411,97{ S 011,97~ f ~11,97/ S 417,974 f d11,97~ f ~11.974 f C77,971 f 071,97~ S d71,974 21 22 Grand Totei' S 3,179,915 S 3,756p79 f 1 B37,383 S A,182,042 f 1,162,022 S ~,162,OY2 S 4162,~24 5 C 1fi2,0Y2 5 11fi2 021 S 4167 024 f 416] 024 23 24 ~- ~. . . . . . . . ~ . . . 25 ~Mid/fRBR fundiny Sourcea: 352:S4i..(GF~ _.. '1522321P8R}. I 5 i.i91675 i 8 1.067.156 5 t223.15E 5 7747J95 S i.747795 5 1,747.795 5 7747J95 S 1,747795 S i747.795 S 1.747J95 S 1747795 I PuDiic Sately BICg. Goal increasetl In FRR for Man L~brery ~New Atldionj Goal ~ncreased ~ ~ . . - ... _ . . ~ in FRR for 26 2%CRVGoaltorMMIFRBR 5 1,262.742 $ 1,376,867 $ 1.376,697 S 1~93,7J6 S 1.493.736 S 1.493J36 5 1.493,736 5 1,5534H5 S 1681137 f 1747795 5 ~,747.755 EBCC. 27 ~Inerence : ~~ ~ ~~ S 25a.059 S 256.059 b 254.059 $ 256,059 5 194,310 5 65,66a $ 0 $ 0 28 .. ~ . - 2.:14W% 2.34% 234% 2,34% 215"r~ 2.08',~6I 2.00`/0 2.00°b 29 30 Es~imaied Backl at End of Vear 5 3.2fi5.+70 $ 3,574,861 $ 3328,552 S 3,474,493 5 3220,434 5 2.966,375 3 2,712.316 S 2.51&.006 5 2,451,342 $ 2,451342 $ 2,451,34t Goal to kee backlo ual lo ur less Nan 54M 31 Components o12Ne GOAL 32 MM 802.809 602,809 802,809 802.809 802,809 802.809 8~2.809 802.809 802.809 802,809 Goal mclea5etl m FRR for 1 PuOiic Salety Bldg Goal inveasetl I ,. ~ in FRR for Man Library (New AdOitoni Goai ~ncreasetl . in FRR for 33 FRSR 574038 574038 S 690927 690,927 69D,927 690,927 690,927 S 75643J S 923097 823,097 EBGC 34 TOTAL 1,376,847 1.376,847 !.49~.736 1 493,736 1,493,736 1 493,736 1.493,736 1.559.247 1 ti25.905 1 625.906 35 36 MM Componenta Only ~ 37 38 FAM(O70) PdR (11 B) 549,5&i 2532Z3 549,586 253 223 549,586 253 223 549,586 253 22J 549,588 253 22'3~ 549,586 253;223 549,588 253223 549,586 253 223 549,586 253 223 Sa9,586 253,223 39 TOTAL 802,809 802,809 802,809 802,809 802,809 802,8D9 802,809 802,909 B02,B09 B02,809 - 4D A1 PBRONLY 42 MM P8R (118) Goal 253,223 253,223 253,?23 253,223 253,223 253;?23 253,223 253.223 253,223 253,223 4;1 MMPBR(11b)AClual 203,HS8 203,84R 2U3,tl4P 103,848 203,848 203,848 203848 203.848 203.848 2U3,848 44 ANNUALUNDERFUN~E~ 45 6 08M funtlfng Sourcea: 352235 (GF~ 35223'!(GF) . 352233iP8Rj 1.054A25 'i ~ 8 7 i]9,442 1A69.3A7 1,464.347 1.464.347 1,464,347 1,464,347 1,46d.347 1.464.347 1464.347 7464.747 47 7°ra CRV Goal tor OSM 5 1 434.537 $ 1 467,347 5 1.4ti4 3?7 S 1A64.347 S 7.466.347 5 1.464.347 S 1.4fid 347 S 1.46d.347 3 1,464,347 5 1.464.347 S 1 464.347 ie Oinerence ~ - ' S 0 49 ~ . . . . 3.00 in sa s~ 52 ._ :-,~[~IJSdd~holW~a.Hadgol.farVNMlF~~i_ b - 5 ~ 5 ~R ~~~ti~4;838. $ - S ~ S - 4 - S - S - 5 - 53 _ _ ~NwFCPI Addilions lo Bu0 et tw 03M S S S~- :321560 5 5 S f S S 5 S 5a 55 707A1 Nao-CPi Add~ecns 5 - $ ~ S 324,904 5 52a,639 S - S ~ S - S - S - £ - S - _._ _ _ .'_ .' 56 Add'~uonai Annual Amouni Nee~ed :o Mee~ Goal~ .~~"~ ~~~~ S D -"'_ ~_- 5) 58 Notes: 59 Operaling Amounts ~n 2006 ana Beyona are in 2005 Oollars~, NO CPI Increase ti0 GbAL Amounis DO NOT include Land Improvemenis 67 Grantl Total'~. includes six (6~ other FAM operaeng OCAs 62 - 63 - goiny~ Jtfi'1. l( .!JUJ~ u 5 ' I -"'- G4 ora515b000~ 20061 3523+t1~(orMeUResiroomloan . ~ .._ ~ __I '_ _ ~ I ~ 65 p1~gDinq atld i I tuntlrttg n Bidq. M11a lenance ~n 20(}(. ~u main~ain 3.0 % CR'J lev I IY rouyh 2D1 "- 66 __ __ _ ~~ingaAdiUOnal.furMinginMMiFRRm2607.tomamtain2.0°k:CRVlerel7hroug~2074 .. ,~r'~ . ,__ __ I ' ____ ._'_ 67 adtlllional on-yuuiy necK1 0! 5~ 16.A89 heg~inning in 2007 br PubLC Safery Bldg. FRSR 68 _ _ adtl~ional on-goiny neetl of y65,50G ~eginn~ing in 2011 (or Main Lihrary - new adtli~ion FRBR. ._ ; 69 adtliliunal onyomg neea of $66,664 ~eginning m 2013 !or EBCC FRSR 70 71 funding Suurta Noles~. 77 0 15 (;ent Szles Tax (GF ~ Sunsets al Ihe End oi 2024 73 0.38 Cent Sales- Tax (GF ~ Sunsets el Ihe End o~ 2017 74 0.25 (;ent Sales rax ~vBR~ Sunsels at the Ena o~ 2015 _ __ _ ~ ~ ~s r ~ ~w ~ r~ ^~ ~ a~ r ~ ~ s~ ~s ~ ~ ~ Renovation 8~ Replacement Funding Needs 2005-2050 $18, 000, 000 $16,000,000 $14, 000, 000 $12,000,000 $10,000,000 $8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2, 000, 000 $- O~~ O~~ O~~ O^~ O~~ O^~ O~~ O~~ O~'~ O~'~ O~'~ O~'1 O~'~ O~~ O~~ O~~ O~~ O~~ O~`~ O~`~ O~`~ O~`1 O~`~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ti ~ ti ti ~ ~ ~ ~ ti ti ti ~ ti ti ~ ~ ~ NOTE: All costs in 2005 $ 6/16/2005 1 Appendix 9 Appendiz 9 APaendi. 9 No Appentliz 9 ~ ~ 4 Appantlix 9 ~ ~ ~ ~ _ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ City u~ ~w~.,er ~ ~ ~ ~ _ ~ ' 2005 Properry Schedule acility N # ot Struct ~~a ~ . ~ ~ Facility Nam~ ~ ~ ~ . . . ~ ~ ~ Addresa induding sHeat ~~m~. BlD6. Sa ~ ~ Year BuiR ~ ~ ~ Service ~~~8 . ~ ~. . ~ Year Replaceme nt Dus ~ ~ ~ ~ Replacement Cost ~ - Year Upgrade Oue Upgrade Cost Sp /o CRY . ~ ~ Year ot Upgrade • (mandaiory H bfdg. is pre- 4970) 001 1 Munici al Buildi 1777 BROADWAY 23,657 1951 75 2026 $ 2.554,466 Com lete 1998 002 1 Munici al Service Center "A" 5050 PEARL STREET 34.971 1968 75 2043 $ 3,210,547 Com lele 1990 003 z Munici al Services Buildin "8" 5050 PEARL STREET :~7, I7fl 1994 75 2069 $ 1,294,543 2032 $ 647,272 004 1 Ins Center 3198 BROADWAY t6,372 1957 75 2032 $ 1,418,207 Com lete 2D03 006 1 Park CenVal Office Butldin 1739 BROADWAY 20,91U 1973 75 2048 $ 2.353,965 2005 $ 400,400 007 1 Malmenance Buildin 1720 13TH St. 6,021 1952 75 2027 $ 317,239 Com lete 1997 008 1 NewBritain 11D7ARAPAHOEAVENUE 13,852 7971 75 2046 $ 1,554,423 2007 $ 777.212 009 1 MAW LIBRARY 1W0 CANYON BLVD 84,760 1961 75 2036 $ 13,295,744 Com lete 1992 011 1 Re noldsLibrar 3595TABlEMESADRN ~0.37t 1968 75 2043 $ 1,147,428 Com lete 1997 012 1 BLDR MUSEUM OF CONTEMP Arts 1750 13TH St. 10,230 1906 100 2012 $ 122,000 Com lete 1998 073 1 Carn ie Libra 1725 PINE 5,610 1906 100 2006 Per assessmen[. Leverage Grarn Fundin Com lele 2000 015 1 Meadows Libra 4800 BASELINE RD 7,812 1988 75 2063 2026 Ot6 1 Public Safet Bld . 1805 E 33RD ST ~.O.UUfi: 7968 75 2043 $ 11,688,927 Com lete 199~ Ot6 017 Oi6 019 020 021 022 1 7 1 7 7 1 1 Public Safe Stora e Bld . GUNBARREI. Radfo Shack Twr/Ant ChaWau ua Radio Shack TwdAnt Fire Statiun #2 Fire Station #1 Ffre Slation #3 Fire Station #4 7805 E 33RD ST GUNBARREL HILL CHAUTAUQUA 2225 BASELINE 2441 13TH STREET 1585 30TH STREET 41Q0 DARLEY l 240 100 4.752 7.941 6,160 2,000 7990 1986 1968 1959 1957 1964 1967 75 75 75 75 ~5 75 50 2065 2061 2043 2034 2032 2039 2017 $ 369.063 $ 63.196 $ 29,631 $ 591,866 $ 989.037 $ 767,234 $ 22~.228 2028 2024 2006 2008 2010 $ 184,532 $ 37,598 $ 14,9'I6 Com lete Com lete $ 393,617 $ 110,614 003 2000 023 1 Ffre Station #6 5145 N 63RD 5T 3,435 1979 75 2054 $ 427,833 2017 $ 213,917 024 1 Fire Station #5 4365 19TH STREET 3,622 1992 75 2067 $ 530,190 2030 $ 265,095 025 1 West Senior Center 909 ARAPAHOE !!i. i&8 1974 75 2049 $ 1,794,568 2012 $ 897,284 026 2 Children, Youth, & Famil Services Center 2160 SPRUCE 5,215 1963 75 2036 $ 605,900 Com lete 2000 027 1 The Ed e 1301 ARAPAHOE 1,000 1953 60 2013 Oemo I 029 1 Chautau ua Auditorium 900 BASEUNE ROAD 16,036 1898 110 2008 Tenan[ Com lete 1990 noPe~a~ v City of Boulder 2005 Property Schedule Year of Facflity M p of Struct ures Facllity Name qddrosa fnciuding straat ~um~~ BLDG. SQ ~. Yaar Buik c~rv~~B ~~ Ysar Repfaceme nt Due Repiecemenl Cwt Year Upgrede Due ~ ratle Cocf pg Sp % CRY Upgrade - ~mandatory N bldg. is pre- 1970) 03D 7 Chautau ua Dinm Hall 900 BASELWE ROAD 5,326 7H98 10U 2005 Tenant Com lete 7996 032 1 Chautau ua Academic Hall 900 BASELINE ROAD 3,460 1900 t00 2005 Tenanl Com lete 1990 033 1 Parks-N.Boulder Park Shelter 800 DELLWOOD 3,000 1969 50 2019 $ 197,513 2008 $ 98,757 1969 034 1 MaNn Park Shelter 3264 Eastman 2,756 19fi2 50 2012 $ 56,226 iggp 035 1 BAN~ SHELL 1212 CANVON 650 1930 B5 2015 $ 213,935 Com lete 1997 036 1 Eben Fne Park Sheltet 2ND 8 ARAPAHOE 960 1930 75 2005 $ 88,473 1930 037 1 Eben Fine Park Restrooms 2ND 8 ARAPAHOE 400 1930 75 2005 $ 82,583 1930 038 1 Salber Park Mairnenance Bid 19TH & ELDER 1,125 1974 50 2024 $ 74,068 NA 038 D38 t 1 Salber Park Meetin Hall Salber Park Shelter Roo 19TH & ELOER 3045 19th Street 2,460 400 1976 1976 50 50 2026 202fi $ 289,626 $ 13,165 NA Com lele 2001 039 1 Pearl Streel Mall Resirooms 13TH 8 PEARL 658 2001 75 2076 $ 292,411 2039 $ 746.205 040 1 7antre Park Sho 585 TANTRA OR 3,062 1984 50 2034 $ 194J81 2009 $ 97,091 042 1 Park O eralions 5200 PEARL ST 5,5(i4 1989 75 2064 $ 338,08H 2O27 $ 169,044 052 1 Forest 5300 PEARL ST 2,300 1985 50 2035 $ 151.427 NA Oemo 053 1 Soulh Boulder Recreation Center 735D GILLASPIE 27,319 1973 50 2023 $ 2,886,853 Com lete 1998 054 1 North Boulder Recreation Center 3170 BROADWAY 62,166 2002 50 2052 $ 6.569,179 2027 $ 3.284,590 O55 7 East Boultler RecJSenror Centr 5660 SIOUX DR ;S.pFt7 1gg1 50 2441 $ 6,665,926 201ti $ 3,332,963 O56 2 Ma lelon Concessrons 2900 MAPLETON 990 1977 SO 2027 $ 116,504 2D05 5 58,252 058 059 1 3 Harbeck House Stazio 8all FieldlRestrooms 1206 EUCLIO 2445 STAZIO ~RNE 2,500 2,800 1900 1989 120 50 2020 2039 $ 658.290 $ 354.451 2014 Com lete $ 177,225 1986 059 1 Stazio Ballfir.ids Malntenance 2445 Stazio Drive SA00 1997 75 2072 $ 632,948 2035 $ 316,474 059E 1 Stazio Ballfield Tensile Cano 2445 Stazio Drive 6,000 1992 50 2042 $ 189,902 2009 $ 94,951 O60 1 Potle Lab 1010 AURORA 2,565 1924 100 2024 $ 237,041 Com lete 2001 061 A 1 SCOTT CARPENTER PARK LOCKER ROOMS 30TH 8 ARAPAHOE 5,886 1963 75 2038 $ 589,063 2006 $ 294,537 Repiace with Pool 061 B 1 SCOTT CARPENTER PARK FILTER BUILDING 30TH & ARAPAHOE S00 19fi3 50 2006 Re lacement 06t E 061 F 7 t SCOTT CARPENTER ATHLETICS OFFICE SCOTT CARPENTER ATHLETICS SHED 30TH & ARAPAHOE 3DTH & ARAPAHOE 1,052 100 1963 1995 75 50 2038 2045 $ 10~,225 $ 1,88U NA Com lele 2003 061 G 0 SCOTT CARPENTER PLAY PAVILLION 30TH 8 ARAPAHOE 0 0 $ NA 061 H 1 SCOTT CARPENTER PRE55 BOX 34TH 8 ARAPAHOE 650 2002 Stl 2052 $ d2,459 2027 $ 41,229 062 063 063 1 1 1 5 ruce Pooi Bath HouselFilter BOULDER RESERVOIR Securi Bld . BOUIDER RESERVOIR Gate House 2102 S ruce Streel 5151 NORTH 51ST 5751 NORTH 51ST 1,810 800 200 7961 19B6 7971 75 50 50 2036 2036 2027 $ 238,290 $ 73.931 $ 1B,4B3 2008 2011 NA $ 119J45 $ 36,9&6 1961 063 1 BOUI~ER RESERVOIR ConwssBth 5157 NORTH 515T 3 75:i2 1984 75 2059 $ 395,657 2022 $ 197,829 063 1 BOULDER RESERVOIR Guard Hut 5751 NORTH 515T 360 1984 50 2034 $ 40,105 NA Ofi3 1 BOUL~ER RESERVOIR Marina Bld . 5157 NORTH SiST 1.320 1984 50 2034 $ 173,781 NA Ofi3 1 BOUL~ER RESERVOIR Maintenance Bld . 5151 NORTH 51ST 3,230 1984 50 2034 $ 253,519 NA 064 1 LATH SHED 5300 PEARL ST. 1,260 1972 50 2022 Dertw NA Demo 068 1 FLATIRONS GOLF Pro Sho 5706 ARAPAHOE AVENUE 3,125 1985 50 2035 $ 384,N41 2010 $ 192,420 APVen[lu 9 I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _ ~ ~ ~ ~ - _ ~ ~ ~ Cit, ... ,.,.,,. ier 2005 Propeny Schedule acOity t A of Struct u~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Fxiley Nama ~ ~ ~ ~ Addrass including sheet number BLDG. SC FT oar Bullt Service Lffe . Year ~~ Rapiaceme nt Due ~ ~ ~ Replacament Coat ~. ~ ~ . Ysar Upgrad~ Due Upgrede Coat ~ ti CRV . .. .. Year of Upgrade - ~mandatory A 61dg. ia pre- 19T0) 069 1 Flalirons Golf Maintenance E31d-- 5706 ARAPAHOE AVENUE 2,025 1971 50 2021 $ 118.823 NA 071 1 FlaUrons Golf Irri ation Pum house 5706 Ara ahce 150 1985 50 2035 $ 7,976 NA 072 1 FLATIRON GOLF Stora e/O~ce 5706 ARAPAHOE AVENUE 5,000 7976 50 2028 $ 265,876 NA 115 1 Fleet Services 5064 PEARL STREET 2a.H5a 1989 75 2064 $ 2,510,056 2027 $ 1,255,028 162 1 Atrium 1300 CANYON BLVD 12.392 1971 75 2046 $ 1,371,271 Com lete 2004 168 3 Fire Trainin Center 970 LEE HILL ROAD 0 1989 25 NA NA 171 1 BOMB OISPOSAL & STORAGE N. 26TH STREET 100 1988 75 NA NA 172 1 Mustards Restaurant 1719 Broadwa 757 1954 75 2029 $ 99,fi60 2005 $ 66.000 2005 194 1 VIOIET AVENUE DWELLING 7889 VIOLET 7,800 1948 50 1998 Sell or Lease Sell or Lease 1948 195 7 Munici al Service Cemer Canvash 505D PEARL STREET ~. i~~~ 1994 75 2069 $ 185.657 2032 $ 92.629 215 1 Justice Center 1777 - 6TH ST 7.260 1977 75 2052 $ 1,255,312 Com lete 1997 216 1 Dai CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2590 WALNUT 33,164 1971 75 2046 S 3,923,968 Com lete 2002 217 1 Harlow Platts Sun Shelter Viele Lake 400 1973 50 2023 $ 13,165 NA 217 1 Harlow Platts Warmin Hut Viele Lake 500 1965 50 2015 $ 32,919 NA 1965 218 1 Ara ahoe Rfd e Picnic Shelter Ara ahoe & Foothills 600 1971 50 2421 $ 19,748 NA 219 1 South Boulder Rec. Center Stora e 1350 Gillas ie 200 1993 50 2043 $ 70,635 NA 225 1 Chautau ua Trolle Sto 900 BASELINE ROAD 216 1900 100 2007 $ 28,437 NA 227 2 Advenlwe Pr m S[ e Buildin s 5200 Pearl Street 3fi0 1990 50 2D44 $ 3.699 NA 230 7 Coot Lake ResVOOm Coot Lake OH 63rd 120 1992 50 2042 $ 32,019 NA 235 1 Chautau ua Stone Arbor 900 BASELINE ROAD 600 1898 100 2007 $ 16,710 NA 1975 236 1 Chautau ua Picnic Shelter 90D BASELME ROAD 1.200 1698 100 1990 Tenant NA 238 1 Bouldar - Dushanbe Teahouse 1770 13th Sireet 3,161 7998 50 2048 $ 1,601,139 2023 $ 800.569 239 1 Pleasanl View Ma~ntenance Shed 3805 47th Sl 200 1992 50 2042 $ 70,128 NA 239 1 Pleasani View Resirooms 3805 47th SL 330 1992 75 2067 $ 62,663 2030 $ 31,332 240A 1 IBM RECREATION Bl11LDING North 63rd Sleet 1,522 1985 75 2060 Easement 2023 Easemenl 2408 1 IBM WAREHOUSE BUILDING North 63rd Steet 5,200 1985 75 2060 Easement 2023 Easemenl 240C-~ 2 IBM S70RAGE BUILDINGS North 63rd Steei 400 1985 W 2035 Easement NA 240E 242 24B 25~ 257 1 1 i 2 IBM IRRIGATION PUMP BUIL~ING Fire Station ft7 M el Pines Club House Foothills MainL Facilit Valmont Bu[te Mill North 63rtl Steet 1360 551h Street 5706 Ara ahce Ave. 800 Cher Ave. 3000 N. 63rd St. 120 5,081 18,500 2,182 1985 2000 1948 2000 50 75 50 75 2035 2075 2005 2075 NA Easement $ 743,759 $ 1.766,022 $ 681,200 NA 2038 1973 2038 0 $ 371,879 Master Plan to Re lace $ 340,600 948 264 0 Fire Trainin Center Valmont & 63rd SL NA 0 275 1 V<`almoot Park R~vr `Nater Purnpnc~use Vaimcnt Ru~n 43`G 2UU5 5U 7055 $ 204,442 NA 301 0 PIONEER CEMETERY 9TH & PLEASANT NA NA 302 0 Heartlfn Plaza 1740 BROADWAY NA 303 0 13TH STREET PLAZA 1780 13TH STREET 7993 50 2043 NA Avve~d« s City ot Boulder 2005 Property Schedule ~~~ Addresa induding atreet BLDG. SO Servica ~ ~°~ YBef Upgrade Coet ~Iruct Pacitky Name numbar ~ Year Built Life Replaceme Replxement Coet Upgrada S0 ~ CRV ures ~ . ~ nt Due Dua ApVendin 9 ~~^ ~ r~ w~ ~ w~ ~r r~ ~~~^r ~~ r~ r.~ r~ ~ " Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning ., ~ Introduction '~ Over the past five years, significant changes in the azeas surrounding the City Yards have ~ occurred that directly impact operations and have caused staff to pursue more effective use of space. In addition, the existing Yards space is not adequate for all current ~ operations and these functions have overflowed to the Boulder Municipal Airport. ~ Recent major events impacting Yards operations include: planned development of the Valmont City Park site and the city's purchase of the Pollard Friendly Motors propeRy ~" for the Boulder Transit Village project with the agreement that land would be made '~ auailable at the Yazds for purchase by Pollard Friendly Motors. ~ A consulting design goup, EDAW, Inc., was hired to assist staff in developing plans to " meet the operational needs at the Yards for the next 10 years. In addition, the Real Estate ,,,, Division of the Open Space Mountain Parks Department (OSMP) was contacted to see if all operations located at the Yards could be moved to another site. OSMP's investigation '" determined that there aze no suitable sites within a reasonable distance that would meet ,,,. the current needs identified. Staff and EDAW have focused on defming the best use of existing space at the Yards and in malcing the existing space work more efficiently. ` Please see the plans below for a graphical representation of the existing and planned site ~. uses. ` Recommendation p The recommendation of the consultant is that the area of the Yards along Pearl Parkway, = approximately 8.4 acres, should be sold to one or two private parties and used for -• commercial purposes and replacement land purchased in close proximity to the Yards to meet identified needs. One parcel of land to be sold is approximately 1.8 acres and the ~ other parcel is approximately 6.6 acres. Overall P[an: ~ A phased plan would be implemented as described below: ,~ Phase I involves the subdivision, rezoning and sale of a 1.8 acre parcel located immediately souttt of the area leased to Eco-Cycle, sale of the 2.1 acre Park-n-Ride ~ property along Pearl Parkway, and the purchase of approximately 4.66 acres of land „~ adjacent to the Yards. On March 1, 2005, Council approved the purchase of approximately 4.66 acres, adjacent to the west boundary of the Yards, to partially replace '~ the land that is to be sold. One pucel of the existing Yards to be sold, approximately 6.6 ,. acres, is being held in reserve for relocation of Pollazd Friendly Motors, should they decide to relocate to that site. If they choose not to relocate to the Yards, the parcel "' would likely be sold to another private party. W Phase II includes the relocation of Eco-Cycle to a new site, deconstruction of the former "' Boulder Emergency Squad building, construction of additional city storage space as .. discussed below and the use of the 4.66 acres purchased for operations. Due to planned development of the Valmont City Park site, material (spoils) handling operations would ~ r Appendix l0 r. ~ Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning ` ~ be moved from the five-acre area northeast of Goose Creek to the land recently purchased -. and the cunent Eco-Cycle site. The sale/loss of land used for Yazds operations in Phases I& II equals 6.8 acres (1.8 acres sold in 2005, plus the five-acre spoils azea) and the '~ purchase/recovery of land that equals 6.76 acres (4.66 acres purchased, plus 2.1 acres - from Eco-Cycle). The net land area change for Yazds operations in Phases I and Il is essentially zero. ~ .. Phase III of the plan includes sale of the 6.6 acre pazcel along Pearl Pazkway and the possible pwchase of additional land. The purchase of additional land and construction of ~ any additional facilities is conceptual at this point and will depend lazgely on the amount " of funding available after the land sale/purchase transactions are finalized. Major facilities needed include: additional covered storage, contractor staging azea, light pole ~ storage, multi-use asphalt pad, additional vehicle wash facilities and additional materials " storage. See "Detailed Analysis" below for more information. It should be noted that ~ approximately 20 acres of land is leased at the Boulder Municipal Airport to support Yazds operations. This leasing arrangement is expected to continue through 2014. If the "' lease is terminated in the future, additional land area in close proximity to the Yards will ~ be needed. r Insuffcient and Improper Storage Space ~ The city has inadequate storage facilities to meet its needs, spending approximately $12,000 per year to rent private garage storage and over $25,000 per yeaz for private ~ storage of city records. In August 2003, the Boulder Emergency Squad moved to its new ~ home; iYs building became the property of the city. It is a two-story building, approximately 5,000 square feet in area, and has been renamed ~ as the "Yards Recycling and Storage Facility." From August 2003 through December ~ 2004, the facility was used for city recycling progams, storage of city records with short retention requirements, and storage of city equipment. Beginning in January 2005, the ~ warehouse has been leased by Eco-Cycle for three yeazs. The building meets some of the ~ city's current storage and records needs, but is not designed for use as a wazehouse or for ~ long-term records storage. The building is in fair condition and should be replaced with a permanent structure designed to better meet city needs. The city currently recycles many ~ items including: fluorescent lamps, lighting ballasts, fiuniture, rechargeable batteries, ~ scrap metal, building materials, etc. Public Works, Parks & Recreation and other departments routinely pick up abandoned drums with unknown contents, unwanted w household items, and other wastes discarded by owners that need proper chazacterization ~, and disposal. ~ Recommended Fisca![y Constrained Plan: ~ As noted previously, EDAW and staffhave developed a phased plan to be implemented over the next 10 years. Phase I of the plan is scheduled for completion in the 2005 to ~ 2006 timeframe. Phase II of the plan is planned for completion in the 2007 to 2009 ., timeframe. ~ These two phases are considered to be the minimum amount of modifications necessary r to continue efficient operations at the Yazds. A brief overview of each phase of the plan II~ r Appendix l0 A r a Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning .- is outlined below. See "Detailed Analysis" below for more information. The funding needed to implement the two phases of the Fiscally Constrained Plan will be provided by '~ the sale of land and by the Capital Development Excise Taac Fund. FAM recommends constructing a Yards Recycling and Storage Facility at ttte Municipal ~ Service Center in 2008 to address the city's needs identified above. The facility would be ~- approximately 5,200 square feet and include eight large storage bays. The project would be entirely funded by the Capital Development Excise Taac Fund (Fund 110). The ~ proposed facility would be designed to use space efficiently, have an environment "' suitable for storage of records with longer retention requirements (dust, temperature, and ,, humidity controls), and would establish an azea to segregate abandoned items recovered by the city until they can be chazacterized and properly disposed. See "Detailed '- Analysis" below for more information. ~ Recommended Action Plan: ° The Action Plan would implement Phase III of the plan described below and would be ,., scheduled for completion in the 2010 - 2014 timeframe. The funding needed to implement the Action Plan will be primazily provided by the sale of the 6.6 acre pazcel, "" supplemented by Public Works/Transportation and Utilities funds. See "Detailed .., Analysis" below for more information. ~ Detailed Analysis .R The City of Boulder Public Work's Department houses and operates its operations and "' maintenance service components of its three divisions - Transportation, Utilities, and r, Development and Support Services - at the Municipal Service Center located at 5050 and 5064 Pearl Street. The entire site includes approximately 120,457 square feet of `° facilities and structures and 797,701 square feet of land. w The original PUD for the site shows that the site is approximately 98% built-out. The site r is zoned PE - Public Established (public azeas and facilities for government use) and the ., land surrounding the site is zoned IG - General Industrial, which allows for a wide range of light industrial uses, including research and manufacturing operations and service ~ industrial uses. Since the last renovation and upgrade of the facilities and site in 1993, ~ there have been some changes and development of the land surtounding the site. These ~ changes along with potential new developments and redevelopments are generating the need to examine space needs and uses on the site to determine the ongoing and future use + ofthe site. Current Uses and Needs - The City of Boulder Municipal Service Center houses the Depattment of Public Works ~ workgroups of Transportation Maintenance, Signs and Signals Maintenance, Utilities Maintenance, Fleet Services, and Development and Support Services. .. Structures There are three major structures at the site: " • Building A(2005 Current Replacement Value: $4,238,547*) 34,971 square feet. ~ Appendix 10 ~ Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning Building A houses the administrative offices and workshops for Signs and Signal Maintenance, Transportation Maintenance, Utilities Maintenance, and Administrative and Support Services. The building contains a large lunch room/conference room, exercise room, as well as houses the City's IT super server mainframe computer. Buildings B1B2 and B3 (2005 Current Replacement Value: $1,294,543*) 25,178 square feet. Building B1B2 is a combination enclosed heated vehicle storage facility and an open-air, covered truck-port for vehicle pazking used by both Utilities and Transportation Maintenance. Building B3 is a large, enclosed, heated vehicle storage facility used by Transportation Maintenance. • Fleet Services (2005 Current Replacement Value: $2,860,921 *) 25,770 square feet. The Fleet Services houses the entire fleet services operations including office space, parts and material storage, and 18 service bays. The land surrounding the Fleet facility is used for vehicle and equipment parking and storage. *Replacement values are per the January 2005 Facilities and Asset Management Insurance Listing. There are vazious other non-enclosed structures on the site used primazily for vehicle and material storage: • A car/truck wash facility and a fueling facility are located in the center of the site between Building B and the Fleet Services building. The caz/truck wash facility consists of two concrete wash bays, bulk water filling bay, and a cold storage area. The facility is 1,690 square feet in size. The fueling facility is approximately 6,000 square feet. • A 5-bay, concrete bin-structure houses Transportation Maintenance's snow and ice control materials, asphalt paving materials, and other street maintenance materials. (Approximately 5,140 squaze feet) Land Use The current land use at the site consists primarily of material and equipment storage and parking for the workgroups including: • Signs and Signal Maintenance uses approximately 26,000 square feet for material and equipment storage (including signal mast arm storage). • Transportation Maintenance uses approximately 5 5,000 squaze feet for material and equipment storage and parking, And, has an approximately 3,000 square foot concrete pad with steel storage tanks on it for liquid deicer storage. Utilities Maintenance uses approximately 37,000 squaze feet for material storage and equipment and vehicle parking Fleet Services uses approximately 25,000 square feet for pazking/storing vehicles and equipment. Fleet Services has a state-licensed Commercial Driver's License (CDL) course that occupies 28,800 square feet. This site must stay properly lined and marked, and cannot have materials stored on it. Appendix ]0 w " Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning _ - • Material Supply uses approximately 3,174 square feet for outdoor storage of inventory materials and supplies. - There is an additiona1212,980 squaze feet of land located next to the Parks Maintenance Facility on the north-west side of the site that is prnnarily used by Utilities Maintenance ~ uses for material ("spoils") storage. This site is designated for Parks & Recreation ~ Department use when the Valmont Park site is developed. ~ Transportation Maintenance currently uses approximately 800,000 square feet of land at " the Boulder Municipal Airport for material storage (sweeping program debris, asphalt „ millings from the annual overlay program, etc.), for material screening operations, for equipment storage, and for heauy equipment training. ,.~ PUD Deve[opment P[ans The site is zoned PE (Public Established) and by its PUD plan is approximately 98% ` built-out. The remaining development planned for the site is the consttuction of an ~ additional building for storage of MSC materials, as well as for citywide storage needs. ` The facility is to be built on the western-most portion of the site on city-owned land and ~ includes the former Boulder Emergency Squad Building that will be leased to EcoCycle as of Januazy 1, 2005 in addition to the existing space leased to EcoCycle. These leases ~ aze for three-year terms and will expire December 31, 2007. The combined land square ..~ footage for bottt sites is approximately 120,000 squaze feet. ~ In the amended PUD (June 1993), the construction of the structure was proposed in .- phases. The first phase of the structure is planned during the Phase II of the development ~ plan and is proposed to be 5,200 squaze feet and would take over the former Boulder Emergency Squad site. The full expansion of the facility (to 10,500 square feet) is - planned dwing Phase III of the plan. ~ This facility was identified in the 1998 Facilities and Asset Management (FAM) Master *~ Plan as a needed facility. The city currently spends approximately $37,500 per year on ~„ leased storage space and for non-city storage services. FAM would like to construct this facility and have all storage needs met and managed by the city in 2008. ~ ,,,. Funding for construction of the facility is identified in the capital improvement program (CIP) for 2008 with all funding being provided from the Capital Improvement " Development Excise Tax Fund (Fund 110). ~ Service and/or Eacpansion of Current Needs " Sign and Signal Maintenance has taken over the ownership from Xcel Energy Company .. of all traffic signal combination poles. This requires the City to stock a significant numbet of poles, foundations, luxninaire extensions, and luminaire arms, to maintain '~ existing field inventories and to supply new and modified installations. It is estimated ~ that 4Q000 square feet of storage area (land space) is needed to accommodate this. ~ Appendix 10 Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning Transportation Maintenance needs to construct a separate wash facility to handle asphalt and oil waste from its vehicles. The current wash facility does not have an appropriate separation tank for the capture of this type of waste. It is anticipated that approximately 2,700 squaze feet of land space at (if connected to the existing facility) or near the existing wash bays is needed. Transportation Maintenance also wants to expand its existing concrete material storage facility by four covered bays. This requires land directly to the west of the existing structure. Access to the three south bays of the existing facility will be lost in the sale of the 6.6 acre pazcel to private ownership and the expansion would provide one additional storage bay. If the Boulder Municipal Airport expands its hangers or buildings, or if the site is no longer available for material storage by Transportation Maintenance, then an altemative site will need to be provided (approximately 800,000 square feet). The Airport Master Plan is being updated in 2005 and will provide guidance on use of this site. In the near term, the Yazds will continue to lease land at the Airport site to support Yards operations. With the development of the Valmont Park site, approximately 9Q000 square feet of material storage used by Utilities Maintenance on the northeast side of the Parks Maintenance Facility building will be eliminated and an altemative location will need to be provided. The park site will likely be constructed in phases during the next ten years and this relocation is included in Phase II of the development plan. A contractor staging azea is a new, desired use for the MSC site. Currently in Boulder, there are limited places for contractors doing work for the city to stage equipment, materials, trailers, etc. When conttactors have to lease space or use space outside of the city for staging, it drives up the cost of a project for the city. If the city can provide an area for contractor staging on-site at the MSC it will reduce to cost of city projects. To provide this service, approximately 40,000 squaze feet of land space is needed. Impacts to Existing Uses on MSC Site Although the zoning of the MSC site and the surrounding land has not changed, and is not anticipated to change with the exception of the subdivision and rezoning of the Yards itself, the development and redevelopment of uses around the site have caused or may potentially cause some of the existing uses of the MSC site to be reduced or to cease. In addition, the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan allows for development around the site that may include office space and some limited residential development. These types of uses may not be compatible with the existing uses of the MSC, as there is the potential for "impacY' issues to arise around noise, smell, airborne materials and dust, hours of operation, eta These are primarily quality of life issues, however, the MSC has had to react to health impact issues (smell and airborne dust) that have arisen now that different uses have begun to neighbor the property. For example, in 1995 a commercial building was constructed east of the MSC. Its owner is a hi-tech hazdware development company. Immediately to the west of this building is Appendix 10 = Municipal Service Center (MSC) Facilities and Site Planning ~ the Utilities Maintenance "spoils" material storage site. When mulch was stored at the site, the company complained that the mulch had an odor and that it became airborne ' during winds. The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE) •- determined that the smell and airborne pollution issues required correction. The City spent $7Q000 to remove the mulch from the site (it was hauled to an organic recycler). ~ The city lost the benefit of using the mulch for city projects. For years prior to this " complaint, mulch had been stored on-site. In addition, the grinding and recycling components of the Spring Cleanup program had been done onsite at the MSC for yeazs. '~ Following direction from CDPHE, these activities also ceased. ~ ~, With the anticipated development of the Valmont Park site there is the potential for "impacY' issues to arise. The prior use of the new park site was for vehicle/junk storage. " The new users of the land probably will be more likely to be concerned with things that ,,, occw from MSC uses, such as huck traffic, noise, smell, airbome materials, hours of operation, eta This will most likely be true for other uses that develop (office buildings, ` residential, etc.). f Therefore, the MSC staff want to identify these potential problems and to look for " possible solutions or directions to take, before problems occur. T Options and Direction ` The following are some additional options or directions to consider to address current and ~ potential space needs as well as potential "impacY' issues that may arise: y • Identify altemative sites not at the MSC for material storage. Determine costs and - impacts to operations. ~ • Consider relocating entire operations to an alternative site further away from ^ developments. This would involve the sale and purchase of real estate and most ,,, likely would require bonding to fund. OSMP/Real Estate was contacted and there are currently no sites for sale within a reasonable distance of the MSC. ~ .. • Relocate the CDL course to another site (possibly the new Valmont Butte site) or discontinue the CDL licensing program in-house to allow for more on-site " storage. ~ • Ask the Planning Department to consider restricting zoning/development of land " around the site, through the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, to not allow "~ uses other than light industrial (uses which aze compatible with existing MSC uses). ~ ~ .. .. ^ r ~ ` Appendix 10 s ~ ~ ~ ~ w ~ ~ ~ ~ as ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~^ • LOCATION MAP , ~ ~ ~, ~ 0 300 600 900ft , Boulder Municipal Airport = 20 Acres Boulder City Yards = 24 Acres Valmont City Park = 5 Acres ~ ~ ! ~ ~ ~ ~ ~# ~ _ i*'~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ EXISTING CONDITIONS VALI.IONT ;:ITY i'ARK ~ PEARL ST~~~~ ` ' ~ ~ . ......_ . --_. `\ ~a a ~___~ ~ 0 o ~ I ____ _ ~ ~Q_~ ~_~~~__ - \ "' ~I CITY YARD$ j~ s I ~ 1 2~ ACHES .. \ ~ ~ ~ a[~ ~ Q ~ ~ ~ , _ ~ L~ / ~ ~Y Pµ~ I / p~ / p~ , L' u ~ ___~ City Yards r +r ~ I I ~ VAIMONT I I SPOILS AREA I 5 4CRE5 I I ' II I / l ,~ - , 200 400 ft. ' ' Appendix 10 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~i ~ ~ ~! [ 1 ~~ I 1 I 1 ~"-~! [ l ~ ~ !~ ~ ~ f ~ • SURROUNDING LAND USES ~ ~-~ ,y ~ "e ' '~:~:i ~' ~ ~- „~, ,~, 1 - ~ ~'.hv ,J ~~ ~t . { _ .: ~ ~•',s~ M A= ~ ~` ..'Y ~ ,~, ~ ~ Y ~ ~ 4.,' y _ e 6 '3. p.:r:, { . . ~'.j+y . . : , ~ a ,~ ~ --~ r - - ' ~- ' . ~-, , _ _ ~ City Yards r r f ~ Gly Pafk f I . ~ . I:' ~~ YAIMONT I saoi~s Open Space ~~I~I AREA ,I l i ;1 Commercial 1. il -~:.::::_~ i; J ~. ~°f Industnal .~ f ..Y ~/ / Q~,P~~ OPEN SonCE / L~ -. 1 .i; ' .. .. .1~.. . . 2 0 400 ft. '.~i~ VA~MONT CITY PARK ~ ~- ....w~ ""' .. - ~ ~v .. - . ~ ~ ., ~.. .~ .. - ._~ . ~ n, , TftfF`1 ~~~_ ~ h Y ~ PEARL ~~ \ 4=- .~r"y~ -,. ` yr '~ ~„` ` _'r,.l~ ~} ,~ ~ I ~ . ~ ~ ~ s x= ~ ~,I \ ~~ -~ ~~ ^ o \ ~' ,•`~ a~-~ rll'. YARpS ~... :, o o , ~.. ~~:;~ ~~Y~ o ~ y~~ ~ ~~,~_ i . _" / ~. ~~~~~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~+ I f"_7 r~ 1 or~t+ L_J 1~...1 I Appendix 10 `~~ _V ~w r rs ~^w ~s ~e ~ ~w w~ ~ ~s ~ ~ ~ w~^ ~^^ ~ ~ ~ ~ • EXISTING SITE USES iAIMONT CITY PAFK ~ ~ ~ 0~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ W a ~ N ~ < JQ ~ Q 0 ~ ~ ~ ;1 ~ L ~. ~, ~,o , _ ~ ~ U ~ " ; _~_ J Administration & - Parking = 3.9 AC ~ ~ ~ , ~---; = ~ Secured Parking = ~ 0 9 AC ~ ' ° ' ` ~" 1 e"'!"" ,_F~_~_:'-«' J Equipment Storage & Mamtenance = ' 6 38AC ' ~ ~ 4 ; ~ Fuelmg 8 Washmg = 1 1 ~ --- 1.2 AC ` I ~ __s ~ Fieet Services 8 L ~ Police Impound = 3.9 AC ~'" g ; Matenals Storaye. ----' Trans(er & Recycling = 8.8 AC ~" 7 ; - -' Drrver~Operator - Traimng Course = 1 .2 AC. r'-- v K~. :;y~y. y Conhnetl Area 8~ Hazartlous Material Trainmg = 1,1 AC. ~~,`.'r'',~ landscape Buffer = nPEN SPACE 2.3 AC. i~ 10 J EcoCyCle = 2.2 AC Total = 29.1 AC. 200 400 ft. ~ ~~,-` Appendix 10 ~----, 2 ----r 1-- _ _ _ ._l / `~ ~ _?---~,~~ `~ r--___ ._ __ ` I~~~~ ~+ . ~ ~ •CITV Y:.HD5! ~ ,' ~ ' ' ~ ~ 1 1 ~ ' O ' ' ' t ' ' 1 Phase 2 Plan: 3- 5 year limeframe (2007 - 2009) - Ecocycle Relocated incorporate land into Ciry Yards Sife (+ 2 7 Acres) Loss of Valmonl Park Spoils Area (- 5.0 Acres) ~ Baulder Ciry Yartls 6perabonal Boundary (26 9 Acres~ Constructlo,i of General Srorage 52~Osi Deconstruct Yartls Watehouse and Ecocycle ouibuild~r,gs - - Material Sforage 26 000 s.( ~ VJ"',ar Goose CreeM ~ ~ ', Ccverec Storage ' ~~ r - 45~OOsf i i ; ~- ' ~ Gfycunirac'or - ~ sfaging area ~~ ~0000sf ~-_ ------- _ - I ~, Phase 1 I i Acquisitian - -i ~ _ -- _ ~_._ ~„ Maierial storage erea I ~'{ 40.000 5 ~ ~ I~,~ ~ I ~ I i~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' P~pe 8 Pole Storage I~ I I~ I ~ i 3s.ooa s f ~~ ~ I~II!~~ ' II '; i Ii~~~ II I ~ , I ~~ ~ i~ i ~ ~~s '`C. PP~ nur„~~,si~aao~~. ~!e- ~ic so~,~;q~ e; i : ~ ~ n ~ - Boufder City a Yartls I Ecocycle 2.I Acres = I I ~ ,~ BOULDER CITY YARDS PHASE 2 MASTER PLAN Valmont Park ~ 1 I 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ' ~ ' Phase 3 Plarr 6-10 year timeframe (2010 - 2014~ Sale uf Phase 2 frontage area (- 6.6 Acresl ~ ~ Boulder C~y Yards Operational Boundary 120 3 Acresj D~splacemen( ot: HAZMAT storage area ~ Confined lraining area ~ Impounded veh,cle storage Relncation of COL Course (28,806 s.f ) Construction of Addrtioral MSC Storage (5,3D0 s f) Potential Phase 3 acquisition (TBD) Addllional Operatlonal Reqwrements Addi~ionaiwashfacdity (2,lOQsf.) ~isplacement from airporf sile (800.ODO s f ~ DisplacementiromValmontParkslte (90,OOOs.t) Phase 3 MSC Covered Storage 5~300 s.f Addihonal Wash faciGty 2.700 s.t Consiruction af rew access to Gty Yards site and existing parking lot Conslruct~on o( 9 Covered Malerial 5lorage Bins 2,100s1 Reahgnmeni ol overhead transmission lines (--}~ I~r'~..~~ar ~1 Goose CreeM ~ i~ ' Govered Storace 45.D00 s f. Iti I !i' i Y I I ~ ~ty contrac~or I slag~r,g area J ~ 40,OD0 s f Phase 1 ~ Acquisition I' ~ --- I ~ il Phase 2 MSC Sto~age Boulder City 5,200 s f ~~ snx~oae~, a: Yards Material storage area . 40A00 s.l- ~ ' -- I I Plpe & Pole 5(orage ~i ^ i Ma~erial 5torage -- - 26.000 s f 35,000 s.f ~c,~, ~ F ~~. ~ Pearl Parkway FronWge 6.6 Acres •~•• .~. ,~. ,~. ,~• ~. /,. ': y ./../~. ` .~. ,' , ~. BOULDER CITY YARDS PHASE 3 MASTER PLAN ~ m ~ - ~ _ - ~,~a~r~. Valmom Park ~~-s~y~~~. .~ Capital Drrclopincni fund Ilia7on~ Totuls ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ~ 1 ~ ' DF.PEI.OPM11EM1T E%CISE T.4X - . ~~ . . ~ ~ . i , FC~U IIU , . I . . . . . . . RG~'F.NLiESdiEVPENDITI~RF.S ~ , . : . . , . ', . ~. . . 5~uru5 19A7 19RA ~ 19A9 1990 . 1991 ~ , 1992 1993 199A 1995 1996 ~ 1997 1998 1999 . 2000 . 20U1 20U2 ~ 20Dti 21104 BEGI~'NING BALAKCE S 5 (11)'~. ~ 1N8,496 5 721.661 S 1.1194,512 ~~ S 132J.19% S 1.179,Z51 A 1.4NI.fi74 S 1.N18,8N6 $ I,&f9,916' S 2,ISd.8U7 $ Z 1A9.J37 x 25UU.719 S 2,9J7I07 5 2.a9M1.9M13 S 2.~4JiN ~ 5 3.0211.028 S 3,567.02M1 I ~.IqJGn.irr.. . ~ . e ,...r~l ~ . ~~~;.-r_~ ~_. . . .-. ,~,: , .. ;-nu~.: . ~ .~.....' . . .,.__. . . ~,_-'~ ~ , ;,..~,;~ , ;.,.iri ~ ~ . ., _ '~ ~ ~ -- ~ _ l . .., . i.ir~,,.~: --- ~ ii~.. ..., ~.ii .. i ~I ,crPn~~...~_~. , . c,i;' +, .*~~.: , r.l.`ii ~. ., I, ~.~ ~,.i> ~ c::,r., . .~..nnLl ~ ii .i_~ •~. ~ li;'in . ~ . ~: 1 ~ ~~~ ~ . . ~~ IfllAIR}lh.AII.S _ _ .._- __ __ ' • li:U~l ~ ~nNP~~ - - ti ;A'~,~~~N . ~ _ `I16.!'U I ~ al~.'JU~ . ntl.'„1 •~ 1 'I'~.I!'1 } ;ili., ! YH' ~ ,II;, li ' H_ ~ ~i l'~.oi~] .. ~ i1111~41 . ~ .,zin: ~ ~ i;nn l fi?_ ~ ,~ a .J_._M1l ~ ~ '.VII. h4 ~ 7a..t<i ~ •~1:.1%` j _ i!~7Alh - i. , ~~~ .I,. , ~ . . _ ~~~, . ~. I ~„ . ,. . .. ~ ~ i . ~ , i . - ~ ~ , . , i.~ , . . . .. . ~ i . I - _ ~. . _ -. - . . , . ~f~l\II\'~'I\lillll;~~'. ' - . , . ' i I~.. , I'~'):t . . - ;ptll . .. , ~ - ~ 1"Ii11Vl .. ;~ti~'lli . . ..•:0~, . ~ 'I,.."I . . . ~ Inf~IN~~ . . ~ '-.1,"~4' .: . ~'ll"~'~li . . il'.I+I ~ . ~ .'~'.~i . ~ ,.'..Il~~i~ . I ~I~~lll` . ... M IIIyFM . . n• 'll(. . . il i 1`'~~'I . . ` \G."'~ ~ .. E~DINC BALAVCE , 3 10~I 4 1R8A9fi S 721,661 $ 1,094 ~72 S 1,227,19%. $ 1,119.251 S 1A81.679 ~. S I,BIR.N86 . S I.N49,936 }; 2,Itq,gll7 S 2345q}7 F Z.5pU,779 S 2.4a1 tlll S ?,a96,963 $ 2,99b164 $ 3.02U,D38 S 3 Sfi7.02fi ~ S 4.0114,717 ~ . ~. , , . . . . . . . ~ . ~~ ; .. . . _ . . II . . . ~ ~ET RE1 E~OF:S & PROJE(T EXPE~'DITl'RE~'1 . ; I~ ~~ , . ~ ~ . I ~~ ~~ '~ . RT 1PECIPIC C.47EGOR1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s~viu+ 1987 1988 1989 I99D 1991 1992 199J ~ 1994 1495 ~ 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 ~ 2003 2004 'rar~e NOLICE ~ . . . ~ . ~ . _ . . ~~ , . . . . . . ~ i ,~.. ~~ .. : . ~ , ~ ~ _. ~_c . .. _ i.~p...~ ~ ~ .~_ ~, .. . ,,,~i. . . , ~~,. . ,.~ .~ , . .- . . ~.' ; ti ~ ~ ~ ~ ~i ~~ - -- -- ' -~ .~, iili~ R~innd.~l _ ~5 S ~ ~ ~ '~ b B 4 11 h97 S b h 'b '~ vull 3 $ _ ~~ ~~~,~a;t~ Nlil~ l iime I.ab Fvrm>inn ~ ~ 5 b 4 S 4 ~ b ~ 4 ! - ~ 4~ 8 ~ 7J ~1G S '?568 ,~ 6 ... ,~,I:Fa~~~le= ` -- 5 -- 5 5 _ ~ - 5 . ,6 - 5 R ~ S - ! I.'_~I ~ - 'f ~6 5 S b $ . ~. ~~asici Plun ,4 5 $ 9. 5 'b $ b 8 ;7,771 ~ S x 4 - S - _t . -- 5 - b -' .. . ~~~ Pohr. Anncv b ~ x 5 ~ . X .. 'y b f. 3 I'~isc ~ ~ - - 4 - ~ % - 3 b - 3 ~ .. ~~rvic.°~ -- ~ ~ 4 ~ 6 fi d I<c ~ 100.~1fN1 ~ - S 5 - b In1 5 i - t _ R 5 - 9 6 6 i P I+Ir. Sofie~ fiidr c g . b c t g c . } 5 ¢ t . < ~(i pJ ~. 6 5 t , ,. . , .n , .. ~ . . . . :. ~ , ~ , . . . Reeenoesless Ex endilures $ ~ 1.954 A 23,5q2 5 . 97,R~711~. S IOA,967 S .. ; NB,S~,t i 5 ...~ 4l 5;3 5 IIJ,H2A S . 107,~fi0 S 12fi,70h S ISSSI 5 fi7,191 S 90 ill S 117,1130 ~• ~-~~ ~~^. S . fiS t~a g a~,13~ !~ . 134,279 _ . 9 . 9N.?J11 S 1,242,536 LIBNARI . ~ i ~ . . . ~ . . . . . . ~ ~ II.<,.:, ~ ..'. .- . _ -i ._ ~. __ „~ ~. __-__ ,.~ . __ .. ._ ---!.~_ . . ' . ~ , ;_~ _~. .... ... td_ ; ~ ___ . ,,., . „ ' , ,.. ~., ~., ~ . ~ __ . , "' q';. F.~pndilures ~ _ . -. .. _ , ~ i : ` S -- --~ $ . i ~ - 1H `- - ~. ! y ,- _ ~ ~ _ ~ ~ ._ - .. . . . .~ .. ~ .. . . , ~ . . . . . . . . . . , , , ~ . . .. . . , I . . ~ . I . . i . . . . ~ , . Re+enues less F.x endilures S . I~51 ~ S IA.h9U ~ f .. 2y 559 3 . , 71J2? , S 75.9112 5 . 710.3+tM1 S ~ 13?.711 S 85JR9 3 1~.3?5 ~. S . 27.5d4 . $ 19.}}2 S iA t27 $ 72 514 • ~.: s~: R 2fi.604 . $ __.. tJ,1W 5 67,9J3 3 114i,~55 S 997.7MI FIRE _ . . ~ n P..,~, ~. . . . , . ~ . ~ - . , , ~ - - . ,.. ~ , ,~ . . ~ i . , . , ~ , . ~ , I ~ . ,. . .,. _ _-__ ~ . ___- ._ - _ _ - - __ _ . . _ _ -_ __ _- . - . _ . -_ - __- __ .._ ~una~ i,,~, ~ ~c1 A . D ) 5 , Ji,.iimi \ ;'~.J_ -- S A ~ ` fi a ~ --- s i. ~ S _ ~ ~h ~ ~ "uTew~l r,,r6~un S 9 A f, '~a * l -~-- ~ i~, :;r 6 In;.4a~ + e.n,tb 5 ~ b ~ 5 f~ 6 5 ~ +2 1 e,~~~ .~ ~,n Lm:l PurehaRe ~~ i F 6 S S i- 5 - S ~ S - 5 }~' =~~17 K:i 6 5 S e > tl ~ C ~P.~! ~- . ~f~~rti~~.~i ~ii ' _._ _.._ _- - - . ~ - _-- 1 . . . .---. ~ _ _- _._ k _ __ _ 5 - . _.__- < _. . _. ~ . . _ 4 ( i . '. ~ . l 'I Ili' . . r.c;h.i%" .... S ~ i .. ~. . . . , ~ . ~, . . , 1 ~ . ~ . ~ . _ . ~ , ~ . . .. Rerenues kss EM endilurrs ~ 1.7911 I S ?I.S63 ~ S ~ NI1,?{p g 91.J32 ~ . .~ 'o:, . ~i -~~;,~i S 1011.61U ~ ~~~.i ~ .~~~i :.S 78.&i9~ $ --61,2JX , '~~: ::.~ . S . J6,129 .. __ ,~~ n'i~~ $ ' Lfi.OJI ', S 78.726 5 1JJ,69R S S?.%Oi ~ HOOSING&HOMA9SF.R~lCES -- - -- . . . ~ - - . . . . . ~ . _ . . - - . - ~ . . ~ - ~ - - - ~ - ~ ' . . i, . . - ~ ~~n~ i,.i_i , . , .~ i . 'in ~ ,i ,a,i ~ ,i~i .,.i. , . . . ~~~~:.~:~.,i. 5 5 ~ 5 % - T - b - 5 b - f~ d~~J S - i 1 S -- ~d ~ 5 ~ S ~ 4 T i!-: ~~ mna~ IwLo,cinrns - 'b S S _ - - b . 'SAfiu c~ - g . 5 - ~ ~ ~ b ~- - j --- 5 b 5 t 6 „_„ i :cr•,, -- -. . _ __- < - - ------ a ~-- - ~- a -- --- - , - --- - t - , - ~ ~, ---- : - --- -- -- ---- c - - -- - - - -- --- - - -------- -- c -- c - --- - ---- - - . . ~ . - .~ . ~ ~ I~ . ~ . .~ , '. I , . ~ . . ~ . ~. .. ~ . i Rc~~enuiw kxc 4,~ enditunre ,$ 675 S 7,M1J5 % 2J.711 i , S 3,356 S 2490t S J3A21 S 75.2U6 i S J~t.92v ~ S 39.121 N 28 Slfi ~ 5 22.9J7 i S 3U.606 ~ ~ i I: `~~;. ~ 5 M.89i $ 27.N29 R S1.d14 ~ 5 Jl.I~Ue $. 328.040 ~ M1IC~9CIPAI.FACILITI6ti ~ . . ~ . . . ~ ~ ' ~ . . . . . ~ _i~~ _ n_I_. _ _ •ir ' ~ _ - '1~u~i~ _ ri~,; ~ ' ;u-I 1.-- ~-~- _ -- - _ _ - ~' 1 _ ~'m.~ _ _ •-~ ~ _ - I.'. - --- I ~ _. ~ .._~P:r I~..i n~J, .~___._ . . .. __ _. -_ __ 5 b S~ S il $li ~ Jn.IIVJ b 5 ~ _ S }~ S -- 5 _ 4 ~ g S - S - 5 ~ 5 y. i,~., .. Ilmltlni~ 5 b 4. 4 - 8 .._ ! 5 37J961 b 3.In9 6 S . 5 . b b S - 5 - _ - 5 5 1~ _ ~F;~~~ ,i tiinrec Paciln~ ~ £ Y S _ F _ b A S S 8 5i~ ~ r,s IHIII 5 9~ S 5 Y 5 4 tn Hri(. ~ .: I.,~ tiwd~ i~ -~ S - - b - F~ 5 4 S % 5 ~ 5 ~ '_n.?oi ; ~ 4 - ~ ~ 5 - 5 h - 4 ~~,Lie~. ~~ ,~ul Hac~llue~ Pl.in S b 1 5 '6 - 4 F 4 f X '.uol~ f 9 4 -- S S S 3~ - ' nOf'~. oall'Inn S b - _- ~ 4 S A S q - . --~ ~ - S t ~ S 6%.11~9 S I'17~iH S S - D 'h, - i, - C q~ ^~~;. ~~~i;~l°..,i,~_ ~ < . . ; ,.,~~. - c <' .~ } - ---- Ih~i~icn i~ IJFJi, _ -- „~r ~ ctl ~ < ~-- ~ < - ~ c, _ - ° - - ` < . .S :._ -~ .. _._ c ~. . _ . , a.~~~t _ ~ . . . ~ - g - -- - -- _ - . _ _ - . . . _ . . _ . . _ ~ . _ . ~ ~ ~ - - ~ - ~ Rcicnmti kss 6x ~ rndfmres ~ 5 2.171 5 2fi,157 ~ S 7iAfi7 ~ a - 33 5711 ~ S 57.Y97 ~~ n~i . ~ , ~~+~ ~.~ S IIS773 5 W3,091 . . S . ~ 66 iNl - ' ~ ~ Y N2.96J $ 1i2.495 y 186.A3; 5 a1.X99 ~ S X3AAR . R 153.386 ~ 5 121.It1 S 942. IU9 STREEI~tiffk:?I . ~~ . I . ~ _ . . ~' P .~ . i , . ._ ... , ~. . . . , . . . . . ~ ~ . ' , I . . . . . , i ~ .. . . . . , . . . . '' ~ ' . . . _ . . . ~. I Rerenues kss Er enditures 5 ~A97 S 105,195 ~ i'~'.. ~' I~ ~~ ~, `~~s i., ~ nI~ nla ' nla nfa nla n!u nla n!a nla nla nla , nla ', nla nla S~ S,~i45 OTHF.RI~'01-PHOJECTREL.4'TED ~ . ~~ ~ i . . ~ ~ i '~. - ~ P . , ~ , - ' ~ , ~ - ~ _ . .~ ', . ~ ~ . , . . . ~ . ~ . . ~~, , ~ . _. . , , ~ . _ , . , ' ' . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . , . , .. , _ . , , . . . ~ ,. . , . , .. . ~ . . .. . , . Rcrrnurs Icss Ex entli~ures iP ~~~', • ,~ i;, ~~:, S .16.9fiS ~ S M1i3U4 5 70.B22 5 2U,596 5 183~i2U S 22 177 • - ~'~ 5 ftR.lU9 S 52.63N S I IR.~19fi 'S I?A.NC; S IUS.222 ' S I13,)511~ ~ N5p12 S %.13R S 16,191 S 766.60J ~i Appcndfs I I ~ _ ^ ~ ~ ~ .. ~ ~ .. r r Cftf~ n~,Rnv(drT 7>>~i~G~ ?' ~r(=i,"• `•'!?`f?1cpt. q'r'~ ^n~, °41 Z~:d.,tr, :'., „0306 Structursl Condition Assessment The Camegie Library 1125 Pine Street Boulder, Colorado Nicol Associates Project No. 04082 January 6, 2005 Appendix 12A 1 ~ _ The Camegie Library, Boulder, Coloiado " Job No. 04082 Page 2 ~-. -- 3.2 Foandalion The building is founded on the site's natural soils. The perimeter exterior walls are load- '"' bearing masonry walls extending to the bearing soils and forming a 3 ft. to 4 ft. lugh crawl space beneath the main level. The perimeter wall at the crawl space is '~ approximately 17 inches t6ick except at the south fagade where the wall thickness is ,~ expanded to appmximately 4 ft. to 5 R thick. tllso, a 3'h R Urick x 8'h ft. long portion af wall occurs along the west wall st the fireplace location. The south fa~ade portion of the +- perimeter wall appears to be supportcd on a continuous conaete slab. Cavities (one in the east perimeter wall and two in the south perimeter wall) were observed from the ciaw( ` space. The east wall cavity penetrated the wall approximately 8 iaches while the south ~ wall penetraflons were more on the order of 3 to 4 feet (Ref. photos # 9, 10, & 11). ~. The interior of the mein floor slxucture is suppor[ed on a continuous 13-inch tiuck stone mesonry wall located at the center of du ctawl space end c~ctending in a ~wtth-south -• direction (Ref. phoW #12 ). The center wall ie appmximately 2'-8" lugh at the portion located beneath the main level a~ bears on a continuous 20 inch wide x 12 inch deep "' concrete footing. The wall is interrupted by a 3 ft wide, wood framed, ventilation duct at a location approximately 34 feet from the interior face of the south perimeter wall (Ref. ^ photos #13 & 14). w One other lerge penehation for metal ductwork was observed along the length of tfie wall ~- (Ref. photo # 15). Verious other sroall diameter penetratious were observed in the interior foundation wall. The south portion of the main level floor suuchue is currenfly supporting library book ~ stacks. To accommodate the heavier book stack loads, 8"x 8" wood beams were added ~ beneath the main level, in the south crawl space area. The beams are supportcd on various combinations of stacked stonework, wood poste, snd adjustable steel posts. The -~ steel posts aze in bun, supported on stacked 2x12 wood pads (Ref. photo #16). '"' Concrete spread footings are loceted in the north crawl space areAs of the building and are supporting various concenuated loads from the building above. ,,,, Thece is no evidence w suggest 1Lat a sub-surFace dcainage system exists along the north, wes; and south sides of the bu't~~ foundation These pocrione of the site appear to be ., e~cposed mainly to ground s~uface water nw-of~ w}uch is accoroplished by the sloped wntows of the finiahed grades. i Two downspouts are connected to the roof gutter, which extends along the east edge of ~ the roof et the north end of the building. The downspouts penetrate into the ground and ,r, are believed to be connected m a below g~ade drainage system, which extends along the east side of the building. ~ ~ ~ ~ .~ ~ .. Appendix 12A 3 ~ The Carnegie Library, Boulder, Colorado `"" Job No. 04082 Page 4 .-. Floor construction at the main level is hardwood finisb flooring over nominal 1 inch ~.. diegonal wood sheathing. The upper and lower level floors are of conventionally &amed wood joist and plywood ' sub-floor wnshucfion. ~ T6e roof over the wain level is framed with parallel chord flat wood dusses spaced at -- 32"o.c, with 2x10 joists centered between the trusses. The roof trusses span in an east- west direction and are supported by the east and west brick mesonry walis. The top "' chords of the trusses are 2xL0, bottam chords aze 2x6, and web members are (2a lx6's. _ The uuss top chords etep down fram the south exterior wall to the south edge of the ppPCi' ~p~CIJJ~ninP.) level and are then sloped &om west to eaet w achieve a positive slope ,~ for dramege firom the south exterior wall W the roof gutter located along the east edge of the roof ebove the upper level. ~ ~ The floor and mof shucture appear to be in good wndition and performing as intended 33 Envelope-Ezterior Walls ~ The exterior walls are generaUy l2 inch flrick, load-bearing, brick masonry waUs ,,, exteading from the top of the crawl space foundation walls to tbe top of the pazapets above the roof strucdse. The wall thiclmess at the south exterior wall is 4 ft. Uvck at t~e ... eest and west ends. The mid-section of the south wall contains two sWne columns measwing approximately 24 inches in diameter and are supporting stone linuls above `" (Ref. photo #1). A stone comice extends continuously from around the brickpilaster at the southwest comer of the building, along the length of the south exterior wall and along ° tbe eest exterior wall to the brick pilsster located at the south edge of the east l~andicap r. entrY• ,,.. 1'he north and south exterior walls are secured IateraUy with two roinforcing tie rods wluch e~ctend through the roof truss space and are placed at the appro~cimate ~/3 points of '•" the length of the wall (Ref. phoW #2). " The east and west exterior walls are secure~ lsterally with three steel tie rods located ~„ beneath the stone comice, near the south end of rhe building, which are tied wgether with steel plate straps at each end. Two additional steel tie rods aze located Puther north, ., beneafl~ the stone cornice (Ref. phoW #3 & 6). ~ The exterior walls are in fair condition witli signs of early wear and distress as evidenced by the presence of the aforementioned horizontal steel tie rods and steel s6ap plates. Tlu "~ tie rods and strep plaus appeaz to be effective in pnveating any undency forwazd ~ outwazd rotation of the walls. ,~„ Further weer and distress in the exterior walls is evidenced by the sepazation of brick mortar joints, damaged brick and stone units, and significent loss of mortar from the ~ stone comice veracal mortar joints (Ref. photos #21, 22, 23, 24, 8c 25). The above descnbed damage to the exterior walls is primarily attribuud w foundation movement " and freeze/thaw affects of surface moisture which have likely been ongoing throughout the life of the building. r w. r ~ .. Appendix 12A 5 '~; --c Vem Seieroe Architect A.I.A r, ~g~n . p~aiming • ikerioraiehilecture «., ~b, office: 2Gi1 Lee HiB Drive ~ 79Ci614° Street ~ Boulder, Calorado 80302 Boulder, CWorado eo302 ~ro"' • ~` ge 1 of 1p~g es _ nwo~ aosaazea~e om~ 3oaeaass2o ~29August2003 ' ~drc. 3osa+3mm , adwm sa3~eaea77 a~i ~~miWm Ken Bloom, Executive Director ~ Boulder Museum of CoMemporary Art 1750 ThiReenth Street ... Bouider, Colorado 80302 - - Re: existing sWcture Facility Master Plan, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art A Ken, ~ r Joe Nicol, structurel eng(neer - Nicol Associates, Inc., and I have conducted severel observations ofthe existing conditions of ++ the building at 1750 Thirteenth Streek We have not been able to directly observe most repetitive member framing as it Is concealed by gypsum dry wall sheething. However, we are confident we have conduded a reasonable assessmeM of existlng "' conditions though unique crondRions may eadst that are not aware of. My construction wo~lc that exposes structure of the building should be used as en opportunity to further observe the e~dsting condi~ons of tlie structure. I askthat I be noUfied when ^ those opportunftles are going to take place. "" Our imresUgation has baen limited to the west portion of the building, first and second level floor framing. We are of the opinion that R is reasonable to assume that the sVudure for the east portion of the building is sound as R exhibits clear evidence of "' remadial reinforcement of a coMemporary consWdion material and technique. We also have not reviewed the roof structure of the west building as it has stood the test of time and appears to be in reawnabiy good condfion. The e~dsting masonry walls "' appear to be sound. It is common, in buildings of this construction technique and age, tl~at tfie masonry walis are capable of cartying loads in excess of what Is nortnal. Exceptions to that are when the building was con~ed upon poor soils. These "" soils of this area are normally very useful for construction with exceptional stabil'ity and load capacity. The buildings condi~on F appears to confirtn that the soils here are consistent with that expectation. The first level framing at the area of the existing devator shaft appears to be over stressed for the type of occupancy of this " portion of the building. In fewr of this e~dsting condition is the fad the walls that surround the elevator drasticelly prevent the usefulness of this area and therefore it is unlilcely that the Ioading for which the code prescribes its structural occupancy load ` limitations would'ever be met. Nevertheless, this condition exists and it is advised that, in the interest wfth both good structural code compliance and responsible maintenance of the building that this condition be remedied. It does not require an expensNe '"~ or disruptive activity to accomplish the scope of work recommended. ~ The second floor is substaMlally under capacity for exhibit or other uncontrolled activity where a dense grouping of peopie could w accumulata As the second floor of the west portion of the emsting building is arreMly used, for perfortnance preparation and production, the very cerrter stn~tural bays in this ar~ are under capaaty per the requirements of the building codes. It should ,,,, be noted, tAat the capacity of the e~dsting shudure does not a0ow (or the use of this space as efQiibiHOn spece for which it Is intended to be used due to the limitations of !he building codes. But in fact, this space has not bee~ used for exhibition for over ~ ten years. A future change to an exhibdion type of use of the space would necessifate strucWrel upgrede. Until this remedy is executed, it is recommended that the center structural bays be reinforced. It is importantthat no activity be permitted that would ,.. accumulate a large group of people, whether visitors, actors, or technicians, in the ar~_ The remedy for this condition is to remove the ceiling below, install new jolsts beside the existing floorjois[s, and replace the ceiling. Such activity would be ~ disruptive. tt could be done during times the space is not occupied by the public. The gypsum demolition end reinstallation will praduce extensive dust. Additionally, long joists wi~l be brought in a~d installed. It is recommended that the actual worlc be +r done at a time that the space is not being used to display any objects of value. „~, This analysis is not intended to be through. At the time of an extensive renovation, such a through survey end analysis ot existing conditions should be conducted. The recommendations presented are based upon the eodsting util'¢ation of the spece. r Simply because the space has been provided to the Boulder Museum of Corrtemporery Art for e~ibition of art, H is not n sarily pdequate for that purpose, in particuiar the use of the second level as exhibition space. .~. erely, ~ V m Seieroe archtted, A.I.A ... ov flle ... Appendix 12B w ~. _ ~ _ ~ ~.. ~ r ~ ~ P Y`~ ... r ~.. W ~ w r r ~~ IE~ Y~ ^ P ~ vem sei~.oe nrcn~tects Re: Bouldet Museum of Cant~mporary AR August 2& Z003 Page 2 IL'n- my upiniun that, with lhe exception ofthe imerior east end beam span (12•_T• span) of the original swcturc and all floor joist camections to the imeriw beams. the e~cisting first floor struduro of the orig"mal buildin~ will safey wppon t6e abo~e deuribed ara~ipmd loada. Regerding the two "east end beams^ supporting the first floor, it is my recommendelion that d~e spans of the beams 6e reduced by adding 8x8 wood pcrsts bmeath th~ besms at near their mid-sQ~. Refa m the eqazhed detail 1/SD2. The first floorjoist to beam camuxion eepncities can bc suffieiently inwoaed by adding one pair of Simpson W 0 reinforcing angla ro the ends of eacb floor joist. 7'de rcmfarcin5 angks shoutd be located in the space above du existing 2x41cdgers. Thrkdgers should be ehecked for a minimum af (4) 1 Rd nails fin each tloor joist Refer m the atuched defail Z/SD 1_ This compteres my initis~ evatuation of the tirst md saond floor load capacities. 'l'hank you for the ' nppornmiry to be of service. If you have airy queuioas please call me at (303) 665-0090. Sincdely, NtCOL ASSOCIATFS, INC. • Consul[ing SmtcNral Snginee[s G "1 1,~ Josep~ l, P.E. - President atladimenu: YDI &SD2 fl03ZI5cpl Appendix 126 3 w ^ n r ~ ~ ~ w ~ r ., .. ~ i ~ ~ ~ r r ~ r ^ r ~ • • . • ~ 2'-0 x 2'-0 x IO' GONG. I f~ll~. W/ Cll #5'S X I! B' EAGH WAY, EOT. GE17H2 FT6. ~OW POST ~ FOOfW6 MAY EF PL~G~ FLUSN TO TOP OF ROOR 5LA8 w El(157, (4) 2d2 FOR JOIST TO BEAM COPN. `$ ~GT. 2/5DI 1/3,1~3~d/4 x 0'-b W/ iL ~~ ~~ 10 F~057 MD 86AM, EALH 5NE 1~18xB P057 SIMx.~ON GBBB CALUl91 BASE W/ C.~ 3/4' 7tW/ BOL75 § I I !_ -~ ' FXLST. 85h'IT. FLO~ - - ' : I a '~ ~ . ~ . ° • / •I ~ o ~ 2~-0' ' ~ sr~noN hwo Lar,aro-+~ 5D2 i in• = r-0 I~icd Assoc3ates, t~c. P~~ ~`"' °ata anvias t~WplqSte~ct~rNlytn~r^ C~t ~~~~ SMN :77~ oapi •q.s^lu:~: I~IqHt~.Ldit~i• ~~Ifi Job No. /~ ~~ fi jiii~ ifi-iili ~~5 ~ G~~~I~It ~ 7~U Nlt~l An~el~tu. lu. D-091l1 By ~ Appendix 12B 5 _ Fus 25 04 11:16a Hicol Assoc 3~3-665-1211 p.1 ~` ~, w Nicol Associates, Inc. Consultin6 Struclunl En6ineers ..~ r August 25, 2004 ~ City of Boutder, FAM -~ P.O. Box 791 Boulder, CO 80306 r Attwilios Glcon Magx, Projad Administratoc ^ Re: Pazk Cmhal Office 8uilding Job No. 04208 -- lntrodaction This report is wriUen lo addreae, in genera] hrms, three major concerns regarding the safety and protection " of the Park Central OfSee Building and iYs contents from posable ou[side deshuctive elements: '~ 1. Damage reaultiag hom eaplosive devicen. ' ,~ 2. Damagc nsulting from tun-away 'velucles (either mtentioual or uointmfional). 3. Dnmage resulUng from Boulder Cceek flood watas. ~ Buildine Descripdon ~ Ths Pazk Cmtcal Office Buitding is a four srory, reinfotced concrete stcuctuce, Theze is open parking on canerete slab-on-grade at the grovad level with 8" x 24", convantionally reinfomed perimettt gradc beams. ^ 7'he uppat tluee levels and ioof shuchue ate B" thick, post-tensioaed concseu sla6s with 16" wide x 24" deep (total depth) post-tensioned conerete spandrel beamc at the perimeters. Each oFthe uppa levels "' coatain a gross flooz area of approximately 6,742 sq. ft Hievator, 5[air, and reskoam facitities are encloaed ~ with 9" ~hzck conventionally reinforced tower walls and Iloors, located at the south-east and south-west coraers of fhe bm7ding. Petimeter comer columus oF the main shucture are 16" x l8" conventionally r reinforced concrete co]umns. Intemiediate perimeter calumas are 14" x 16" conveatianaUy ~einE'omad concrote colu~s. 17vee interior colwnns are 14" x 24" comentionally reinfotced columos at the paridng r IeveL The interior columns [educe to IA" x 7A" columns abwe the p~king level. The building is inunded on - ~ ieinforced concrete spread footings , placed at a*~++n~„~~„~ depth balow g[ade of five faet "' A conventionally reinfarced concrete canopy erztends out from the cast end of fhe main ba'tlding to form a ~ covared enlry. The coaf of the canopy is an 8" thick, conventlonatly reinfomed concrate slab with a 36" wide x 24" deep pust-tensia¢ed spand[alboam at the easl edgc and a 14" x 24" posRteasioned spandrel ~,,,, beam at the aorth edge. The west edge of tha canopy ie supported by the maum building shucti¢e while the south edge of the canopy cests on an existing on story CMU stcuctu[e. The north-east comer of the canopy ~ is supportad by a 14" x 16" caaventionally~roinforced eonccotc coluron and spread Fooling. ~ psmaeeResultirlgFromEmlasiveDevices ~ This 6wlding, as aze most publie buildings, is pecticularly suaceptible to significant stmctural damage from explosive devices. Because tetrorist attacks ia this country aze a relatively new concept, struchual design ~ engineers have not been inclined ro consider such forces ia the past and building codes do not ao[maily address such activities in the CoavenHonal design of buildings. r D~age to this building shvcn~te would deQend an the magnilude and placeaient of the cxplosive device(s) .. and may vary ~om minor, supenc~ial damage ta catastraphic collapse of t6e shvctiae Becauae of the posb teasioned systems wit6in the tloor slxucture of this buildiog, isolated acposure to explosives, espccially at ~" thc pcrimeter of tha upper levels, would likety affect the shucnnal integcity o[ the eutire floor. ~ znOD~yWay,swkzoz ' ~ Appendix 12C ~ Piwne: (303166S009U lafayelte. Colondo 80016 FaY: iam~ ~.ac.»+~ r