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A - Draft Park Service Area GuidelinesPark Servrce Gaps and Standards 2/9/06 Attachment A Draft Park Service Area Guidelines Page 1 Park Service Guidelines The National Recreation and Pazk Associa6on (NRPA) has established national guidelines for quantities of pazk and recreation facilities according to population, ggesting that these guidelines should be adapted to individual municipalities. The City of B er Pazks and Recreation Department used the NRPA guidelines as a starting point, and considered Boulder's unique geography, recreation preferences, and other circumsta~e ch as the high cost of land. ~~ ~~ The guidelines listed below aze used to evaluate if pazk services in existi' ~ neighborhoods aze sufficient in quantity and quality; to determin~ need for new s to serve new or redeveloping residential or commercial azeas; a~to monitor progress' m meeting departmental goals. They aze intentionally flexible to allo aT~e city~~~espond to opportunities and constraints. .a ~~,: ~: ,., Types of Parks Pocket Parks and Urban Plazas Boulder's park system includes acres and serve residents living within a.25 ~ smaller hazdscaped and landscaped spaces ti~ offices, and commercial buildings. Pocket pa pazcels aze not available or when unique opp arks, which ~re typically smaller than 3 ~ " ~°ce. Urban plazas aze often de op, space for surrounding residences, urbazi plazas will be acquired when lazger present themselves. Characteristics of Pocket~'ar~s;~~ ~~~ 1. Smaller than 3 a~, '~s °~ 2. Easily access, ~° „ ~ `" '~ig~~`e~ghborhood 3. Often include seat d/or children's play azea 4. Generall d for pa~ '~ ncit active) recreation 5. Expe ~°' tain ~` o size, materials, and features Char ferisfics of Url~ Plazas: 1. ,a all urban sp~e, often with a higher amenity level (hardscaped azeas, street 'ngs, p~xintings, etc) 2. Off '~ , c~~tnded by buildings and uses that help generate activity 3. Consi ~ed outdoor "rooms" for passive recreation and civic uses 4. Attrac.tive and usable to a wide range of people 5. Include flexible space that can be used for outdoor festivals, markets, and other public events 6. Expensive to buiid and maintain due to high amenity level and size. Park Service Gaps and Standardr 2/9/06 Page 2 Neighborhood Parks Neighborhood parks often are considered the most fundamental park type in a city's pazk system because they provide a focal points for neighborhood identities, gathering places for friends and family, opportunities for informal play, and natural settings for quiet reflection. Historically, Boulder's neighborhood pazks are 5 acres or lazger. With limited availability of lazger pazcels, future sites between 3 and 5 acres will be considered only when lazger sites cannot be acquired. The department develops specific features for individual pazks on t}x~~asis of a design process that includes extensive neighborhood participation. Characteristics of Neighborhood Parl~s: ~ y~ti , 1. T icall 5 acres or laz er ~~~~~° YP Y B " ~_~~,~, ~~~~,,, 2. Typically serve residents living within easy walking and biki~~distance' ~• ile)y 3. Offer nonprogranuned outdoor space including paths, seati~ areas, places "'cnic and play catch, children's play azeas, and landscaping that e~~ances and preserves the sites' nariual character. Characteristics of Smaller Neighborhood Parks: ~'v;, ~ 1. Minimum of 3 acres ~ <= ,. , 2. Flat, grassy, flexible use space of at least 1 acre that is iiot~programmed for active recreation use or used for stormwater detention 2. Area for children's playground equip~ent 3. Areas for sitting, picnicking ~~fi ~ ~ a~~ ~~ 3 ~ ~ 4. Easily accessible to neighbors by side~alks ~~~ tit~~is Community Parks Community parks aze larg~e~~ than 50 acres and include a mix of active and passive pazk azeas and active recreation fa;s~i,~; such as cott~' and formal sports fields. They include playgrounds and picnic f~e~lities. ~oulder's c~~rimunity pazk guidelines are met by East Boulder Community Pazk, Foo, ~s Co ~ , and Harlow Platts Community Pazk. The ~ ~.„ ~.:~~.~~~ department plans additio~i~dgve~opment at East Boulder and Foothills. No additional community pazk sites aze pla~ined, thgugh the department remains open to future possibilities. ~ °~...~ ~~~ ; >~~ ` City Park~~ `' ~ ~,",>?#e, ; C~y pazks serv~ie entire communiry. They provide space for high-intensity recreational facilit~ as weil as natiual azeas and features typical of neighborhood and community pazks. Vakm~` ~'~ ~ Park and the Area III site meet the ci 's uideline for ci azks. Part of Valmont ~~~3' , tY g tY P City Par~C'~ been cleveloped, and the Area III site will be held in reserve to meet long-term recrearional`ne~ee~~ No additional city park sites aze planned, though the department is open to future Park Guidelines: Park Type Size (acres) Pocket Park ' < 3 Neighborhood Park > 5* Community Park > 50 Walking Distance (miles) .25 mile .5 mile 3.5 miles** AmounU1000 Population 1.5 acre/ 1,000 1.5 acre/ 1,000 1.5 acre/ 1,000 Park Service Gaps and Standards 2/91Q6 City Park 100-300 n/a 100-300 acres total Page 3 * Smaller neighborhood parks will be considered if guidelines can be met (see above). ** 12esidents [iving within .S mile of a community park are considered to have their neighborhood park needs me~ Gaps in Boulder's Park System There aze approximately 178 acres of undeveloped pazkland in the syste ; is includes 28 acres of neighborhood and pocket pazks, 35 acres of community pazks, an 15 acres of city park at Valmont. There aze also 191 acres of city park land in Area III in r e for future consideration. Due to funding constraints, pazk development has not ke pa ' residential development in certain parts of the city. Underserved azeas aze locate~primari[y, e northernmost part of the city (see Pazk Services Map). Completi ~~f Boulder's oped pazks will meet the department's service guidelines in most of ~e exisfing underser~ed azeas, and will provide addirional parks in well-served azeas. Exce~ions ia~lude azeas neaz New Vista High School and CU, where land is scarce and joint-use `~ men~ the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) aze in place to help mitigate n~eds,° '~ everal azeas in Gunbarrel, wluch will be addressed as Gunbarrel redevelops. ,,°~. The 2005 Pazks and Recreation Survey confirmed that re '~"' ' place a high priority on completing undeveloped park sites: Develop' neighborhood par_ was the highest priority, followed by developing pocket pazks. The ' t,4pnority was to finish developing East Boulder Communiry Pazk. ~ ~ ~" ~~ `~~~ ~ ~> Park Needs in Developing Areas Due to the high price and • generally will take place in ~ commercial and industrialmareas. to acquire and develo "" may have an even greatet because of higher density story housi will includs than in ~o: and f ~"~' ie to ~v a ~°~ more acre~ department of availa land to develop in Boulder, future growth that aze n urrently zoned for housing, including ing an"edevelopment of infill sites may require the city an open space and recreation. Infill developments er neighborhoods for parks and urban green space per square mile) with more vertical development (multi- over offices or commercial space). New infill housing ~variety"°,a ousin~rtypes and a range of prices, including more affordable units Boulder n$ `~ borhoods. With smaller housing lots, more young singles and seniors, living in "° er" homes, infill developments will need public spaces for residents ;lax. The~ sites may not be large enough to provide a neighborhood pazk of 5 or smal~ei neighborhood parks, pocket pazks, or urban plazas will be considered. The ~, ~. ~~~plore creative ways to acquire, develop, and maintain these smaller neighborhood~iarks, pocket parks, and urban plazas. The areas where significant change is anticipated aze Gunbarrel and the Transit Village. Gunbarre] has been through a planning process where there is an identified park need. The next step will be to identify where and how it will occur. Future Population Projections and Park Needs Current population projections estimate a population in Boulder of 124,400 (Area I and II) by the yeaz 2030. The current pazk acreage (developed and undeveloped) exceeds the Park Service Gaps and Standards Page 4 2/9/06 departmenYs guidelines established for park acreage per 1,000 residents and meets the guidelines for this projected population. However, the geographic distribution of the city's park land may need adjustment to meet future community needs. Through the city's azea planning and subcommunity planning processes, future pazk needs in new and redeveloping neighborhoods will continue to be addressed. Subcommunity and azea plans address planning issues at a detailed level and explore new land use ideas, including specific pazk needs, for an entire subcommunity, specific areas, or neighborhoods. When Specific Needs Can't be Met New park locations aze determined on the basis of an evaluation of„fa~tors such as the ~~E.~ distance to the nearest pocket, neighborhood, or community pazk, the au~ilab ~~~~f a suitable pazk site, the nature and density of the surrounding neighborhood, ac~ess to Op`eq' ~~, Space/Mountain Pazks lands, the availability of private homeown~association pa?~~~nd competing community goals for suitable parcels. Where acqui~"~on of additional pa~k land is not feasible, the department wi11 explore collaborations such as 1€ing-terq~ lease agreements with BVSD, private schools, churches, or child care centers; s. closuies"or transportation right-of- ~~.: way "vacations" [or easements?]; joint development ofpnv~ .~owned property; use of indoor spaces, terraces, and rooftops; and designs that increase the eff~ue capacity of smaller spaces. u: .a <u::, ' ~ .~;.,:. ,_; >.~. ~~.:~';,~:,, z~::u ~.~~n ° ~~sw;;:.. ti~,,...,