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9A - Master Plan outline C I T Y O F B O U L D E R PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE:March 29, 2004 (Agenda Item Preparation Date: March 15, 2004) AGENDA TITLE:Master Plan Outline PRESENTERS: Jan Geden, CPRP, Director of Parks and Recreation Jeff Lakey, Parks and Recreation Planning and Development Superintendent Cate Bradley, Planner Executive Summary: The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) is being asked to review and comment on the expanded Parks and Recreation Master Plan outline. This outline provides the framework for the completed document and addresses the major required plan elements. Revised mission, vision and values statements are included as well as an explanation of the proposed three-tier approach to developing plan recommendations. Fiscal Impacts: None at this time. Budgetary: None at this time. Other impacts: None at this time. Board and Commission feedback: None at this time. Public feedback :This item is being heard at this public meeting, as advertised in the Daily Camera. Staff Recommendation: None at this time. Analysis: The Master Plan is now entering its final phase of development, the drafting of the plan document. The majority of the research and analysis has been completed, including the Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment, the Parks and Recreation Citizen Survey, the analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT), and the discussion of departmental mission, vision and values. Fountainhead Communications will be in charge of writing and editing the draft plan, with assistance from Jeffrey Rainwater on graphic design.Development of new or revised policies will be considered by the staff over the next month and will be a topic of discussion at the PRAB retreat on th April 12.A first draftof the plan will be reviewed initially by departmental staff and a revised draft will then be brought to the PRAB for review and comment, most likely in July 2004. Subsequently the department will conduct a communityoutreach effort to solicit comments from the public, including AGENDA ITEM#IX-A; PAGE1 holding one or more public meetings to discuss the plan. Once a final draft has been completed and approved by the PRAB, we will proceed with review and adoption by Planning Board and City Council. Questions for the Board: 1.Are there any other topics you would like to see included in the outline? 2. Do you support the three-tiered approach to the master plan recommendations? 3. Any other comments regarding the plancontent or review process? Attachments: Attachment A:Master Plan Outline AGENDA ITEM#IX-A; PAGE2 Boulder Parks and Recreation Master Plan Table of Contents--DRAFT OUTLINE, 3.15.04 Fountainhead Communications, LLC Executive Summary Chapter 1: Past and Present Chapter 2: Celebrating Common Ground Chapter 3: Strategic Issues and Trends Chapter 4: Master Plan GoalsandRecommendations Chapter 5: Financial Plan Chapter 6: Action Plan Appendix Executive Summary This Master Plan is a strategic plan that focuses on issues and redirects the goals and objectives of the Parks and Recreation (P&R) Department over the next five years. It also is intended to meet therequirements of the City of Boulder and the Commission for the Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA). x Key elements of Master Plan x Summary recommendations Chapter1:Past and Present x Boulder’s parks and recreation history: Olmsted Plan, etc. x Service Area (Areas I & II) x Populations/ employment x Update of majoraccomplishments since the previous Master Plan was adopted in 1996, such as: -Land acquisition and development of Valmont City and Foothills Community parks -Renovation/remodeling projects such as Spruce Pool and the Southand North Boulder Recreation Centers Facing Budget Challenges The 1996 Parks and Recreation Master Plan outlined an ambitious program of park land acquisition based on the finding that the diminishing land area for park and recreation facility development, coupled with rapidly rising land costs, would severely limit the P&R Department’s future options. The 1995 approval of a dedicated .25-cent sales tax increase for parks and recreation, along with the necessary bonding authority, enabled the P&R Department to proceed with a major land-acquisition effort. With the purchase of [TK] acres of neighborhood and pocket parks, and more than 300 acres at the Valmont City Park and Area III sites, we have accomplished the major land-acquisition goals of the 1995 Master Plan. In the current economic climate, with declining sales-tax revenues challenging our ability to sustain park and recreation facilities and programs, this Master Plan takes a very different approach from 1996. The primary issue is how to make the most effective and efficient use of our resources while continuing to provide the best possible service. Boulder has more than 60 acres of undeveloped pocket, neighborhood, and community park land, in addition to the partially developed Valmont City Park and Area III sites. At an estimated development cost of $150,000 to $300,000 per acre, it will require $9 million to $18 million to complete the development of these parks. Our projected capital budget is $[to be determined] per year through 2015, when the dedicated .25-cent sales tax expires. During that period, we also need to renovate aging park landscapes and infrastructure, upgrade and replace playground equipment, and refurbish recreational facilities. In addition, the Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment completed in 2002 documented the need for investments of well over $20 million in new or expanded recreational facilities. AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 3 Chapter 2: Celebrating Common Ground Withthesechallenges come new opportunities to re-envision our parks and recreation system. This Master Plan introduces a new direction for Boulder, one based on celebrating the common ground of our parks and trails and the communityinterconnections they weave throughout the city. Mission (Draft) Our mission is to sustain and enhance Boulder’s “commons”—the public park lands and recreational spaces and programs that promote the health and well-being of Boulder residents and the community as a whole. Vision (Draft) The Boulder P&R Department aspires to: -Nurture community connections and convivial public spaces -Preserve places of natural beauty and spiritual refreshment in the midst of the city -Enliven family and social relationships -Help people of all ages reach their full potential -Champion diversity and inclusion -Stand for the importance of play in a balanced life -Integrate natural lands, urban forests, and ecosystems into our neighborhoods -Contribute to a sustainable economy P&R Department Values (Draft) In all we do, we are guided by the “spirit of Boulder,” which underscores our commitment to excellence in service, personal contribution and growth, integrity, respect for diversity, innovation, and teamwork. Our values include honesty, professionalism, stewardship, accountability, and fun! We believe that adhering to these values will help us provide responsible, efficient, and effective public services for the Boulder community. Benefits of Parks and Recreation x Community benefits x Personal benefits x Environmental benefits x Economic benefits the Parks are public gathering places for the community, our common ground. People come together at parks, playgrounds, sports fields, and other facilities to enjoy activities, each other, and Boulder’s spectacular setting. Neighborhood parks, in particular,foster a sense of place and help people develop relationships with their families and their neighbors. Parks and recreation facilities help connect people to their community. Parks connect people to nature; as urban open land, they provide food, habitat, and travel corridors for wildlife. Parks also connect us to our city’s cultural history. Organizing New Priorities Given funding potentials and realities, we organized this plan into three levels of priorities for goals and objectives in the next five years: Tier I: Basic Sustainability TheP&R Department maintainsservices and infrastructure at levels consistent with the current reduced revenues, while addressing strategic issues that can be accomplished by minor reallocations of staff resources and funding. Tier II: Service Enhancements The P&R Department directs increased funding to high-priority service enhancements, based on the assumption that sales-tax revenues or other funding sources will rise by [$to be determined] percent to [$to be determined]per year. New initiatives arising from the strategic issues analysis may be implemented. AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 4 Tier III: Vision Fulfillment The P&R Department achieves its ideal service level as aresult of a continual infusion of dollars from substantial new funding sources, including private donations, grants, partnerships, or new taxes with increased bonding authority. Chapter 3: Strategic Issues and Trends SomeKey Issues x Effectson P&R Department of declining city sales tax and development excise tax revenues x Meeting the changing needs of a diverse community with a declining budget x Evaluating programs and services x Creating priorities for new programs and facilities x Redefining the nature of our public parks and urban open space, and creating a sense of place x Raising awareness of the interconnections among our parks, trails, and recreation facilities x Creating environmentally and economically sustainable parks and recreation facilities x Renovating landscapes for drought tolerance x Maintaining parks and recreation facilities with declining resources x Meeting new requirements, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and environmentally sensitive design and maintenance, within a limited budget City Planning Context x Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, including potential changes in the next Comp Plan update - Land use: Undeveloped park land and urban open land -Subcommunityand Area Plan implications -Redevelopment and rezoning requiring new park acquisition and development at infill sites such as Crossroads and Gunbarrel -New higher-density and smaller-lot residential developments x Boulder Transportation Master Plan x Cooperative agreements with the Boulder Valley School District and other agencies and organizations x Colorado tourism plan Trends x Growth assumptions: Population projections through 2015 x Current demographic trends, including the following (check current validity), may require alterations in programs and facilities: -declining number of families with young children -increasing numbers of middle-aged and older residents -increasing number of non-English-speaking residents -increasing number of single-parent families -increasing number of families with both parents working x Changing demographics which require changes in the mix of programs (example: increasing numbers of single-parent families and families with both parents working may mean more youth at risk needing after-school and summer programs) x Boulder is becoming a retirement destination, and residents in general tend to have moved here from somewhere else; many do not live here long-term. Programs that help foster community connections, relationships among neighbors, and bonds between youth and elders are particularly important. x Recreation/fitness/leisure trends pertinent to Boulder x Impact of new technologies, including GIS AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 5 Chapter 4:Master Plan Goals and Recommendations The P&R Department determined goals and recommendations on the basis of information such as needs assessments, the costs to fulfill specific needs, and community feedback. Sources of data used include: x 2001 Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment, which identified 13 types of recreational facilities with the highest need in the community, at a cost exceeding $22 million x Parks and Recreation Citizen Survey x Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis results x Boulder Valley School District Athletic Facilities Needs Assessment (in process), which may help determine cooperative agreements regarding facility use x Additional information included in the needs assessment process, such as interviews with community leaders and other stakeholders, and focus group feedback MajorGoals (more may be added): 1)Enhanceparksby providing elements neighborhoods desire to make them aesthetic and interesting places to relax and recreate. 2)Transform parks and recreation facilities into an environmentally sustainable system. 3)Improve access to programs and facilities for a broader range of residents. Policy Changes Refocusing P&R Department priorities will require some policy changes, especially operational, program, facility/resource, environmental, and maintenance policies. These policy changes will support the five main areas of policy focus determined in 2004 by the City Council. The P&R Department’s part in meeting these goals might include actions such as the following: x Economic vitality : Develop stronger partnerships with the private sector. x Environmental protection : Reduce emissions of green-house gases by promoting energy efficiency, the use of wind and solar energies, and green building. x Affordable housing : Create urban parks and natural areas in redevelopment and infill projects that support housing for low and middle-income residents. x Transportation : Evaluate the potential to link parks to neighborhoods by creating and improving paths, supporting public transit, and helping expand Boulder’s alternative transportation network. x Community/services to residents : Examine the P&R Department’s service to the community, especially youth, seniors, and low-income residents, and explore how to close the gap between the haves and have-nots. Additional areas of policy changes: -Service standards : The GIS Service Area Analysis (underway) will identify underserved areas and possible needs for new park land. Environmental sustainability -: In keeping with the city’s environmental sustainability goal and the BVCP’s sustainability policies, the P&R Department will evaluate the potential to improve recycling andreduce water use, energy consumption, and waste generation. The Department will also focus on helping improve the city’s environmental health through actions such as the following: x Earn LEED certification (example: North Boulder Rec Center) for projects and meet other national environmental standards x Reduce hardscapes/parking lot areas x Evaluateturf-grassneedsand consider artificial turf for appropriate areas x Landscape with native/drought-tolerant, low-maintenance plants x Increase wildlife habitat x Improve water quality -Use of facilities by other programs and institutions -Policies related to funding, fees, and pricing AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 6 Master Plan Recommendations Recommendations are assigned to Tier I, II, or III on the basis of the benefits of each action,as well as their relative costs. Discussed in Chapter 1, the benefit categories are environmental, social, economic, and personal. Parks, including amenities such as playgrounds, group picnic shelters, and community gardens, provide benefits in all four categories: Environmental : Parks provide conservation areas, wildlife habitat, tree cover, and links to greenway corridors. Social : Parks provide common ground for families and neighbors to gather, and thereby enhance social cohesion. Economic : Parks provide beautiful spaces that encourage tourism, create a sense of community identity, and contribute to a healthy business climate. Individual : Parks provide places for contemplation and active play, and enhance health and fitness. Parks also are the least expensive component to provide and enhance within Boulder’s Parks and Recreation system. Tier I generally addresses parks-related recommendations. Recreation centers and programs provide benefits primarily in three categories: Social : Recreational offerings provide opportunities to develop new relationships and enhance existing friendships and family bonds. Economic : Recreational facilities attract businesses and out-of-town visitors, and enhance productivity in the workforce. Individual : Involvement in recreational activities helps maintain health and improve fitness. Recreation centers and programs generally are more expensive to provide and maintain, and consequently are placed in Tier II. Specialized recreational facilities provide many of the same benefits as recreation centers and programs but serve a smaller number of people who benefit from opportunities to practice higher-level skills and participate in team sports. Providing tournament venues also attracts revenue into the community. The major recommended actions at each funding level are summarized as follows. Tier I: Basic Sustainability Tier I recommends priority actions for the P&R Department given its current level of funding. These actions would help sustain a high level of service with a limited budget. The P&R Department would continue to provide services and programs identified in its 2004 work program and funded in the 2004 budget and Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). Recommendations to continue major initiatives underway: x Enhance the P&R Department’s financial resources (see Chapter 6 for financial plan). x Complete land-lease negotiations for facilities at Valmont City Park. x Develop a pilot park management plan for Eben Fine Park. x Create a process for developing future park management plans. x Create priorities for all park management plans for future implementation. x Evaluate conservation lands and develop maintenance protocols. x Begin the process of CAPRA certification. Recommendations on priority issues for the next five years: x Educate city officials and citizens about P&R Department opportunities, budget constraints, and needs. AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 7 x Develop support among the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, City Council, and other city departments for P&R Department concerns, and include staff and advisory board members in developing new policies to address concerns. x Create an effective recreation program evaluation system. x Evaluate Boulder’s parks and revise the definition of a park and park service standards. x Study demographic changes andassess the need for new programs and facilities, particularly for high-priority target groups (youth, low-income, etc). x Create a priority system for funding P&RDepartmentprograms, services, and facilities. x Revise policies to encourage more environmentally sustainable design and management of park lands and natural areas. x Develop new design guidelines and management plans to conserve water, simplify maintenance, andreduce costs. x Devise a dog-management plan. x Create a staff position for GIS-based information systems to improve the efficiency of park planning and management. x Collaborate with other citydepartments and divisions, including Transportation, Water Quality, and Housing and Human Services, regarding issues such as park management plans and program services. x Develop partnerships with local businesses, institutions, and organizations. x Strengthen the Parks and Recreation Foundation’s ability to generate funding for programs and facilities. x Create policies that allow the P&R Department to pursue new funding sources, including removing restrictions that discourage cost-effective pursuit of smaller grants. x Develop ways to leverage the influence of world-class Boulder athletes to support the P&R Department and its programs. x Develop recreation programs related to computer games and web-based activities. x Conduct an employee survey to assess how to improve staff communications and decision- making. Tier II: Service Enhancements Tier II recommends actions the P&R Department should pursue if funding levels recover in the next few years. They include: x Develop undeveloped or partially developed park sites, based on priorities established in the CIP (Elks, Foothills, East Boulder Community Center); include playgrounds, picnic shelters, and multi-use fields. x Implementprogram changes identified by the Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment that require additional funding. x Redevelop existing park sites in order of priority, based on the park management plans, incorporating low-maintenance and water-conserving designs. x Add park maintenance staff. x Develop new community gardens in existing parks. x Evaluate playing fields for possible replacement with artificial turf. x Evaluate possible uses of alternativeirrigation systems or other approaches to reduce water use in turf areas. x Identify areas of Boulder affected by zoning changes to allow residential uses, assess their impact on park standards and design character, and revise the standards for parks in these areas. x Assess the effects of American with Disabilities Act requirements on the costs of park design and development. Tier III: Vision Fulfillment Tier III recommends actions the P&R Department should address if it receives significant funding from new sources. They include: x Acceleratethe development of now-undeveloped park sites. AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 8 x Develop new recreation facilities according to priorities established in the 2001 Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment. x Using new park management plans, redevelop park siteson an accelerated schedule. Chapter 5: Financial Plan x Current funding sources: -General Fund -Fees and Charges -Lottery/Conservation Trust Fund -Grants -The Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund -Bonding/Debt -Developer Fees -.25-cent Sales Tax Fund (through 2015) Cost projections: To be developed New financing strategies (explore potential): -Extending the .25-cent sales tax -Fee-based programs -Partnerships with local businesses and public and private organizations -Special/Improvement districts -Sponsorships by businesses and organizations -Foundations/gifts -Friendsassociations -Special fundraisers -Development director (new staff position) Current projections for income and what they will allow Chapter 6: Action Plan This chapter will feature a matrix with recommended actions, responsible parties, costs and funding sources, and completion schedule. Five-year project plan to be developed (one-year work plans arise from this framework) Appendix x Park Services Guidelines (Draft) x P&R Department Policies x NRPABenefits of Parks and Recreation x Recreation Facilities Needs Assessment x Parks and Recreation Facility Inventory x Status Report on Accomplishments Since 1996 Master Plan AGENDA ITEM IX-A, Page 9