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Handout, PLAN-Boulder County July/August 2000• ~~; 1~~ ~ I ~~~ ~ '~ ~ ~ ~ ~'' PLAN-BOULDER COUNTY °"~ ~ .TULY I AUGUS7' 2000 . - ~_ ..~."J•~'- - ~,~ Affordable housing PLAN-Boulder County has given long-standing suppoR to the following principles: PBC supports urban housing policies that: • provide for a balanced variety of housing rypes and sizes; • preserve cucrenfly afforclable housing; • require the majority of new construction to be permanendy af- fordable. PBC believes that all communities should define urban growth boundaries and that annexaaons ofArea II iand to the city of Boul- der should be made only for a clear and compelling communiry puipose. To that end, PLAN-Boulder County supports the goals and strategies of the Housing Implementation and Funding Task Force, and strongly encourages the Planning Boazd and City Council to facilitate the recommendadons of the Task Force as quickly as possible. PLAN-Boulder County specifically endotses these key goals ~ and implementation strategies: • achieving 10 percent permanendy affordable units within 10 y~; • modifying the CompreHensive Plan to allow addiaonal uniu, generally in higher-density developmenu along transit corridors and in commerciaUindustrial azeas, to increase the number of per- manently and built-to-be affotdable units; • maximizing affordable housing as a top priority in any future annexaaons of targeted Area II parcels; • focusing direct public subsidies on pmviding affordable hous- ing for households with incomes below appro~cimately 60 percent of the Area Median Income; • asking the citizens of Boulder to to approve a new ta~c that would raise approximately $33 million annually. While many of the strategies will be discussed in detail and fine-tuned during the Comprehensive Plan update now under way, City Council must act quickly in order to place the tax increase on the November 2000 ballot, and we encounge the Council to do so without delay. PLAN-Boulder County believes that providing affordable housing will help maintain our socio-economic diversity, allow more Boulder workers to live in Boutder, and house those in need, which is a key community priority. ,,,~, We also believe that the package described in [he Task Force ,~ repoa allows many secto~s of the community to share in che cost of creating affordable housing, and thus should be adopted in its enqrety. Affordable housing is a broad community issue that must be addressed comprehensively and equitably by the community as a whole. Trails in Boulder County At its June meeting, the PBC board adopted the following position on trails, to be presented to relevant ciry and county agen- cies and the U.S. Forest Service: Wirh increasing population growth and development in the Boulder Valley, many qualiues of open space, such as rare plant communities and wildlife habitat, are becoming threatened by over- use and by encroachment from nearby development. Wildlife species need unfragmented areas in which to feed, rest and reproduce. Wildlife habitat, nesting areas and movement corridors must be protected from disturbance by humans and their companion animals. Similazly, rare plant communities need buffer areas to protect them from invasive species that aze imported by people and dogs, and to protect them from human disturbance. Expansion of the trail system threatens to fragment plant and animal habitat. The effects of trails extend beyond the nazrow area on which they aze located. Wind and animals carry non-native seeds. Dogs wander off trails. The noise of people carries through an area. Many aspects of a functioning ecosystem are unable to roleo- ate disturbance or intcusion. Whi1e it may be reasonable to reqaest that different trail-user groups compromise among themselves on trail use, some plant and animal species will not survive if com- pmmise is imposed on them. In planning new Uails, PLAN-Boulder Coanry believes [he protection of delicate habitat on ciry- or county-owned open space should take priority over recreational needs. Planning and imple- mentation of any future bikeways or footpaths should give prior- ity to protecdon of wildlife habitat and rare plant communities. No trails should be constmcted in or adjacent to areas desig- nated in the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan as Critical wld- life Habitat, Significant Natunl Communities, and Rare Plant Areas. New trails that aze constructed in areas designated as Envi- ronmental Conservation Areas in the Boulder Counry Compre- hensive Plan should be developed only when doing so will not cause significant hazm to any habitat. Existing vails that are inappropriately located should be relo- cated or realigned so that [hey avoid sensitive habita[, minimize opportunities for social trails, and minimize erosion. (continued on next paxe) (corttinued from previous page) Planning for new uails and assessment of impacrs should in- clude consideration of future increases in use and potential social ,~,., tsails over a twenty-year period. +v When paths are constructed, only nadve species sho~ld be usecl for restoration. Consttuction of trails should minimize the width of the dismrbed uea to preserve the natural in[egrity of the site. The paths should be placed well away from sveams. A public review process should be an integrel part of any plans for addiaons to the trail system. 28th Street project At the TransportationAdvisory Boazd meeting of May 8, Linda Andes Georges presented PLAN-Boulders letter of concem as follows: along it. `"1'he 28th Shee[ project should in- clude a full review and evaluation of cransportation and lac~d use options along -~ the corridor, of their potential impacts ,,,y on one another and on the ciry and re- gion. Fast tracking the south segment of the comdor, without a clear, comprehen- sive plan for the full project, compro- mises the entire effort. Objectives, trade- offs, and impacts need to be evaluated as a whole, not piecemeal." Table Mesa street improvement project At its May meeting the PBC Boazd adopted a posiaon in sup- port of the Table Mesa street improvement projecYs altemative 1, which calls for conswction of a combination bicycle and pedes- trian lane on each side of Table Mesa from Broadway to Moorhead. Out of the red and into the black Thanks for the great response to the bright red notices stamped on Ihe May-June newslette~s of inembers whose 2000 dues had not been paid. Within a couple of weeks, we had received more than 30 payments. But quite a few members sull have no[ paid. If your dues are among the missing, you will find another bright red stamp near your address label on this issue. Of course, it could be that we have made a mistake, and if you think we have, please phone Jeannette Hillery, 303-543-7143, and she will work it out. But if you simply have forgotten to pay, please take the time now '"~" to fil] out the coupon in this newsletter and send in your check. ~r.... PBC dues are kept very low because we want to encourage wide pazticipation. Our members are our strength. It is also pos- sible to keep dues Iow because PBC's behind-the-scenes work dces not involve ouUay of funds. Our biggest expense is for our election newspaper advertising. PLAN-Boulder Counry's endorse- ments aze important to the voting public, and the main way we artnounce them is ihrough buying ads in major local news oudeu. With a local eleclion coming up this fall, it is especially important that member dues are fully paid. Our other major ouflay - about half the cost of the newspaper advertising -- is for printing and mailing the bi-monthly newsletters. Friday brainstorming sessions The Friday luncheon meeting May 26 included an open dis- cussion among the participants. More than half of PBC's board members attended, especially eager to hear suggestions on how the board can encourage a more active flow of communication from PBC's wide membership and especially those who attend Friday lunch meetings. The discussion resulted in a consen- sus among participants and boazd mem- bers that at least once every two months the Friday lunch meeting be scheduled as an open discussion, with a11 members and board membecs encouraged to at- tend. It will be an opportunity for mem- bers to raise issues of concem, share in- formation about them, and suggest po- tential PBC acaon. These open discus- sion meetings will help form the board's agenda, so they will be scheduled on the Friday 10 days before the upcoming board meeting. At the fiist Friday lunch following each board meeting, a board member will briefly repoR on the board's discussion and actions. A link to the broader membership There is a large number of loyal PBC members whose work schedules do not allow them to attend the Friday lunches. It was to form a stronger link with those members that this newsletter was launched in 1998. Iu mission has been to kcep this bmader membership informed of the organizadon's acdvities and posi- uon statemen[s. Even if you are one who cannot attend the Friday meetings, we want to hear from you. If you are aware of an issue that you think PBC should address, please contact a board mem- ber (see the back page of this newsletter) at least 10 days prior to a board meeting. Members welcome at board meetings Please remember that all members are welcome at all board meeungs. They aze the first Monday of each month. Call Pat Cahn (303-543-9417) for the current meetlng's locarioa If you would like to make a presentation, contac[ the boazd chair or vice-chair at least 10 days prior to the board meeting to be placed on the agenda. ---- ~ ~ - - -~ ~, FRIDAY NOON MEETING SCHEDULE ~7~ ~~ .,'" _ ~ ~' 3u1y 7- Bob Harberg, i3tilities Project Coordinatoy Boulder Department of Public Works TOPIC: Update on Fourmile Canyon Creek flood hazard mitigation planning: issues and recommendations Juiy 14 - J~stin Dombmwski, Boulder Fire Depart- ment TOPIC: Wildfire! Ju1y 21- NO MEETING - University Club unavailable J~1y 28 - Fme-for-all Discussion PLAN-Boulder Commty boazd members will brainstorm with members on issues - a bi-monthly feature of the Friday meetings Agendas and minutes by e-mail Any of you who wish to receive e-mail with the agendas and minutes for PBC board meetings should e-mail your address to Joni Teter: j_teterC~hounail.com ~ August 4- Gordon Riggle and Spense Havlick, Bonl- der City Council's Subcommittee on Environmental Sustainability TOPIC: What actions can Boulder take to continue to be an environmental leader? August 11 - Dan Corson and Rich Lopez, Boulder City Council's Subcommittee on Economic Sustainability TOPIC: What dces Boulder need to do to sustain itself economically and what creative and innovative Boulder- style approaches should we consider? August 18 - Pete Fogg, Boulder County Long Range Planning Manager and Susan Richs[one, City of Boul- der Planner TOPIC: Proposed changes to the Boulder Valley Com- prehensive Plan, Update 2000 August 25 - Kirk Oglesby, Director, Broomfield Com- munity and Goveramental Affairs ' TOPIC: Density, transit and open space: Bmomfield's unique perspective on development Irends and altema- ave futures To join PLAN-Bouider County: send this form with your check [o: PLAN-Boulder County P.O. Box 4682 • Boulder CO 80306 • Name : Address . ; City State _ Zip , ~ Phone E-mail address ; Annual dues (new or renewal) ; ^ Regulaz ($15 per yeaz) Enclosed: ' ; ~ Sustaining ($25 per year) ' ;~ Student or Senior ($10 per year) $ :..........................................: 60P p9 i O Ci^p ~'~A~3tl~ ~ 90£08 O~ `~ap~nog I6L XoH'O'd siaqucay~ o~ a~nqrnstQ asea~d eog ,Gosinpy uo~ea~~ag ~g sKaed iap~nog 9£i #1?~ad 7A£OS OJ `iap~nog ~6'd aS~sod'S'R ~2I ~II~E PLAN-Boui.nEx CovrrrY soaxn Co-chair: Charles Madove 303-444-6911, FAX 303 444-691, chazman@indra.com Co-eLair: Joni Teter 303-499-8970, FAX 303-499-2124, j teter@hotmail.com Vice-chair, newsletter: Pat Caha 303-543-9417, FAX same, pcahn@earthnetnet Secretary: Neal McBurnett 303-4946493, neal@bcn.bouldecco.us Treasurer: J~ette Hillery 303-494-7718, FAX 303-543-7143, jmhillery@hotmail.com Programs co-chair. Sara Michl 303-447-2206,smichlC~spotcolorado.edu David Adamson 303-545-6255, FAX 303-545-2192, david@ecabuildcom Matt Appelbaum 303-499-8970, FAX 303-499-2124, matta@aspectdv.com Bruce Bland - 303-499-8612 Linda Andes Georges 303-543-9404, FAX same, andes@rmi.net Jane Greenfield 303-444-9492, FA7C 303-447-1661, pettit@diac.com Claire Levy 303-4942244, FAX 303-543-7276, clevy 1@uswestnet Beth Pomv~er 303-444-2545, pommerco@aol.com Janet Roberts 303-442-7446, FAX same, janetsroberts@earthGnk.net Ricky Weiser - 303-530.1037 90£08 O~ `x~a~nog Z890 X~ff ~~O ~d sir'~ ~"`~ .~wno~ aaa~nog NV'Id l~~ i ~~ "~~ O~-sonxn: Programs co-chair: Mary Fran Myers 303-444-9044, myersmf@colorado.edu Membership: PaW Bailey 303-449-7779, E-FAX 630.566-3774, pbailey@esri.com Newsletter design & layout: Caroline LitUefield cdlittlefield@mac.com All PLAN-Boulder membecs are welcome at board meetings. Board meetings are scheduled on the first Monday of each month. Call Pat Cahn at 303-543-9417 for location and directions. IssuES oF coNCExrr To PBC nv 2000 • Redevelopment of the Boulder Valley Regional CentedCrossroads azea • Development of an economic vision for the city of Boulder • Housing affordability and mixed-use development for community diversity • Transit, transportation issues, county aansportaaon funds • South Boulder Creek flood plain and the Flatirons property • City and County Open Space: acquisition, presecvation, use • Update of the Boulder Va(ley Comprehensive Plan • CU master plan • Greenways and Comprehensive Drainage U6lity Master Plans Visit PBC on the web at http://bcn.boulder.co.us/planboulder ,