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4A - Draft proposal for Mountain Park Land Transfer to Open Space to be used for public notice priorDO NOT REMOVE - PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT PRAB File Material July 18, 2000 ~,.. MEMORANDUM TO: Pazks and Recreation Advisory Board FROM: Chris Dropinski, Director of Pazks and Recreation Ann Wichmann, Manager of Mountain Pazks RE; Draft Proposal for Mountain Pazk Land Transfer to Open Space to be Used for Public Notice Prior to Public Hearing and Action August 31, 2000. Purnose At its June 26 regulaz meeting the Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd detemvned that it would schedule action on the land transfer issue at a special meeting and public hearing on August 31. Based on its discussion, the Board asked staff to prepaze a document, to be distributed well in advance of the August 31 meeting, which would convey the principles and criteria which underlie the decision about the land transfer, and would also convey values and commitments to the community which we believe are important to understand and uphold after the land uansfer is completed. This memorandum is proposed as the public document to prepare the citizenry and the Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd for this discussion. It is important to provide this level of detail to ~ the public so that they may better understand the issues and alternatives considered and ° understand how the boazd arrived at the proposal being considered. Maps of affected properties will be included, and the document package will be made available at the libraries, the Ranger Cottage, and the Iris Center. It is hoped that, at the July 24th meeting, the Boazd can find consensus regazding the documentation to be distributed prior to the August 31" meeting. INFORMATION REGARDING THE CONSIDERATION OF THE TRANSFER OF CTTY LAND FROM PARKS DESIGNATION TO OPEN SPACE DESIGNATION (for public hearing and Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd discussion at a special meeting of the Boazd on August 31, 2000) Back~round The Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd has been requested by the City Council and the City Manager to consider and recommend the transfer of some pazkland that has historically been managed by the Mountain Parks Division of the Pazks and Recreation Department. The transferred land would become a portion of the city lands managed by the new Department of Opea Space and Mountain Pazks, and is one of the actions to support the creauon of this new department. The consolidation of the Mountain Pazks Division and the Open Space/Real Estate Department into this new department was supported by City Council on Apri14, 2000. Staff has been working ~closely with the City Attomey's Office on legal descriptions and deternunation of funding sources for the initial acquisition of the lands currendy under management of the Mountain Parks Division of the Parks and Recreation Department. The Parks ~ and Recreation Advisory Boazd has considered the recommendations contained in the "Wright- ~~ Figgs" merger proposal which recommends retaining some of the intensively used and managed azeas in the Parks and Recreation Department rather than transferring them to the new departmen[, as well as a matrix entitled "Info on Selected PropeRies Currendy Managed by Mountain Pazks". This matrix, and the accompanying "Mountain Pazks Commitments for Core Services and Implementation of the Resource Protection and Visitor Use Plan" (Attachment A) provides, in some detail, the actualities of managing some of the higher use portions of the Mountain Pazks system. The adopted management plan for the Mountain Pazks, "Charting the Vision: Integration and Balance in the Boulder Mountain Pazks, Boulder Mountain Pazks Resource Protecuon and Visitor Use Plan", 1999, has also been considered. This plan is the product of three years of intensive work and public process, and was very broadly supported by both environmental and recreation interest groups. This plan provides a framework for the future, incorporating a citizen advisory group to assist in filling out the framework and contributing to major updates in five yeaz increments. Recent Board Discussion At the Parks and Recreation Advisory Boazd Study Session, held on June 6, 2000, board members considered presentations on the ecological values of the Mountain Pazks and a report on land ownership issues. The board brain-stormed ideas in order to deternune some preliminary principles/criteria on which a decision on land transfer might be based. These thoughts aze included within this document. The major perspectives expressed at the study session captured interests/hopes, concerns, and questions. Boazd members were asked to submit additional '~: thoughts regazding principles/criteria in prepazation for the June 26 discussion. These principles `" and criteria were refined by the Board at the June 26 discussion. Next Stevs A public meeting on the land transfer issue is planned for 6 P.M. on August 31, 2000. Staff continues to address outstanding questions and complete the detail work on the land transfer proposal itself in order to present the boazd with a complete recommendation, addressing all boazd and staff concerns for a final decision on disposal of the pazk property. Following the Parks and Recreation Advisory Boazd meeting on August 31, 2000, action taken will be forwazded to the Open Space Board of Trustees for consideration of acceptance of the properties as open space. The Open Space Boazd of Trustees will hold a public hearing and make an advisory recommendation to City Council regazding acceptance of the properties and management agreements. Planning Boazd would then make an advisory recommendation to City Council regazding both the disposal of pazk properties and the acquisition of open space properties. And, finally, the City Council would take the final action to transfer existing pazk lands into the new Department of Open Sgace and Mountain Pazks. ~*+~ ~ The Prouosal r"~' Princinles/Criteria `"" The decision on transfer of lands to the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Pazks is primarily based on the following three principles: A. Support ecosystem wholeness and the enhancement of environmental ethics B. Support simplification and efficiency in management and avoid the necessity of a mini-Mountain Pazks system in Pazks and Recreation, if possible C. Provide for continued outdoor recreation in addition to natural azea protection in and azound the Boulder Reservoir ALTERNATIVE I (the Preferred Alternative) This alternative supports the principles stated above and also indudes consideration of significant commitments made to the public through our ongoing relationship with the citizens. These commitments are highly valued by our community and should be understood and considered prior to actual transfer of lands to the new department. The public has developed expectations about our Mountain Pazks and other properties through our public processes and it will be impoRant for them to heaz during these deliberations from Boazds and City Council as well as staff that these commitments will be upheld. The Mountain Parks: The bulk of the Mountain Pazks lands should be transfeaed to the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Pazks (map package included as Attachment B). This ~ transfer would include the Ranger Cottage and pazking lot and the very high use azeas on the ~ summit of Flagstaff Mountain. Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake: Due to high use, types of activity and lazge events, and intensive cooperation which is required with the other divisions of the Pazks and Recreation Department, management and existing designations of the natural lands of Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake should remain in the Pazks and Recreation Department, and appropriate staff and budget be retained for the management of this land unit and other natural lands and resource management responsibilities within the Parks and Recreation Department. Sawhill Ponds: As a complete package, the management agreement with the Colorado Division of Wildlife should be transferred to the new department of Open Space and Mountain Pazks, and the acres currently owned by the Pazks and Recreation Department which were purchased with Lo[tery Funds should be transferred to the new department, and the acres owned by the Pazks and Recreation Department which were purchased with Permanent Pazks and Recreation Funds (approximately 4 acres) should be purchased by the Open Space Fund. It is recommended that the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Pazks pursue purchase of the 230 acre property currenfly owned by the Colorado Division oF Wildlife. ..,. Outlying Properties (Buckingham, 4"' of July, Boulder Falls): These lands should be transferred to the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Pazks and managed until other agreements can be negotiated or the land disposed to other natural resource management agencies. ''~* Alternative I includes aspects of the land transfer from Mountain Pazks to the new organization tha[ are very impoRant to the Ciry's ongoing relationship and credibility with the public and our ability to continue to provide service to the natural lands which remain in the Pazks and Recreation DepaztmenL Experience and hazd lessons learned over [ime have resulted in excellent land management practices and strategies, developed with the public, which should be sustained. These aspects, detailed below, should be carefully considered and addressed prior to the final decision to Iransfer. 1. Support the continuation of uses and historic programs in the Mountain Pazks, consistent with overall resourceprotection, as detailed in the adopted Boulder Mountain Parks Resource Protection and Visitor Use Plan (1999). This plan is scheduled to be updated in five year increments through ongoing public involvement. Some of these uses and programs include: ^ Historic environmental educaUOn programs like Ecology Hikes and Fireside Talks at the Flagstaff Summit and individualized public and school environmental education programs on request. The Flagstaff Summit Nature Center should be supported and continued and an overall increase in environmental education is encouraged.. ^ Provisions for visitor contact and information, coordination of public safety, and environmental education at the Chautauqua Ranger Cottage. ^ Historic Junior Ranger Program involving youth in pazk stewazdship, trail maintenance and restoration projects, environmental education and first job experience. ^ Historic outreach programs like the Pazk Ranger Intem Program, the Ranger Horse Patrol Program, and the Ranger Service Dog Program. ^ Cazeful management of visitor use impacts, continued use, maintenance, and protection of Flagstaff Mountain and Chautauqua facilities for public programs, group picnics, weddings, and other events and Flagstaff Road scenic overlooks. 2. Endorse the overall intentions and implementation of the Boulder Mountain Parks Resource Protection and Visitor Use Plan. including key components such as: ^ Holistic and adaptive management of natural areas, based on integration of ecological, social, and recreational concerns with an emphasis on resource protection and ecosystem management. ^ Implementation of the proposed area management system, applying it to appropriate lands, expanding the system if it proves successful, and adapting it to fit management needs over time. ^ Provision of adequa[e mearis of involving the public in the management of natural, cultural, and recreational resources, which should include the formation of an Open Space and Mountain Pazks Citizens Committee. ~ ~ ~, 3. The designation of an historic district recommended in Cultural Resource inventorv of the Contieuous Boulder Mountain Parks (1995) should be comple[ed and ongoing protection, r"^ interpretation, maintenance, and restoration of historic structures assumed. `~~.. 4. Confirm that the Open Space Charter is consistent with current uses and management in the Boulder Mountain Pazks. Incorporate the current mission statements of both the Mountain Pazks and the Open Space program into a new mission statement for the new department. An Open Space Boazd of Trustees resolution may be a way to address both of these issues to build confidence in the public while also assuring a joining of two equal partners (Boulder Mountain Pazks and the Open Space/Real Estate Department). 5. A portion of the curren[ Mountain Pazks staff, with appropriate funding and equipment, would be retained in the Parks and Recreation Department to continue to provide service to Boulder Reservoir, Coot Lake, the site informally known as the Papini property, Area III, and other natural lands owned by the department and to continue natural resource expertise to the overall managemen[ wncerns of the Pazks and Recreation Department. A preliminary estimate of up to 2 FTE's would continue the following services on Pazks and Recreation Department lands: biological inventory and analysis, research, management of prairie dog and other wildlife populations, coordination on wetland and wildlife issues, control of invasive weed populations and restoration of natural landscapes, assistance with dog management and control, environmental education, law enforcement services on natural lands, coordination of environmental sustainability goals, maintenance of natural azeas and other services as required. A budget of $100,000 is recommended. for materials, seasonals, and contracts. "~"' 6. Any equipment shazed or jointly purchased between Mountain Pazks and City Pazks would ""' remain in the Pazks and Recreation Department. Transfer of this shazed equipment would leave the Pazks and Recreation Department withou[ needed equipment. 7. Utilize the expeftise of the Moun[ain Pazks staff, and train Open Space staff, to continue intensive management systems like the pazking pemilt and reservation systems on Flagstaff Mountain. 8. Continue working closely with the new department to ensure that prairie dog relocation needs of the Pazks and Recreation Department receive high priority and timely response. 9. Maintain the Ranger Cottage as a public information center through facility staffing and educational programs. 10. Maintain the integrity of the Permanent Pazks and Recreation Fund through reimbursing the fund for past purchases. Properties which may be considered for reimbursement aze: Sawhill Ponds ($15,000), Laingor ($27,520), Johnson ($60,000), Flagstaff Associates ($170,000), Ranger Cottage ($8Q000), Flagstaff Maintenance Shop ($100,000), Flags[aff Summit Na[ure Center ($25,000). Note: Listed costs are not adjusted for curren[ value. ALTERNATIVE II This alternative would maintain a core, high use, and intensively managed poRion of the Mountain Pazks as a division of the Department of Pazks and Recreation. Altemative II was not ~9 supported by the Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd at its June 26 meeting, but was ~ considered. It is shown here so that the reader may benefit from knowing what discussion has led to the final proposal. It is important [o have understanding of this alternative in case Altemative I is not accepted. Puks and Recreation Staff and Boazd do not support moving forward on the land transfer issues in a piecemeal way. Alternative II should be considered only if Altemative I is not approved byCity Council in its entirety. In essence, the thteshold question for this alternative is whether any of the Mountain Pazks managed lands aze interpreted by some to be inconsistent with the Open Space Charter, so this alternative could be considered either a "fall-back" position, or may be considered by some to be a more desirable combination for ecological and recreational management. There has been concem expressed by the public and some advisory boazd members that portions of the Mountain Pazks aze so intensively used and managed that they do not adhere to the allowed uses or restrictions imposed by the City of Boulder Open Space Charter. In the proposal formulated by Ruth Wright and Mike Figgs, i[ is specifically recommended that portions of the Mountain Pazks system remain in the Pazks and Recteation Department. Some of these properties aze indeed very heavily used and have required extensive and intensive management, including pazking permit fee and reservation systems. These properties are also bisected by major county and state highways, and form the majority of visitor contacts and emergency responses. While staff does not support retaining specific structures or administrative systems in the Pazks and Recreation Department, there may be a reasonable solution in retaining a sensible management unit of very high use azeas within the Parks and Recreation Department. This altemapve will satisfy the perceived wncems regarding the Open Space Char[er, and also continue the diverse spectrum of recreational opportunities currently provided by the Pazks and Recreation Department. This Department, in its long term management of the Mountain Parks system, has protected and preserved the natural resources of these lands while supporting consc:entious recreational use, nature study, and environmental education. It is capable of continuing the intensive management, including administrative support of fee and reservation systems, that these lands require. This alternative would maintain a core, high use, and intensively managed portion of the Mountain Pazks as a division of the Department of Parks and Recreation. These lands should include Boulder Reservoir and Coot Lake, and a cohesive unit including Enchanted Mesa, the Flatirons, Gregory Canyon, the eastern, southem and summit portions of Flagstaff Mountain, Setder's Pazk, Red Rocks, and the Boulder Canyon Paih corridor. These areas aze identified in the Boulder Mountain Parks Resource Protection and Visitor Use Plan (1999) as "management challenge azeas", `Yecreation opportunity azeas", and "special protection areas" (raptor closure on the Third Flatiron and the Preble's Jumping Mouse habitat in lower Gregory Canyon). In addition, this portion should contain the outlying areas now managed by Mountain Parks (4th of July, Buckingham, Lefthand) until such time as they can be disposed of to the County or U.S. ~ ~ Forest Service. The Ranger Cottage at Chautauqua Pazk would remain in the Parks and Recreation Department. Appropriate staff and funding would be retained in the Pazks and ,,,., Recreauon Depaztment to conunue managing and protecting these important natural resources W while intensively managing the very high visitor use and the fee and reservation systems. These staff inembers would work in close cooperation with the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Parks. Other, less intensively used lands curtently managed by Mountain Pazks (azeas identified primarily as"natural preservation/dispersed use", "special protection azeas" and "management evaluation azeas" in the Boulder Mountain Parks Resource Protection and V isitor Use Plan (1999) would be transferred into the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Pazks. These ]ands aze considered by most if not all to be clearly consistent with the Open Space Charter, and should be managed as a unit with resource protection and more dispersed uses as the goal. Sawhill Ponds should be purchased by the City and managed within this unit. Support for this altemative will require some further analysis of the staffing and funding needs to be retained within the Parks and Recreation Department. As this is a"fall-back" opUOn, only a preliminary analysis of these needs has been completed. However, these high use areas are cleazly the locus of many of the difficult issues in management, and it is to be expected that approximately half to three-quarters of the current Mountain Pazks staffing level and appropriate funding would be needed to provide the current service level. Attachments: ,..,. ,,,, A. "Info on Selected Properties Currently Managed by Mountain Parks" and "Mountain Pazks Commitments for Core Services and Implementation of the Resource Protection and Visitor Use Plan" B. Map package Attachment A MOUNTAIN PARKS COMMITMENTS FOR CORE SERVICES AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RESOURCE PROTECTION AND VISITOR USE PLAN ~i/6/00 ~... PROVISInN nF KEY CORE SERVICES These core visitor services resource management activities include but aze not limited to: Visitor Services and Operations • Public and school environmental education programs • Provision of physical presence and visitor contacts on education, safety, regulations, public relations, stewardship issues at the Ranger Cottage and throughout the Park • Media contacts and public outreach services • Coordination and management of volunteer and junior ranger programs • Enforcement of safety and resource protection laws and regulations • Public safety, emergency medical, and search and rescue services • Enforcement of safety, resource protection, laws and regulations ' • Management of facilities and shelters for visitor use • Snow removal • Trash pickup and hauling • Servicing of outhouses, including disposal of human wastes • Facility and uails maintenance and improvements • Vandalism control and repair • Administration of revenue, pazking pernut, and incident log systems ~'^Resource Management ~''• Wildfire suppression and prescribed burns • Protection of wildlife habitat and sensitive species • Lazge- and small-scale vegetation and habitat restoration projects • Integrated weed management • Project management and technical assis[ance for wildlife, vegetation, and natural resource issues (e.g., forest ecosystem and prairie dog management) • Administration of raptor closure system IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RESOURCE PROTECTION AND VISITOR USE PLAN Public Outreach / Cooper¢five Management • • Formation and implementation of a Mountain Pazks Citizens Committee • Development of a neighborhood outreach program, including cooperative management agreements and projects • Formalization of the management agreement and designation with the Colorado Natural Areas Program Education And Outreach • Additional upgrades to interpretive facilities, signs, and brochures • New user-friendly trail signs • Expansion of education / ouueach to college and high-school aged youth • Re-instituuon of the semi-annual Woodswise newsletter ~' ~ Expansion of the "stay-on-the-trails" program `"`'• Continued evaluation of potential for private and non-profit support for specific park projects Resource Management • Completion of the Mountain Pazks backside land acquisition program • Continued pursuit of disposition of satellite areas • Completion of the Forest Ecosystem Management Plan landscape assessment and overall planning document ~** for Mountain Pazks ~ • Completion of specific forest stand treatment prescriptions • Formation of a Mountain Parks historic district • Enhanced protection of critical wildlife ateas and raze and sensitive plant communities • Expansion of the scope of prescribed bums, thinning, and weed control Recreation • Investigate the feasibility for cooperative development of a frontside-to-backside biking trail neaz Eldorado Springs • Invesugate the feasibility for a program to retire certai~ fixed-hazdwaze climbing routes in exchange for new routes • Reuofitting of facilities for ADA access Research and Monitoring Program • On-going resource inventory, research, and monitoring functions • Expansion of reseazch activities and development of resource and visitor use monitoring systems • Development of a citizens "hands-on" program for involvement in research and monitoring Trails • Development of a comprehensive trails management plan • Continuation of major refurbishment 1 hardening 1 relocation projects to improve the antiquated Mountain ..+~, Parks trail system • Development of a more aggressive social trails eliminaUOn program " • Development of a new adopt-a-trail program • Work with Colorado Mountain Club, Access Fund, and Flatirons Climbing Council on improving climbing access Facilities • Development of a new proactive facility maintenance program • Development of a transportation management program, including better multi-moda] options • Expansion of the Ranger Cottage • Expanded reuofitting of facili[ies for people with disabilities • Major new facility refurbishment and hazdening projects Public Safety f Resource Protection • Increased frontcountry and backcountry patrol and visitor contacts • Decision and implementation for revising the parking fee system • Implementation of new group use / commercial use regulations Area Management • Development of azea management implementation plans and mechanisms for each management area • Enhancement of protections for special protection azeas • Completion of planning work and public process for deciding how management evaluation azeas should be ~ managed .,.~ 2 ¢ INFO ABOUT SELECTED PROPERTIES CURRENTLY MANAGED BY MOUNTAIN PARKS ~ ~ ~ 5/22/00 U ~ Q MOUNTAIN PARKS MANAGEMENT CONTEXT: • Boulder Mountain Parks (BMP) is an incredible natural area, with many unique, diverse, sensitive, and threatened plant and animal species / communities, and it is recognized by the State Natural Areas Program and the Colorado Natural Heritage Program for its rich ecological resources. At the same time, Mountain Parks is a heavily-used local and regional recreational destination, offering a diverse park setting for a wide variety of recreational activities. It is [hese dual characteristics that make it so challenging to simultaneously protect the natural and cultural resources and provide recreational opportunities compatible with resource protection. • Mountain Parks draws visitors from the Denver region and beyond; growth in use has been exponential over the last 15-20 years. • BMP is relatively small compared to the number of visitors (1.7 million visitors in 6,000 acres in the mountain backdrop), which results in very concentrated use azeas with associated impacts (loss of natural qualities, significant impacts related to degradation of resource values and the quality oF recreational experience). • Four major roads dissect the core mountain backdrop areas in Mountain Parks (Flagstaff Road, Boulder Canyon, Sunshine Canyon, Lefrhand Canyon), which creates habitat fragmentation and difficu(ties for managing visitor use. • There are literally hundreds of access points into Mountain Parks from adjacent public and priva[e lands, which creates many difficulties for park management. • The location of Mountain Parks in close proximity to high-density urban neighborhoods creates many wnstraints and complexities for managing the Parks' natural resources and visitors. • Close proximity to the University of Colorado campus and large numbers of student users, with a"revolving door"of incoming and outgoing students, magnifies the challenge of educating them as conscientious users. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTIES: ~ 1 ~ _~ ~ PROPERTY DATA Sawhill Ponds 230 acres; west of 75'" St., north of Valmont. Owned by [he CllOW and leased by BMP for 25 years (except -10 acres which are ownec5 by COB). Includes an ADA accessible fishing pier, trails, and outhouse. Primary uses: bird wa[ching, fishing, hiking, dog walking, and hunting reVieval dog training. ~~ ~ MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS • A valuable weUands habitat, created by gravel mining of Ihe Boulder Creek floodplain. Designated as a bird habitat of statewide interest, with exceptional educational opportunities. • Heavy use as an environmental education / na[ure viewing si[e. • Many na[ive wedand plan[s, but also extensive weed infesta[ion. • Modera[e [o high visi[or use area • Walden Ponds, a similar wedands natural area owned by Boulder County, is adjacent to Sawhill. Lots of cross-over use between the two. His[orically users have faced inconsistent use regulations between Walden and Sawhill. • A new BMP-CDOW Sawhill draft management plan is currently being considered; i[ includes new on-leash restrictions and new perimeter fencing (has been installed). • Fishing regulation compliance and trash are problems; fishing management is shared with CDOW. • Strong need for law enforcement of both City of Boulder legal codes and state wildlife regulations. • Chronic wa[er shortage; adequacy of water rights is uncertain; need for a comprehensive hydrology study. • Reduc[ion of the steepness of [he pond banks may improve the habi[a[ values, and [his will require extensive restora[ion efforts. LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS County has an importan[ presence with its Walden Field s[ation; County has invested heavily in it environmental education / interpre[ive signs / boardwalks. CDOW has expressed interest in sclling Sawhill (rather [han continuing a long-term lease). Discussions about purchase between CDOW and Mountain Parks are ongoing. Separa[e negotiations would be needed on the P&R property at Sawhill if this was contempla[ed for sale. Management requires strong law enforcemen[ and environmental education presence. Management requires ortgoing cooperation with CUOW and County Parks and Open Space. 2 PROPERTY DATA MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS FLAGSTAFF MOUNTAIN AREA Note: max. attendance is 150 people in any one 3-hour [ime block for all Summit facilities combined (8-11 am., 1 I-3 p.m., 4-7 p.m., 8-10 p.mJ; 3 hour time limit for facili[ies with a one- hour space between reservations. Parks and Recreation runs the reservation system. ADA accessible vault outhouse and contrac[ed water service (fiberglass cistern). Limited ADA access is provided at the Flagstaff shelters, amphithea[er, & restrooms at [he Elags[aff Summit and also at an overlook at Lost Gulch. The Flagstaff Summit area gets a"resP' from high visitor use during the six months that the Flagstaff Summit Road is closed (Nov. I-April 30). Stone Shelter ( I50 people max.); located on Flagstaff Summit; primary use: group gatherings. Wood Shelter (I50 people max.); located on Flagstaff Summit; primary use: group gatherings. Sunrise Amphitheater ( I50 people max J; located on Flagstaff Summit primary uses: weddings, gatherings, environmental ed. programs (- 6100 participants in 1999). Halfway House (75 people max); located 1.2 miles up Flagstaff Road on the east side; primary use: group gatherings. Because of its wonderful scenic views and its high accessibility via Flagstaff Road, the Halfway House gets a moderate amount of use. • The Flags[aff Road corridor and Summit are a very high use area; Flagstaff Road, scenic viewpoints, and Flagstaff Summit facili[ies, as a collec[ive destination, draw a large number of visi[ors. Opportuni[ies for visitor education abound here. • All of the visitor use facilities are historic structures and uses, many built by the CCC. CurrenUy, historic designation and res[oration funding are being sought. • Heavy use by CU (Conference Services) for large picnics - 2000 participants in 1999. • Flags[aff Road and Summit parking permit program is designed to increase revenues and provide a mechanism for positive and/or corrective visitor contacts. It may also help reduce parking congestion problems and encourage car-pooling. The new license plate system, which does not identify the county of residence, will require some adjustment of the parking permit program. Options [o resUucture it are being considered. • In close proximity to developed areas on the Flagstaff Summit, [here are many significant ecological areas, rare and vulnerable plant communities, and important habitat areas. • Flagstaff Summit Nature center provides an important role in intercepting visitors and mo[ivating them [o use the park in environmentally benign ways. • Problems of illegal uses, high crime incidence (often nighttime activi[ies), and vandalism. COB Police Dept. and Ihe Boulder County Sheriff provide some late-night patrol (contract) services. • Management efforts have been refined over many years [o successfully achieve balance between intensive use and natural resource protection. • High levels of refuse and outhouse sewage are generated by the large numbers of visirors and require removal. • Social trails, due to high use, are an ongoing problem. • High incidence of vehicle accidents and search / rescue. • Adjacent areas were registered by BMP in 1993 as State Natural Area; these include critical plant and wildlife habitat. E ~ • High levels of use require high levels of services, patrol, enforcement, education, and intensive visitor use management. • Historic sUUC[ures and uses must be maintained. Maintenance of these uses requires a rental / reservation system. • Con[inuation of the parking permit system will require ongoing management. • The management approach has been to reduce impacts through "hardening" of key high-use areas, channel visitors away from ecologically important areas, and educate visi[ors on na[ural resource values. • Management requires close cooperation with the County Sheriff & Transportation Depts., City Fire Department, & Rocky Mtn. Rescue. • A close working relationships with Flagstaff area residents must be maintained. • Picnic and high use facilities require increased erosion conVol and continual replacement of amenities. • Protection of rare and [hrea[ened plant communities and importan[ wildlife habitat in proximity [o Ihe high-use areas will continue to be a challenge. • Expansion of ADA access is needed. • The Sunrise Amphitheater currently needs refurbishment and enhanced ADA accessibility is being explored. • Tight integration between visitor use management and resource protection activities is critical. " ~ ~~ f~ (x PROPERTI'DATA MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS Panorama Point Overlook-approx. one-half mile up Flagstaff Road from Baseline. BMP Panorama Point trail connec[s with the OS View Point trail, which winds up from Boulder Canyon. Includes parking, a visitor info center / fee station (staffed during the busy season on week-ends), large overlook interpretive signs, and four picnic areas. All facilities are ADA accessible. Flagstaff Summit Nature Center (FSNC), built in I980, and enlarged in 1996 (cooperative effort of BMP, GOCO, and Scholl Foundation) to 1200 square feet, open May I- Oct. 31; approx. 2500 visitors per year, not coun[ing some school group environmental education use and poor-weadier back-up use for Fireside environmental educa[ion programs; includes professional interpretive exhibits and displays. Major poin[ for dissemina[ion of park brochures and information about the park and natural resource managemen[. • A major viewpoint destination with very high visitor use. • An excellent opportunity for intercepting visirors, providing them with info, and educating them about taking care of the Park. • One of the key places for visitors to obtain a parking permit. • Some illegal uses and nighttime activi[ies here need significant law enforcement presence. • FSNC's primary role is to intercept visi[ors and educate to increase their appreciation of the Park's fragile resources and knowledge of low-impact use me[hods. It is not managed to generate destination use to it. • Volun[eer namralists staff the Center on week-ends during [he open season. There is an unmet need to expand week-day coverage and longer day coverage during the high-use months. • FSNC does no[ have any electricity and, consequendy, does not have any kind of electronic security system. It has been broken into twice, with theft of mounts. However, it now has more secure physical security devices, and a solar-powered alarm and lighting system is being researched. • Opportunity for continued role as a center for visitor contact, environmental education, information, and fee system administration. • Need for con[inuing strong law enforcement presence. • In its role in intercepting and educating visitors, Ihe FSNC ou[reach program is [ighNy in[egrated with the resource managemertt and visitor use management programs. • Opportunities to integrate wi[h the Sombrero Marsh Na[ure Cen[er-the two could complement each o[her to provide diverse educational views of Boulder's ecosystems. 4 PROPERTY DATA MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS Red Rocks, Settler's Park, Anemone Hill, • Historic plaques and a historic interpretive trail along Boulder Canyon Boulder Creek have been created in [his azea. The mouth of Boulder Canyon is an • This is an extremely high use area, and it has significant important historic location, as it is the first crime issues, including camping, fires, assaults, alcohol, setdement area for the future City of and transients. Boulder. Visitors are drawn to the Red • Signi6cant social trail problems have been mitigated Rocks azea, and this area is an important recendy by major restoration and traii improvements in the migration corridor for wildlife. area of Settler's Park and Red Rocks. • Heavy climbing use and social trails in area of the Dome climbing area, which require extensive restoration. • ImpoRant natural resource values, including native plants, of Anemone Hill are threatened by high use and pressure for more trails. LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS • Strong law enforcement, search and rescue, and environmental education presence is needed here. • Need for close cooperation with COB police, parks, transportation, Public Works, Sheriff, Silver l.ake Ditch. • Upper bikepath currently maintxined by Boulder County, and this has been suggested as trade for Bouldec Falls. • Con[inued restoration and trail improvements are needed to mitigate erosion problems. I ~ ~ ~ ~~ ( ~ PR,OPERTY DATA" I MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS ,, v CHAUTAUQUA AREA Chautauqua Meadow • Chau[auqua Meadow is a ga[eway to many of the most Includes a major trailhead and many designated accessible and popular visi[or use areas and Uails within and social trails; a native grassland ecosystem Mountain Parks. With its scenic qualities and high and Boulder scenic des[ination wi[h the accessibili[y, it receives very high use and is a place [hat almost Flatirons as a backdrop. all Mountain Parks users visi[ throughout Ihe year. Chautauqua Meadow is a gateway to high-use Management efforts have been refined over many years to areas like the Fla[iron climbing areas, Mesa successfully achieve balance between in[ensive use and natural Trail, McClintock Trail, Gregory Canyon and resource protection. Enchan[ed Mesa. • Chautauqua Meadow is a grassland habitat for various grazers, roden[s, birds, and predators like coyotes, foxes, bears, and Several ac[ive recreation uses have historically occasional mountain lions and bobcats. It is also a very occurred such as ski jumps, sledding, golf important habitat for bu[[erFlies, some of which are identified course, and the CCC camp. None of these by the Colorado Natural Heritage Vrogram as rare or threatened. ac[ive uses are currenNy permitted. This is a very important loca[ion for environmental educa[ion, and is a portal for environmental education in [he whole park. • In spite of many diverse uses throughout it his[ory, Chau[auqua Meadow still contains some very valuable, diverse, and rare na[ive plant communities (incl. remnan[ tall grasses and several listed species of statewide concern). The restoration potential of these natural plan[ communi[ies is very good. A pilot grassland restora[ion project, in conjunc[ion wi[h [he Colorado chap[er of the Society for Ecological Res[ora[ion, is currendy underway, wi[h a focus on removing smooth brome. • Invasion of non-native plants [hat can outcompete nalives is a very serious problem. Some of the worst plants are escapees from adjacen[ residen[ial gardens. Sweet Pea is a particular problem, because some adjacent residen[s do no[ wan[ this pretty plant eradicated. (Continued on the next page) ~~ LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS Chau[auqua Meadow is an incredible and highly-loved natural area, but it is a very complicated place to manage. It requires very intensive managemen[, including s[rong law enforcement presence, search and rescue operations, [rash hauling, environmental education, restoration, etc. Additional management efforts are needed in Chautauqua Meadow to reduce social trails, get higher dog regulation compliance, channel people to appropriate areas and trails, restore native habitats, and take advantage of educational oppor[unities. As one of the major portals in[o Mountain Parks, Chau[auqua Meadow must be managed by the land management agency responsible for i[s upland natural areas or efforts to tighNy integrate separa[ely managed areas must be implemented. Management requires very close cooperation with the Chautauqua Association, the Parks and Recreation Dept., and the City Fire and Police departments. PROPERTY DATA MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS Chautauqua Meadow (Continuation) • To help restore na[ive plant communities, recycle nutrients, and reduce wildfire hazards, prescribed burning in rela[ively small patches has been conducted on a rota[ion basis. • Chautauqua Meadow has his[orically had a severe social vail problem, although it has been substantially reduced in recent years. This season's trail work program will implement several trail reloca[ions and o[her improvements to further reduce the social trail network and associated habita[ fragmentation. • Dog management is a significant issue. While dog regulation compliance is relatively good, the Iarge number of visitors with dogs results in a significant problems of dog waste, dogs loose off trail, and conflict with pedesVians. • Poten[ial problems with human-bear conFlicts are high, due [o high concentrations of bears in the Fall, and attractants to the Chautauqua neighborhood of garbage and fruit trees. • High level of trash pick-up is necessary. • The Chautauqua Green park, which is managed by the Parks Division (not the Mountain Parks Division), is on the east side of the Meadow. Some large events that happen there spill over in[o the Meadow and require law enforcement presence (4'" of July, annual Bluegrass concert, olher large events, e[cJ. • Given the proximity of the Chautauqua Cottages, a very complex and close relationship with the Chautauqua Association is maintained. • Chautauqua parking lo[ much of [he year is overflowing, which causes some spillover parking into the neighborhood and Baseline Road. LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ t~ ~ f ~ PROPERTY DATA ~ MANQGEMENT CONSIDE1tATIONS ~ ~..., ~ • :,, Ranger Cottage (1200 s.f.); built in 1986, used • A key point for visiror contact, the Ranger Cottage is as a visitor information / ouVeach center, understaffed on busy weekday nights and some week-end hours ranger outpost and emergency response center, • Parking at the Ranger Cottage parking lot is highly conges[ed and staff offices for 9 staff; in proximity to at certain times of the year, which causes parking spillover to Chautauqua Meadow and several major the neighborhood. trailheads; includes parking lot with 51 spaces. • The majority of formal and informal environmental education programs are initiated from [he Ranger Co[tage. • This area is [he major poin[ of climbing, history of Ihe park, raptor management, and dog management contacts. • The Ranger Cottage is within the Chautauqua Park Historic District. • The Ranger Cot[age functions as a major "ambassador" for [he city and the Mountain Parks and Open Space programs. Bluebell Shelter (50 people max.); located • Because it requires a half-mile walk to it, the Bluebell Shelter one-half mile from [he Ranger Coltage up only ge[s a small amount of use as a des[ination. Bluebell Road; primary use is group picnics but • Historic structure meriting protection. this is a low level of use. • Bluebell fire road / trail needs periodic and ongoing repair and Restricted vehicle access for ADA placarded maintenance work. vehicles is permitted. • Bluebell shelter is a staging area for search and rescue operations on a regular basis. • Fairly high incidence of illegal fires, camping, and parties here. ~ LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS • Excellent opportunities exist for continuing and expanding the Ranger Cottage's function as a visitor services / outreach / environmental education center. There mus[ be significant s[aff presence at the Ranger Cot[age to help manage the high use Chautauqua area. Multiple staff / ranger presence is important [o be able ro respond ro citizen con[acts, problems, and emergencies, as well as to provide ongoing, daily environmental educa[ion, including weekends. • Historic structure and use must be maintained. If use is maintained, [hen a rental / reservation system is necessary. PROPERTY DATA I MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS I LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS BOULDER RESERVOIR AREA Boulder Reservoir Natural Area / Coot Lake Large na[ural areas around the west, north, and east shores of Boulder Reservoir (approx. 700 acres). Includes plains grasslands, aquatic, and wedand ecosystems. The sou[h shore of Boulder Reservoir is managed for active recrea[ion and has several developed facilities. Coot Lake (20 acres) is located northeast of Boulder Reservoir and west of 63`d S[ree[. Coot Lake has a parking lot /access point along 63rd across from [he IBM-donated Watson Park property There are multiple ownerships around Boulder Reservoir. City of Boulder Public Works, Parks and Recreation, Open Space, and Northern Water Conservancy District, and private landowners. Primary activities: hiking, dog exercise, fishing, water sports, aeromodeling, and biking (nor[h side of property). A portion of the NW area of Boulder Reservoir natural area has been Ieased [o Ihe Boulder Aeromodeling Club since the late 1960's, and they have installed asphalt runways, struc[ures, and fencing. Aeromodeling use has increased in the last couple of years. The reservoir has been leased [o KBCO Kinetics for 21 years and water sports have occurred at the reservoir since 1956. ~ ~ ~ , • Relatively high use area. • Non-na[ive grasses and invasive weed species are a significant problem; however, there are still some remaining parehes of na[ive plan[ communities. The wetlands on the northwest side of the Reservoir are extensive and offer important wedand and aqua[ic habita[s. A relatively rare salt Fla[s plan[ community exis[s on the eas[ side of the Reservoir. • Boulder Reservoir is a very important bird habitat area, given the fact that large bodies of water are scarce in Colorado. It is also an important protected habitat area for various raptors. • Boulder Reservoir offers a significant amount of habitat for prairie dogs, and prairie dogs have been reloca[ed here from other city lands. Intensive management is required [o manage Ihis habitat (protection, fence barriers, monitoring). • Burrowing owls, a rare species in this part of Colorado, have historically burrowed and used the natural area on [he east side. • While motorized water sports and aeromodeling can disturb wildlife and degrade habitat, continual monitoring and mitigation efforts are ongoing in cooperation with the Parks Division • Large even[s a[ [he Reservoir and Wa[son Park spill over into the natural areas (e.g., Kinetics, races, triathlons) and create potential conflicts with nawral resource management. • Coot Lake and environs have significan[ habi[at values, including two wedands created by BMP to mitigate habitat loss. • Coot Lake gets high use by dog owners whose pets retrieve and swim in [he lake; Ihis use was supported and enabled by [he Dog Management Plan and changes in [he leash ordinance. • A coopera[ive relationship exists between [he Ciry and Northern Water Conservancy DisVict regarding water, weeds, and prairie dog management (MOU on prairie dog management). • BMP has conducted multiple restoration projects, including wetland creation, prescribed fires, native seed planting, and noxious weed control to enhance habitat. • Multiple ownerships make effective land management more complica[ed and challenging. There is no wri[ten overall coopera[ive management plan for [he natur~l areas around Boulder Reservoir. • Given [he high use and high natural resource values, a s[rong law enforcement, resource managemen[, and environmental educa[ion presenceis required. • Very close coopera[ion with the Parks and Recrea[ion Department, which runs [he developed recrea[ion area and large events, must be continued. • Close cooperation has been developed and mus[ be continued with the Water Quality Division and Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District. • The Mountain Park Moun[ed Patrol Program horses are stabled and pastured in this area. • Aeromodeling, wa[ersports, and various large events such as Kinetics are essentially his[oric uses on this praperty, and provide valuable recreational oppor[unities for a broad segment of the population ~ ~ \ g ~ s ~ ~ PROPERTY DATA ., •~r~ MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS Papini Property 77 acres; primarily plains grassland ecosys[em, with hayfields, riparian areas, ponds, and irrigation ditches. Much of [he property is in hay produc[ion. This property was originally purchased as a community park site for development that might have occurred in this part of Area UI. However, the City now has no plans to extend the urban service area here, and the area is designa[ed as part of the Rural Preservation Area. Consequendy, this property is "surplus" for the Parks and Recreation Dept. • Very IitNe public use of this property. • Prairie dog and riparian habita[ provide impor[ant feeding and resting for rap[ors and o[her preda[ors. • This property is a major reloca[ion site for prairie dogs from developed city park properties. • Knapweed is a significan[ problem; periodic prescribed burns and chemical and mechanical treatments have been implemented [o combat this problem. • The hayfields on this property furnish the hay for the Park Moun[ed Pa[rol horses. • This property primarily serves as an open space buffer, agricultural area, and wildlife habitat area. This property was purchased with Permanent Park and Recreation Funds, so disposal of this property must reimburse the Fund. Kentucky Property, 55th and Boulder Creek - small city park parcels that may make sense to be managed by the new Department of Open Space and Mountain Parks. OUTLYING SATELLITE PROPERTIES Boulder Falls • A high use area during Spring, Summer, and Fall. 5 acres, loca[ed about 6 miles up Boulder • A rela[ively remo[e si[e, with its loca[ion posing problems for Canyon; primary use is a sightseeing stopover regular patrol and main[enance ac[ivi[ies. [o see the falls. • High frequency of violation of the climbing prohibi[ion, which results in severe injuries or fatalities every year through falls and drownings. • Relatively high incidence of drugs, alcohol, and private property trespass. • Safety issues related to mineshaft access. • Handrails and signage need repair. • Dangerous pedestrian crossing from the parking area to the use area. Given the remoteness of the site, visiror hazards present, and illegal uses, this high- use park requires intensive management efforts, esp. law enforcement presence. Moun[ain Parks, in the past, developed a coopera[ive agreemen[ in which [he County managed this property. The County is no[ in[erested at this time in managing [his property, although there have been recent County purchases in Boulder Canyon. 10 PROPERTY DATA MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS Buckingham (Fourth-of-July) Campground • During July and August, this is a high use area, with the 36+ acres, several picnic areas and seven campground full. The surrounding Forest Service land, with its formal camp sites; very remote location next to portal to the Indian Peaks Wildemess, provides a very high the Arapaho glacier USFS trailhead. draw of visitors that sometime use Buckingham. Mountain Parks replaced [he outhouse restroom • The campground gets overflow parking from Ihe USFS in 1997. [railhead, which can create congestion and parking encroachment on[o an adjacent weNand area. • Because of its remote location, regular patrol, monitoring, and maintenance activities are difficult. • Illegal activities of hunting, off-site camping, and fires make law enforcement presence important. • Because of its remote loca[ion, i[ is difficul[ to provide an adequate level of service for trash pickup and restroom maintenance. • Noteworthy native plant species must be protected here, and recent information indicates listed plants of sta[e concem. Buckingham (Lefthand Canyon) Park • Perennial golden eagle nest on the Pallisades and important 120 acres, not counting Ihe stream corridor riparian / wetland habitat are present. mining claims; located at the mouth of • Recent information indicates the presence of listed plant species Lefthand Canyon; primary use is picnicking, of state concern on the property. hiking, and meeting place / restroom stop by • Relatively high use area, which because of its location, is not numerous Lefthand Canyon bikers. easy to patrol. Nighttime activities are sometimes a problem. Adjoining the property is a 200 acre (?) County • Proximity to USFS land makes i[ a high-use portal area for off- parcel and the Joder Ranch Open Space road vehicle use and shooting areas. conservation easement; the County Heil Ranch • Law enforcement problems include: deposi[s of trash and property access is nearby. human wastes, garbage dumping, illegal camping, and assorted criminal activities. • Tables and parking areas are de[eriorated. Could use extensive redesign, hardening, delineation of areas, and restoration of native plant communities. H:~PRAB~2000Action~PRO PERTI. W PD Il ~ F ~ LAND TRANSFER CONSIDERATIONS • Services, law enforcement, and search and rescue are difficult for the City to provide here. • Mountain Parks has encouraged [he Fores[ Service to take over management of this property. The USFS land and some private in-holdings surround [he Buckingham Campground. The USFS could provide the required patrol and other services much more efficienHy, but staffing and funding constraints on the part of Ihe USFS are a problem. • Impediments to the land [ransfer include the extensive bureaucratic process for land transfer of federal lands and possible legal constraints in the gift dedication to [he City. • In close proximity [o both County lands and Open Space GE lands. • Management requires significant law enforcement presence. • Transfer could separate the valley from the high use area. • Mountain Parks did develop a cooperative agreement with the County to manage this area, but the County is not interested at this time. ~ ~ , ' ti , •I•~-:r~~•~~~-~~r.~• ~°. -"~..~.,,,~~~~.. _--~ ~ Buckingham Park ~ Buckingham ,. 7 !r Boulder Campground ~ ~ (Fourth of July ~~ Falls ~ ' I ~ T~..:~a.,~.a~ - - . ~~~~ ~ Boulder Mountain "Core Area" ~.. -'~ 1 \ ~ A j f~;~ Boulder County ~f~'-~"~ ~ 0 5 Miles ~`~~~~ N Boulder Mountain Parks Managed Areas W E City of Boulder Open Space ~ Map produced July 11, 2000 by Open Space and Mountain Parks Technical Services Group s ~ ( ~ Attachment B ~ ~r ~-__.__~ ~r --j .; , - ~~ ~ ~--- '~-~ -~ -' ~ - ~ "~ ~~ ~ -- ~ ~ ~ , L ~ ~_i.~ ~ ~-1- -~ e i ~ - ~ ~ „~ i ~ ~- ~ -~°r ' ~-~-' ~ . ~,---r`~ ( ~ ; ~ ~-; ( ,~ ~ ~ ~: ~ ~, ~ 119 . ~ ~ ~ ,_ ~ ',I ~ ~ ~~ ----'-- , , / 1'~-. r D ~ ~ _ Sawhill - - ~~~ ~- Ponds t „ = ~. ~~ ~ ~ ~`~-- ; ~ ~ - ~-- - -- ; ~ ~ , '~ ~ ; ~~ ~'~ ~i~--+ - ~ , - ; . `- ~~~ ~ y " I ~ ~- - -- - '; ~t, ~~- i ^~ ~ r ,~ ~ ` Chautauqua ~ ,..• '~ ~ Area ~~ - ;~~, -'"~-~ -- ~ -- - ~ - - - -'~,~ 7 ~ f~ ~~- i - i ~ ~ ~ ~~ .= ~ ~ ~n ~ ~~' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~--- i ~~, ~ ~ ' ~ .~~ - ~ ;~~,'~, F ~ r` 93 ~ ~ ' ~~ ~~ ~;'~ / ~ ,~ Jefferson Count~ - , ~ ~- ~_, , ~ : i r' ~ r-` ~ r ~ ~ ~ ~ r ~ ~lr~ ~ ~~ ~ _~ _~ ~~ ~~~~J ~i ~ ~ ~~~ .- ~ = : w~~~/ `~~,~ ' ~, ~, ~ ~ ~`~ ~ ~ , '~~ ~ ,~`~,~, ~ ~ `~ ~n~ ~ f ~~ld; ~ ~~ /~ ~~ j ~ ~ j~ , A ~ ~ ~2 ~ `" ~,,,~d~ ~ IS ~r-•'' i ~ ~i ~~~ i ~~~ ~~C i ~ tf ; . . r ) ~` ~ ~~ f f ~ ~ ~J!~~ ~~ :~' ~J~J!J1~~ r~~J1~ ~~ Y.l'~1'1~ . .. ; I i~ : ~°~a .: ~; ~o ~~ ~s~ ; ne ~ 3,•-^--..-~' ,`~ ; y : `t" ! r'" ; iJ J wov ~ % " f ~ ~ . ~~' ''t ~ ~`• : V~ 1 ~ '•. ~ : ~ ' : •~,..~~l, '~~~~ ~ , ~ „% : B~ EBELL ~~ ' %~ f" PICNIC ~ •--- ~ ~ ~ ,6HELTER ~ ~ ~ `~ ~%' ~ % . ~ ~ ~ ! ; • ; '"~ f o Zoo 400 60o Feet Boulder Mountain Parks Property Reference Map ~ ~ Chautau ua Area q Map produced July 11, 2000 by Open Space and Mountain Parks Technical Services Group WASTEWATER TREAT ENT PLANT CITY OF BOU ER ~ ~ ~{~;"';;' `: ~"~°,l r = ~j ? ,, ; • /~ ~ p , ~ , . r -: ~~ ~ ; k ~' ~ '~~ P r~ , ~ " ~" .r~ = `, .. ,. "_""" _i "' . _ - ;,4 . ;J1J~~ . ~ ~ ti ~ ,~ ~~ ~ 4~Y . ' ~~ '~ 7 ~r " ~~~~ r~ ~ - ~ _,_-y------- ,~~~~`~f:. Boulder _~=: ~ Mountain ; .J ~l ~JI~~11 ~ ~I~% r~~ ~~ ~' ~' f Parks ,,--- ~~ J~~~1 ad ,, , ' ~ o - ~~ _ . } ~ ~ ~ ~~-~ -~ : e55 R ~~ JJ'JJ ~J `.1JJ_:/~'_ J~Jl~l~~l~~ i~ rJ J~~` P p~G '~----------- - ,__, _ _ . ~ ~•J ~irJ J;~~1~ ~;~ _~ ~ ~ 0 ~ NOTE: :~ }' ~ ,/ ,ooo Zooo Feet Boulder Mountain Parks Property Reference Map - --- ~ Sawhill Ponds Iocated in Sec. 24, T. 1 N, R 70W of the 6 P.M. Map produced July 11, 2000 by Open Space and Mountain Parks Technical Service Group z~ ~!~!:1>~1.) 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Id ~ ora ~- ~ ' ~~ ~,~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ; ~~ ~ =~ ~ ~ ~G ~.::_: _. ~.' __ __ _ _ ~ . :,- ~'~ ~% /~,f!ij ..~ .~:.. . i - P ~'~.~ C~ , : - _ __.. . ~ / ~' -~ . . .. _ .__. . , _- , / -- ~ - i ' ~ ls /! ~ ' ~ ~ . ~ ~ S , ~ _ ~~ -~~ ~" l 9f y.. „ ~, - , _,~ , , _. __, S~ ~ ` ~ ~ , ., , _ _, _ .__ _ ~ -- - - _ , ~ , , , y ~ ~ ~ ,, ~ , . ~ ,: .~ , , :r: __- ::.. _ , ~.~~;~ ' ~ ~~ ~ - - ~, - ; ~ c~- ' ~y: t Boulder Mountain Parks Property Reference Map ,oooo F ee o Zooo 4000 6000 8ooo ~ - ~ ~ Buckin ham Campground (4th of July Trailhead) g NOTE: Property located in Sec. 2, T. 1S, R 74W of the 6 P.M. Map produced July 11, 2000 by Open Space and Mountain Parks Technical Services Group ( f F ~~ ~~ s J I Approximate location 1 of Boulder Falls ~ / `~ ~ / __-------'~`_~ \ ~.~ --. -- PARKING ~`~ ~ _ _. _ ~ '\.°'~ r ~~ I r,~~ ~`~~ ~ ..a~.....a. ~ ~ ~ .~ ~~ ~ ~ Forest ~ ~- ~`~°'°'~~ ~ ~ l r- " : . _, - ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ . 0 200 40o Feet Boulder Mountain Parks Property Reference Map - ~ Boulder Falls NOTE: Entire map is within Sec. 36, T. 1N, R 72W of the 6 P.M. Map produced July 11, 2000 by Open Space and Mountain Parks Technical Services Group