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Memo, Information and Draft Spreadsheet for the proposed 2001 CIPApril 14, 2000 t o MEMORANDUM To: Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd From: Chris Dropinski, Director Ken Ramsey, Superintendent, Pazks Planrung & Construction ~ Steve Russo, Admuustrative Analyst Subject: Information and Draft Spreadsheet for the Proposed 2001 Caprtal Improvement Program (CIP) Each year, at approxunately the May meeting, the Pazks and Recrearion Advisory Board is required to approve a CIP for the Parks and Recreation Department Due to the compleacity and importance of this actioq staff typically presents an informational item for the Board's review and feedback prior to presenting the proposed CIP for pubhc hearing and consideration of approval The proposed CIP is generally built on the previous year's approved projects with changes lug}ilighted and discussed Please find attached an mformational packet for the 2001 CIP It includes the 2000 CIP packet that the Boazd approved last year, as well as a Draft 2001 CIP spreadsheet. Requested Boazd changes will be incorporated into the final CIP spreadsheet for the May meeting That packet will look similaz to the 2000 CIP packet Highlighted Changes Proposed from the 2000 CIP Revenues: Lottery revenues were under collected in 1999 Expectations for 2000 have been adjusted down by $40,000 and the pro~ected revenues for 2001 through 2006 have been adjusted from previous expectations of $800,000 per yeaz to $750,000 per yeaz In 2003 through 2006, the Golf Revenues for capital, reflect a reduction from $224,000 per yeaz to $130,000 per year Tlvs is a planned shift of $94,000 per yeaz from capital to operating funds The conUnued rental of the Platt Farmhouse at Valmont City Pazk has been projected through 2006 at $9,700 per year. The Bond Acquisition Fund interest has been increased to $3,250,000 reflecting the actual earnings through 1999 and anticipated eaznings through 2000 ~ Additional, one time revenues, have been added for Baseline 1vLddle School ($55,000), Skate Pazk Public Private Partnerslup ($499,614), Tram Grant ($94,050), Urban Drainage and Flood Control District ($105,000) ~ Eapenditures: The 2000 Urban Park Refurbishment project funds have been distributed to Beach Pazk and North Boulder Park Irrigation projects per Board approval in 1999 For the Historical & Cultural project, $50,000 has been replaced in 2001 &om the dollars previously available m 2006 The Debt Sernce for the Lottery Fund has been increased reflechng the final pazcel acquisihon at the Area III site The Debt Service for the 25 Sales Taac has been adjusted to reflect the $6,000,000 bond refund The Mountam Ocean Acquisition pro~ect has been adjusted to reflect current expected costs of the purchase In the outlyuig yeazs (2004 - 2006) mcreased funding levels have been reflected for the Long Range Strategy for Neighborhood/Pocket Park Acquisition This was a specific request raised by a Council member at the tune of consideratron of the $6,OOQ000 Bond refund The Neighborhood & Pocket Park Development project funds for 2000 and 2001 have been ( distributed to Blue Sky F~ill, Fortune Park, Baseline Middle School, Elmer's Two Mile and Dakota ~ Ridge Village park sites as per past Boazd approvals Funding to complete the Skate Pazk at Scott Carpenter Park has been adjusted to reflect the Boazd's recent funding approval for that project. Funding for Foothills Community Pazk has been ad~usted to reflect current cost estimates to fully complete the development of that site To accommodate the increased funding level for Footlulls, the completion phase of East Boulder Community Pazk has been delayed to begin in 2005 The North Boulder Recreation Center project has been increased to reflect the Board's previous approval Relocation of E~risting Facilities (Valmont City Pazk) has been moved out to 2003 and 2004 and funded enUrely from the Permanent Pazk and Recreation Fund Staff will be prepazed to review these proposed changes in more detazl at the Board meetmg Attachments: 2000 CIP Packet 2001 DRAFT CIP Spreadsheet CITY OF BOULDER PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARq ~ MEETING DATE: Mav 24. 1999 (Agenda Item Preparation Date:) May 21, 1999 AGENDA TITLE: Pubiic Hearing and Consideration of Approval and Recommendation to City Council regarding the Parks and Recreation Department's Proposed 2000 Capital lmprovement Program (CIP) REaUESTED BY: Chris Dropinski, Director Ken Ramsey, Superintendeni Parks Planning and Construction Julya Bridgewater, Administration Director Steve Russo, Administrative Analyst FISCAL IMPACT: The Capital Improvements Project Program uses funding available through the Lottery Fund, the Permanent Park and Recreation Fund and the 1995 Ballot Issue funds ~; PRESENTATION TO BOARD: Due to a focus on three majo~ project undertakings, staff intends to first discuss with the Board the philosophy behind ihe changes to provide the context of a line by line walk ihrough of the proposed 2000 CIP spreadsheet. GETtERAL: Attached are the Fund Overview Statements (Attachment A, includes Lottery, Permanent Park and Recreation and 1995 Ballot Funds) that are included in the annual CIP portion of the City Budget and the Proposed 2000 Capital Improvement Program spreadsheet (Attachment B) for which staff is requesting the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board's consideration and approval. There are several changes in the proposed 2000 CIP from what the Board considered in pasi CIPs. Philosophically, staff has identified three major, as well as several less significant projeci changes and have identified specific funding to accomplish those projects. The three major projects include the Refurbishment of NoRh Boulder Recreation Center; Acquisition of the Mountain Oceans Property and associated projects; and the possible AcquisitionlRefurbishment of Land and Facilities at Flatiron Galf Course. The project costs identified for the three projects are rough estimates page 1 at this time, but staff feels the numbers get the projects close to the anticipated scope. All three projects are oppoRunities that exist today and staff believes are very important to make every effort to pursue. r~ l The Refurbishment of North Boulder Recreation Center requires the use of the remaining funds (after all anticipated acquisitions including the portion of the cost for Land and Facilities at Flatiron Golf Course, in 1999) of approximately S5 to 56,000,000. Staff will address possible options for potent~ally making those funds available for that purpose at the Board meeting. The Mountain Oceans acquisition utilizes 51,000,000 set aside from the Bond Issue Debt Service Savings that had been ident~fied for the relocation of existing Park and Recreation Facilities that may be required at the Valmont City Park site. The current plan for Valmont does not require any facility relocation for the Phase I development which is expected to occur over the next 3 to 4 years. The p~oposed 2000 CIP spreadsheet moves those dollars from a current allocation to the year 2002. The acqwsition of land and facilities at the Flatiron Golf Course represents an opportunity to resolve a long standing issue of having a private ownership located in the middie of the Golf Course. it also takes advantage of an existing bwlding to serve the snack bar and resiroom functions that had been identified~ and approved as an expansion to the existing Golf Pro Shop, which would no longer be necessary. A business plan for the operation of the site is being prepared and wiil be presented to the Board when the acquisition request comes forward. ` t Additional changes that have been made to the CIP as projected last year (to accommodate cash fiow for the three major projects listed above) include: • Decrease in Anticipated Sales Tax Revenues for 95 Ballot Issue • increase Goif Course revenue ifee adjustment) • Bond restructure or ballot issue to lift restrictions creating revenue for other needs from remaining, current N/P Acqwsition fund • Identification of additional revenues trom Bond Fund Interest • Increase in 2000 ailocation as a shift from 2001 for Historical and Culturai projects • Park Site Acquisition to make 3 annual payments for the Damon Property purchase in Mountain Parks (previously approved by the Board) ~ Identificat~on of a fenced Dog Park project • Identification of funds associated with Facility/Pool Improvements/Development, Recreation Center Improvements, and New Recreation Facilities spec~fically for the North Bouider Recreation Center Remodel • Reduction in funding for the Community Park in North Boulder with ihe intent of not impacting the completion schedule of Phase I in 2001 (southern '/z) but possibly deiaying implementatian of Phase II (northern '/:) by one year ~ a V page 2 • Reduction in funding for Neighborhood/Pocket Park in 2001 with the intent of moving the completian of this praject out one additional year (~ BACKGROUND: The following is a description of the department fund sources and the Board's role in reviewing, recommending and approving various components of the department's budget. Although this item is regarding the Capitai Improvement Projects iCIP) Budget, we thought it would be helpful for you to see the Board's role in the bigger picture. The Parks and Recreation budget is comprised of an Operating Budget and CIP Budget. Our fund sources, untortunately, do not fall neatly along these lines. In generai, the Board "Shall review the city manager's proposed annuai budget as it relates to park and recreation matters and subm~t its recommendations concerning said budget to the council." (Charter Sec. 160 (d)) General Fund - Primary source of the department's ongoing operating budget ~ Contains no CIP items ~ Board Role: review of highlights which in the past have included productrvity improvements, changes in services or programs, changes in budgeted full time equivalent employees (FTE's), review of budget progrem reductions, budget policy issues, revenue issues and adjustment to base requests; non-binding recommendation to Councd. 1 i Permanent Park and Recreation Fund (PPRF) - Consists of .9 mill levy of assessed valuation of all taxabie property in the city, gifts and donations to the fund, proceeds of the sale of park or recreation property or equipment, and any appropriations made by council (currenUy a fee charged at the `goif course goes into the PPRF to support renovation or development at these facilities.) The fund also inciudes revenues from a one time fee assessed on each new residentiai unit constructed in or annexed to the city. - "...Fund shall not be used for an y purpose other than the acquisition of par land or the permanent improvement of park and recreation faciiities." (Charter Sec. 161) - Funds are used for CIP projects and renovations (operating budget) of existing facdities for items under the 550,000 CIP deflnition. - Board Role: "Expenditures from this fund shall be made only upon ihe favorable recommendation of the parks and recreation advisory board and appropriation by the council." (Charter Sec. 161) This refers to both CIP and operating expenses. page 3 Ballot Issue - .15 °r6 Sales Tax (1992) - 20% of the proceeds annually was earmarked for Parks and Recreation for a five year period: Council extended this for two more years (through 1999). E^+~ As required to consider a change to the earmarking, Council created a citizen s F committee to provide a recommendation. This committee report wiil be reviewed by Councii in a Study Session on April 13. The committee recommendation cails for no change to the Parks and Recreation portion ot the funding. - The 20% share provides debt service for a 20 year period for the Pleasant View and Stazio Athletic Compiex development projects. Any of the 20% not needed for the earmarking was to be available for the ongoing operetions and maintenance for the two complexes. If there was additional surplus it was to go to the Permanent Park and Recreation Fund. There has never been additional surplus. ~ In addition to the 20%, Mountain Parks currently receives $300,000 annually to support its operations which was identified as a deficiency in the 1992 Management Study done by 8rown, 8ortz and Coddington. This allocation comes from the unearmarked "municipal services" portion of the proceeds. As you may recall, the 1998 and 1999 budgets reduced the general fund support by $200,000 annually for Mouniain Parks. The operating budget is considered adequate at this time. - Board Role: there is currently no specifiic review or action required of the Board. Ballot Issue - .25% Sales Tax (1995) ~~ - Revenues pledged for "...Payment of the principal, interest, and premium, in any, on ... bonds; and tfien for development, operation, and maintenance of the land and improvements purchased or constructed with the proceeds of the bonds; renovation and refurbishment or repiacement of four pools; renovation and replacement of recreation facilities, playgrounds, mountain park trails, and the civic park complex; improvements to recreation ce~ters and development of new recreation p~ojects to be determined in the future through the Master Planning Process by the City Councii; maintenance of the community park site in north Boulder; development of a mountain parks environmental education program; and for renovanon of city-owned historical and cultural facilities; with the rema~nder being dedicated for parks and recreation purposes..." (Ballot ~ language) ~ Bonds were soid for the purpose of ..."up to ten acres of pocket park sites, up to 16 acres of neighborhood park sites, up to three hundred and fifty acres of mountain park additions, and the purchase and pianning and partiai development of a city-wide park site or sites totaling at least 100 acres..." (Ballot language) The acreage limitations were removed in a 1999 ballot issue. - Proceeds used for both CIP and operat~ng budgets - Board Role: "No purchase of land or capital improvement shall be funded by revenue produced by this measure without the affirmative recommendation of E , ~f page 4 the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board." (Bailot language) Board would also p~ovide general recommendation to Council on the Operating Budget portion ~ of the fund.. Lottery Fund - Distnbution of the Lottery proceeds is through the State Conservation Trust Fund on a per capita basis. Use is resVicted for park and recreation and open space/type projects (ranging from active recreation to preservation natural areas) - We desire a focus on high leverage and high visibdity projects - Although technically could be used for ongoing maintenance, because of the potentiai volatility of the fund source, we have chosen not to use the Fund in that manner. It is used for CIP and one time projects including a multi-year trails renovation program. ~ Board Role: Current use of Lottery Fund follows a 1994 joint agreement of PRAB and the Open Space Board of Trustees. Pending outcome of current discussian of Mountain Parks/Open Space issue City Council may want ta revisit that agreement. FACILITIES & ASSET MANAGEMENT (FAM) This information affects both the CIP and the operating budget and is included to provide the methodology for caring for our bwidings over the short and long term. ~ - This program, defined by the City of Boulder's Facility and Asset Management Master Plan, is comprised of several categories including: Ongoing Maintenance, Major Maintenance, Renovation & Replacement and Equipment Replacement. The overell City efforts toward the FAM program is administered by Biil Bayes, Facility and Asset Manager in the Public Works Department. - The Parks and Recreation Department provides monies for FAM to address some of ihe Department's needs. There are additional monies administered by the Parks and Recreation Department to address some of the remaining needs. Most needs are covered by the combined efforts at this point. - Ongoing Maintenance - for building related items under 52,500 and includes: routine maintenance on existing systems and equipment to keep them operational throughout the manufacturers recommended service life; and routing surface refurbishment (ie: carpet, paint, tile, ceiling and floor coveringsl. The City policy recommends funding 2% annuaily of current value of the facility. - Major Maintenance - includes repair and replacement of existing buiiding system components exceeding $2,500. Systems eiigible far repair or replacement include: Interior and extenor structure, roofs, gutters, plumbing, page 5 HVAC, pooi pumps and filters, electrical, scoreboards, lighting, windows and doors. Repair only: pool covers, slides, diving boards, kilns, weight equipment, washers, dryers, refrigeretors, microwaves, lockers, compressors. The City ~% policy currently recommends funding 1°k annually of current value, however the intent for the future is to increase this to 2%. - Renovation & Replaceme~t - includes aiterations and the replacement of buiiding systems with systems of different design or improved efficiency. City poiicy recommends funding 2% annually of current value. Buildings currently financed through debt service are not included in the program. - Equipment Replacement - annual contributions based on industry lifetime standards to repiace equipmeni aver 55,000. Items include: battmg cage, concession stands, kiin. Water sfides are not included on the annual contribution list at this time due to the intent to replace them with funding from the .25% sales tax. Parks and Recreation Participation in FAM Efforts Ongoing & Major Maintenance - In 1999, the Parks and Recreat~on Department has des~gnated S608K from various funding sources for services in the first two categories. ~ This equates to fully funding the 2% ($434K) Ongoing Maintenance ~ Also funding 1%(S 174K) of the recommended 1% for Major Mainte~anca ~~ - There are currently 3 FTE's from P&R along with 2 vehicies withing the monies assigned to FAM efforts. Renovation & Replacement - Parks and Recreation is currently exceeding the recommended 2% provision through the capital program allowed through the .25% sales tax bafiot issue. - The most obvious example is the project at South Bouider Recreation Center. Over S600K was designated in 1997 for this and an additional $1M was approved in 1998. ~ in the 1998 & 1999 Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund budget there is aiso 513QK for recreation fac~lit~es and S 130K for the goif course facilities dedicated to renovation. ~ In the 1999 .25% sales tax fund there is 5336K for pool improvements and S 182K for recreation center improvements that will be utdized for Renovation & Replacement purposes. ~ Beyond these amounts the Department also provides for projects beyond the FAM programs' scope such as Mountam Park traii refurbishment and urban parks and playgrounds. Equipment Replacement - The Department is currently participating in the FAM equipment replacement program. ~ page 6 - The FAM manager has identified $483K in backlog replacement in addition to annual replacement costs of approximately S 100K. We are contributing to this ~ S100K annual replacement. - P&R staff intends to address the backlog but there are equipment identification discrepancies within the S483K that must be sorted out. For example, the two largest items on the list are 2 water slides that require replaceme~t (at S370K) according to industry replacement standards. There is the possibility that these slides may have a longar life than indicated, thereby lowering the immediate backlog amount of 8483K but increasing the annual amount of S100K. Also, these slides may be replaced in future renovation projects. Other Replacement Funds - These are repiacement programs that are similar to FAM programs but are administered by other departments - Computer Replacement Fund - Administered by the information Techno~ogies Department. This is generally a three year replacement schedule for computers and associated software. Parks and Recreation fully funds its share of this replacement fund. - Vehicle Replacement Fund - Administered by Fleet Services. Replacement costs are collected annuaily based on the individual life expectancy of each vehicle. it includes trucks, cars, mowers, tractors, etc. RECOMMENDATION: , Staff is requesting the Board's approval and recomme~dation to City Council of the s Proposed 2000 CIP as presented. ATTACHMENTS: A. Fund Overviews B. 20Q0-2005 CIP Spreadsheet (approved last year) page 7 ATTACE~IENT A DRAFI' L01'TERY F[JND 2000 CAPTTAL IlbIPROVENIEIVT PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Lottery Fund CIP is based on the 1993 joint recommendation to City Council as requested of the Parks and Recmaaon Advisory Board and the Open Space Board of Trustees. Tlie original agreement set aside 1% of the annual revenues for Art in the Park, $150,000 per year for the Tributary/Greenways project and the balance of the annual appropriation to be split 75 % to 25 9b for Park Site Acquisition and Contingency projects respecrively. There have been alterations to this past agreement due to the passage of the 1995 ballot issue and the resulting need to realign pmjects between the Lottery Fund, the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and the .25 cent Sales Tax Fund. The 1996 City Council decision to use I.ottery pmceeds of appm~dmately $264,000 per year bea nning in 1998 for 10 years, toward the acquisition of the Area III site has been included in the Lottery Fund Capital Improvement Progiam. POLICY ISSUES No Policy Issues have been idennfied. It is anticipated that the original dme period of rhe 1993 agreement (through 1998) will be extended until a decision on the possible consolidation of Mountain Parks and Open Space is concluded. At that time, it is expected that the agreement may be considered. For the purposes of the Capital Impmvement Program (CIP), stafF has included only pmjects which meet the CIP definition. Non pmject specific fund accumulations, where no actual pmject is bemg proposed in a given year (such as the Art in the Park project) have been removed from the CIP. While pmjects such as Art in the Park will be txacked to keep the commitment to prior funding levels, the use of those funds that are not anticipated to have a specific project in a given year has been diverted to other higher priority projects where there is an expectation and focus to implement the project. 11us change will increase immediate dollars available for lugh pnority projects, decrease annual carryover requests and still maintain funding expectations for pm~ects in geneial, over a 6 to 10 year period. ~ ~ For 2000 and future yeazs, the three funds (I.ottery, Permanent Park and Recreation and the .25 cent Sales Tax) have been considered joinfly to provide funding levels for CIP and non ~ CII~ projects. The following are the major CIP projects in the three funds: Community Park in North Boulder Debt Service for Large Park Site Acquisition New Recreation Facilities ImpnovemendDevelopment Neighborhood/Pocket Park Develapment Boulder Reservoir Improvements IBM Site Improvements North Bouider Recreation Center Flatirons Golf Course Improvement and/or Facility Acquisition Admimsuative Office Improvement or Acquisition ' Skateboard Facility Damon Purchase for Mountain Parks Dog Parks Pottery Lab Facility Consideration for Moving and Fxpanding Salberg Shelter Renovation Stazio Ballfields Playground Mapleton Ballfield Renovation Scott Cazpenter Pool Renovation Parks Operation Facility Major gains have been made towazds "talflng care of what we have" and sustainability. Facilities and Asset Management (FAlvn is now fully funded for Ongoing and Major Maintenance for the majority of the structures/facilities in Parks and Recreation. Park and Recreation renovation and refurbishment needs as well as equipment replacement, many of wfrich are in the operating budget, are likewise more completely funded but will still require multiple years to complete the backlog. The South Boulder Recrearion Center, 4 p]aygrounds and an irrigation system rebuild are all eacamples of major renovation efforts in 1998 and 1999. The proposed Tnbutary/Greenways projects are identified in that multi-departmental CIP with O& M requu~ements provided for in t6e Transportation budget. FINANCING Generally the estimated revenues for each year are conservative figures to make certain tUat funds are available to complete the projects supported by them. RRT"ATIONSHIP TO OPERATING BUDGET The Ballot Issue identified funding for the operating costs for the majority of the new development pmjects. The operating costs for renovation/refurbishment projects aze expected l.J DRAFr ~ 1 PERMANENT pARS AND 1tF.[~uFeTION FUND 2000 CAPPI'AL Il1?PROVII~IENT PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Permanent Park and Recreation Fund consists of .9 mill levy of assessed valuation of all taxable property in the city, gifts and donations to the fund, proceeds of the sale of park or recreation property or equipment, and any other appropriations made by council such as a fee charged at rhe golf course w support that facility's renovation or development needs. The fund aLso includes ievenues fmm a poniou of a development excise tax assease~ on each new residential unit constcucted or annexed to the city except for those units that az+e designated as permanenfly affordable. The City Charter requires the "...Fund shall not be used for any pwpose other than the acquisition of park ]and or the permanent improvement of park and recreation facilities." (Charter Sec. 161) Funds are use~ for CIP pc+ojects and renovations (operating budget) of existing facilities for items under the $50,000 CIP definition. POLICY ISSUES No Policy Issues have been identified ~ ffiGHLIGHTS For the purposes of the Capital Imp~vement Program (CIP), staff has included only projects wlrich me~ the CIP definition. Non project specific fund accumulations, where no actual project is being proposed in a given year (such as the Art in the Park project) have been removed from the CIP. While projects such as Art in the Park will be ttacked to keep the commitment to prior funding levels, the use of those funds that are not anticipated to have a specific project in a given year has been diverted to other }righer priority projects where there is an e~tation and focus to implement the project. This change will increase immediate dollars available for high priority projects, decrease annual cazryover requests and still maintain funding expectations for projects in general, over a 6 to 10 year penod. For 2000 and fuuue years, the three funds (L,ottery, permanent Park and Recreation and the .25 cent Sales Tax) have been considered joindy to provide funding levels for CII~ and non CIP projects. The following are the major CII~ pmjects in the three funds: V Community Park in North BouIder Debt Service for Large Park Site Acquisition New Recreation Facilities Improvement/Development Neighborhood/Pocket Park Development Boulder Reservoir Improvemenu IBM Site Improvements North Boulder Rzcreation Center Flatirons Golf Course Improvement andlor Faciliry Acquisition Administrative Office Improvement or Acquis~tion Skateboazd Facility Damon Purchase for Mountain Parks Dog Pazks Pottery Iab Facility Consideration for Moving and Expanding Salberg Shelter Renovation Stazio Ballfields Playground Mapleton Ballfield Renovahon Scott Carpenter Pool Renovation Pazks Operation Facility ~~ Major ~azns have been made towards "taking care of what we have" and sustainabiliry. Facilities and Asset Management (Ft~ is now fully funded for Ongoing and Major Mamtenance for tlte majority of the stcucnues/facilities in P~u9cs and Recreation. Park and Recreation renovation and refurbishment needs as well as equipment replacement, many of which are in the opeiating budget, are likewise more completely funded but will still require multiple years to complete rhe ~ backlog. The South Boulder Recreafion Center, 4 playgrounds and an urigation system rebuild are all earamples of major renovation efforts in 1998 and 1999. FINANCING Geneially the estimated revenues for each year are conservahve figures to make certain that funds are available to complete the pmjects supported by them. RELATIONSHIP TO OPERAT'ING BUDGET The Ballot Issue identifie~ funding for rhe opeiating costs for the ma~onty of the new davelopment projects. The operating costs for renovation/refurbishment pro~ects are expected to remain the same but increase annually for inflaaonary increases. DRAFT 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUND 2000 CAPITAL IMPROVENIEIVT PROGRAI~I ~ i OVERV~W for parks and recreation purposes.. "(Ballot language) The 1995 Ballot Issue ~nd revenues were pledged for "...Payment for the principal, interest, and premium, if any, on...bonds; and then for development, opention, and maintenance of the land and improvements purchased or constiucted with the proceeds of the bonds; renovation and refurbishment or replacement of four pools; renovation and replacement of recreation facilities; playgrounds, mountain park tiails, civic pazk complex; improvemerns to recreation centers and development of new recreation projects to be determined in the future through the Master Planning Process by the City Council; maintenance of the community park in north Boulder; development of a mountain parks environmemat education progiam; and for the renovation of ciry-owned historical and cultural facilities; with the remainder being dedicated The following is a summary of project and Operation & Maintenance funding (in 1995 dollars) that was identified in the ballot issue backup information: Bonded Projects Pocket Parks Acquisition up to 10 acres $4,900,000 Neighborhood Park Acq. up W 16 acres $4,500,000 Iarge City Park Acq. w/master site planning and some infiasuucture development $18,000,000 Mountain Parks Acquisihon $2,000,000 Renovation & Refurbishment of E~sting Facilities Recreation Facilities $17g,ppp/yr Mountain Parks (Tiails) $168,000/yr Civic Pazk Complex $ '7g,ppp/yr Urban Parks (Irrigation Systems) $130,000/yr Pool Improvements (capital) $2'7'7,ppp/yr Development of Facilities & Programs Community Park in North Boulder (O&.1~ $210,000/yr Dev of New Neigh Park Sites (capital) '$200,000/yr (~8r~ $ 64,000/yr Dev of New Pocket Park Sites (capital) 5120,000/yr (08r~ $ 40,000/yr Dev of F.acisting Neigh Park Sites (capital) $200,000/yr (O&.11~ $ 67,000/yr ~ Improvements to Recreation Centers (capital) $150,000/yr Mountain Parks Environmental Education $130,000/yr New Recreation Facilities (capital) $200,000/yr Historical & Cultural Facilities $ 50,000/yr POLICY ISSUES While Parks and Recreation buildings are currenfly funded through FAM (Facilities and Asset Management) additional funding through boad issues or other sources will continue to be required for renovation and replacement of specialty components such as pools, ballfields, playgrounds, turf, plant material and iixigation systems. Parks and Recreation facility renovation was included in the 1995 Ballot Issue over a 20 year time fiame. However, because many of the facilities are overdue for renovation, would Council consider a ballot question asldng the citizens, "Without razsing ta~ces, can current revenue stream from the .25 Sales Tax be utilized for bonding purposes to improve North Boulder Recreation Center and Scott Carpenter Pool?" ffiGHLIGHTS For the purposes of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP), staff has included only those ~~ projects that meet the CIP definition. Specific pro~ects have been identified for the ist year of the CIP, but have been left in more generel "project categories" (such as the Neighborhood/Pocket Park Development, Recreation Center Improvemems, and New Recreation Facilities projects) for the ouflying years, where specific projects aze unidentified at this time. For 2000 and future years, the three funds (I.ottery, Permanent Park and Recreation and the .25 cent Sales Tax} have been considered jointly to provide funding levels for CIP and non CIP projects. The following aze the major CIP projects m the three funds: Community Park in North Boulder Debt Service for Large Pazk Site Acquisition New Recreation Facilities ImprovemendDevelopment Neighborhood/Pocket Park Development Boulder Reservoir Improvements IBM Site Improvements North Boulder Recreation Center Flatirons Golf Course Improvement and/or Faciliry Acquisirion Administiative Office Improvement or Acquisition Skateboard Facility Damon Purchase for Mountain Parks f~ V Dog Par~ Pottery Lab Facility Consideration for Moving and Fxpanding Saiberg Shelter Renovation ~ Stazio Ballfields Playground Mapleton Ballfield Renovation Scott Carpenter Pool Renovation Parks Operation Facility Major gains have been made towards "taldng care of what we have" and sustainability. Facilities and Asset Management (FAivn is now fully funded for Ongoing and Major Maintenance for the majority of the structures/facilities ia Pazks and R~reation. Pazk and Recreation renovation and refurbishment needs as well as equipment replacement, many of which aze in the operating budget, are likewise more completely funded but will still require multiple years to complete the backlog. The South Boulder Recreation Center, 4 playgrounds and an irrigation system reb~uld are all examples of major renovation efforts in 1998 and 1999. FINANCING The revenues fmm the .25 cent Sales Tax are estimated based on BudgedFinance Department projections. RELATIONSHIP TO OPERATING BUDGET The Ballot Issue iden~ed funding for the opereting costs for the majority of the new development projects. The operating costs for renovation/refurbishment pmjects are expected to remain the same but increase annually for inflationary increases. C~ V A B C D 1 521/99 11 49 2 2000 PROPOSED CAPfTAL IMPROVEMENT PR OGRAM (CIP) 3 718/226 = FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUNDS 4 23W PERMANENT PARK 8 RECREATION FUND 5 111= LOTTERY FUND 6 1998 Budget 7 DESCRIPTION Actual 1999 8 1181Z26 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE Balfot Fund $ 4,489,409 S 2,064,751 9 230 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE PP~R Fund S 2,064,041 $ 431,028 10 111 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE Lottery Fund S 819,524 S 118,751 11 TotalPrrorYearFundBalance $ T,372,974 S 2,614,530 12 13 ANNUAL REVENUES 14 118 Sales Tax 25 Safes Tax Fund $ 5,333,429 $ 5,629,316 15 230 PropertyTax Perm Parks Rcn Fund S 1,127,427 $ 1,140,141 16 111 Annual Lottery Revenue S 835,346 S 800,000 17 Total Funds MaprRevenue Sou~e S 7,296,202 S 7,569,457 18 118 Interest income 25 Sales Tax Fund $ 247,517 S 140,733 19 230 Interest Income Pertn Parks Rcn Fund S 154,247 S 42.436 20 111 Interest Eammgs $ 46,800 S - 21 Total Inteiest Eam~nqs S 448,564 $ 183,169 22 118 Intergavemmental Aqreement (CU) S 89,900 S - 23 230 Park & Recreabon Fee Pertn Parks Rcn Fund S 455,541 $ 272,344 24 230 Golf Revenue Pertn Parks Rcn F1~nd S 124,595 S 168,000 25 230 Cap~l Replace Fee Rcn Centers & Pools PPR S 40,000 S - 26 230 Miscellaneous Revenue Pertn Parks Rcn Fund S 13,201 S 10,000 27 118 Rents 25 Sales Tax Fund $ 7,239 S - 28 118 Bond Refund g _ g _ 29 226 Bond Acq Fund interest g _ 30 111 BMPA Revenue S 1,250,000 S - 31 TotalOtherRevenues S 1,980,476 S 450,344 32 118J226 TOTAL ANNUAL REVENUE $ 5,678,085 S 5,770,049 33 230 TOTAL ANNUAL REVENUE S 1,915,011 3 1,632,921 34 111 70TALANNUALREVENUE $ 2,132,146 S 800,~~0 35 TotalRevenues S 9,725,242 S 8,202,970 36 37 118 Total Funds Avatlable $ 10,167,494 $ 7,834,800 38 230 Total Funds Availabie S 3,979,052 $ 2,063,949 39 111 Total Funds Available 3 2,951,670 $ 918,751 40 Tota/FundsAvadable S 17,098,216 810,817,5~0 41 42 ANNUAL EXPENSES 43 44 OPERATING USES OF FUNDS 45 118 Ope~ahon & Ma~ntenance 5 678,574 S 1,010,052 46 230 Operatian & Maintenance $ 192,015 S 217,553 47 Sub Tota! Operatmq & Mamtenance S 870,589 S 1,227,605 48 49 RenovatioNRefurbishment 50 111 Contingency S 33,028 S 25,000 51 111 Tnbutary/Greenways 5 116,700 S 150,000 52 230 Art in the Park $ - $ 17,000 53 111 Art in the Park $ - $ 8,000 54 Total RRln The Park S - S 25, 000 55 230 ' Park Survey $ - S 10 000 56 230 ' Pub6cAssessment S 19 , S 5,000 E Ad)usted 1999 3,580,761 2.723,125 564,022 6, 867, 908 $ S $ S S S $ S S $ g S $ $ $ S S $ S 3 $ S S $ S S 5, 544, 742 1,140,141 800,000 7,484,883 140, 733 42,436 183,169 272,344 168, 000 10,000 1,200,000 1, 650,344 6,885,475 1.632.921 800,OOU 9,318,396 S 10,466,236 $ 4,356,046 S 1,364,022 S 16, i 86, 304 ' S S s 1.285, 052 I 462,043 1,747,095 I $ $ $ $ S 5 S 34,822 183,796 162,000 42.970 204, 970 10,000 5, 000 $ S $ S 5 $ S S S S S $ S $ 5 $ 5 S S $ $ S S $ $ S F 2000 1, 386, 996 235, 849 33,540 1, 656,385 5, 665, 756 1,153,480 800,000 7,619,236 141, 644 44, 558 I 186,202 , 285,961 ', 224,000 I 10,000 i 1,400,000 !, 919, 961 7, 207, 400 1,717,999 800.000 9, 725, 399 S 8,594,396 $ 1,953,848 S 833,540 S 1l,381,784 S $ S $ S S S S $ S 1,185,540 225,711 1,411,251 25, 000 150, 000 17, 000 8, 000 25, 000 G H I J K ATTACHMENT B 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 , 10 5 I 15 ~ 2 I 8 8 $ 3,899 $ 6.322 S 58,362 60, 04 $ $ 6 ,233 S 1, 9 78, 902 I S 309, 444 ( S 750, 947 I S 733,375 I S 1,186, 077 ~ S 5,842,321 $ 6,077,120 S 6,271,658 S 6,473,425 $ 6,699,995 S 1.211,154 $ 1.271.711 I S 1.335,297 S 1,402.062 S 1,472.165 $ 800,O~a S B~O,DO~ ~$ 800,000 $ 800,000 $ 800,000 S 7,853,475 $ 8,148,831 S 8,406,955 S 8,675,487 S 8,972.160 $ 146,058 S 151,928 5 156,791 $ 161,836 S 16~,500 $ 46,786 S 49,125 3 51,581 $ 54,160 5 56,869 $ - $ - 5 . $ - S - S 192,844 S 201,053 S 208,372 $ 215,996 $ 224,369 S - S - S - $ - $ - S 300,259 $ 315,272 5 331,036 $ 347,587 $ 364,967 S 224,000 S 224,000 S 224,000 S 224,000 $ 224,000 S - S - 5 - S - S - S 10,000 S 10,000 S 10,U00 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ - S - S - 5 - $ . S 1,4~~,000 $ 1,4~~,000 S - $ - S - S 2,269.358 $ - S - $ - $ _ $ - $ _ $ _ $ _ $ . $ 4,203,617 $ 1,949,272 S 565,036 S 581,587 S b98,967 $ 9,657,737 $ 7,629,048 $ 6,428,449 $ 6,635,261 $ 6,867,495 $ 1,792,199 S 1,870,108 61,951,9'14 S 2,037,809 $ 2,128,001 $ 500,000 $ 800,000 S 800,000 S 800,000 $ 800,000 S 12,249, 936 S 10,299,156 S 9,180, 363 S 9, 473, 070 $ 9, 795, 496 $10,760,408 $ 7,778,247 S 7,01'1,964 $ 7,089,512 5 7,184,106 S 1,864,531 $ 2,024,031 $ 2,060,184 S 2,256,928 S 2,936,234 $ 803,899 S 806,322 S 858,362 S 860,004 S 861,233 513,428,838 $f0,608,800 S 9,930,5i0 S f0,206,444 S 10,981,572 $ 1,393,490 I $ 1,513,297 S 1,619,Q61 S 1,691,523 S 1,769,861 $ 234,176 $ 242,958 S 252,068 $ 261,520 $ 271,327 S 1,627,666 S 1,756,255 S 1,871,129 S 1,953,043 $ 2,041,188 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 S 25,000 S 25,000 S 25,000 S 150,000 S 150,D00 3 150,Q00 $ 150,000 $ 150,000 $ 17,000 5 17,000 S 17,000 S 17,000 S 17,000 $ 8,000 $ 8,000 S 8,~00 $ 8,000 $ 8,000 S 25, 000 S 25, 000 S 25, 000 S 25, 000 S 25, 000 S - S - S - S - S - S - S - $ - S - S - ~ • ~ J V A B C D E F G H I J K 1 5/21199 11 49 2 2060 PROPOSED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PR OGRAM (CIP) 3 118/226 ~ FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUNDS 4 23~ PERMANENT PARK 8 RECREATION FUND 5 1'11= LOTTERY FUND 6 1998 Bud~et Adjusted 7 DESCRIPTION Actual 1999 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 230 'ADA ~ $ - S - $ 20 000 5 - $ - 3 $ - $ S 58 118 CouR Refurbishment 804801 $ 1 43,082 S 60,000 $ , 60,000 S 60,000 S 60,000 S 6~,0~0 S 50 006 S 60,000 S 60,000 59 230 ' Court Refurbishment $ 999 $ - g 45,000 $ - $ - $ _ $ - $ - $ - 60 TotaiCouRRefurbrshment I$ 44,081 S 60,000 $ 105,000 $ 60,000 $ 60,000 $ 60,000 S 6Q,000 S 60,000 $ 60,000 61 'I'f8 Urban Parks 803201 801801 S 55,465 $ 120,51 $ 200,240 S 165,916 S 174,212 $ 182,922 $ 192.069 $ 201,672 S 211,756 62 230 Urban Park Refurbishment S - S 80,000 $ 80,000 S 200,000 S 200,000 S 25~,~~~ S 250,000 $ 250,OOD $ 250,000 63 118 ' Martin Park imgatton 804101,1p2,103 $ 60,786 $ - g _ g _ g _ $ $ _ g _ g _ 64 118 ' Resurtace Scott Carptr Pariang 804202 S 13,670 ~$ - $ . g _ g _ g _ g _ g _ g • _ 65 118 ' Pla round ArroNntiood 803301,302,3 S 103,454 S $ _ g g _ g g _ g _ $ _ 66 111 Siaz~o BalifieWs $ - $ 3~,000 $ 30,000 $ - $ - S - $ - S - S - 67 118 ' Scott Carpenter Pia round S - $ - ~ $ 73 400 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 5 - 68 230 ' Pfayground~ScottCarpenterPk $ 151,576 S . S , 78,687 $ - g - $ $ - S - S - 69 Total Scott Carpenter PYayground $ 151,576 $ - S 152,087 $ - $ - $ - $ - ~ - $ - 70 118 ' Playground Development 802001 $ . g . g _ g . $ _ g _ g _ ~ _ g . 71 230 ' PlayAround Reno (Barker & Tantra~ $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ _ g _ $ _ ~ _ $ _ 72 111 MounW~n Park Trads Refurb $ 102,971 S 100,000 3 1~0,000 5 100,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - S - 73 Tota/Mounta~nPaACT2dsRefurb~shment S f02,97f S 100,000 3 t00,000 $ 100,000 S IOG yG S - $ - S - S - 74 118 RecreaUon Fawl~es 803601 $ _ g _ g _ g . $ _ $ _ $ _ $ _ g _ 75 230 ' Sde FumRure $ 12,822 $ 15,000 $ 15,~4~ S 15,000 S 15,000 S 15,000 $ 15.000 I S 15,000 S 15,400 76 118 ` Recreation - FAM in Ad 98=$68K+$114K S 775,920 $ 327,268 S 475,472 S 343,631 $ 360,813 $ 378,854 S 397,796 $ 417,686 S 438,570 77 230 ' CentedPool - FAM $ - g g g - g - ~r g - g - $ - 78 118 ` Eqwpment Reptacemeni $ - $ 100,000 S 1~0,000 $ 105,000 S 110,250 5 115,763 S 121,551 $ 127,628 S 134,Ot0 79 230 RecreadonFaatdyRefurbishment S 59,193 3 130 000 $ 368 113 S 130 000 5 000 130 $ 130 000 S 130 000 S 130 000 S 130 ~00 80 Tota/RecreationFacrirt~esRefurbrshment 3 847,935 S , 572,268 $ , 958,585 3 , 593,631 $ , 616,063 $ , 639 616 S , 664 3d7 S , 690,314 , S , 7i7,580 81 Sub Total Renovatlon Returbishmefrt 5 1,529,885 $ 1 177 784 $ 2 084 5~0 S 319 547 1 $ 1 250 275 S , 1 332 538 S , 416 1 366 $ 986 401 1 S 439 336 1 82 , , , , , , , , , , , , , . , , 83 Histoncal & Cuttura18~3700 $ - S 50 000 I S 91 896 S 10~ ~~~ S - S 50 000 3 50 000 S 000 50 S 50 000 84 118 ' Boulder Museum of Contemp AR803704 S - $ , - $ , 9,058 $ , $ - 3 , S , - $ , - S , - 85 118 ` Harbeck House 803701 S - $ - S 5,453 S - $ - S - S - S - S - 86 118 ` Columbia Cemetery 8037~3 $ 3,299 $ - S 2g,352 S - Q - $ - 5 - 5 - S - 87 118 ' Chautauqua Butldings 803702 $ _ g _ g _ g _ g _ g _ $ _ $ _ g _ 88 Sub Total Histoncal & CWtu2/ S 3,299 S 50,000 S 135,759 $ tOQ,~QO S - S 50,000 S 50,000 S 50,000 S 50,000 89 118 Crvic Park Complex 803801 11800~ $ 3,290 $ 75,000 S 109,643 $ 48,OOU $ 48,000 S 48,000 $ 48,000 3 48,000 5 48,000 90 0 $ - $ _ g _ g _ $ _ g _ g _ g _ g _ 91 TOTAL OPEftATING USES OF FUNDS 5 2,407,063 $ 2,530,389 $ 4,076,997 S 2,878,798 5 2.925,941 $ 3,186,793 3 3.335,545 S 3,453,029 S 3,578,524 92 83 118 Less Transfers (See Note) 25 Sales Tax $ 186,066 $ 127,115 $ 186,066 $ 186,066 S 186,U66 S 186,066 S 186,066 S 186.066 S 186,066 94 230 Less T2nsfers (See Note) Pertn Parks & Rcn $ 275,A77 S 230,002 5 2)5,477 $ 279,159 S 283,025 S 85,246 I$ 89,509 S 93,984 S 98,683 95 111 Less Transfers CostAllocabon S 9,506 $ 9,506 S 9,506 S 9,862 $ t~,232 $ 10,616 S 11,014 S 11,427 S 11,999 96 TotalTrensfersOut(CostAlloqtron,etc.J $ 471,049 S 366,623 S 47i,049 $ 475,087 S 479,323 S 281,928 S 286,589 S 291.477 $ 296,748 S7 ~98 111 DebtSernce S 134,510 $ 134,509 S 134,509 S 134,509 $ 134,5~9 $ 134,508 $ 134.509 S 134,509 S 134,509 I 99 118 Debt Sernce $ 2,457,185 $ 2,479,745 $ 2.479,745 $ 2,502,925 $ Z,SQ8,675 $ 2,521,425 $ 2.522,525 S 2,515,725 S 2,509,725 100 230 Debt Ezpense S 50,403 S 50,402 $ 51,489 S 50,409 S 50,409 $ 50,4d8 $ 50,409 S 50,409 S 50,409 101 Total Annual Debt S 2, 642, 088 3 2, 664, 656 ~ S 2, 665, 743 $ 2, 687, 843 3 2.693, 593 S 2, T06,343 S 2, 70T, 443 S 2, 700, 643 S 2, 694, 643 102 1~3 CAPITAL iMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) PR I 104 ~ - - ~ A I B 1 5/21/99 11 4 9 2 2000 PROPOSED CAPITAL fMPROVEMENT PI 3 118/226 = FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUNDS 4 23~ PERIYIANENT PARK & RECREATION FUND 5 111 = LOTTERY FUND 6 7 DESCRIPTION ~ IPark Site Acquisitioo 10 22fi 8ond Issuance Cost 10 7 226 L~e,Cdy Park (Bond) 804801 10 8 17 outam`pcean Purohase 1~9 226 Pocket Parks Acq bond 600901 110 226 ' 1650 Alpine 111 111 Park Site Acquis~t~on 112 226 Maunt Parks up ta 350 Acres 8ond 600701 113 1~1 BMPA Area III 'I 14 Sub Total 115 1 ~ 6 Park Develo ment 117 118 Neiqh/PockeYPark Dev 118 118 ' Baselme Middle School 119 118 ` ins Hollow 120 118 ' Bradfield 805101 121 230 `62dfiNdLumberSheDesign 722 230 ' Eaton Park 123 118 ' Sinton 124 230 ' Sinton Sde Des~gn 125 1'IS ' ~og Parks 126 118 ' Boulder Creek west of J C 802002 127 118 ' Valmont 128 118 ' East Palo Park Sde 802004 129 118 ' Shanahan Ridge 802003 130 1'18 • Blue Sky Hill 131 118 ' Simte Faa6ty 805401 ~32 230 ' East Bldr Communrty Park Dev 133 230 New Playqround Developmeni 134 230 ' Shanahan Ridqe 135 230 Chnstensen Park 136 111 Communrty Park in North Boulder 137 230 CommunRy Park in North Bldr 198 118 Community Park in Narth 8ou{der 80030~ 139 Total Communtty Parkln North Bou/der 140 Sub Total 141 142 118 Facil IPoo-Im rovementsJDeveio merrt 143 118 Recreat~on Center Improvements 144 118 ' NBRC Remodel 802403 145 118 • 58RC Poo1802404 146 118 ' Spruce Pool 802406 ~4~ 1~8 ' 3oott Ca enter Pool 8~2405 148 118 ' EBCC Pooi 8d2402 149 118 ' SBRC improvements 8025U3 '150 118 ' EBCC Im rovements 802505 151 118 ' Center analysis 802801 152 118 N ew Recreation Faali~es i C D tOGRAIN (CIP) 1998 Budget Actual 1999 S - S - S - S - $ - S 511,573 S . ~ $ - S 1.25a,0~~ $ 129.491 $ 1,761.573 S 129,491 S 5,109 ~ $ 280,106 S . $ _ S 8,073 $ _ S 68,467 S _ S 3,309 $ _ $ 34.272 S 200,000 $ - g _ $ 3,954 $ _ S - g _ 5 9,491 $ _ S 209,158 $ _ S 125,431 S _ S 24,411 $ _ $ 4,477 $ _ S 3,308 S _ S - $ _ S - g _ $ 105,349 $ _ S 3,440 $ $ 229,360 $ 250,000 I S 271,366 5 430,072 ~ 5 48,006 S 393,101 S 548, ~32 $ 1, 073,173 S 1,156,981 S 1,553,279 S 185,696 $ - 5 182,326 $ 49 $ 100,000 $ 307 $ _ S 840 S _ $ - S 50,000 S 13 $ _ $ 1,670,818 $ - S 8,702 $ - $ - $ _ $ - S E F Adjusted 1999 2000 $ - $ 1,046,050 $ - S 128,120 S 169,835 $ 1,344,0~5 $ `$ _ S S - $ - $ - $ - 5 169,835 $ 169,835 $ 699,814 ' S 15,000 S 11,927 S 481,532 S - $ 414,215 5 - S 1,325 S 30,000 S - 3 18.975 S - S - 5 2.846 S 16,692 S - 5 - $ - $ - S 496,924 $ 1,569,273 $ 549,988 $ 2, 616,185 $ 4,308,511 182,326 336,696 82.017 - - S 484.136 $ - $ - 3 - S - $ - $ - S S 20,000 I Ig _ $ Ig - ~, _ ? - $ - S - S - S - S - S - S 232,435 3 324,637 S 235.000 S 792.072 $ 1,296.208 S - S 0 S 1,405,510 3 - $ - $ - S - S - $ - $ - $ - _ G H I ~ J K 2001 2002 2003 2904 2005 $ - $ _ g _ $ _ g _ $ $ _ g _ $ _ g _ $ - g _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ - g _ g _ g _ $ - $ _ $ _ $ _ $ _ S 112,000 $ 112,000 S 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ I S - 169,635 $ $ _ 169,835 $ $ _ 169,835 $ $ _ 169,835 $ $ _ 169.835 j$ I ~ 281,835 5 281,835 S 469,835 $ 469,835 $ 469,835 S 292.712 $ 556,153 $ 534,279 $ 563.918 $ 595 ~49 S - S - g _ g _ g _ $ - $ _ g _ g _ g _ S - S _ g _ g _ $ . S - $ _ g . g _ g _ $ - 3 _ $ _ g _ g _ $ - g _ g _ g _ g _ S - $ - g _ g _ g _ S - $ - g . g _ g _ S - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - S _ g _ g _ $ _ S - g _ g _ g _ g _ S - $ _ g _ $ _ g _ $ - g _ g _ g . g _ $ - $ - 5 507,p79 $ 500,782 $ 600.000 $ - g _ g _ g _ $ _ $ - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - S _ $ . g _ g _ S 188,000 $ 138,000 5 - $ - $ - $ 530,998 5 625,148 S 400,Q00 S - $ - $ 200,000 $ 200,000 $ $ - $ - S 918,998 f 963,148 S 400,000 S - $ - S 1,2~1,710 $ 1,519,301 S 1,441,358 S 1,064,700 $ 1,195,149 S - $ 389.768 5 409.256 $ 429,719 $ 451.204 $ - $ 211,065 $ 121,618 $ 170,699 S 244,334 $ 5.276,991 $ _ g . g _ g _ 5 - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ _ $ _ $ _ $ _ S - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ - S S $ - S - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ _ g _ g _ g _ $ - $ 281~420 $ 295,491 S 310,265 S 325,778 ~ ~ ~ A B 1 5/21199 11 49 2 2000 PROPOSED CAPITAL IMPROVEiNENT PRC 3 1187226 = FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUNDS 4 23W PERMANENT PARK 8 RECREATION FUND 5 111= LOTTERY FUND 6 7~ DESCRlPTION 230 • Ope2Gons CenterNehicle Storape 154 118 'Pleasant View Field (889th fields)800101-4 155 118 ' Stazio F~elds 800501 156 230 ' Stazio 157 118 ' Boulder Reservov Improvements 158 118 ' IBM Sde Imprnvements 159 118 ' GoIF Facddy RemodH 'I60 230 FlaUron Golf Caurse 'I61 230 Flatiron Golf Course Shefter 162 118 ' Relocation of 6c~ng Facd~res 163 23~ ' Reloeation Exisdnq Faaidies ~ 64 Sub Total Recreation Faciiity Cevelopmerrt ( e ~65 - 166 118 TOTAL CIP EXPENDITURES ". ._._ 167 230 TOTAL CIP 168 111 TOTAL CIP 169 TOTAL CiP ALL FUNDS 170 171 172 173 174 118 TOTA~ USE OF FUNDS 175 230 TOTAL USES OF FUNDS 17 111 TOTAL USE OF FUN0.S 177 7ota1 Funds Uses 178 • 179 118f226 FUND BALANCE 180 230 ENDING FUND BALANCE 12/31 181 111 ENDING FUND BALANCE 182 Total Endinq Fund Balance 183 230 Less Designated Reserve• 184 Less Reserve of $1,000,000 for BVRC 185 Wortang Fund Balance 186 187 188 ~ 189 ~ 190 C GRAM (CIP) 1998 Actuai $ ~ - $ 1,403 S 15,66~ $ - S - $ - $ - S 91,733 S - $ - S - $ 1,789.532 S 2,205,742 $ 664,999 $ 1,990,933 S 4,861,674 $ 6,586,733 $ 1,255,927 S 2.387,648 S 10,230,308 S 3,580,761 $ 2,723.125 $ 564,~22 $ 6,867,908 $ 51,748 S - $ 6,816,160 S 6,586,733 $ 1,255,927 S 2.387,648 S 10,230,308 D $ - S ~ - $ $ - 5 $ - $ $ 500,000 S $ - $ $ - $ S - S $ 380,000 $ $ - S $ - S $ 1,212.326 $ S 1.692,229 S $ 1,D10,072 $ 3 379,491 $ $ 3.08~.792 S S 6,041,925 $ 1,765,029 $ 836,506 $ 8,643,460 S 1.792.875 $ 298,920 S 82.245 $ 2.174.040 $ 66,175 $ 1,000,000 $ 1,107,865 $ 6,041,925 S 1,765,029 $ 836,506 $ 8,643,460 E ~ F G I usfed 1999 J 2000 ~ 2001 ._. ._ • $ _ °'- $ ZSO,OOO S - S - ~ - $ - ' ~ ' $ - 500,000 S - $ - - $ 200,000 $ - - $ 450,000 $ - - $ - ~ - 562,575 5 639,600 S - - ~ - S - ' $ - $ - 1,663,_614 ~ S 2,695,110 ~$ 5,526,991 3,973,863 2,626,075 794, 879 7,394,817 $ 9,079,240 $ 4,120.197 $ 1,330,482 S 14,529,919 5 $ S $ S $ $ 1,386,996 235, 849 33,540 1,656,385 51,748 1,604,637 $ 9,079,240 $ 4.12~,197 $ 1,330,482 $ 14,529,919 $ 2,794,646 $ 5,769,703 S 964,237 $ 780,998 $ 402,270 $ 469,835 $ 4,161,153 $ 7,020,536 S $ 7,491,724 $10,611,209 s ~.aa~,s~s $ ~.~~a.sos $ 829,641 ~ S 797,576 S 10.202.882 $13, l 19,394 $ 1,102, 671 $ 149,199 S 72,332 $ 153,923 S 3,899 $ 6,322 S 1.778,902 I $ 309,444 S 69,175 $ 74,675 S - S - $ 1,109,727 $ 234,769 3 7,491,724 $10,611,209 $ 1,881,516 $ 1,710,608 5 829,641 $ 797,576 S 1Q202,882 $13,119,394 H 1 J K ~ Z002 2003 2004 2005 $ . ,_ .$ _ __ $ ..... _ . $ _ _: S - $ - S - 5 - S - $ - S - $ - $ • $ - $ - $ - S - $ - $ - 3 - S - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ • $ 730,000 S 130,000 5 130,000 S - $ - $ - $ - $ 500,000 5 - $ - $ - S 500, 000 S - $ - I 3 $ 1,492,485 $ 547,109 5 610,964 3 70~,112 $ 2,138,406 S 1,36~,645 S 1,474,601 $ 1,616,465 S 1,125,148 $ 1,037,079 S 630,782 $ 730,000 5 419,835 5 469,835 S 469.835 $ 469,835 S 3,683,389 $ 2,867,559 S 2.575,2'18 $ 2,816,300 S 7,194,732 S 6,557,712 S 6,772,901 S 7,024,453 $ 1,915,761 $ 1,841,065 S 1,448,695 $ 1,562,419 S 747,960 $ 798,358 $ 798,771 $ 799,343 $ 9,858.453 S 9,187,136 $ 9,020,368 3 9,386,214 $ 583,515 S 454,252 $ 316,611 $ 159,653 $ 108,270 S 2'19,119 S 808,233 S 1,373,815 $ 58,362 $ 60,OU4 $ 6t,233 $ 61,890 S ?50,147 S 733,375 $ 1,186,077 $ 1,595,358 $ 69,675 ~ 89,675 S 69,675 $ - S 1,000,000 S 1,D00,000 $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 S (319,526) 5(356,300) S 116.402 S 595,358 S 7,194,732 S 6,557,?12 $ 6,772,901 S 7,024,453 $ 1,915,761 $ 1,841,065 S 1,448,695 $ 1,562,419 S 747,960 S 798,358 $ 798,771 S 799,343 S 9,858,453 $ 9,197,"36 S 9,020,368 3 9,386,214 A 00 11 05 1'f ~ 230= 111= DRAFT ~ ~ .2 3, 4 5 6 7 8 9 '10 ' 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 39 40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 52 53 75 76 Sheet'1 B i ~ i o PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS & REFURBISHMENT PROGRAM (CIP) 7995 BA4LOT iSSUE FUNDS JIANENT PARK & RECREA710N FUND 'ERY FUND DESCRIPTION 118 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE Ballot Fund 230 PRIOR YEAR FUND BAIANCE PP&R Fund ~ ~ 1 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE Lottery Fund ToNal Prror Vear Fund Balance ~'18 Ad~ustment to Fu~d @alance 230 Ad~ustment to fund Balance 11'I Ad~ustment to Fund Balance 1 ANNUAL REVENUES 118 Sales Tax 25 Sales Tax Fund 230 Property Tax Pertn Parks Rcn Fund '1'11 Annual Lottery Revenue Total Funds Ma~or Revenue Source 'I'18 Interest Income 25 Sales Tax Fund 230 Interest Income Perm Parks Rcn Fund 'I'11 Interest Incrome Lottery Fund Total lnterest Eam~nqs 't'18 Intergovemmental Apreement (Baseline Middle School) 'I'f S Fenced Dop Park 'I 18 Design Fee Ad~ for SBRC entry 118 Horticulture Fund 118 Skate Park Public Pmrate Partner (NIC~ 230 Park & Recreation Fee Perm Parks Rcn Fund 1'IS Columbia Cemetary G2nt 'I'18 Trem Grant 118 Pioneer Cemetary '118 Urban Drama,qe & Flood Corrtrol pistnct 230 Golf Revenue Perm Parks Rcn Fund 230 Capdal Replace Fee Rcn Centers & Pools PPR 230 Miscellaneous Revenue Perm Parks Rcn Fund 230 Arts Commission 118 Rents 25 Sales Tax Fund 226 Bond Acq Fund tnterest 111 BMPA Revenue Total Other Revenues f226 TOTAI ANNUAL REVENUE 230 TOTAL ANNUAL REVENUE 1'11 TOTAL ANNUAI REVENUE Total Revenues 118 Total Funds Available 230 Total Funds Available 111 Total Funds Available Total Funds Avallable ANNUAL EXPENSES Operatlon 8 MaiMenance 118 Subtota/ Ope2hnq B~ Mamtenance 230 Subrotal Operahnq & Mamtenance 1999 Actual 53,580,761 52,723,125 5564,02d $6, 867, 910 $68, 906 $5,872,617 $1,134,158 $745,685 S7, 752,460 $207, 343 $168,427 ($'1,484j $374,286 $55,000 $3,756 $2, 000 $1,146 $386 $'171, 037 $66, 530 $48,000 $3,000 $0 $'I62,938 $0 $4, 061 $9, 700 $0 $300,000 $827,554 $6,269,478 $1,640,621 $1,044,201 $8, 954,300 $8,954,300 s9~781,333 54,363,746 51,608,225 E15,753,304 $1, 239, 799 $209,137 Budqet Z000 51,576,663 5281,324 534,645 $1, 892, 632 $5,708,378 51,153,480 $800, 000 $7, 661, 858 $142,709 $44,558 SO $187,267 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $285, 961 $0 $0 $224,000 $0 $'10,000 $9,700 $0 SO $529,661 55,860,787 $1,717,999 $800,000 $8,378, 786 $8,378,786 57~437~450 51,999,323 5834,6C6 510,271,418 $1,185,520 $225, 7#!; E F 2000 2001 54,436,160 s1,406,201 52,468,386 s496,~T 5130,577 53,268 $7, 035,123 $1, 905, 566 $3,445 $172 $5,872,617 $1,153,480 $760, 000 $7, 786, 097 $142,709 $44,558 $0 $187,267 $0 $0 $0 $0 $499,614 $295,000 $0 $94,050 $5,990,657 $1,'188,084 $750,000 $7, 928,741 $146,037 $as,7as $0 $192,823 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $295,000 $0 $105,000 $224, 000 $0 $'I 0,000 $3,000 $9,700 $0 $0 $1,240,364 $6,723,690 $1,730,038 $760,000 $9, 243, 728 $9,213,728 571,156,405 54,198,424 ssso,sn 516,245,406 $1,316,026 1 $225, 711 $224,000 $0 $10,000 $9,700 $3,062,469 $0 $3, 601,169 $9,208,863 $1,763,870 $750,000 $11,722,733 $11,722,733 510,614,891 52,259,967 s~sa,zsa E13,628,126 $1,333,449 I $234,176 G H 2002 2003 M14,362 51,013,909 S534,382 5861,492 536,000 5168,302 $784, 734 $2, 043, 704 $9 $0 $6,23't,481 $1,223,727 $750,000 $8,205,208 $150,754 $49,125 $0 $199, 879 SO $0 $0 $0 SO $300,000 $0 $224,000 $0 $'I 0, 000 $9,7~~ $D $0 $543,700 $6,391,935 $1,806,852 $750,000 38,948,787 $8,948,787 ss,sos,z~e 52,341,234 s~es,ooo 59,733,513 S1, 515, 569 5242.958 $6,417,179 $1,260,439 $750,000 $8, 427, 618 $155,318 $5~,581 SO $206,899 $D $0 $0 $0 $0 $300,000 $0 $130,000 $0 $10,000 $9,700 $0 $0 $449,700 $6,582,197 $1,752,020 $750, 000 $9,084,217 $9,084,217 rr,sss,~ os 52,673,513 5918,302 i11,~27,927 51,623, 834 $252,069 J I K 2004 ZppS I y0p6 5962,641 5775,512 5497,783 5348,892 521,637 5225,063 5412,163 5166,573 t48,502 $1,723,696 $952,722 $771,34B $0 $0 $0 $6,610,978 $6,810,629 $7,0'16,3'10 $1,298,252 $1,337,199 $1,377,315 $750,000 $750,000 $750,000 $8,659,230 $8,897,829 $9,?43,626 $160,'I60 $164,965 $'169,913 $54,161 $56,869 $59,712 $0 $0 $0 5214,321 $221,834 $229,625 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO $0 $0 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $130,000 $'130,000 $130,000 SO $0 $0 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $9,700 $9,700 $9,700 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 .8449,700 $449,700 $449,700 $6,780,838 $6,985,294 $7,195,923 $1,792,4'12 $1,834,068 $1,877,027. $750,000 $750,000 $750,000 $9,323,250 $9,569,362 $9,822,951 $9,323,250 $9,569,362 $9,822,951 r,~aa,a~s s~~~so,so~ s~,ssa,~os ~`2_141,304 S1,866,T05 52,102,091 51,162,163 5905,673I 5798,502 E11,046.947 E10,S22,084 510,594,299 51,699,013 81,777,522 $1,860,136 $261,521 5271,32B $281.503 Sheet~ 111 118 230 TOTAL OPERATINO USES OP FUNDS Subtotal OperatinQ Uses of Funds Subtotal Operatmp Uses of Funds Subtotal OpereUnq Uses of Funds '~.° 124 118 Less Transfers (See Note) 25 Sales Tax '125 230 Less T2nsfers (See Note) Perm Parks & Rcn 126 111 Less Transfers Cost Allocation '127 Tohal Transfers Ouf (Cost Adocatwn, etc ) 3 4 5 6 7 ~ 77 83 84 86 87 88 89 93 98, A I B 11 05 2001 PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS 8 118= FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUNDS 230= PSRMANfiNT PARK 8 RECREATION FllND 111= 111 1'I 1 230 1'I 1 118 230 118 118 118 230 1'18 230 230 111 230 1'18 118 230 103I 111 '104 118 105 230 'I'10 1'18 '111 118 112 1'18 113 1'18 118 118 FUND DESCRIPTION Sub Total Operating 8 Maintenance RenovatioNRefurbishment Tnbutary/Greernrays Art m the Park Art in the Park Tota/ AR !n The Pa~Yc Court Refurbishmerit 60480'I ' CouR Refurbishment Total Court Refurb~shment Ur6an Parks 803201 801801 ~ eeacn P~am ' AmowwoodPlay,qround Urban Parks 803201 801801 ` Scott CarpenterPlaypround ' Playground at Scott Carpenter Toha/ Scott Carpenter PYd yground North Boulder Park /m,qatron Mountam Park Tratls Refurb Total Mountam Park Trads Refurb~shment • Sde Fumdure ' FAM " EqwpmeM Repiacement Recreation FaalRies RefurbishmeM Tota/ Recr~tron Facdnres Refurbishment Subtota/ Renovatron Refurb~shme~t Subtota! Renovat~on Refurbishment Su6toha/ Renovadon Refur6ishment Sub Total Renovatfon Refurbishment Historical 8 Cultural 803700 • Boulde~ Museum of Contemp Art803704 • Harbeck House 803701 • Columbia Cemetery 803703 • Chautauqua Buddinps 803702 ' Tram RestoraUon Match Sub Tota/ Histw~'ca/ d Culturol Clvic Park Complex 803801 118000 C I D T PROGRAM (CIP) 1999 Budpet Actual 200~ $1,448,936 ~ $1,4'11,23't $25,458 $138,740 $94,100 $~ $94,100 $81,993 $39, 729 $12~,722 $10 $1,122 $9 $13,350 $1,350 $33, 509 $34. 859 $62,279 $'100,372 $100,372 $14,790 $581,572 $0 $15,108 $611,470 $264,570 $666,056 $272,865 $1,203,491 $1,203,491 $25,000 $150,000 $17,000 $8,000 825,000 $60,000 $0 560, 000 $165,916 $0 $0 $200,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 5100,000 $15,000 $343,631 $'I05,000 $13~,000 $593,631 $283,000 $674,547 $362,000 $'1,319,547 $1,319,547 $0 $~ $9,274 532,939 $9,824 $26,144 $7@,181 $60, 325 t2,790,933 5264,670 52,044,361 5+1~2,002 52,790,933 $'107, 067 $230,002 58,4~1 .8345,470 $100,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 548, 000 52,878,778 5283,000 S2,o08,OS7 5587,711 ~~r~ $127,1'15 $260,229 S'17,504 $404. 84~ Ad~usted 2000 $1,541,737 $25, 000 $'195,056 $81, 900 $50,976 $132,870 $63,966 $2,091 $66,057 $0 $178,135 SO $16,650 $0 $0 $0 $187, 721 $'100, 000 $100,000 515,000 $343,631 $105,000 $483,005 $946,636 $37i,026 $690,732 $786,367 $1,848,125 $1,848,125 $111,970 $9,OSB $0 $0 $0 $36, 550 $157,578 $97,318 53,644~768 5371,026 s2,2s~,sta 51,012,078 53~644~768 $'I47,418 $260,229 $17,504 z $425,151 2001 $1,567,625 $25,000 $15~,~0~ $17,000 $8,000 $25, 000 $60, 000 $0 $60, 000 $174,212 $0 $0 $80, 000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 $100,000 $15,000 $360,813 $110,250 $130,000 $616, 063 $283,000 $705,275 $242, 000 $1,230,275 $1,230,275 $50,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 550,000 .848, 000 M,895,900 5283,000 sz,~as,ru 5476,176 52,896,9C0 $186,066 $230,002 $17,924 $433,992 G H I J K 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 $1,758527 $'1,875,903 $'1,96~,534 52048,854 $2'141,639 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $150,000 $150,000 $'I50,000 $150,000 $'150,000 $17,000 $17,000 $~7,000 $17,000 $17,000 $8,000 $8,000 $8,000 $8,000 $8,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 525,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $0 $0 $~ $0 $0 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $182.922 $192,068 $201,672 $211,755 $222,343 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO $0 $0 $0 $0 $200,000 $200,000 $250,000 5250,000 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $~ $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 5378,854 $397,796 $417,686 $438,570 $460,499 $'115,763 $121,551 $127,628 $'134,010 $140,710 $130,000 $130,000 $130,000 $130,000 $130,000 $639,617 $664,347 $690,314 $717,580 $746,209 $183,000 $183,000 $183,000 $183,000 $183,000 $737,539 $771,415 $806,986 $844,335 $883,552 $362.000 $362,000 $412,000 $412,000 $412,000 $1,282,539 $1,3'16,415 $1,401,986 $1,439,335 $1,478,552 $1,282,539 $1,316,415 $1,401,986 $1,439,335 $1,478 552 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 550, 000 $50, 000 $50, 000 $50, 000 SO .848, 000 .848, 000 .848, 000 548, 000 ,848, 000 53,139,066 53,290,318 53,460,620 53,586,185 53,668,191 5183,000 5183,0~ 5183,000 S183,000 5183,000 52,351 708 52,493 249 52,603 999 M,719 857 791 688 i604,958 S614,069 5673,521 5683,328 5693~503 53,139,066 53,290,318 53,460,520 53,586,185 53,666,191 $'{86,066 $186,066 $186,066 $186,066 $186,066 $61,227 $63,064 $64,956 $66904 $689'I2 $18,354 $'18,795 $'19,246 $19,727 $20,467 8265.647 $267,925 $270,268 5272,697 $275,445 Sheet'I • ~ 1 2 6 7 1 1 141 151 171 A B ~ C ~ ~ 4/2000 'I 1 05 2001 PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS & REFURBISNMENT PROGRAM (CIP) 118= FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE_FUNDS L I 1'I'I 1'IB 230 DESCRIPTION Debt Semce DebtSernce Debt Serv~ce Total Annual Debt CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGfiAM CIP PRWECTS 1999 Actual ~~~~ $1,036,420 $23,171 $ 1,363,935 Budpet 2000 ~~.3`~ $2,479,745 550,409 $ 2, 834,496 Park Site Acqufsition 11 B Mountain Ocean Purohase SO $0 ~'18 Land Acqwsdio~ SO SO 111 Park S~te AcquisRion $341,772 SO '111 BMPA Area III $75,454 - Sub Total $417,226 SO Park Development 118 Neiph & Pocket Park Deve~opment $0 $484,'136 1'I8 ' Baseline Middle School $7,254 SO 118 ` Ins Hollow $11,769 SO 1'18 ' Bradfield $440,2'13 $0 1'18 ' Dakata R~dpe Park 230 ' Dakota Ridpe Park SO $C 230 ` Eaton Park $61,362 $C ~ 18 ' Fortune Park $2,'195 SC 230 ' SiMon Sde Design S23 SC ~~8 ' DopParks SO $20,OOC ~~8 ' PlannmqReserve 518,140 S( '118 ' Valmont (from debt semce sawngs) 5260,746 S( 1'18 ' East Palo Park $9 $~ ~'18 • Burke Park 51,123 S( 1'18 ` Blue Sky Hill $8,414 S( 230 • Skate Park Art Gate 118 • Slmte FacilAy desipn $16,692 118 • Skate FaalAy 577,478 $I 230 ' East Boulder Commundy Park - 111 Community Park m North Boulder $483,107 $232,43' ' 230 Commurnty Park in North Bldr $625,091 $324,63 118 Commun+ty Park m North Boulder 800301 $949,522 $235,OOi Total CommunR~Parkm North 8oulder 52,057,720 $792,07: Sub Total $2,963,138 $1,296,201 118 FacliitylPool Improvements/DevelopmeM $0 $~ 118 Recreation CeMer Improvemerns $350 5~ 118 ' NBRC Remodel $19,278 $1,405,51 118 • Spruce Pool 802406 $2,339 $ 118 ' S<~tt Carpenter Pooi 802405 $0 $ 118 ` SBRC Improvements 802503 $213,771 $ 1'18 New Recreation FaaltGes $~ $ 230 ` Operations CenterNehicie Stotaqe $~ $ 118 ' Stazio FiNds 800501 $'14,493 S ; '118 ' Boulder Resenroir ImprovemeMs S'I 13,539 ~ E F G H I J K usted Ad ~ ~ yppp ypp~ Zpp2 2003 2004 2005 2~a'+ 5304,344 5304,344 5304,344 $304,344 $304,344 $304,344 8304.344 $1,'126,093 $1,126,092 $1,126,093 $2,396,093 $2,398,942 $2,429,093 $2,385,'193 $77,640 $50,409 $50,409 $50,409 $50,409 $50,409 $50,409 $ 1, 508, 077 $ 1,480, 845 $ 1, 48Q 846 $ 2, 750, 846 $ 2, 753, 695 $ 2, 783 646 $ 2J39~ 946 $1,200,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO SO $0 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $112,000 $112,000 $'112,000 $0 $500,000 $350,000 5250,000 $1,312,000 $112,000 $'I12,000 $0 $600,000 $450.000 $350,000 $'1,031 $60,593 $696,849 $731,692 $768,276 5806,690 $847,025 $'182,746 $0 $0 SO SO $0 $0 $205,158 $564,073 $0 $0 $0 SO SO $41,3'19 SO $0 $0 $0 SO SO $275,000 $0 SO $0 $0 $0 $300,000 $300,000 $352,854 $0 $0 $0 SO SO SO $17,805 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO 302 $1 $0 $0 $0 SO $0 SO , $50,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO SO $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO $0 $135,000 SO $0 SO $0 $0 SO $0 SO $0 $0 $0 $0 SO $13,877 $0 $0 SO $0 $0 $0 $179,432 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO $6,000 I $79'1,522 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 400,000 700,000 i $82,435 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,268,819 5718,998 $763,'148 $907,079 $700,782 $0 $0 1 $335,467 5300,000 $1,100,000 $0 $0 $0 50 $1,686,721 51,018,998 $1,B63,148 $907,079 $700,782 SO SO t $3,939,767 $1,643,664 $2,559,997 $'1,638,771 $1,469,058 $'1,506,690 $1,847,025 ) $0 $0 $'132 253 $409 256 $429,719 $451,205 $473 765 ) $0 $0 $0 5121,618 $170,699 $244,334 $256,551 ) $'1,722,305 56,026,991 SO $0 $0 50 $0 ) $26,670 30 $0 $0 50 $0 SO ) $0 $0 SO $0 $0 $0 SO ) $'1,245 $0 SO $0 $0 $0 $0 ) $0 $0 $0 5295,491 $310,266 5325,779 $342,068 ) $0 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 ) $0 $0 SO $0 $0 SO $0 ~, o q $386,462 $0 $0 $0 $0 SO $0 DRAFT V Sneen _, - A 4„ 4n000 „ ~5 -- B - -- - C ~ __ ~ p -. -- E_.- F - G.~. 2 2001 PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS 8 REFURBIS HMENT PROG RAM (CIP~ 3 118= FOR 1995 BALLOT ISSUE FUNDS 4 230= PERMANENT PARK & RECREATION FUND 5 111= LOTTERY FUND 6 1999 Budget Ad~usted ~ T ~ DESCRIPTION Actual 2000 2000 2001 2002 '179 118 ' IBM SRe Improvements $0 $200,000 $200,000 $0 SO 180 ~ 18 ` Golf Faalrty Remodel SO $450,000 $450,000 $0 g0 ~8~ 230 FlahronGolfCourse $473,709 $0 $0 $0 $0 9 182 230 Flatiron Golf Course Shetter $0 $639,600 $723,405 $0 $0 183 230 • Reloption of Ewstinq FaalRies (Valmont) $0 $0 g0 SO g0 S 184 Sub Total Recreation Facility Developme~rt $837,479 $2,695,11D $3,510,087 $6,276,99'I $132 253 $1 185 , , 186 1'I8 TOTALCIPEXpENDITURES $2,157,325 $2,794,646 $6,215,039 $6,951,657 $1 929 102 $1 187 230 ' TOTAL CIP EXPENDITURES $1,'160,185 $964,237 $2,352,380 $968,998 , , $763 148 , $1 188 111 TOTAL CIP EXpENDITURES $900,333 $232,435 $194,435 $'I'12,000 , $'I'12 000 , 189 TOTAL CIP ALL FUNDS $4,217,843 $3,99'1,318 $8,761,854 $8,032,655 , $2 804 250 $3 190 $4,217,843 $3,99'1,318 $8,76'1,854 $8,032,655 , , $2,804 250 , $3 191 , , '192 '193 194 '118 TOTAL USE OF FUNDS $5,345,'173 $7,409,573 $9,750,204 $10,400,539 $5,592 369 $6 195 230 ' ' TOTAL USE OF FUNDS $1,895,360 $'1,862,586 $3,702,327 $1,725,585 , $'1 479 742 , $2 196 1 t I TOTAL USE OF FUNDS $1,477,648 $837,283 $887,309 $717,268 , , $617 698 , $ 197 Total Funds Uses 58,718,181 510,109,442 S14,339,840 512,843,392 , 57 689,809 yg 198 , , 199 118 FUND BALANCE $4,436,160 $27,877 $1,406,201 $2'14,352 $1 013 909 $. 200 230 ENDING FUND BALANCE 1T131 $2,468,386 $136,737 $496,097 $534,382 , , $861 492 $', 201 '111 ENDING FUND BALANCE $130 577 $2 638 , , ( , ) $3,268 $36,000 $168,302 $ 202 To~lEndlnqFundBalance E7,035,123 5161,976 51,903,566 f784,734 52,043,704 Si;, Page 4 H 2003 ~~30,0 500, 0 0.56, 3 558, 0 537, 0 095,1 095,1 633, 4~ 264, 6: 506,1; 404,2 362,6~ 348,8! 412,11 33,65 - -~- ~ --- ... K , 2004 2p05 2006 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 00 $130,000 $130,000 $'130,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 00 $500,000 $0 $0 65 $1,540~684 $1,151,3'18 $1,202,384 57 51,778,960 $1,928,008 $2,0'19,409 79 $'1,330,782 $830,000 $1,130,000 SO $500,000 $350,000 $250,000 36 $3,609,742 $3,108,008 $3,399,409 36 $3,609,742 $3,108,008 $3,399,409 35 $6,967,967 $7,263,024 $7,382,356 21 $2,119,668 $'1,630,64'I $1,942,g24 39 $'1,006,590 $857,07'I $757,811 t4 S10,094,225 59,750,T37 510,082,991 4'I $775,512 $497,783 $311,350 i2 $21,637 $225063 $159267 i3 $'155,573 $q8,502 $40,691 ~6 5952,722 t771,348 5511,308 DRAFT