Loading...
7 - Items for Discussion/Information, Review of Parks & Recreation 2002 CIP ,.» , City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department ~ MEMORANDUM To Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd From Christine Anderseq Deputy City Manager for Environmental Services Doug Hawthorne, Acting Codirector of Parks and Recreation Linda Kotowski, Acting Codirector of Pazks and Recreation Kate Bemhazdt, Acting Superintendent of Pazks Planning and Construction Julya Bridgewater, Administrative Services Division Manager Steve Russo, Financial Analyst Sub~ect Discussion Item Review of Pazks and Recreation 2002 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Date April 18, 2001 PURPOSE This is an opportunity for the Boazd to provide input and direchon about the proposed Parks and Recreation Proposed 2002 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Staffwill retum to the Board in May for approval of the Year 2000 CIP, so that this document can be fonvarded, along with the overall City's CIP to the Planning Board and City Council While the Boazd would be approving specifically the year 2002 CIP, general information is provided for a seven yeaz CIP which provides a more comprehensive view for planning purposes ~ ~,.... BACKGROUND The Parks and Recreation budget is comprised of • Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Budget • Operating Budget The Boazd reviews the CIP budget in eazly spring and the Operating Budget later m the summer Copies of the Fund Overview Statements which are included in the annual CIP portion of the City Budget aze included in Attachment A The Parks and Recreat~on Source of Funds includes (see key of Spreadsheet Attachment B) • General Fund • Permanent Pazks and Recreation Fund • 1995 Ballot Issue ZS Cent Sales Tax and Bond Funds (Debt Service on bonds is paid by Sales Ta~c) • Lottery Fund General Fund Source Property and sales and use taxes Use Primary support for the departmenYs ongomg operating budget Page 1 of 8 Note Tkus fund does not contain Capital Improvement items Board Role The Board may provide non-binding recommendations to Council ''~ .~ Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund Source 9 mill levy of assessed valuation of all taxable property in the city, gifts and donations, proceeds of sale of park property or equipment, any appropriations by Council This fund aiso includes revenues from a one time fee assessed on each new residentaal unit consUucted in or anneaced to the ciry with the exception of affordable housing units. Use Acquisition of park land or permanent improvement of park and recreation facilities This fund is used for CIP projects and renovarions of $50,000 or more in value Note See Fund 230 on the attached spread sheet Boazd Role Expenditure of these funds requires favorable recommendation af the Board and appropriation by Council 1995 Ballot Issue 25 Cent Sales Tax Revenue and Bond Funds Source 25 Cent Sales Tax approved by the citizens in 1995 Use Revenues pledged for " payment of principal, interest, and premium, in any, on bonds; and then for development, operatioq and maintenance of the land and improvements purchased or constructed with the proceeds of the bonds; renovation and refurbishment or replacement of four pools; renovation and replacement of recreation faciliries, playgrounds, mountain park trails, and the civic pazk complex, improvement to recreation centers '~ and development of new recreation projects to be determined in the future "~ through Master Planning Process by the City Councii, maintenance of the community pazk site in north Boulder, development of a mountain parks environmental education program, and for renovarion of city-owned historical and cultural facilities, with the remainder beuig dedicated for pazks and recreation purposes" (ballot language) Bonds were sold for the purpose of"up to ten acres of pocket pazk sites, up to 16 acres of neighborhood park srtes, up to three hundred and fifty acres of mountain park additions, and the purchase and planning and partial development of a city-wide pazk site or s~tes totaling at least 100 acres. " Proceeds of the bonds and sales tax may be used for both CIP and operating budgets Note See Fund 118 on the attached spread sheet for 25 Cent Sales Ta~c Note See Fund 226 for the bond fund projects The bond fund projects have been determined by prior Boazd approvals Boazd Role An affirmative recommendation of the Board is required for purchase of land or capital improvements funded by this revenue Page 2 of 8 ~' ~~ Lottery Fund ,+~°~ Source Funds are provided by the Lottery Distriburion of Lottery proceeds is +..- managed by the State Conservation Trust Fund on a per capita basis. Use Lottery funds may be used for a wide range of park and recreation and open space types of projects ranging from active recrearion to preservation of natural azeas Note See Fund i l l on the attached spread sheet Boazd Role Past use of Lottery funds followed a 1993 joint agreement of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB) and Open Space Board of Trustees These two boazds will meet this summer to discuss a new agreement. TI-~ PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN AND Tf~ CIP• The CIP is designed to accomplish the goals of the Approved Pazks and Recreation Master Plan A summary of the Master Plan Goals and the status of accomplishing these goals is included in Attachment C In Attachment C you will also see a list of projects to be accompGshed over future yeazs CIP SPREAD SHEET NOTES Revenues: (See Attachment B. PaEe 1. Lines 6-21) • The revenue projections in the CIP reflect the estimates of the Budget Division of the City Finance Department. The CIP for the past year is adjusted in February of each year to ~" reflect actual revenues collected ''r- • The City Manager has requested that each department be prepared to reduce their Capital Improvement Program tax supported funding by approximately 5% to cover the potential undercollection of taues Given current anticipated revenues, a 5% reducrion would translate to a $313,000 Eapenditures ~See Attachment B. Pa~e 2. Lines 46-491 Operations and Maintenance • Operations and Maintenance aze funded by the Permanent Parks and Recreation Funds (Fund 230), the .25 cent 1995 Sales Tax (Fund 118), and General Fund (Fund O10) Funds 230 and 118 provide partial funding for Parks Planning and Construction sta~ Snancial staff support, long range planning, maintenance (sta~ equipment, suppGes, and hired services) for new pazk properties, and the recently established Pazks and Recreation Environmental Resources Division More detailed information, including a review of the General Fund (Fund O10) funding, will be provided to the Board at the time of the Operating Budget review this summer Renovation and Refurbishment (See Attachment B. Page 2. Lines 51-581 • Funding is allocated annually for renovation and refurbishment of park and recreation facilities such as new pazk walks, complete renovation of irrigation systems, renovation of Page 3 of 8 playgrounds, resurfacing play courts (tecuus, basketball, other), replacement of park furniture, contributions to FAM (see below) ~ • The City's FAM (Facilities Assets Management) division maintains most of the City's "" buildings, including recreation buildings and pools The Pazks and Recreation Department provides funding for FAM as identified through the Facilities Assets Management Approved Master Plan. FAM handles on going maintenance (under $2,500), major maintenance (over $2,500 for repair and replacement of building system components), renovation and replacement (alterations and replacement of building systems of different design or improved efficiency), and equipment replacement (replacement of equipment, such as a pottery kiln, over $5,000 based on industry lifetime standuds) • Lottery Funding allocations have been shown to provide information for the Boazd's up- coming discussion about these funds with the Open Space Board of Trustees. • Transfers (Attachment B, Page 2, Lines 66-68)• These are required eupenditures to cover the general support provided to the Parks and Recreation from other city departments (Finance, Information Services, Human Resources, City Attomey, i.e "cost allocation") • Debt Service (Appendix B, Page 2, Lines 71-74) Fund 111 (Lottery Funding) $304,444 per year to pay for Area III property and $112,133 per yeaz unti12002 to pay for Mountain Park property located west of Mountain Pazk System Use of Lottery funds for these property purchases was approved by City Council Fund 118 (Sales Tax) Payment of debt service on bonds Fund 230 (Permanent Parks and Recrearion) • Payment of debt service for purchase ofIris Center Park Site Acquisition (Attachment B, Page 3, Lmes 81-88) ~' • No new pazksite acquisitions have been proposed for 2002 `"~ • In the outlying years, 2004 through 2007, funding levels have been reflected for a long range strategy for Neighborhood and Pocket Park Acquisirion. Ttus was a specific request raised by a Council member at the time of consideration of the $6,000,000 Bond refund wtuch reallocated Neighborhood and Pocket Pazk funding to fund the renovarion and expansion of North Boulder Recreation Center • The 2001 adjusted budget shows $899,293 funding for the potential purchase of the Mountain Ocean Building and site Staff has proceeded, based on the Boazd's direction, to negotiate the purchase of this site The current property purchase arrangement imolves creating a building site at Stazio Ballfields Phase 2 in addition to purchasing the site Due to previous defened utility extension requirements associated with the Stazio Ballfield Development, and newly identiSed road improvement requirements for the new development lot, staffanticipated that roughly $1,500,000 may be needed to fund the required infrastructure and Mountain Ocean purchase In addition to the $899,293 identified in the CIP, funding is available from the Bond Funds specifically identified for the purchase of city pazk property and Valmont City Park Phase 1 development to assist in funding ttus site purchase. Park Development (Attachment B, Page 3 and 4, Lines 91-116) Page 4 of 8 ~" ~ • Neighborhood and Pocket Park Development: $200,000 has been identified from this ~ category to pay for infrastructure development of roads and utilities adjacent to the future Drive In Theater park (Board approvai June, 2000). The Board will be requested to prioritize neighborhood and pocket pazks to be designed and developed over the next multi-year period. There is $538,773 in the 2002 for this development followed by yearly allocations of roughly $700,000/year. Park development prioritization considerations of existing undeveloped parksites are provided in Attachment D • Foothills Commumty Park (Attachrrtent B, Page 3, Lines 112-115) and North Boulder Recreation Center (Appendix B, Page 4, Line 120) The current spreadsheet shows the implication of choosing to fund the entire scope of work ($10,257,102) for the North Boulder Recreation Center by reallocating funds from other azeas of the CIP $7,950,000 Original budget, summer 2000 $1,591,938 Reallocation offunding from Foothills Community Pazk (2001 and 2002) $ 582,911 Reallocation from fund balance (2002) $ 132.253 Reallocate available Recreation funding (2001) $10,257,102 $1,591,938 Reallocation of Recreation funding in future years 2003-2006 to restore budget for Foothills Community Pazk $ 0 Fund balance will not be restored ~... In addidon to delaying the construcUon of Foothills Community Park to fund the recreation center renovation and expacision, the decision to fully fund the current scope of recrearion center in 2001-2002 reduces the flexibility of being able to distribute available Capital Improvement dollars for the design and development of neighborhood and pocket parks The $582,911 removed from the fund balance reduces available funding for future projects STAFF RECOMNIENDATIONS: Staffis requesting the Board's input on the following recommendations Address Citv Mana¢er rec~uested 5% revenue reduction• Staff recommends that the scope of work identified for Foothill Community Pazk in 2002 take into consideration the potential reduction of available tax supported funds in this account by roughly $313,000 This anticipated budget cut would need to be considered for future years also. Final direction conceming ttvs proposed reduction will be provided to staff later this year ^""' Page 5 of 8 ~.. Evaluation- This will slow down the Phase 2 community pazk development. Approximately 44 acres of the Foothills Community Park was recendy completed, 2000, ''°'~ in Phase 1 and provided for a number of recreational needs (large open turf for °` unprogrammed play, community gardens, child's play area, youth play area, two roller hockey courts, restroom facility). Given this progress in providing for these community needs, slowing the conswcrion of the remaining community park would have less impact on the overall park system than reducing funds from the Neighborhood and Pocket Park Development or Park Acquisition projects Fund the purchase of the Mountain Ocean site Staff recommends that a minimum of $600,000 be reserved, in addition to the identified 2001 funding of $899,292, through existmg bond funding (Fund 22b •designated for the purchase of city park property and development of Valmont City Pazk ) to assist in funding the purchase of the Mountain Ocean building and site for Valmont City Park The Snal negotiated cost of the property is anticipated to be available later t7us yeaz. Evaluation Funding this property purchase is through sales tax and bond funds would support the City's ability to purchase this piece of property without compromising exisring commitments to construct Valmont City Park Phase 1 It is an appropriate use of t7us available bonded funding to complete the purchase of Valmont City park property, which will bridge a difficuk development gap in the patk property configuration and will provide a valuable asset for future development options The Board directed staff to purchase this site in earlier stages of the park pianning process ,~"*~ Fundina North Boulder Recreation Center '"` An option for funding the North Boulder Recreation Center renovation and expansion through reallocation of CIP funds is shown above, along v~nth an evaluation of how this funding choice is anticipated to affect future CIP projects. Staff agrees that the full scope of work currently idenrified for the North Boulder Recreation Center would meet many of the currently identified recreation needs It is also most efficient to accomplish this expanded scope of work in the current project with available funding, as opposed to delaying development options and Snding future funds for additions to the building. The affect to the overall CIP is that the Foothills Community Park and neighborhood and pocket pazk development will be delayed somewhat over future years, however the on-going revenues from the 1995 25 cent sales tax will continue to be available for the fu1120 year period to complete these projects Fundm f~ or Neighborhood and Pocket Pazks There are eight undeveloped neighborhood and pocket pazks m addihon to the undeveloped portions of the East Boulder Community and Foothills Community Pazks See Attac6ment D Taking into consideration the general criteria for park developmeM, Sintoq Dakota Ridge, and the Drive In Theater neighborhood parks would be prioritized for development over the ne~ct few Page 6 of 8 '~ ..., yeazs The Violet Park design and development may need to proceed if an acceptable proposal ~ comes forward for the North Boulder Community Center, which is intrinsically connected to the '~-- pazk Given the current staffing levels, it is anticipated that design and development work on these sites would not proceed until next year While the focus of the Board's review and recommendations are for the year 2002, staff is suggesting that additional funding might need to be reallocated in future years (2003 forward) from the Foothills Community Pazk Phase 2 to complete the development of these and other neighborhood and pocket parks This action would extend the development period for Foothills Community Park, bearing in mind that there is a full intention and need to complete this community pazk over time ATTACHI~IENTS A Fund Overview Sheets for CIP B Pazks and Recreation CIP Spreadsheet C Pazks and Recreation Master Plan Status of RecommendaUons D ,~ ~ ~"" Page 7 of 8 ~.... years The Violet Pazk design and development may need to proceed if an acceptable proposal ~ comes forwazd for the North Boulder Community Center, which is intrinsically connected to the ` park Given the current staffing levels, it is anticipated that design and development work on these ~ sites would not proceed unhl next year While the focus of the Boazd's review and recommendations aze for the year 2002, staffis suggesting that additional funding might need to be reallocated in future years (2003 forward) from the Foothills Commumty Pazk Phase 2 to complete the development of these and other neighborhood and pocket pazks This action would extend the development period for Foothills Community Pazk, bearing in mind that there is a full mtention and need to complete this commumty pazk over time ATTACHMENTS A Fund Overview Sheets for CIP B Pazks and Recreation CIP Spreadsheet C Parks and Recreation Master Plan Status of Recommendations D Undeveloped Pazk Informahon ~'-~ ...- Page ~ of 8 ~ ...- ,~ ATTACHMENT A ~ PERMANENT PARK AND RECREATION P'[TND 2002-2007 CAPITAL Il1~ROVEMENTS PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Permanent Park and Recrearion Fund cons~sts of 9 mill levy of assessed valuation of all taxable property in the city, gifts and donations to the fund, proceeds of the sale of park or recreation property or equipment, and many other appropriations made by council such as the fee chazged at the golf course to support that facility's renovation or development needs. The fund also includes revenues from a pomon of a development excise tax assessed on each new residenrial unit constructed or annexed to the city except for those units that aze designated as permanently affordable The City Charter requires the " Fund shall not be used for any purpose other than the acquisition of park land or the permanent improvement of park and recreation facilities "(Charter Sec 161) Funds area used for CIP projects and renovations (operating budget) of existing facilities for items under the $SQ000 CIP definition HIGHLIGHTS For the purposes of the Capital Improvement Program(CIP), staff has included only project which meet the CIP defurition Non pro~ect specific fund accumularions, where no actual project is being proposed in given yeaz (such as the Art in the Pazk project) have been removed from the ~,,., CIP While projects such as Art in the Pazk will be tracked to keep the commitment to prior funding levels, the use of those funds that are not anhcipated to have a specific project in a given year has been diverted to other higher priority projects where there is an expectation and focus to implement the project. Thts change wdl increase immediate dollars available for high priority projects, decrease annual carryover requests and still maintain funding expectations for projects m general, over a 6 to 10 year period For 2001 and future years, the three funds ( Lottery, Permanent Pazk and Recreation and the 25 cent Sales Tax) have been considered jointly to provide fundmg levels for CIP and non CIP projects The following are the major CIP projects in the three funds Foothills Community Park New Recrearion Facilities ImprovemenUDevelopment Neighborhood/Pocket Park Development North Boulder Recreation Center Flatirons Golf Course Improvement Pazk Site Acquisition Pazks Operation Facility East Boulder Community Park Development "°` Relocation of E~cisting Facilities at Valmont City Pazk ~,... - eb 5 Major gains have been made towards "taking care of what we have" and sustainability Facilities ,,,A and Asset Management (FAlvn is now fully funded for On-going and Major Maintenance for the ~,,, majority of the structureslfacilities in Parks and Recreation Park and Recreation renovation and refurbishment needs as well as equipment replacement, many of which are in the operating budget aze likewise more completely funded but will still require multiple years to complete the backlog FINANCING Generally the estimated revenues for each year are conservahve figures to make certain that funds aze available to complete the projects supported by them RELATIONSHIP TO OPERATING BUDGET The 1995 Ballot Issue identified funding for the operating costs for the majority of the new development projects. The operating costs for renovat~on/refurbishment projects aze expected to remain the same but mcrease annually to account for inflarion ''y ~ ~ a n~5 ~~ ATTACHMENT A '~-- LOTTERY FUND 2002-2007 CAPITAL Il14PROVEMENTS PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Lottery Fund CIP is based on the 1993 joint recommendation to City Council as requested of the Pazks and Recreation Advisory Board and the Open Space Board of Trustees The original agreement set aside 1% of the annual revenues for Art in the Park, $150,000 per year for the Greenways project and the balance of the annual appropriation to be split 75% / 25% for Park Site Acquisition and Contingency projects, respectively There have been alterations to this past agreement due to the passage of the 1995 25 cent sales taac Parks and Recreation ballot issue and the resulting need to realign projects between the Lottery Fund, the Permanent Parks and Recreation Fund and the .25 Cent Sales Tax Fund The Pazks and Recreation Advisory Boazd and Open Space Boazd of Trustees will meet this yeaz to discuss a potenrial change in the agreement for use of Lottery Funds The 1996 City Council decision to use Lottery proceeds of approximately $264,000 per year, beginning in 1998 for 10 years, toward the acquisition of the Area III site has been modified to reflect the final negotiations and purchase contracts of $304,344 per year ffiGHLIGHTS '~ Projected annual revenues are $750,000 per year based on average collection for past years For the purposes of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP), staff has included only projects which meetthe CIP deSnirion The majority of Lottery Fund projects are non-CIP projects (Art in the Park, Greenways and Mountain Pazk Trail Refurbishment) The one CIP project identified in the Lottery Fund is Pazk Site Acquisition The proposed Greenways projects are identified in the mulri-departmental CIP. O and M requirements for Greenways are provided likewise by a vaziety of agencies (City, State, and private) ~ . FTNANCING Generally, the estimated revenues for each year aze conservative figures to make certain that funds area available to complete the projects supported by them. RELATIONSHIP TO OPERATING BUDGET The 1995 .25 cent Sales Taac Ballot Issue identified funding for the operating costs for the majority of the new development projects. The operating costs for renovation/refurbishment projects are expected to remain the same but increase annually for inflation. ,.. 3 .b 5 ATTACHMENT A ~^"' ~ PARKS AND RECREATION 1995 BALLOT LSSUE FUND (.25 CENT SALES TAX k'IJND) 2002-2007 CAPTTAL Il1~IPROVEMENTS PROGRAM OVERV~W The 1995 Ballot Issue Fund revenues were pledged for " Payment for the principal, mterest, and premium, is any, on .. . bonds, and then for development, operation, and maintenance of the land and improvements purchased or constructed with the proceeds of the bonds, renovation and refurbishment or replacement of four pools, renovation and replacement of recreation facilities; playgrounds, mountain park trails, civic park complex, improvements to recrearion centers and development of new recreation projects to be determined in the future through the Master Planning Process by the City Council, maintenance of the community park in north Boulder, development of a mountain parks environmental education program; and for the renovarion of city-owned historical and cukural facilities, with the remainder being dedicated for parks and recreation purposes " (Ballot language) The following is a summary of project and Operahon and Maintenance funding (in 1995 dollars) that was identified in the ballot issue backup information ~, ~ Bonded Projects ~ Pocket Parks AcquisiUon up to 10 acres $4,900,000 Neighborhood Pazk Acq up to 16 acres $4,500,000 Large City Park Acq w/master site planning and some mfrastructure development $18,000,000 Mountain Pazks Acquisition $2,000,000 Renovarion and Refurbishment of E~cisting FaciGties Recreation Facilities $178,000/yr Mountain Pazks (Trails) $168,000/yr Civic Pazk Complex $75,000/yr Urban Pazks (Irrigation Systems) $130,000/yr Pool Improvements (capital) $277,000/yr Development ofFacilities and Pro~.rams Community Park in North Boulder (0 and 1~ $210,00/yr Dev of New Neigh Pazk Sites (capital) $200,000/yr (O and Iv~ $64,000/yr Dev ofNew Pocket Pazk Sites (capital) $120,000/yr -~^ (O and Iv~ $40,000/yr ~ ~} u~ ~ Dev of E~cisting Neigh Park Sites (capital) $200,000/yr (O and 1~ $67,000/yr Improvements to Recrearion Centers (capital) $150,000/yr Mountain Parks Environmental Education $130,000/yr New Recreation Facilities (capital) $200,000/yr I~'istorical and Cultural Facilides $50,000/yr ffiGHLIGHTS For the purposes of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP), staff has included only those projects that meet the CIP definirion. Specific projects have been identified for the 1° year of the CIP, but have been left in more general "project categories" (such as the Neighborhood/Pocket Pazk Development, Recreation Center Improvements, and New Recreation Facilities projects) for the outlying years, where specific projects are unidentified at tlus time For 2001 and future yeazs, the three funds, (Lottery, Permanent Pazk and Recreation and the 25 cent Sales Tax) have been considered jointly to provide funding levels for CIP and non CIP projects The following are the major CIP pro~ects in the three funds Foothills Community Pazk New Recreation Facilides Improvemem/ Development Neighborhood/Pocket Pazk Development North Boulder Recreation Center Flatirons Golf Course Improvement Pazk Site AcqmsiUon Parks Operation Fac~ty East Boulder Community Park Development Relocauon of Existing Faciliries at VaUnont City Pazk Major gains have been made towards "taking caze of what we have" and sustainability Facilities and Asset Management (FAl1~ is now fully funded for Ongomg and Major Maintenance for the majority of the structures/facilities in Pazks and Recreation Pazk and Recrearion renovation and refurb~shment needs as well as equipment replacement, many of which are u- the operating budget, aze likewise more compete funded but will still require multiple years to complete backlog FINANCING The revenues from the 25 cent Sales Tax are estimated based on BudgeUFinance Department projections. RELATIONSHIP TO OPERATING BUDGET The Ballot Issue identified funding for the operating costs for the majonty of the new park development projects. The operat~ng costs for renovation/refurbishment projects are expected to remain the same but increase annually for inflationary mcreases ~ ...,.- ~'1 ~ ~'~A 5a~s A1"TACHMENT B ~ ~ 1 2 3 4 5 s 7 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 30 37 32 33 34 35 37 38 39 40 41 42 A 17-Apr-01 118= 1= Prior Year Fund Balance 2002 PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS &IREF RBfSHMENT PROGRAIN (CIP) 1995 BALLOT .25 SALES TAX FUND I PERMANENT PARK & RECREATION FUND(Property Tax) L0ITERY FllND I 2000 Adjusted DESCRIPTION 116 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE Ballot Fund 230 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE PP&R Fund 111 PRIOR YEAR FUND BALANCE LotteN Fund 118 TOTAL ANNUAL REVENUE 230 TOTAL ANNUAL REVENUE 111 TO7AL ANNUAL REVENUE Total Revenues 118 Total Funds Available 230 Total Funds Available 111 Total Funds Avaifable Total Funds Available Actual 4,553,624 2,468,387 130,577 7,152,588 6,791,018 1,660,249 815,474 9,266, 741 11,269,314 4,128,636 946,051 16,344,~1 2001 2,697,543 497,097 3,268 3,197,908 6,265,321 1,668,870 8, 684,197 2,165,967 753,268 11,878,333 Page 1 2001 7,118,811 310,291 9,504,468 6,377,190 1,750,687 no,ooo 8,897,877 13,492,234 3,826,053 1,080,291 23,Q29,754 F 188,471 117,430 985,340 6,554,241 1,675,688 750,000 8.979,929 6,742,712 2,355,127 867,430 9,965,269 G 2003 585,244 625,385 274,499 1,485,128 6,759,238 1,621,939 750,000 9.131.177 7,344,483 2,247,324 1,024,499 10,616,306 H l J K ~ ~ 2004 256,728 2005 353,374 ~ 2006 395,850 2007 210,458 552,703 543,360 1,352,790 297,289 311,770 962,433 411,155 229,699 1,036,704 353,975 246,888 8i1,321 6,935,720 1,663,472 750,000 9, 349,19 i 7,137,620 1,644,5Q8 750,000 9, 532.128 ~ 7,340,769 1,585,643 750,000 9, 676, 413 7,550,356 1,625,475 750,000 9, 925, 831 7,192,447 2,216,175 1,293,360 7,490,994 1,941,797 1,061,770 7,736,619 1,996,799 979,699 7,760,814 1,979,450 996,888 I 10,701,982 ,I 10,494,561 10,713,117 10,737,152 i A ( ~ 1 17-Apr-01 2 118= 3 230= 4 111= 5 6 43 44 45 46 47 118 ~48 230 49 51 52 111 53 111 54 111 55 230 56 111 57 118 ti 58 230 59 60 61 62 111 63 118 64 230 65 66 118 67 230 68 111 69 70 71 111 72 118 73 230 74 77 ~ i 78 ---- B ~ C ~ D I E F G I H i I J K 2002 PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS & REFURBIS HMENT PRO GRAM (CIP) 1995 BALLOT .25 SALES TAX FUND ~ PERMANENT PARK & RECREATION FUND(P roperty Tax) LOTTERY FUND 2000 Adjusted DESCRIPTION Actual 2001 2001 2002 2U03 2004 20p5 2pp6 ypp7 ANNUAL EXPENSES OPERATING USES OF FUNDS Operations & Maintenance Subtotal Operating & Maintenance 1,234,170 1,313,360 1,474,024 1,410,708 7,50'7,342 1,57Q,119 1,635,412 1,703,941 1,718,683 Subtotal Operating 8 Maintenance 225,159 234,176 234,176 242,958 252,069 261,521 271,328 281,503 281,503 Sub Total Operating 8 Maintenance 1,459,329 1,547,536 1,708,200 1,653,666 1,759,411 1,831,640 1,906,740 1.985,444 2,000,186 RenovatioNRefurbishment TributarylGreenways 46,265 150,000 298,791 15p,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 Art in the Park 8,000 58,970 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 Mountain Park Trails Refurb 102,293 100,000 100,000 Art m the Park 17,000 98,900 17,000 17,000 17,000 17,000 17,000 17,000 Subtotal Renovation Refurbishment 174,270 283,000 482,761 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 Subtotal Renovation Refurbishment 626,472 705,275 984,362 737,539 771,415 806,986 844,335 883,552 883,552 Subtotal Renovation Refurb~shment 167,169 242,Q00 978,288 362,000 362,000 412,000 412,000 412,000 412,000 Sub Tota/ Renovation Refur6ishment 967,911 1,230,275 2,320,411 1,257,539 1,291,415 1,376,986 1,4i4,335 1,453,552 1,453,552 TOTAL OPERATING USES OF FUNDS 2,542,492 2,875,811 4,266,253 3,009,205 3,145,826 3,306,626 3,419,075 3,486,996 3,551,738 Subtotal Operatmq Uses of Funds 174,270 283,000 482,761 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 ISubtotal Operatinq Uses of Funds 7,975,894 2,116,635 2,696,028 2,246,247 2,376,757 2,475,105 2,577,747 2,635,483 2,700,235 ISubtotal Operatinq Uses of Funds 392,328 476,176 1,212,464 ~604,958 614,069 673,521 683,328 693,503 693,503 I Less Transfers (See Note) .25 Sales Tax 762,038 168,305 168,305 186,066 186,066 186,066 186,066 186,066 186,066 I Less Transfers (See Note) Perm Parks & Rcn 260,229 242,265 242,265 61,227 63,064 64,956 66,904 68,912 70,979 Less Transfers Cost Aflocation 17,504 11,501 11,501 18,354 18,795 19,246 19,727 20,467 20,467 Tota/ Transfers Out (Cost Allocation, etc.) 439,771 422,071 422,071 265,647 267,925 270,268 272,697 275,445 277,512 Debt Service 416,577 416,577 416,577 416,577 304,344 304,344 304,344 304,344 304,344 Debt Service 128,278 2,396,093 2,398,942 2,429,093 2,385,193 2,385,193 Debt Service 77,633 50,402 50,402 50,409 50,409 50,409 50,409 50,409 50,409 TotalAnnua/Debt 494,210 466,979 466,979 595,264 2,750,846 2,753,695 2,783,846 2,739,946 2,739,946 Page 2 ~ 1 2 4 5 6 80 82 83 84 85 86 a~ 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 104 105 10E 107 108 109 11C 111 112 11~ 114 A ~ B ~ C ~ D , E 17-Apr-01 2002 PROPOSED CAPITAL RENOVATIONS & REFURBISHMENT PROGRAM (CIP) 118= 1995 BALLOT .25 SALES TAX FUND ~ 230= PERMANENT PARK & RECREATION FUND(Property Tax) 111= LOTTERY FUND I 2000 Adjusted 41PTION ~ Actual AL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) PROJECTS 226 Mountain Parks Acqwsition ~ 226 Mesa Memonal 118 Mountain Ocean Purchase 118 Land Acquisition 118 Mesa Memonal 111 Park Site Acqwsition 111 BMPA Area III Sub Total Parks~te Acquisit~on 118 118 118 118 118 230 230 118 230 118 118 118 118 118 118 230 118 118 230 11i 230 118 Valmont Development Ne~gh & Pocket Park Development ' Basefine Middle Schooi ' Iris Hollow • Greenleaf Park (Bradfieid) ' Dakota Ridqe Park ' Dakota Ridge Park ' Eaton Park ' Fortune Park ' Sinton Site Design ` Dog Parks ' Dnve In Theater ' Valmont ` Violet S~te • Burke Park ' Blue Sky Hdl ' Skate Pa~lc Art Gate ' Elks Site ' Skate Faciltty ' East Boulder Commurnty Park Foothills Commurnty Park (in North Boulder) Foothills Community Park (in North Bouider) Foothilis Community Park (in North Boulder) 256,671 22,372 38,208 3,752 207,998 6,584 29,276 158,169 481 13,396 3,000 813,284 27,409 1,054,297 152,462 F 2001 2001 200: 426,337 529,216 899,293 200,000 2,054,846 3,675,623 ),593 538,77; 12.107 ~,073 746,919 271,248 144,855 11,221 20,724 200,00( 13,396 169,147 718,998 500,000 52,022 825,947 7,031 763,14E 291,6p5 Page 3 G H I J K ' 2003 2004 2005 I 2006 2007 100,000 700,000 100,000 100,000 500,000 350,000 250,000 250,000 600,000 450,000 350,000 350,000 731,692 768,276 806,690 847,025 847,025 ~ 300,000 300,000 600,000 700,000 700,000 837,079 910,684 1,397,147 910,684 695,549 135,000 . ~' , A___~ ..- .. B ~ _C ~p r.-. E F G ._ H I _ J... K 1 17-Apr-01 2002 PROPOSED CAPRAL RENOVATIONS & REFURBISH MENT PRO GRAM (CIP) ~ 2 118= 1995 BALLOT .25 SALES TAX FUND I I 3 230= PERMANENT PARK & RECREATION FUND(Pr operty Tax) j 4 111= LOTTERY FUND 2000 Adjusted I 5 - 6 DESCRIPTION Actual 2001 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 115 Total Foothills Community Park (in North Boulde 1,234,168 1,218,998 &85,000 1,054,757 2,234,226 910,684 695,549 135,000 i 16 Sub Total Park Development 2, 793,161 1,843,664 5,950,240 1,793,530 2,965,918 1,678,960 2,402,239 1,982,025 1,547,025 117 118 118 Facility/Pool Improvements/Development I 338,765 473,765 ~119 118 Recreation Center Improvements i 256,55t 256,551 120 118 ' NBRC Remodel 281,029 5,026,991 7,251,814 2,516,495 ~ 121 118 * Spruce Pool 802406 29,286 I 122 118 * Scott Carpenter Poo1802405 879 ~ 123 118 ' SBRC Improvements 802503 989 ~ 124 118 New Recreation Facdrties I 342,068 342,068 125 230 ' Operabons CenterNehicle Storage 250,000 250,000 ~ 126 118 ' Stazio Fields 800501 j 127 118 ' Boulder Reservoir Improvements 133,875 252,586 50,000 i 128 118 ' Tom Watson Park Improvements (IBM) 1,288 198,712 , 129 118 * Golf Factlity Remodel 64,768 385,232 i30 230 ' Flatiron Golf Course 57,785 130,000 130,000 130,000 130,000 130,000 131 230 ' Flatiron Golf Course Shelter 670,681 132 230 ' Relocation of Existing Facilities (Valmont) 1,000,000 133 Sub 7otal Recreation Facilrty Development 569,899 5,276,991 8,759,025 2,816,495 730,000 i,130,W0 130,000 f,067,384 1,202,384 134 135 226 TOTAL CIP EXPENDITURES 4,631,176 136 118 TOTAL CIP EXPENDITURES 2,012,571 6,151,657 10,439,430 3,596,877 2,128,839 1,778,960 1,902,239 2,319,409 2,019>409 137 230 TOTAL CIP EXPENDITURES 1,323,080 968,998 1,641,483 1,013,148 967,079 1,130,000 730,000 830,000 830,000 13i 111 TOTAL CIP EXPENDITURES 27,409 52,022 500,000 350,000 250,000 250,000 139 TOTAL CIPALL FUNDS 3,363,060 7,120,655 16,764,111 4,6f0,025 3,095,918 3,408,960 2,982,239 3,399,409 3,099,409 140 141 226 TOTAL USE OF FUNDS 4,631,176 4,631,176 142 118 TOTAL USE OF FUNDS 4,150,503 8,436,597 13,303,763 6,157,468 7,087,755 6,839,073 7,095,145 7,526,161 7,290,903 143 230 TOTAL USE OF FUNDS 2,053,270 1,737,841 3,146,614 1,729,742 1,694,621 t,918,886 1,53~,641 1,642,824 1,644,891 144 111 TOTAL USE OF FUNDS 635,760 711,078 962,861 592,931 481,139 981,590 832,077 732,817 732,811 145 Tota/ Funds Uses 6,839,533 10,885,516 22,044,414 8,480,141 9,263,515 9,739,549 9,457,857 9,901,795 9,668,605 146 ' 147 118 FUND BALANCE 7,118,811 522,501 188,471 585,244 256,728 353,374 395,850i 210,458 469,911 148 230 ENDING FUND BALANCE 12/31 2,075,366 428,126 679,439 625,385 552,703 297,289 411,155i 353,975 334,559 149 111 ENDING FUND BALANCE 310,291 42,190 117,430 274,499 543,360 311,770 229,699 246,888 264,077 150 Total Endinq Fund Balance 9,504,468 992,817 985,340 1,485,128 1,352,790 962,433 1,036,704 811,321 1,068,547~ Page 4 ATTAC~IlVIENT C CTTY OF BOULDER PARKS AND RECREATION ~.. MASTER PLAN . STATUS OF RECOMMENDATIONS Update. Apri123, 2001 1996 Approved Pazks and Recreation Master Status April 10, 2001 Plan Recommendations _ City Pazk Acquisition Acquire 100 to 300 acres Citv Park Acres Acquired 105 acres Valmont City Park 28 acres Valmont City Pazk (City Yards) 191 acres Area III City Park Future Acquisihon Desired 1 acre and building Mountain Ocean Site City Park Development The Master Plan recommended design considerations and recreation facilities for City Pazks as follows. ~ central location for large scale recreation, playfields, indoor courts, large playgrounds open landscaped lands, preserve natural character on sites, provide quiet past time uses, provide playfields for baseball, softball, soccer, lacrosse, rugby, disc golf or similar uses, provide hard surfaced courts such as tennis and basketball courts, provide aquatics facilities, ice uena, arts and dance space, space for track and field events, space for special events, lazge group picnic facilities, indoor basketball and volleyball courts, lazge playgrounds for day care/summer day camps, a golf training facility room to grow for new activities Citv Pazks DeveloQed 13 acres Phase 1 Valmont Crty Park development will be completed by 2002 providing open turf for unprogrammed play, landscaped park, walks, trails, simng and picnic azeas, and requ~red site infrastructure Valmont City Pazk Concept and Site Review Plan provides walks, trails, youth baseball, legion baseball and other athletic field uses, large open turf for informal play, bike racing track, skate facility, space for special events, a large playground for day caze/summer camp use, group picnic facilities, specialty gardens, dog exercise area, three building pads (potential uses dance, pottery, ice, swim, bike, tennis, gymnasium, basketball, weight rooms, etc), hard surface courts (roller hockey, tennis, basketball), lustoric building preservation for potential commumty use, space for special events Page 1 of 6 M1 Neighborhood and Pocket Pazks Acquisition• Neighborhood and Pocket Pazk Acres ~ ~ Acquire up to five acres for neighborhood pazks . north of Valmont 29 to 30 . . . east Valmont corridor . . . .. . . Mapleton and 30'~. ... .. . . . Between Folsom and 28'" south of Iris . West of 28 and north of Jay. .... .. West of Broadway and north of Lee Iiill North of Yazmouth west of 28 West of Broadway neaz NOAA, NIST Other . .... .. .. . . . . . Acquire ten pocket parks (one acre each) Acquired. (76 83 acres total) unableto procure included in Valmont City Park unable to procure, pocket pazks available along Goose Creek 4 acres Elmer's Two Mile 7 93 acres Elks Site 3 5 acres Dakota Ridge Neighborhood Pazk 2 1 acres Drive In Theater unable to procure See Mesa Memorial 23 acres Eaton Neighborhood Pazk 32 acres Tom Watson Pazk 1 4 Hickory Site 33 Fortune Pazk 28 acre Alpine site 25 acre 22°" Street right of way 1 73 acre Mesa Memorial (late 2001) 33 East of Eben Fme Under consideration for future acqaisihon Pocket park SE 28'" and Valmont near Goose Creek Halcyon School '""'A / .~+, Page 2 of 6 - Develop Neighborhood and Pocket Park Development Identified in Master Plan Bradfield (Greenlea~ Neighborhood Pazk Sinton West of Justice Center Meadow Glen Boulder Valley Village (Violet) Other pazk complete Andrews Arboretum Development by phases on going Other pazk work with Greenways Program to Coordination of park and greenway projects expand urban trail system on going ~~ ~ Neighborhood and Pocket Park Development Development status New Sites Elmer's Two l~file To be completed 2002 22°" Sueet Right of Way To be completed 2001 Eaton Neighborhood Park To be completed 2001 Elks Site Future Drive In Theater Future Dakota Ridge Future Fortune Future Mesa Memorial Future Develop Community Park and Recreation Facilities Foothills Community Park (69 acres) Complete East Boulder Community Pazk (38 acres developed in 1980s and 1990s, 15 acres remain undeveloped) Neig.hborhood and Pocket Pazk Develo~ment Status Development completed Future Future Development completed Future Community Park Development Status Development completed (44 acres) for Phase 1 including• open turf; native grasslands, children's play azea, youth play azea, 2 roller hockey courts, maintenance and restroom building, community gazdens, picnic shelter and seating, roads, utilities, parking, landscaping, public art Phase 2 design (2001) Phase 2 construction (2002-) Future Page 3 of 6 New Play~tround Development in Exishna Pazks Catalpa East Pa1o Park Bear Creek Shanahan Ridge Aurora 7 Thunderbird Stazio Ballfields Pleasant View New Plaveround Development in Existing Parks Status Future Development complete Future Development complete Future Future Development complete in 2001 Future Park and Playground Facility Renovation Neiahborhood Parks as prioritized Park and Playground Facility Renovation Community Parks Harlow Platts Pazk Park and Playpsound Facility Renovation Neiahborhood Pazks 2 to 4 tennis courts aze refurbished yeazly Walks, site furmture, imgation systems renovated or replaced as prioritized Park and Playground Facilitv Renovation Commumtv Pazks Pazk and Playground Facility Renovation H'istoric Facilities Bandshell Park and Playground Facilrtv Renovation Historic Facilities Status Renovation completed Other priorities per community/PRAB input Cemetery (renovation work on going) Central Pazk Traui car renovation completed Page 4 of 6 ~ ...~ '""`i ...~ .~.. , Pazk and Playground Facilitv Renovation• .~ Playground ~~ Arrowood Park Barker Pazk Beach Park Canyon Pazk Eben G Fine Pazk Keeywaydin Pazk Municipal Complex Parkside Pineview Salberg Scott Carpenter Park Tantra Wonderland Lake Park Pazk and Plav¢round Facility Renovation. Playground Renovation Status Renovation complete Renovation complete Renovation complete Future Future Future Future Renovation complete Future Future Renovarion complete Renovation complete Future Pools and Recreation Facilities Renovate recreation centers Renovate or replace indoor and outdoor pools Pools and Recreation Facilities Needs assessment on recreation centers and pools completed South Boulder Recreation Center and Pool replacement complete North Boulder Recreation Center and Pool renovation/expansion scheduled for 2001- 2002 Spruce Pool renovation complete May, 2001 Maintenance and Administrarion Faciliries E~cpand mamtenance facilities Maintenance and Administration Facilities Status Future E~cpand or renovate Iris Center Phase 1 to be completed 2001 Additional space for Mountain Pazks Staff MASTER PLAN LEVEL OF SERVICE STANDARDS Neighborhood Pazk at least five acres located within'/: mile of population served considering major barriers to access 1'/: acres per 1,000 residents per subcommunity and city-wide Community Pazk at least 50 acres located within 3 5 miles of population served 1'/z acres per 1,000 residents city-wide ~- Page 5 of 6 Pocket Pazk less than five acres "~ located within 1/4 mile of population served help meet neighborhood park needs Piaygrounds provide facilities for toddlers to age 12 wittun 5 acre park will serve '/z mile radius within a pazk of less than five acres will serve a 1/4 mile service radius if ad}acent to a school with play equipment, will serve a'1z mde radius 4*ti .... Page 6 of 6 ATTACHMENT D "~'~ City of Boulder Pazks and Recreation Department «..• UNDEVELOPED PARKS INFORMATION Apnl 18, 2001 The Pazks and Recreation Master Plan provided a prioritization process and criteria to guide all the recommendations in the plan This criteria included. 1 Need Program or project necessary to meet Master Plan standards and/or fills a documented current or project service gap m the community 2 Economic Consequences Significant opportunity costs or loss of previous investments will be mcuaed if the program or project is not commenced at this time 3 Service Population Progam or project serves a broad spectrum of residents (age, sex, mcome, ethnicity, skill levels, spectators) 4 Target Group Opportunities Program or project specifically addresses the needs of cluldren and youth 5 Environmental Considerations Program or project will contribute to the preservation or restoration of natural ecosystem or will ~,,~ support environmental education and development of stewardstup ethic ~,,~ 6 Collaborative Opportunities Program or project is appropnate for collaborative efforts with other City departments, governmental or non-profit agencies, volunteer organizations, or private service population 7 Regulatory Requirements Program or project is necessary to meet statutory or regulatory requuements for example ADA Addirional cntena have been idenhfied for prioritization of Neighborhood and Pocket Pazks 1 Are there unsolicited requests for pazk or play azea development by the neighborhood~ 2 Withm the park service radius is there a high percentage of children, seniors, youth, a high percentage of attached housing, a high percentage of housing units for people with lower than median income 3 Is the nearest public playgound more than'/2 mile from site and if so, is there a school playground or other publically accessible playground within 1/4 mile of site~ 4. Is the nearest park with open turf play areas and recrearional features more than'h mile from site7 5 Have funds been expended on park or playground facilities serving this subcommunity within the past five years~ 6 Is there an efficiency of effort m the site development provided by combining a Pazk and Recreation Project with a project of another city agency~ Page 1 of 5 Length of time the City has owned this undeveloped pazksite .*~., UNDEVELOPED PARK PROPERTY- Pazk site Acres Estimated design and development cost (in 2001 dollazs) Drive In Theater 2 1 $441,000 (plus (Pocket Pazk) $200,000 for infrastructure to be funded m 2002) Notes Note. Parksite is not yet dedicated to City May be available for devetopment in 2003, depending on development progress This pazk would serve new residential development 1 Received request for 2003 park development from developer, Housmg Authority No requests from neighbors 2 Anticipate that there would be higher than average number of low to moderate income families m this development 3, 4, and 5 Crestview Neighborhood Pazk and School play azea aze over'/: mile from ~ site Foothills Community pazk is within ~, 1 25 m~le and accessible by underpass of Broadway 6 The project would benefit both the Housing Authonty and the Parks and Recrearion Department 7 City does not yet own site Note• Wait until there aze neighbors to participate m the pazk design Page 2 of 5 ~ ~,,.,,, Dakota Ridge 3 5 $630,000 (plus Note~ Site not available £or development ~ Pocket Park aaes $271,000 paid for until 2002 or 2003 depending on progress of infrastructrure in development consuuction. This pazk would 2001) serve new residential development 1 Developer has asked that pazk be developed No neighborhood requests 2 Site would serve some affordable housing units and families 3, 4, 5 1 mile access to Foothills Community Site (but required crossing Lee Hill Drive) recently developed 44 acres 6 No 7 Site acqu'ued recently by agreement m 2001 Eaton 24 $400,000 Note Development of a small portion of Neighborhood Eaton Pazk will be completed in 2001 The Pazk remaining site will be preserved as undeveloped parkland unless neighborhood or community demands suggest revisiting this decision Elks Site 7 9 $1,580,000 1 No ,r~^'°^ (Neighborhood 2 Yes, the project would serve an older `'~ Pazk) population when the Elks Club Elder Housing project is developed and site cucrently serves children for summer camp 3 and 4 No open turf or public play areas wittun'/z mde of site Parkside Pazk roughly 1 mile from site 5. No 6 No 7 Purchased site in 1999 East Boulder 15 $4,000,000 to 1 Respond to documented recreation needs Community Park $500,000. 38 acres developed Foothills 25 $5,200,000 1 Respond to documented recreation needs Community Pazk 44 acres developed Page 3 of 5 FortunePocket 33 $83,160 1 No ~ Pazk 2 There are some attached housing units, ~ low income housing projects, senior and people with disabilities housing in the neighborhood 3, 4, 5 There are three pocket parks within 1/4 mile radius of site, but no piay azeas. Eben Fine Park is within 1 mile of site 6 No 7 Site acquired within past 3 years by gift Ii'ickory/ 1 4 $280,000 Note Cuaent use of portion of site by Neighborhood Pk Transportation Dept inhibits full and Community development of site at this time Gardens 1 Yes, a portion of srte is currently being developed with community gardens in response to neighborhood requests 2 Park service area contams primarily single family housing, low to moderate density 3, 4, 5 No playgrounds or open turf within '/s mile of site 6 Srte acquired by agreement between ,,.~,, Pazks and Recreation and Transportation ,~, 7 Site acquired in 2001 Mesa Memorial 1 7 $357,000 Note The City does not yet own site Anticipate owning site in late 2001 Page 4 of 5 ~ <""` Sinton 68 $200,000 to Note~ This park is currendy developed with "` Neighborhood $475,000 rough tur~ benches, and mature trees Park 1 The Dairy Center for the Arts and BURA have requested development of this park, throughout the past 6 years No requests &om the neighbors 2. This park will serve primarily the artistic and commercial uses near by along with elderly neighbors to the west 3, 4, 5 Initial park planning efforts revealed that neighbors do not want a playground in pazk Greenleaf Park is within'/s mile of site, however citizens would have to cross Pearl and Folsom 6 The pazk development would benefit the Diary Center for the Arts and BURA. 7 Approximately 8 years Valmont City Park 132 Note- Rough costs have not been generated (13 acres to be for the complete project at this time in view developed by of the fact that the final pian, facili6es, and 2002) infrastructure for the pazk have not been ,r^ confumed. ~`` Violet 7 $1,400,000 Note This park would ideally be developed Neighborhood in conjunction with development of the Park Lbrary and commercial areas along North Broadway 1 No 2 Site would serve low to moderate income community of near by trailer park and other low to moderate density single family housing umts 3, 4, 5. Crestview park and school is within '/s mile of this site Foothills Community Pazk is within 1 mile of ttus site by underpass of Broadway 6 Yes, anticipated that pazk development efforts will be planned in conjunction vv~th the branch Lbrary and the North Boulder Community Center 7 Over 10 vears ,,. w... Page 5 of 5