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Boulder Arts Commission Cultural Facilities Needs Assessment May 2002 BOULDERARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT MAY 2002 , Ra i �A [ may- •'m- i Prepared By HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS 'i. r�f' 'Lt,•fl�'.�ijY BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT MAY 2002 Prepared by: Hartronft Fauri Architects, p.c. 801 Main Street Suite 300 Louisville, CO 80027 303/673-9304 At the request of: The Boulder Arts Commission 1000 Canyon Boulevard Boulder, CO 80302 303/441-4113 Ann Moss, Commissioner Erich Hill, Commissioner Don Berlin, Commissioner Patti Bruck, Commissioner Virginia Zukowski, Commissioner Donna Gartenmann, Staff Liaison Hartronft Fauri Architects would like to acknowledge the significant support provided for this project by the Boulder Arts Commission and the City of Boulder. We are particularly grateful to all the individual artists, cultural organizations, and facility owners and managers who generously shared their insights with us through surveys and phone conversations. G BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT MAY 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SECTION 1: BACKGROUND AND HISTORY SECTION 2: CONTEXT: MARKET AREA ANALYSIS SECTION 3: CULTURAL FACILITY USERS: SURVEY RESPONSES SECTION 4: CULTURAL FACILITY OWNERS AND MANAGERS: SURVEY RESPONSES APPENDIX : ORIGINAL SURVEYS PRELIMINARY DATA ANALYSIS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT 2002 RESEARCH PROCESS Hartronft Fauri Architects was engaged by the Boulder Arts Commission to develop and implement a Cultural Facilities Needs Assessment. The information obtained through this research will inform the update of Boulder's Cultural Plan, now underway. The process began with the development and distribution of two separate survey instruments: ■ A Cultural Facility User Survey, aimed at eliciting facility needs from artists and organizations that use, or desire to use, cultural facilities; and ■ A Cultural Facility Owners and Managers Survey, aimed at eliciting current and comprehensive information about Boulder's cultural facilities. Cultural Facility User Surveys A total of 1037 Cultural Facility User Surveys were distributed to individual artists and cultural organizations operating in Boulder that use, or might desire to use, cultural facilities. Recipient lists were derived from the Boulder Arts Commission's database, which includes all artists and organizations working in Visual Arts, Dance, Literary Arts, Theatre, Music, Film and Video Arts that have ever applied for BAC grant support, and the Open Studios visual artists list, comprised of artists who have participated in Open Studios. The master list was then cross-checked against a number of other sources, and then additions were made to ensure the broadest possible distribution of the survey. Due in part to the well developed visual arts target list provided by Open Studios, 59% of the Cultural Facility User Surveys were sent to visual artists working in Boulder. Artists and organizations working in Dance, Literary Arts, and Film/Video each constituted about 10% of the surveys distributed. Theatre and Arts Organizations/Galleries each constituted about 3%. A total of 89 responses to the Cultural Facility User Survey were received, constituting a response rate from this sector of 8.6%. Of these, 61 were from artists (69%), and 28 were from organizations (31%). Within this pool of respondents, 46% identified themselves as Visual artists and organizations; Music and Dance artists and organizations each constituted about 16% of the respondent pool; Theatre and Literary Arts each accounted for 7%; and Media Arts and "Other" were 5% and 3% respectively. The results of the Cultural Facility User Survey are detailed in Section 3 of this report. In order to obtain the most comprehensive results, the analysis of the survey responses involved looking at the information from various perspectives, including aggregating and comparing information provided by individuals, by organizations, by those working in the performing arts, and those working in the visual arts. However, because the results tended to converge around discipline issues, the summary of results below reflects that orientation. 1 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Cultural Facility Owners and Managers Surveys A total of 60 Cultural Facility Owners and Managers Surveys were distributed to performing and visual arts facilities, as well as churches and schools that often provide alternative facility opportunities for area artists and cultural organizations. The distribution list for this survey was derived from the Boulder Arts Commission's Cultural Organization list, and the Arts and Humanities Assembly of Boulder's Facilities Directory. In response to this effort, 17 surveys were received, constituting a response rate of 28%. Of these, 8 respondents (47%) identified themselves as exclusively performing arts facilities; 4 (24%) identified themselves as exclusively visual arts facilities; and 4 (24%) indicated they operate both performing and visual arts spaces. One respondent, Historic Boulder, indicated it was neither a performing nor visual arts space. According to these survey results, the use of these facilities is relatively evenly distributed across the disciplines. Ten of the 17 facilities indicated they support more than one discipline. Dance and Music account for approximately 18% each of facility use; Theatre accounts for 16%; Visual Arts accounts for 15%; Literary Arts accounts for 13%; Media Arts is 11% and "Other" is 9%. Within "Other" facility owners and managers indicated that their facilities are also used by the humanities, healing and martial arts, businesses, and film. The results of the Cultural Facility Owners and Managers Survey are detailed in Section 4 of this report. EXCERPTS FROM THE FINDINGS Budget Information Ten of the 17 facilities that responded included budget information. Among those 10, 8 had annual operating budgets above $300,000, and 4 of those had budgets of more than .$500,000. This is in stark contrast to the arts organization budgets detailed in Section 3, in which more than half (16 of the 28 organizations) reported annual operating budgets of less than $100,000. Only 3 of the 28 arts organizations that responded reported budgets of more than $500,000. Organization Staffing Both the arts organizations and cultural facilities reported significant reliance on volunteers and part-time staff to facilitate their operations. Among facilities, the average number of volunteers is 125, and among cultural organizations the average number is 41 . Both cultural organizations and facilities reported relatively small board sizes, with an average of 9 board members for organizations, and 13 board members for facilities. Organization Function Among facility respondents, slightly more than half (58%) identified themselves as 501-c-3 nonprofits, while almost all the arts organizations that use facilities identified themselves as nonprofits. Nine of the facilities that responded identified themselves as "presenters" (i.e., presenting the work of artists or organizations other than their own). These presenters indicated that 48% of the artists they presented were from Boulder County, with another 24% from a combination of Denver and the front range. Among the 8 facilities that indicated they provide some kind of exhibit space, Boulder County artists comprise a majority of the artists exhibited, at 63% of the 2 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 total. The Front range and metro Denver account for another 23% of visual artists whose work is exhibited in Boulder cultural facilities. SUMMARY OF CRITICAL NEEDS BY DISCIPLINE VISUAL ARTISTS AND ORGANIZATIONS Seventy percent of the individuals, and 17% of the organizations, that responded to the Cultural Facility User Survey work in the visual arts. The salient needs that emerged from this segment of the respondents concerned studio space and exhibition opportunities. Studio Space The data gleaned from the Facility respondents supports the individual artists' contention that studio space is a challenge to secure (affordably) in Boulder. Specifically, we learned that Boulder's cultural facilities do not appear to provide any studio space, or visual arts equipment (kiln, dark room, etc.) that could be used as part of a cooperative. At present, most (97%) of the artists who indicated that they currently occupy studio space do so in their own home. One consequence of this trend is that because most artists do not currently share space, they are not in a position to take advantage of the potential to make efficient use of available resources that shared space might provide. At the same time, only about one quarter of the artists who responded indicated they would be interested in sharing studio space. However, the amount of studio space desired rose significantly when respondents were asked to compare current to ideal space. One solution to the need for more studio space in Boulder that may warrant consideration is the development of affordable, individual studio spaces operating under one roof that could be designed to take advantage of the synergistic opportunities for shared equipment, shared operating expenses, and collaborative marketing strategies. Examples of this concept include the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, VA, and the Brick Bottom Studios in Boston. In Colorado, comparable artist live/work space projects are now in development in both Original Aurora and Colorado Springs. Often funded in part through tax increment financing, these developments have proven invaluable in supporting urban revitalization efforts in communities across the country. Exhibition Space The critical demand for Exhibition Space is evident in the survey responses. In response to an open-ended question asking facility users (artists and organizations) what their greatest space need is today, 70% of the 52 visual arts respondents (artists and organizations) indicated exhibit space. Anecdotal comments related to this issue provide additional insight. Specifically, artists expressed concern about the lack of exhibit space for emerging artists, space for large 3D work, and outdoor sculpture space. Free space, or heavily subsidized space, that could be programmed by independent artists was suggested as one option that might help address this issue. The Cultural Facility Owners and Managers survey corroborates these findings. While 63% of the artwork exhibited by the facilities that responded is by Boulder County artists, all the facilities indicated they select work through some form of competitive process. Artists indicated a desire for space to rent for "open" rotating exhibitions that could be structured 3 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 outside of the confines of the competitive system, and facilities confirmed that they do not provide that kind of space. Perhaps some consideration could be given to the incorporation of exhibit space into more public buildings, where the incremental increase in the cost of operating the space could be kept to a minimum while providing informal exhibit opportunities for Boulder's artists. However, even informal exhibit space would need to be managed (scheduled, maintained, and exhibits installed and lit) by someone, and therefore some modest costs would likely be incurred. Should the development of studio space become a reality, another option to address the dirth of "informal" exhibit space that might warrant consideration is the incorporation of such space in a studio complex. At the Torpedo Factory, for example, artists display and market their work within their studio space, and are required to have their studio open to the public a certain percent of the time. Likewise, the Original Aurora arts district now under development will likely include the renovation of an existing building for studio space and an informal gallery run by the studio artists. In short, there are many models to consider, should there be interest in addressing what has been expressed as a critical need within the visual arts segment of the cultural community. It is worth noting also that this survey was not designed to elicit information about audience levels now being experienced by facilities that currently exhibit artwork. Whether or not more people would go to see more artwork if it were available to them is a question that we did not attempt to answer. However, it is fair to say that other communities have experienced both growth in audience and economic revitalization by developing arts districts designed to draw visitors (both community members and tourists) to enjoy quality performing and visual arts experiences — especially when such experiences can be provided in critical mass. Other Space Needs Office Space: With regard to other kinds of space needs articulated by the visual arts respondents, we did see a significant rise (303%) in the amount of office space desired. However, while the demand for square footage increased substantially, one artist accounted for more than 30% of that increase, and only 11 of the 61 artists (18%) who responded to the survey indicated an interest in office space. Classroom Space: With a rise in square footage desired of 740% among individual visual artists, classroom space appears to emerge as a significant need. However, this ideal represents the wishes of only 4 of the 61 artists who responded, or less than 7% of the respondent pool. In addition, although the data shows an 80% increase in classroom space desired by organizations, only 1 of the 8 organizations that articulated this need focuses its programming, even in part, on the visual arts. These findings indicate that classroom space is not presently a critical need for the majority of visual artists and organizations. Meeting space: Meeting Space also does not appear to be a significant need for this group. The survey results indicated a reduction of 77% in the demand for meeting space among individuals. While we saw a rise of 143% in meeting space desired by organizations, only 2 of the 8 organizations that voiced this need are focused in part on the visual arts. Again, this category of space does not seem to be a critical need for the visual arts segment of the cultural community. 4 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 PERFORMING ARTISTS AND ORGANIZATIONS Eighteen of the 28 organizations (64%) that responded to the survey, and 8 of the 61 individuals (13%), work in the performing arts (dance, music, theatre). Among this group of 26 performing arts respondents, the overwhelming need expressed is for more performance space. Performance Space Overall, 50% of organizations responding to the Facility User Survey, and 23% of the individuals, indicated performance space was the community's greatest space need. However, within the performing arts subgroup of respondents, a significant majority of 85% indicated a mid-sized performing arts space (300-500 seats) is Boulder's greatest cultural facility need. While 11 of the 17 facilities (65%) that responded to the Owner/Manager Survey indicated their facility includes theatre space, there is no 300-500 seat house in Boulder — and 44% of those who responded to the Facility User Survey indicated that a theatre with 300-500 seats would be ideal. The need for a well equipped, mid-sized theatre is clear. Although more than half of the cultural facility space now available provides space for dance, music and theatre, there are many significant constraints for artists and organizations that desire the use of these spaces. These challenges include scheduling and availability, cost of rental, seating capacity, availability of equipment (sound, lighting, flooring, etc.), acoustics, and audience and performer amenities. Other Performing Arts Space Needs While performance space generated the most significant response to the question asking respondents to identify their greatest space need, a handful of other needs also emerged in this section of the survey. Among the performing arts organization respondents, 28% indicated classroom, lecture, or workshop space as part of their greatest need; 15% identified storage space as a critical need; two organizations (11% of the performing arts organization respondents) mentioned a ballroom specifically; and only one identified a space for costume and scene shop as a critical need. In response to other questions on the Facility User Survey, 55% of the performing arts organizations indicated they would like to have additional office space, yet none of the individual performing artists articulated this need. Only one artist and four organizations (22%) identified additional rehearsal space as part of their ideal. Only two of the performing arts organizations (11%) identified additional meeting space as a need. CONCLUSIONS This survey effort elicited a statistically significant response regarding the need for more visual arts studio and exhibition space, as well as additional performance space. The development of economically viable strategies for addressing these needs will undoubtedly be part of the Boulder Arts Commission's efforts to update Boulder's Cultural Master Plan. Part of the ensuing dialogue will likely focus on the dynamic tension that is integral to efforts to make well equipped arts spaces affordable and accessible. If cultural facility rental rates are kept artificially low, as they need to be to ensure that these spaces remain accessible to a broad cross-section of the community, then provisions need to be made to cover the operating gap that is inevitably created between the income that can be generated from rentals and the 5 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 cost of building (or renovating), operating, and maintaining these facilities. Again, models exist in other communities across the country that might prove useful to Boulder in developing strategies to address this problem. The development of cultural spaces in conjunction with other, tax generating, developments is also something that Boulder may want to consider. For example, if a convention center were to be developed, could it incorporate exhibition opportunities? And potentially a performance space as well? And what steps could be taken to ensure that existing facilities are utilized most effectively? For example, would rental subsidies targeting particular user groups provide a means of increasing access to some of the facilities now in operation? Or could resource allocation aimed at increasing the quality and amount of equipment help bring some of the existing, and sometimes marginal, spaces up to the level needed to meet the needs of community artists and organizations? While these ideas don't address the gap in the size of available theatre space that now exists, nor the lack of affordable studio space or informal exhibit space, perhaps they will help in the development of interim solutions, and engender more discussion which will ultimately focus on the development of innovative cultural facilities designed to meet the needs expressed in this study. 6 1 . BACKGROUND AND HISTORY BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 SECTION 1 : BACKGROUND AND HISTORY THE BOULDER CULTURAL PLAN In 1991, The Arts and Humanities Assembly of Boulder (AHAB) initiated the development of Boulder's first (and only) Cultural Plan. Armed with funding support from the Boulder Arts Commission, Colorado Council in the Arts, the Boulder County Cultural Council Tier III SCFD, and the City of Boulder, AHAB engaged ArtsMarket Consulting, from Marion, MA, as the consultant to guide the planning process. ArtsMarket was contracted from June of 1992 through April of 1993. Initially, a sub-group of the planning committee developed three surveys for distribution to the community at large, the business community and the arts and humanities community. These surveys were refined by ArtsMarket, and two additional surveys were subsequently developed: one for the Principals of Boulder Valley schools, and one for audience members attending any of Boulder's three popular summer festivals (the Colorado Shakespeare Festival, the Colorado Music Festival and the Colorado Dance Festival). During the same period, AHAB engaged Winter and Company, of Boulder, to undertake a facilities survey to examine the scope and status of Boulder's cultural venues. Thus a separate survey effort was initiated targeting this subgroup. ArtsMarket gathered information from their surveys, as well as through interviews and roundtable discussions, which was summarized in the fall of 1992 in the Cultural Needs Assessment Report for Boulder. Winter and Company Delivered a report titled Survey of Cultural Facilities in Boulder, also in late 1992. These reports were published and presented to the community in a series of community forums in November 1992, which were attended by over 100 people. Based on the information gathered through the surveys, and resulting reports, and the community forums, four task forces were formed and charged with developing the philosophy, goals, objectives and strategies for Boulder's Cultural Plan. The Task Forces focused on the following issue areas: Audience Development and Advocacy; Arts in Education, Community and Arts Partnerships; and Organizational Development. ArtsMarket continued to help guide the planning process, and advise the work of the task forces through March of 1993. The Cultural Plan was completed and presented to the community in April, 1993. 1992 Findings Briefly, the 1992-93 research efforts, including surveys, public forums and task force reports, concluded that while Boulder benefited from a vital and diverse cultural community, it lacked sufficient cultural facility capacity to meet the needs of the artists and organizations developing and presenting their work in Boulder. _ 1 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 At that time, ten years ago, the principal needs that emerged from the studies were additional performance space and additional exhibit space. The performance venues desired at that time were a 100 seat house which could be available for 300 performances per year, a 175 seat house available for 114 performances per year, and a 350 seat house for 29 performances per year. In addition, 43% of the respondents desired exhibition spaces larger than 8,000 sf, and 46% expressed a need for more cooperative exhibition spaces. In the intervening years, some of the needs articulated in the ArtsMarket report have been addressed. For example, the investment of more than $3.5 million dollars in the renovation of The Dairy Center for the Arts has added three new theatre spaces to the community's inventory—two dramatic theatres of slightly less than 100 seats each, and a 250-seat theatre suitable for several kinds of performance, including dance, music, literary arts and film. The Nomad Theatre, closed for several years, has also undergone a significant renovation and now provides a well equipped 155-seat home for community theatre productions. Likewise, the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art developed an intimate upstairs theatre that is ideally suited to presenting innovative performances and the work of both emerging and established artists. Boulder's Cultural Plan: Update 2002 The Boulder Arts Commission is currently in the process of revisiting and updating the 1993 Cultural Plan, and this Cultural Facilities Needs Assessment is part of that effort. In addition to the research and analysis reflected in this report, the Arts Commission has established a Cultural Plan Steering Committee, whose task it will be to guide this effort. The process will include surveys, town meetings, and focus groups all designed to provide ample opportunity for public input. Cultural Studies Pertinent to Boulder's Cultural Plan Several other communities in the area are reviewing and evaluating the capacity and quality of their cultural facilities, and some are also engaged in the development and implementation of plans related to these issues. For example the East County Arts Alive (ECAA) group is a collaborative effort now underway involving the Cities of Louisville, Lafayette, and Broomfield. These communities have contracted the team of Carter Burgess, Webb Management Services, Inc., and Leland Consulting Group to evaluate both the availability and quality of existing arts facilities, and the need for additional space. This group is currently evaluating the feasibility of developing a mixed use, multidisciplinary arts complex designed to serve the needs of the artists and arts organizations operating in these communities. Of particular interest is the possibility that such an "arts village" could be designed to include tax generating components from which some of the operating revenue required to ensure the sustainability of the arts village could be derived. Another related effort is the work of the Original Aurora Redevelopment Authority. Their focus is more specific to the development of an "arts district," which may incorporate an arts incubator, studio space, exhibit space and artist live/work opportunities. Community Development Block Grant Funds have been secured to provide loans designed to support the development of these arts spaces, which in turn will aid revitalization efforts in Original Aurora. In Colorado Springs, another effort aimed at transforming a blighted area into a thriving mixed- use neighborhood, is the Depot Arts District and Marketplace, called DADA. Planning is 2 1 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 currently underway to create live/work space and exhibition opportunities, combined with historic restoration of some key municipal landmarks. Several other studies and performing arts facility development projects are currently underway as well, including Longmont's Cultural Master Plan, the expansion of the Arvada Center, the renovation of Denver's Auditorium Theatre, the South Metro Arts Initiative, and the development of a plan for the Englewood Cultural Arts Center, among others. These and other similar models may prove helpful as Boulder moves to revisit and revitalize its Cultural Plan. 3 II . CONTEXT: MARKET AREA ANALYSIS BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 SECTION 2: CONTEXT: MARKET AREA ANALYSIS BOULDER DEMOGRAPHICS Located at the base of the Rockies just north of Denver, Boulder is well recognized as a beautiful and relatively affluent small city. Over the past 20 years the population of the City of Boulder has increased 26%, from 76,685 in 1980 to 96,727 in 2000. However, during the same period, the population of Boulder County has increased by 54%, from 189,625 in 1980 to 291,288 in 2000. While this increase undoubtedly reflects the desirability of both the City of Boulder and Boulder County, with its sunny climate, beautiful geography and high quality of life, the increase in the number of people living in Boulder Valley has posed significant challenges for both the municipal and County governments, and threatens to undermine the very characteristics that drew people here in the first place. Traffic congestion, school crowding, and the rising cost of real estate are but a few of the results of this rapid population growth. There is no question that these factors have also magnified the challenges facing both artists and arts organizations, and increased the pressure on Boulder's cultural facilities. Ethnically, although the City of Boulder is still predominately Caucasian, this cohort has declined from a high of nearly 95% of the population in 1980 to 88% in 2000. Conversely, individuals of Spanish Origin have risen from 3.7% in 1980 to 8% in 2000. The Asian population has increased as percent of the total as well, from almost 2% in 1980 to slightly more than 4% in 2000. African Americans comprise only 1 .2% of the City's population, which has remained more or less steady since 1980. County-wide, the mix is nearly the same, with a significant Caucasian population (82.5%); a slightly larger Spanish Origin cohort (10.4%); a slightly smaller Asian population (3.1%); and a slightly larger African American population (3.3%). American Indian/Eskimo individuals comprise less than 1% of the total population in both the City and the County. Census information also confirms Boulder's reputation as having a relatively young, well- educated citizenry. Just over 18 percent of the population is between the ages of 5 and 20; more than 51% is between the ages of 21 and 44; and slightly more than 18% are between 45 and 64. Within the adult population, a significant 71% have completed at least one year of college education, and 42% have a Bachelor's degree. The education level also seems to be reflected in the annual median income, which has risen in the Boulder/Longmont area by 47% between 1993 and 2000, from $50,500 to $74,000. This is also significantly higher than the current median income of $54,900 in Colorado, and well above the national median income of $50,200. The unemployment rate is also substantially lower than the national average, at 2.4 percent. Growth in population is often accompanied by a rise in real estate prices, and Boulder is no exception. Between 1995 and 2000, Boulder witnessed a 45% increase in the average cost of a single family home — from $271,298 to $393,689. Moreover, Boulder County outpaced the City's significant rise in the cost of housing with a 56% increase, from $190,335 in 1995 to $296,266 in 2000. 1 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 While the cost of single family homes in the City of Boulder outpacing single family home prices in Boulder County by approximately 33%, both the City and the County have experienced significant increases. Consequently, the challenge for individual artists and arts organizations to secure affordable space for the development and presentation of both the performing and visual arts has risen substantially as well. Conversely, the challenge for cultural facilities to rise to the expectations, in terms of location, parking, design, acoustics, and audience amenities of Boulder's well educated and culturally experienced population is significant— and expensive. Finally, potential audience members have significant competition facing them as they attempt to allocate their available resources — both time and money. With such a broad spectrum of compelling outdoor activities available in and near Boulder, and fabulous weather in which to engage in them, Boulder's cultural community faces competition for audience that other communities of comparable size likely do not. 2 III . CULTURAL FACILITY USERS SURVEY RESPONSES BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 SECTION 3: CULTURAL FACILITY USER SURVEY RESPONSES GENERAL INFORMATION A total of 1037 Cultural Facility User surveys were distributed to artists and organizations operating in Boulder that use, or might desire to use, cultural facilities. Lists were derived from the Boulder Arts Commission's "Boulder Arts Resource" database, which includes artists and organizations working in Visual Arts, Dance, Literary Arts, Theatre, Music, Film and Video Arts, as well as the Open Studios mailing list, which consists primarily of individual visual artists. These lists were cross-checked against several other sources, and additions to the master list were made in order to invite the broadest possible response. The Cultural Facility User Survey mailing lists produced the following distribution per artistic disciplines: Survey Mailing Distribution Discipline # Sent % of Total Visual Artists 614 59% Dance 97 9% Literary Arts 96 9% Film/Video 92 9% Music 77 7% Theatre 34 3% Vis. Orgs & Galleries 27 3% TOTAL SENT 1037 A total of 89 responses to the Cultural Facility User Survey were received, representing a response rate of 8.6%. Of those, 61 were from artists (69%), and 28 were from organizations (31%). Due in part to the well developed target list provided by Open Studios, in addition to the list provided by the Boulder Arts Commission (including all artists who have ever applied for grant support), 59% of the total Facility User Surveys sent went to visual artists. Likewise, the responses to this survey reflect significant input from the visual arts community, with 46% of respondents identifying themselves as visual artists. 1 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 Often artists and organizations work in more than one discipline. Respondents were asked to check ALL disciplines that pertained to their work. Consequently, the discipline breakdown of respondents is broader than the number of surveys returned. Response by Discipline Discipline # Responses % of Total (adjusted for multiple responses)* Visual Arts 62 46% Music 22 16% Dance 21 16% Theatre 9 7% Literary Arts 9 7% Media Arts 7 5% Other 4 3% TOTAL RESPONSE 134 Responses by Discipline as a Percent of Total Responses Other Media Arts 3% 5 of Literary Arts v'V 7% Theatre 7% Visual Arts 46% Dance 16% Music 16% 2 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 The 61 artists who responded reflected the following discipline distribution: Artist Response by Discipline Discipline # Responses % of Total (adjusted for multiple responses)* Visual Arts 51 70% Music 8 11% Dance 6 8% Theatre 1 1% Literary Arts 2 3% Media Arts 2 3% Other 3 4% TOTAL RESPONSE 73* The distribution of disciplines among the 28 organizations responding to the user survey is somewhat more evenly spread, as illustrated below. Again, the percent of responses has been adjusted to reflect the fact that several organizations work in more than one discipline, thereby expanding the perspectives represented in the respondent pool. Organization Response by Discipline Discipline # Responses % of Total (adjusted for multiple responses)* Visual Arts 10 17% Music 14 24% Dance 15 25% Theatre 8 14% Literary Arts 7 12% Media Arts 5 8% Other 0 0% TOTAL RESPONSE 59* ORGANIZATION INFORMATION In addition to the discipline identification requested, organizations responding to the survey were also asked to provide a variety of baseline operating information which was not applicable to the individual artist respondents. This information includes the organization's function within the arts community, budget specifics, and staffing, board and volunteer support. Function Twenty-seven out of the 28 organizations that responded identified themselves as serving more than one function. Nine out of the total 28 organization respondents, or 32%, indicated they are BOTH a presenting (i.e., host of another artist or organization) AND a producing (i.e., developing and performing their own work) organization. Most, but not all, identified themselves as nonprofits. 3 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 Organization Function Function # Responses % of Total (adjusted for multiple responses)* 501-c-3 21 28% Producing Org 16 21% Performing Group. 15 20% Presenting Org. 13 17% Service Org. 10 13% Facility Manager 1 8% TOTAL RESPONSE 76* Organization Function 30%7 � v 25%-t 20%- Percent 15% { of Responses 11 :I 10% 0%_1 501-c-3 Producing Performing Presenting Service Facility Manager Nonprofit Organization Group Organization Organization Budget Twenty-five of the organizations that responded included budget information. The total value of all the organization budgets included in the survey respondent pool is $4.9 million. The range of operating budgets included a low of $700 and a high of $1 .6 million. The average annual operating budget was $196,500. More than half (16) of the 28 respondents had budgets of less than $100,000. Only 3 of the 28 organizations had budgets of $500,000 or above. 4 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 Annual Operating Budgets 14- 12- 10- 8 41210 8 al w O s O Z a fi 2 IJPW ` E J ! j 0450,000 $51,000 -100,000 $101,000-250,000 $251,000-500,000 More than $500,000 Approximately 18% of the total $4.9 million annual operating budget amount reported is allocated to artist fees, equal to approximately $876,000. However, only 13 organizations (those that identified themselves as Presenters) included artist fees in their budgets. The range of annual artist fee budgets included a low of $400 to a high of $600,000, the latter representing the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. By comparison, the total annual amount reported budgeted by responding organizations for rent OR mortgage payments was approximately $204,000, reflecting an average annual mortgage/rent fee of a little over $10,000. While 16 organizations (57%) reported some rent or mortgage payment obligation, the total annual mortgage/rent amount is only 4% of the aggregate annual operating budget amount of $4.9 million. Even adjusting for the Colorado Shakespeare Festival, which has a large general operating budget ($1 .1 M) and pays no rent, due to its affiliation with the university, the mortgage/rent obligation is still only 5% of the adjusted aggregate operating budget total. While it's possible to interpret this data to indicate that space is not as expensive for cultural organizations as might be expected in Boulder, it's more likely that organizations have simply adapted to the high cost of real estate in Boulder by successfully securing in-kind or low cost space, or by opting to run the administrative component of their organization out of a home office. The survey results detailing answers to questions about current and ideal space, beginning on pg. 7, explore this issue more fully. 5 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 Staff, Board and Volunteers Organization responses to questions concerning staffing indicate that almost half of the respondents have fulltime staff, while 60% have part time staff. Ten of the respondents, or 35%, have both fulltime and part time staff. Among the organizations that reported fulltime staff, the average number of staff was three. Among the organizations that reported part-time staff, the average number was 28. The total number of fulltime and part time staff reported by organizations was 338. Average Number of Staff, Board and Volunteers 41 45 — .1 40 -—---- -- --- - -- -- -- - - --.�_—.-- - -- 35 --- ---- -- ----- i 30 - ---- — - ----�. 251 __- 1S 201 9 15 _.. -- -- ------ --w_.. f 10 - - 3 5_i ! ll 1 0-r- Fulltime Staff Part-Time Staff Volunteers Board Members By comparison, 21 of the 28 responding organizations reported a total of 864 volunteers, or an average of 41 per organization. In addition, the total number of board members reported was 163 among 19 organizations, or an average 9 per organization. Overall, local cultural organizations rely on a significant number of volunteers, guided by very small fulltime staffs. The average board size is relatively small. 6 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 SPACE NEEDS: CURRENT VS. IDEAL The Cultural Facility User Survey examined seven types of space: Office, Classroom, Meeting Space, Rehearsal Space, Performance Space, Studio Space and "Other." For each category, respondents were asked to compare their current situation, in terms of square footage, to their ideal. OFFICE SPACE Current Ten organizations (35%) indicated they occupy current office space totaling 4390 sf. However, 2400 sf of that total current space is occupied by the Colorado Shakespeare Festival; the organization total without CSF is 1999 sf. The average for organization office space is 440 sf. Eleven artists (18%) indicated their current office space totaled 2165 sf. The average size for current artist office space is about 200 sf. Artists most often have offices in their home, and may include office space as part of their studio space. Ideal Fifteen organizations (53%) indicated their ideal included office space, up from 10 organizations that indicated they currently occupy office space. This 50% increase in the number of organizations desiring office space translated into an increase in square footage of almost 80%, from 4390 to 7840 sf. Eleven artists (all but two were the same individuals that indicated they occupy office space currently) included office space as part of their ideal. Although the number of individuals remained the same, the amount of space rose from 2165 sf currently to 8,730 sf in the ideal — an increase of more than 300% in demand for space. Office Space: Current vs. Ideal Current Ideal % Change Organizations 4390 sf 7840 sf 79% Artists 2165 sf 8,730 sf 303% Total sf 6,555 sf 16,570 sf 153% The survey indicates that most artists have offices in their homes, and many may use studio space as office space. However, the increase of more than 300% from artists' current office space of 2165 sf to the ideal of 8730 sf indicates that many artists would opt to have space outside their home, and more of it, than is currently available (or affordable). With an increase of 80% from current to ideal square footage of organizational office space, and a 50% increase in the number of organizations desiring office space, it appears that more organizations would occupy office space if it were available and affordable. The overall increase in demand for office space of 153% is significant. 7 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 CLASSROOM SPACE Current Organizations and artists currently occupy approximately 9850 sf of classroom space. Of that total, 9600 sf is occupied by organizations, and only 250 sf occupied by (one) artist. The average size of the classrooms included in the responses is 1400 sf. Ideal In the ideal, we see a 65% increase in classroom space, from a total current of 9,850 sf to an ideal total of 16,300 sf. The organizations responding increased their ideal classroom space from 9600 sf to 14,200 — up 48%. Classroom Space: Current vs. Ideal Current Ideal % Change Organizations 9600 sf 14,200 sf 80% Artists 250 sf 2,100 sf 740% Total sf 9,850 sf 16,300 sf 65% Artists increased their classroom space ideal from 250 sf to 2100 sf— an increase of 740%. However, despite the fact that the square foot increase is significant, the ideal still represents the desires of only 4 of the 61 artists who responded to the survey, less than 7% of the respondent pool. The average size among those four artists is 525 sf of classroom space. MEETING SPACE Current Only two artists mention meeting space, along with five organizations, for a total current meeting space square footage of 5600. The current organizational response is 3400 sf, or 40% of the current space. Ideal However, in the ideal, only one artist mentions meeting space, at 500 sf, which indicates a decline in need from the current 2200 sf. The combined artist and organization meeting space grew from 5600 to 8750 sf, an increase of 56%, but all the growth in demand is attributable to organizations. Meeting Space: Current vs. Ideal Current Ideal % Change Organizations 3400 sf 8250 sf 143% Artists 2200 sf 500 sf (77)% Total sf 5,600 sf 8750 sf 56% The responses indicate that the need for meeting space is substantially higher among organizations than artists, which is not surprising given the minimal specifications required to make meeting space work. In addition, it is reasonable to assume that meeting space for individuals is relatively easy to secure on a pro-bono basis, easy to share, and/or this need can be met on an ad hoc: basis at individuals' homes or in local restaurants. 8 . I I BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 REHEARSAL SPACE Current Like meeting space, rehearsal space seems more critical to organizations than to artists, as only 4 artists (7% of artist respondents) responded to questions about this kind of space, compared to 7 organizations (25% of organization respondents). Overall, this constitutes less apparent demand for rehearsal space than might have been expected. The total current rehearsal space indicated in the survey is 16,100 sf. Of that, organizations account for 13,850 sf (86%), and artists account for 2250 sf (14%). However, of the total artist rehearsal space, one artist claims the use of 1600 sf, and the remaining 650 sf is claimed by two other artists. This may be a reflection in part of the number of visual artists that responded to the survey, as compared to the number of performing artists represented in this pool. Ideal The total desired ideal rehearsal space is 29,500 sf, an increase of 83% from the current 16,100 sf. This also represents an increase in the number of organizations responding from 7 to 10, and a 95% increase in the amount of space desired by organizations. The total ideal artist rehearsal space rises modestly from 2250 to 2500 sf, again with one artist accounting for 1600 sf, and two additional artists claiming the balance. Clearly, rehearsal space seems to be a much greater concern for organizations than for artists. Rehearsal Space: Current vs. Ideal Current Ideal % Change Organizations 13,850 sf 27,000 sf 95% Artists 2,250 sf 2,500 sf 11% Total sf 16,100 sf 29,500 sf 83% PERFORMANCE SPACE Current In response to this question, some respondents provided square foot dimensions, and some provided numbers of seats, so this summary captures both. Ten of the 28 organizations that submitted surveys (36%) included data on performance spaces. Only one individual artist, a dancer, responded to general questions about performance space, although seven artists responded to more detailed questions that occurred later in the survey. From the perspective of the artists and organizations who present work in cultural facilities, current performance spaces range in capacity from less than 100 to almost 2,000 seats. The square footage estimates ranged from 800 sf to 20,000 sf, for an average of 4,885 sf. Ideal Twenty four artists and organizations responded to detailed questions regarding performance space. Within those responses, the optimum seats range from 100 to 1,000, resulting in an average desired seating capacity of 350. The breakdown of responses regarding ideal seating capacity are as follows: 33% of respondents suggested 90 to 250 seats as ideal 44% of respondents suggested 300 to 500 seats as ideal 23% of respondents suggested 500 to 1,000 seats as ideal 9 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 The total ideal square footage for performance space ranges from 1,000 to 33,000 sf. While this represents quite a wide spectrum of "ideal" space, the average is 8600 sf, which is an increase of 76% over the current average of 4885 sf. However, it is useful to keep in mind that these specifications, both current and ideal, represent the views of the facility users, not the facility managers. As such, information regarding seating capacity and the need for high quality acoustics, and appropriate lighting and sound equipment, is likely to be more exact than information about the dimensions of existing spaces. STUDIO SPACE Current Not surprisingly, studio space generated a much more significant response rate from individual artists than from organizations. Thirty-three artists (54% of the total individual respondents) indicate they currently occupy studio space, which is also undoubtedly a reflection of the high number of visual artists who responded to the survey. Of those 33, 97% indicated their studio is in, or attached to, their home. Seven organizations (25%) indicated they currently occupy studio space, with notes indicating that this category includes ballroom space and a press room for a small literary space. The total (artists and organization) current studio space occupied by survey respondents is 25,950 sf. Of that, artists occupy 15,400 sf, with an average individual studio space of approximately 500 sf. Ideal Thirty-four artists indicated studio space was part of their ideal space needs. However, the total amount of space rose by 62% from 15,400 sf to just over 25,000 sf. And the combined (artist and organization) studio space ideal rose by 20%, to just over 31,000 sf. However, organization interest in studio space actually declined by almost 4,000 sf. Studio Space: Current vs. Ideal Current Ideal % Change Organizations 10,550 sf 6,000 sf (43%) Artists 15,400 sf 25,112 sf 62% Total sf 25,950 sf 31,112 sf 20% It is clear that affordable, well equipped studio space emerges as a significant need for individual artists. While the vast majority indicated their current studios are in (or near) their homes, the significant increase in the desired square footage in the ideal underscores the constraints on those who operate in their home, and the challenges for those who cannot accommodate studio space in their home. For organizations, it appears that rehearsal space fulfills the function of "studio" space, by providing a place for the development of their artwork. 10 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 Current Versus Ideal Space 350000 30000- ---- 25000--1` � I Z 20000 LL rr U5 15000- 10000 r 5000 Ll L D �.. Office Classroom Meeting Rehearsal Performance Studio �©Current ■Ideal "OTHER" SPACE A variety of other types of space were mentioned in the survey responses. This includes storage space, scene shops, workshop space, and a ballroom and press room. While consensus of need did not emerge around these spaces, it is clear that there are needs beyond the "traditional" rehearsal, studio and performance spaces. Only one artist indicated "other" space, while six organizations responded to this question. SHARED SPACE Twenty four respondents (27% of total pool) indicated they currently share space. Of those, only 11 artists (18%) are currently sharing, compared to 13 organizations (46%) which indicated they share some or all of their space. A slightly higher number of artists, 14 (23%) indicated they would prefer to share space, while 12 of the organizations (43%) indicated their preference is to share. This information appears to support the premise that a high number of visual artists (who in turn made up a high percentage of the individual artist respondents) are currently working in their home, and thus do not share space. Organizations, by virtue of the work they do and the space they need, are more likely to share space, and thereby defray some of the significant cost of the infrastructure they require. 11 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 OWNERSHIP All of the 24 artists (40%) who indicated they own their own studio space confirmed that those studios were in their homes. The remaining 14 (23%) rent studio space. Artists also typically rent office space, except the 8 who have a home office, as well as rehearsal space and classroom space. Ownership is more common among organizations, with more oranizations claiming ownership to office space (36% own, 15% rent), classroom space (25% own, 18% rent), and studio space (25% own, 0 rent). Only performance space is clearly more commonly rented (40%) than owned (15%). GREATEST NEED In response the question "What is your/your organization's greatest space need today?" artists and organizations responded as follows: Space Needs 50-1 45A 40 c m j 0 30 a 25 f m 20 a 1s - 10-1 i 0 5�a 5Qa y�2 yQa Gec yQa ptir `oo ago woe 01 PZc ,oe Q� EE]Artists tit Organizations- 12 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. May 2002 With regard to individual artists, the impact of the strong visual arts component of the respondent pool is evident in the percent of artists voicing a need for exhibition and studio space. Performance space, with desired specifications including good acoustics and flooring, ranked third as a priority among individuals. For organizations, the overriding interest is to see more performance space become available in Boulder. However, there seems to be little agreement as to the optimal size of such space, with seating ranging from 100 to 1000. However, segregating visual artists and organizations as a respondent group from performing artists and organizations yields even more definitive results. Among the fifty-two visual arts respondents, almost 70% indicated that exhibit space was the community's greatest need. Variations on this theme included space that was rent free or heavily subsidized, space dedicated to emerging artists, and outdoor exhibit space. In addition, some respondents indicated a desire for stricter curatorial standards, and some expressed a desire for little or no curatorial oversight. In addition to this strongly voiced need for more exhibit space, almost half of the visual arts respondents indicated a need for more, and more affordable, studio space. Ten percent of this group also indicated a need for more visual arts classroom space, and 8% felt that the community would benefit from more cooperative space, where artists work collaboratively to exhibit and market work. Among the 25 performing artists and organizations, viewed as a distinct subset of respondents, the overwhelming need is more performance space. Again, the specifications vary widely regarding the optimum number of seats, with 45% of this group suggesting 300-500 seats as the ideal. There is strong consensus that, regardless of size, adequate sound and lighting equipment, and quality acoustics are all a critical to developing successful performance space in Boulder. COMMENTS Throughout the anecdotal responses, there is a strong voice for the development of vibrant, well-equipped, well used spaces that effectively serve not only the artists and cultural organizations, but the community as a whole. In response to a final, open-ended question asking for "other comments regarding Cultural Space Needs in Boulder," respondents noted the following ideas: ■ Boulder needs a "Torpedo factory" type place ■ The Dairy should be supported for performance and as space for organizations ■ The community would enjoy more art shows ■ Boulder's greatest need is theatre space ■ We need a space for rotating outdoor sculpture ■ Boulder lacks music rehearsal and performance space for small groups • Boulder needs an "Arvada Center" • We need accessible and affordable space for rotating exhibitions • Walls are easier to find than places to display large 3D work ■ The Boulder Public Library should support Boulder artists (as opposed to famous, outside artists) ■ There's great space at The Dairy ■ We need a "real" theatre, with state of the art lighting and sound ■ Need painting studios with storage for props and equipment, with 24 hr access ■ Need a small performance venue ■ We need to recognize and celebrate the artists who live and work in Boulder 13 i IV. CULTURAL FACILITY OWNERS & MANAGERS SURVEY RESPONSES BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 SECTION 4: CULTURAL FACILITY OWNERS AND MANAGERS: SURVEY RESPONSES GENERAL INFORMATION A total of 60 surveys were sent to the Owners and Managers of Cultural Facilities in Boulder. The recipients included churches, galleries and performing and visual arts venues throughout the City. The distribution list was derived from the Boulder Arts Commission Cultural Organization List, and the Arts and Humanities Assembly of Boulder's Facilities Directory. We received 17 survey responses, which constitutes a response rate of 28%. Eight respondents identified themselves as exclusively performing arts facilities; 4 identified themselves as exclusively visual arts facilities; 4 indicated they operate both performing and visual arts spaces; and one indicated it was neither a performing nor visual arts space. Survey Respondents by Facility Type Both Perf. & Visual 24% Performing Arts Only 47% Other 5% _ - l Visual Arts Only —_ __1 24% 1 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Function Several of the facilities identified themselves as serving more than one function. The breakdown is as follows: Facility Responses by Function Function # Responses % of Total (adjusted for multiple responses)* Arts Facility 11 25% 501-c-3 10 23% Presenting Org. 7 16% Service Org. 5 11% Other 5 11% Producing Org. 4 9% Performing Group 2 5% TOTAL RESPONSE 44* The "Other" category included the Boulder History Museum; NCAR, whose primary function is not arts related; the Village Arts Coalition, which focuses on participatory dance; the Colorado Chautauqua Association, which identified itself as a historic facility; and the Boulder Public Library, which noted that it is part of the City of Boulder. Facility Function 25% -- 20%-{ i 15%-f Percent of Responses 10%-I l F 50/6— I %I I i o°�°-� i �— —• (— Arts Facility 501-c-3 Presenting Service Org Other Producing Performing Org Org Group 2 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Discipline When asked which disciplines use their facility, 10 of the 17 that responded (59%) indicated they support more than one discipline, which is typical of cultural facilities. When asked to identify ALL the disciplines that use their space, respondents indicated the following: Facility Use by Discipline Facility Use # Responses % of Total (adjusted for multiple responses)* Dance 10 18% Music 10 18% Theatre 9 16% Visual Arts 8 15% Literary Arts 7 13% Media Arts 6 11% Other 5 9% TOTAL RESPONSE 55 Respondents that indicated "Other" in response to this question noted that their facilities are also used by those working in the humanities, healing arts and martial arts, businesses, and film. The use of Boulder's cultural facilities is rather evenly distributed across disciplines, as illustrated below: Facility Use by Discipline Other 9% Dance 18% Media Arts 11% •�. 1 Literary Arts Music 13% `ti 18% 7 Visual Arts 15% Theatre 16% 3 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 FACILITY MANAGEMENT Staff, Board and Volunteers Almost 200 people are employed by the 17 cultural facilities that responded to our survey. Within that group, 44 are fulltime and 154 are part-time. Among those reporting fulltime staff, the average number was 3.5 FTE. Among those who included part-time staff, the average number was approximately 20. However, Macky Auditorium indicated that they operate with approximately 85 part-time staff (and no volunteers). Since this accounts for more than half of the total number of part-time staff reported, eliminating Macky from this calculation drops the average number of part-time staff in cultural facilities to approximately 10, which is likely a more accurate representation of the staffing structures of most of these organizations. Three of the 17 respondents reported operating with the help of more than 100 volunteers. The total number of volunteers reported was nearly 1,000, for an average of 125 per organization. Only 10 of the respondents identified themselves as 501-c-3 nonprofits. The total number of board members reported was 125, for an average of 13 per organization. Average Number of Staff, Board and Volunteers 140 125 1201 1 100- 80- " 60 40� 10 13 20 � 35 0-j Fulltime Staff Part-Time Staff Volunteers Board Members Like the cultural organizations that they support, most of Boulder's cultural facilities rely heavily on a corps of volunteers, guided by very small numbers of fulltime and part-time staff. 4 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Budget Ten of the 17 facilities that responded included budget information in their response. Among those who provided information, annual operating budgets ranged from a low $70,000 to a high of $2.2.million. The operating budget distribution, by range, is reflected below-. Summary of Facility Budgets 4 4 4--j 3.5 2.5-Y 2 Number of Facilities 2� i 0.5f 0 0 0Z j I_' �►' 0-$50,000 $51,000-150,000 $151,000- $301,000- More than 300,000 $500,000 $500,000 Eight of the 10 (80%) have operating budgets in excess of $300,000, and 4 of the 10 (40%) have budgets greater than $500,000. These are substantially larger than the operating budgets of most of the cultural organizations that responded to our Facility User Survey, in which only 2 of the 25 organizations that included budget information had operating budgets in excess of $500,000. Clearly, the costs associated with running, staffing, maintaining and programming an arts facility are significant. Moreover, based on the detail provided by 7 of the ten facilities, all but one depended on at least 50% earned income to meet their operating expenses. Ownership Of the 17 facilities that responded, 7 (41%) indicated that they currently rent the facility that they manage, while the balance of 10 (59%) own their facility. All but one noted that they manage the facility that they occupy. The exception was the Village Arts Coalition. Of particular interest is the fact that 75% of the facilities (13 orgs.) indicated that they DO make space available for rent by community members and others. However, those rental opportunities, and the parameters within which the decision to rent is made, vary widely from facility to facility. 5 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Fees and Frequency Among the 13 organizations that indicated that they rent space to community members, the fee structure and amounts vary widely. Some spaces are rented for rehearsal on an hourly basis, generally between $15 and $16/hour; other facilities rent rehearsal space by the day, ranging from $150 to $700/day. Fees for performance space range from $55/hour to $4500/day. Variances are driven by the seating capacity of each facility, the quality and amount of sound and lighting equipment, and staff support available during the operation of the space. According to the survey results, only the Boulder Arts and Crafts Coop indicated it rented space for the exhibition of visual art. However, that space is only available to member artists, who pay a monthly fee plus commission on work sold. Consequently, there appears to be no space available, at least on a regular basis, for Boulder's visual artists to rent for exhibitions. Seven of the 12 respondents (58%) that identified themselves as performing arts facilities indicated that they schedule their space on a daily basis; 4 of the 12 (33%) indicated that they schedule space on a weekly or weekend basis. Four of the 12 (33%) schedule spaces in more than one configuration. Types of Space Respondents identified the following spaces available in the facilities they own or manage: Types of Spaces 12� 11 10� I it I I 5 e q I --- 2 J � 1 Theatre Classroom Conference Room Gallery Other 6 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 PERFORMING ARTS FACILITIES Performance Space Specifications Eleven of the 17 respondents indicated they operate a performance space in their facility, and information on two additional facilities (at The Dairy) was also available. The capacity of these theatres ranges from 85 seats, at The Guild Theatre West, to just over 2,000 at Macky Auditorium on the C.U. campus. Nine of the 13 theatres (almost 70%) accommodate less than 350 people. Moreover, the only theatre that seats between 300 and 500 audience members, is in Longmont, not Boulder. This is particularly important given that 44% of those who responded to the Facility User survey indicated that a theatre with a seating capacity of 300 to 500 seats would be ideal. Seating Capacity of Cultural Facility Respondents 25001 f 2000 2n11 f I 1500- --..__..._ N 1200 IrF O d 1000 `r 890 Z 625 (� 500- • -- - - —__ ---- 250 322 8590 99 100 155 L200 208 Q a` QpP a`� �Jb`o eat® titer <� 4�G� 0a� e7�`S� ea<<e t.JP 1v� ��` myL�p aim 5 5 �o no �bwo acG ° @�� PJa,�o a��e � �Nke �p aha 0ai� q��9 �t�° 1QP a�a0aa r ` eta le Gia G All of these facilities indicated that their spaces are available to rent, although BMoCA does not rent their space for performance. Rather, BMoCA indicated that they prefer to collaborate with artists and organizations who desire the use of their theatre; they will rent the gallery space for functions, or negotiate some sort of "trade." The size of the performance area varies widely also, from a modest 450 sf at the Boulder Public Library, to more than 2500 sf at Chautauqua. It should also be noted that several of Boulder's churches and schools do offer some performance space opportunities. However, data as to their scheduling, seating and equipment was not available. i 7 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Only four of the facilities that responded offer fly space, though most provide wing space. Only one of the 13, Kakes Studio, provides a rehearsal space that is separate from the performance space. Twelve of the 13 provide separate dressing rooms for performers, although only half of these include showers. Only 3 of the 13 provide storage space, and only 3 provide a scene shop. The following chart summarizes the equipment and amenities available in Boulder's performing arts facilities: Performing Arts Facility Equipment 12 12 101 � I W $ 7 0 6 E E 4 Z 4-1. 3 3 , 2 2 � I 0 — L� N to �!1 d a N C M E — N L C a) ar r N O N l` N U m N o `_' 2 L LL O Q v N 8 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Booking Nine of the 13 performing arts facilities provided information about booking (i.e., scheduling) practices pertaining to the space they manage. Respondents were asked to specify what percent of the time they, acting as producer or presenter, selected and scheduled performances, vs. the percent of time the space was rented and programmed by others. The results are illustrated below: Booking Patterns per Facility 100 90 80 70 60 Percent 50� 40-� 30-r 20-1 0 a m m A m o -a o r v �a o a = a E ) io O Q a " m H F- �' V Y Z 7 o -a V 0 cn jp m rn O Y c DO t H J 0%o Booked as Producer/Presenter A%Booked by Renters; Eight of the 9 schedule at least some part of their performance season by presenting (i.e., selecting and inviting performers) or producing their own work. Four of the 9 schedule 50% or more of their season via presenting or producing. None of these facilities depends entirely on producing or presenting their entire season, and only one (Kakes Studio) depended entirely on rentals to program their space. All of the nine performing arts facilities that provided booking pattern information schedule some of their performance activities by renting their facility to others. Such rental opportunities create the potential for use of these facilities by local artists and organizations, although both scheduling constraints and fee requirements can pose a challenge — especially for small and emerging artists and organizations. Programming via rental also reduces the up front expenses for the facilities, and helps ensure the cash flow required to meet their bottom line. Moreover, this combination of producing/presenting AND renting creates a vital mix of curated and non-curated programming, which benefits the entire community. 1 9 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Geographic Range Presented by Facilities Nine of the 1 1 organizations that identified themselves as "presenters" (i.e., presenting the work of artists and organizations other than their own) provided information as to the geographic representation of a typical season. This information is summarized below: Geographic Range of Artists Presented Outside US 3% Outside CO 23% Bldr Cnty 48% Greater CO 2% Front Range 13% t 4 t { Denver 11% The fact that almost half of the programming that is presented in these facilities is from Boulder County is indicative of the level of support that exists for community artists and organizations. The mix of community-based programming plus 25% programming from other Colorado sources, and almost 25% from outside of Colorado, provides Boulder's community members with a rich and varied palette of cultural programming. 10 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 VISUAL ARTS FACILITIES Four facilities identified themselves as exclusively serving the visual arts, and four identified themselves as serving both visual arts and performing arts. Of the 8 facilities that indicated they support the visual arts, only six included additional details about the programming and operations of their facility. None of these facilities indicated that they offer any studio space, or equipment that could be used cooperatively by community artists. This finding coincides with the data from the Facility User Survey, which indicated that affordable studio space, outfitted with at least natural light and running water, was the second most pressing need for Boulder's visual artists — with more accessible exhibition space being the most pressing need. Except for the Boulder Arts and Crafts Coop, which rents exhibition space only to its dues paying members, none of the six visual arts facilities allow their space to be rented for exhibitions. Instead, exhibitions are developed, with varying degrees of curatorial control, using the following strategies: Exhibition Selection Strategies 6 6 1� 0 4-" 3 f 0 S m 2 z ffI � I Invitation Application Call for Entries Curated Elsewhere Other Most exhibitions mounted in Boulder's cultural facilities run approximately 7 to 8 weeks, and the average number of artists exhibited by each facility ranges from a high of 150/year at the Arts and Crafts Coop, to a low of 6 artists/year at Macky Auditorium. 11 BOULDER ARTS COMMISSION CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS ASSESSMENT HARTRONFT FAURI ARCHITECTS, P.C. MAY 2002 Boulder County artists comprise the majority (63%) of artists exhibiting in these facilities, with another 26% coming from other parts of Colorado. Only 111% of the work exhibited in the facilities that responded is from outside of Colorado. The breakdown is as follows: Geographic Range of Visual Artists Exhibited in Boulder Outside CO 11% Greater CO 3% Front Range 14% a 1 Bldr Cnty Denver 63% COMMENTS Anecdotal comments from managers of Boulder's cultural facilities in response to an open- ended question about what Boulder's greatest facility need is elicited the following individual thoughts: ■ Consider under-used sites like Crossroads and the Holiday Inn Drive-In site for studio space ■ Boulder needs more collaboration, not more facilities ■ Tax breaks would be helpful ■ Boulder needs a space(s) for small, independent groups to perform ■ Boulder needs a well equipped, 500 seat facility ■ Boulder needs a 400 seat facility ■ Boulder needs a 700-800 seat auditorium ■ Additional rehearsal space ■ A space that can accommodate drumming, parties, meetings ■ Boulder needs a mid-sized concert hall (800-1200 seats) plus a conference center 12