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Item 3 - CAMP UpdateCITY OF BOULDER LANDMARKS BOARD AGENDA ITEM MEETING DATE: December 6, 2017 AGENDA TITLE Staff briefing and Landmarks Board feedback on the Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) summer 2017 pilot results and preliminary recommendations PRESENTER/S Bill Cowern, Principal Traffic Engineer Susan Connelly, Deputy Director of Community Vitality Amanda Bevis, Project Coordinator for Public Works EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) project is being led by the Public Works Transportation Division and the Community Vitality Department with the goal of exploring ways to manage existing demand for transportation access to and from the Chautauqua area in ways that minimize vehicular and parking impacts to surrounding neighbors, visitors, and the area’s natural and cultural resources. Following approval by City Council in April 2017, staff launched a pilot program in summer 2017 that included free transit using the Park-to-Park shuttle from free off-site parking and managed parking within the Chautauqua area and in the immediate neighborhood. A robust technical evaluation and public process accompanied this pilot program and based on the findings of these evaluations and outreach efforts, staff considers the pilot program successful and recommends continuing the program with minor modifications and improvements for five years. Staff presented 2017 pilot results and preliminary recommendations for a continuing CAMP program at the October 24 City Council Study Session. The attached study session memorandum (Attachment A) provides the pilot results and preliminary recommendations. In addition to the council and the Landmarks Board, staff have sought feedback on the preliminary recommendations from the Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT) and the Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA) board of directors and will seek feedback from the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board (PRAB). In June 2017, the Landmarks Design Review Committee (LDRC) issued a Landmark Alterations Certificate (LAC) for the city to add a temporary payment kiosk to the Ranger Cottage for paid parking transactions. The CAMP team anticipates returning to the Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA) Building and Grounds Committee and the city’s LDRC to submit an application for a LAC for one permanent payment kiosk at the Ranger Cottage (in the same place as 2017), one permanent payment kiosk near the Dining Hall, and two “dual-head smart meters” to be placed at each of the two accessible parking areas within the Chautauqua area (at the Dining Hall and Ranger Cottage). Questions for Landmarks Board 1. Does the Landmarks Board have any questions about the CAMP Summer 2017 pilot program implementation or results? 2. Does the Landmarks Board have any feedback on the preliminary recommendations regarding the proposal to continue the summer CAMP program for five years? Attachments and Links A. City Council October 24 Study Session memo and attachments M ayor Suzanne Jones Council M e mbe r s Matthew Appelbaum Aaron Brockett Jan Burton Lisa Morzel Andrew Shoemaker Sam Weaver Bob Yates Mary Young Council Chambers 1777 Broadway Boulder, CO 80302 October 24, 2017 6:00 PM City M anage r Jane Brautigam City Attorne y Thomas A. Carr City Cle rk Lynnette Beck ST UDY S E S S ION BOULDE R CIT Y COUNCIL TO F O L L O W 6 P M S P E C I A L ME E T I NG C hautauqua Access Management P lan (C A MP) Report on S ummer 2017 P ilot and Presentation of P reliminary R ecommendations and Next S teps (1.5 Hours) Urban F orest Management Update (1 Hour) City Counc il documents, including meeting agendas, study session agendas, meeting action summaries and information packets can be acc essed at www.boulder color ado.gov/city-council. This meeting can be viewed at www.bouldercolorado.gov/city-council. Meetings are aired live on Municipal C hannel 8 and the city 's website and are re-cablec ast at 6 p.m. W ednesday s and 11 a.m. Fridays in the two weeks following a regular c ounc il meeting. Boulder 8 TV (C omcast c hannels 8 and 880) is now providing closed c aptioning for all live meetings that are aired on the channels. The closed c aptioning servic e operates in the same manner as similar services offered by broadc ast channels, allowing viewers to turn the closed captioning on or off with the television remote control. C losed captioning also is available on the live HD stream on Boulder C hannel8.com. To activate the c aptioning servic e for the live stream, the "C C" button (which is located at the bottom of the video play er) will be illuminated and available whenever the c hannel is providing c aptioning servic es. The counc il chambers is equipped with a T-C oil assisted listening loop and portable assisted listening devices. I ndividuals with hearing or speech loss may contact us using Relay Colorado at 711 or 1-800- 659-3656. Anyone requiring special packet preparation suc h as Braille, large print, or tape rec orded versions may contact the C ity Clerk's Office at 303-441-4222, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Please request spec ial pac ket preparation no later than 48 hours prior to the meeting. City Council Study Session Page 1 of 199 I f you need Spanish interpretation or other language-related assistance for this meeting, please call (303) 441-1905 at least three business days prior to the meeting. Si usted nec esita interpretacion o c ualquier otra ayuda c on relacion al idioma para esta junta, por favor c omuniquese al (303) 441-1905 por lo menos 3 negoc ios dias antes de la junta. Send elec tronic presentations to email address: CityClerkStaff@bouldercolorado.gov no later than 2 p.m. the day of the meeting. City Council Study Session Page 2 of 199 C I T Y C OU N C I L AGE N D A I T E M C OVE R S H E E T ME E T I N G D AT E : October 24, 2017 AG E N D A T I T L E TO F O LLO W 6 PM S PEC IA L MEET IN G C hautauqua Access Management Plan (C A MP) Report on Summer 2017 Pilot and Presentation of Preliminary Recommendations and Next Steps (1.5 Hours) P RI MARY STAF F C O N TAC T Susan Connelly, Deputy Director of C ommunity Vitality B RI E F H I STORY OF I T E M C ity Council in April 2017 approved a C hautauqua Access Management Plan (C A MP) pilot (temporary program) for summer 2017 to explore ways to manage existing demand for access to and from the C hautauqua area to minimize impacts to surrounding neighbors, visitors and the areas' natural and cultural resources. T his memorandum and the presentation to be made at the Oct. 24 study session will present the results and analysis of the pilot program and outline preliminary recommendations for an ongoing five-year summer weekends program. AT TAC H ME N T S: Description C AMP SS 10.24.17 P resentation - C AMP City Council Study Session Page 3 of 199 1 TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT: STUDY SESSION MEMORANDUM Mayor and Members of City Council Jane Brautigam, City Manager Mary Ann Weideman, Deputy City Manager Maureen Rait, Executive Director, Public Works Molly Winter, Executive Director, Community Vitality Tracy Winfree, Director, Open Space and Mountain Parks Michael Gardner-Sweeney, Director, Public Works-Transportation Bill Cowern, Principal Traffic Engineer Susan Connelly, Deputy Director, Community Vitality Melissa Yates, Access and Parking Manager, Community Vitality Deryn Wagner, Senior Planner, Open Space and Mountain Parks Kathleen Bracke, Manager, GO Boulder Natalie Stiffler, Senior Transportation Planner, Public Works – Transportation Chris Hagelin, Senior Transportation Planner, Public Works – Transportation Meghan Wilson, Temporary Communications Manager Colin Leslie, Human Dimensions Coordinator, Open Space and Mountain Parks Amanda Bevis, Project Coordinator, Public Works October 24, 2017 Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) – Report on Summer 2017 Pilot and Presentation of Preliminary Recommendations and Next Steps EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the study session is to brief City Council on the results of the Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) summer 2017 pilot and to seek council feedback on the proposed process and schedule to develop a recommended implementation plan for summer 2018 and beyond. The city initiated the CAMP process in response to the 2015 city lease with the Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA); to address neighborhood concerns about spillover parking, congestion and safety; and to be proactive regarding the city’s climate commitment, including reduction in single-occupant vehicle (SOV) usage. The purpose of the CAMP is to manage transportation access to and from the Chautauqua area during the peak summer period in ways that minimize vehicular and parking impacts to surrounding neighbors, visitors and the area’s natural and cultural resources. City Council Study Session Page 4 of 199 2 On April 18, 2017, City Council approved a summer 2017 pilot program to test various mitigation measures and assess effectiveness in achieving the plan’s purpose in order to inform development of a CAMP for implementation in future summers. Success for the pilot was defined as: • Transit ridership levels (not including Transportation Network Companies, or TNCs) of 250 shuttle riders per day on average, including visitors, employees, volunteers, (using summer 2016 data, this would comprise approximately 10 percent of trailhead visitors); • Increase use of TNCs; • Reduction in traffic volume on Baseline Road and on surrounding neighborhood streets; • Reduction in parking utilization on neighborhood blocks to the north of Chautauqua and in the CCA leasehold area; and • Reasonable compliance with parking restrictions. Since the pilot concluded at the end of August, staff and consultants have analyzed data and community feedback to measure outcomes and determine areas for improvement. The CAMP summer 2017 pilot appears to be a success relative to the criteria. Staff has prepared preliminary recommendations involving minor improvements while continuing the same or better level of service for th e majority of pilot components. Staff recommends that the pilot program become an ongoing funded program for a period of five years while other relevant studies and updates are completed, including the Open Space and Mountain Parks Master Plan. Council feedback on these preliminary recommendations will be presented to several boards during the next few months. Board feedback will be incorporated into final recommendations for the ongoing program to be presented to City Council during the first quarter of 2018, along with code changes required for implementation. KEY ISSUES IDENTIFIED Was the CAMP summer 2017 pilot successful? Did it achieve the project goals? Is it the right approach to continue in one or more future summers? Questions for Council 1. Does City Council have any questions about the CAMP Summer 2017 Pilot program implementation or results? 2. Does City Council have any feedback on the preliminary recommendations for an ongoing five- year summer CAMP program? BACKGROUND “Chautauqua” is used as short-hand to refer to a variety of places and things, including the Colorado Chautauqua National Historic Landmark (NHL) district; various places within the NHL, including the Colorado Chautauqua Association leasehold area; the city park; the Chautauqua Dining Hall and the Chautauqua Ranger Cottage; the adjacent open space trailheads; and even the adjacent residential neighborhoods. Usage of many of these areas peaks every year during the summer months. Access to the Chautauqua area has been a concern for decades as usage has increased. For example, the number of visitors to Chautauqua trails doubled between 2004 and 2015. The trails average about 2,500 visitors per day in the summer peak period, with summer 2015 visitation on weekends approximately double weekday visits on average. Concerns about increased use have been identified in a series of leases over the years between the city of City Council Study Session Page 5 of 199 3 Boulder and the CCA, with a commitment made in the most recent lease (effective Jan. 1, 2016) to create a Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP). In February 2016, City Council determined in February 2016 to proceed with data collection in summer 2016 as a foundation for a future pilot program. An internal staff team, along with the Fox Tuttle Hernandez Transportation Group, evaluated data collected throughout summer 2016 and developed recommendations for 2017 in coordination with the CAMP Working Group. Staff presented these recommendations, which were based on data analysis, technical expertise and community input, to City Council on April 4, 2017. On April 18, 2017, City Council approved a summer 2017 pilot program to address key issued identified through the 2016 data collection: • Reduction of automobile mode share to meet CAMP governing principles and city transportation and climate goals; • Reduction of parking demand on adjacent neighborhood and CCA leasehold area neighborhood streets, currently used as overflow parking for access to the area; and • Reduction of conflicts between automobiles and pedestrians in highly trafficked residential areas. The pilot included an integrated program of free transit, the Park to Park shuttle from free off-site parking and managed parking within the Chautauqua area, and staff executed a data collection plan to measure the components. Summer 2017 Pilot Components and Results The CAMP 2017 pilot operated on the weekends, Saturday and Sunday, between June 1 and August 31. The Council-approved components of the CAMP summer 2017 pilot were: Transit • Free transit service: three shuttles branded as the Park to Park shuttle operated in 15-minute increments from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in conjunction with free satellite parking in five downtown parking garages, at New Vista High School (Baseline and 20th Street) and at University of Colorado-Boulder (Broadway and 20th Street/Regent Drive). • The shuttles ran for a total of 936 total hours and had 22,933 boardings (which includes the number of people boarding and could include individuals using the shuttle more than once per day), which equates to an average of 882 boardings per day . • Dogs were allowed on the shuttle, with no incidents were reported involving dogs. • An average of 43 percent of the daily boardings occurred at King’s Gate and Baseline (Chautauqua stop), with an average of 31 percent at the New Vista satellite parking lot, 10 percent at the CU- Regent satellite parking lot, and the remaining 15 percent spread between the 9th Street and College Avenue stop and the downtown stops. Average daily boardings peaked at the 11 a.m. and noon hours and were about 10 percent or more above average each hour from 9 a.m. through 3 p.m. The distribution of boardings by stop and hour was consistent each month. • The New Vista High School parking lot was not available for Park to Park satellite parking on the final weekend of the 13-weekend pilot, and that weekend had depressed shuttle ridership and increased paid parking transactions. City Council Study Session Page 6 of 199 4 • The Via Mobility Services (Park to Park shuttle service provider) bus drivers were friendly and helpful, and were specifically identified in multiple complimentary e-mails to the Park to Park team. Paid Parking • Paid parking was implemented in four zones: on Baseline Road, around the Chautauqua Green, in the Ranger Cottage Lot and in the temporary Neighborhood Parking Program (NPP) zone (see below) for $2.50/hour. There was no time limit or restriction on duration of parking. • Parkers could pay at any one of five payment kiosks installed temporarily along Baseline and at the Ranger Cottage using credit or debit cards and entering license plate numbers, or they could pay using the ParkMobile phone application. • During the pilot, the average length of paid parking was 2.42 hours. • Of the paid parking transactions, 64 percent (12,742) used one of the five payment kiosks and 36 percent (7,216) used the ParkMobile app. There were more ParkMobile transactions at Chautauqua than downtown on the same days. • Some users experienced difficulty connecting to the ParkMobile app, and some users didn’t realize that they needed their license plate numbers to pay at the payment kiosk, requiring a walk back to their cars. Additional signage was added mid-pilot to remind users to record their license plate number. Temporary Neighborhood Parking Permit (NPP) Program The purpose of an NPP program is to manage parking to balance the needs of everyone who uses public streets in residential neighborhoods. NPP zones provide for resident permit parking and public parking. • The city created a temporary Neighborhood Parking Permit (NPP) zone from 6th Street to Lincoln Place and from Baseline Road north to Cascade Avenue (one block north of Baseline). • The city issued 158 resident permits at no charge during the pilot. CAMP Ambassadors and Guides • The city hired seasonal employees to be CAMP Ambassadors during the pilot. The ambassadors were stationed around the five payment kiosks, in the Ranger Cottage lot and around the Chautauqua Green and were available to answer general questions about the pilot and shuttle and to provide assistance to people using the payment kiosks. The city trained ambassadors through a pre- pilot orientation. • The Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau (BCVB) staffed guides who worked on each shuttle to orient new and returning visitors on the shuttle. CCA Leasehold Parking Permits • The city issued permits to CCA for distribution among its residents, lodging guests, Community House users and employees and volunteers of all three organizations within the leasehold (CCA, Colorado Music Festival and Chautauqua Dining Hall). • On pilot Saturdays and Sundays, CCA used signage to manage access into the leasehold area at two entry points (one at Kinnikinic Road and Clematis Drive and another west of the trailhead parking for the McClintock Trail). Parking within the leasehold on pilot Saturdays and Sundays was permit- City Council Study Session Page 7 of 199 5 only past these two signed entry points, with public (paid) parking on the Clematis and McClintock Trailhead portions of the CCA leasehold (Figure 1 – Parking Study Areas) • Voluntary compliance with the “permit-only parking” on pilot weekends was higher than had been anticipated. • CCA cottagers and staff expressed great satisfaction with the pilot, finding it easier to park within proximity to their residences or rental lodging, but also appreciation for the reduction in cars circling for parking. Several people specifically mentioned that it was quieter within the historic core than it had been in past summers. Employee Transportation Demand Management (TDM) An employee Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program was organized and managed for each set of employees within the CCA leasehold (CCA, Chautauqua Dining Hall [CDH] and Colorado Music Festival [CMF]) to reduce parking demand and expand access to transportation options. • CCA provided a $3 per day “cash out” incentive for its employees who chose not to get a permit to park within the leasehold area and limited the number of parking passes provided to employees. • CDH provided a meal credit as an incentive to employees to not drive or use a parking permit during their shift on the weekends of the pilot. • CMF employees (including musicians at rehearsals) were provided with parking permits through CCA to park within the leasehold. Only about half of musicians and staff were provided permits to encourage carpooling and use of the shuttle. • Employee questionnaires were issued prior to and after the pilot to understand the effectiveness of the TDM program. Results indicate that driving alone to work reduced by approximately 14 percent over the 13 weekends of the pilot, due to a slight increase in carpooling and with 10 percent of employees regularly using the Park to Park shuttle service from designated lots. During the pilot, approximately 20 percent of employees tried the shuttle at least once during the pilot. Transportation Network Companies (TNC) To supplement the free shuttle service for visitors and employees, the city worked with Lyft and CCA worked with Uber to provide ride discounts, particularly outside of shuttle service hours. • The city subsidized TNC rides to offer a discount to visitors who used Lyft to arrive and/or depart from Chautauqua at any hour during the weekend. Midway through the pilot, the city increased the subsidy from $1.25 to $2.50 to encourage usage. By the end of the pilot, 66 Lyft rides were taken using this method. • CCA also worked independently with Uber to provide TNC rides from the shuttle lots for employees arriving before or after the operational hours of the shuttle. No data has been provided at this time from Uber. Parking Enforcement City of Boulder parking enforcement officers patrolled the five managed parking areas to enforce the NPP zone, CCA leasehold area, and the paid parking zones (Figure 1 – Parking Study Areas). City Council Study Session Page 8 of 199 6 Planning and Implementation Following City Council approval of the pilot approach and required ordinance amendments (archived here), staff conducted the following activities to plan for summer 2017 implementation of the components mentioned above: • Finalized a negotiation with the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) and the University of Colorado (CU) regarding satellite parking lots; • Completed a request for proposals (RFP) process and contracted with Via Mobility Services for shuttle service; • Developed and implemented a branding and marketing plan; • Ordered, installed and programmed parking payment kiosks; • Designed, fabricated and installed 320 transit and parking signage, including variable message signs on Highway 36; • Hired and trained 13 on-site parking ambassadors; • Coordinated with the BCVB on orientation for CAMP ambassadors, BCVB ambassadors and Via bus drivers; • Coordinated with CCA and produced parking permits for its leasehold users; • Ordered and distributed temporary NPP zone permits to neighbors north of Baseline; • Coordinated with CCA, the Chautauqua Dining Hall and the Colorado Music Festival on an employee TDM program; and • Contracted with Lyft for discounted rides to supplement the shuttle service. As the CAMP pilot transitioned from planning to implementation, staff monitored each pilot component regularly and made tweaks as possible. In response to user feedback, staff added additional “License Plate Required” signage to clarify paid parking requirements. Another modification in response to customer need was gaining Landmarks Board’s Design Review Committee approval to relocate one of the five payment kiosks from its original location on the far western end of Baseline into the Ranger Cottage lot by the third weekend of the pilot, which improved user accessibility to the kiosk. Marketing and Communications Staff contracted and coordinated with the Vermillion Design and Digital to develop the Park to Park brand and graphics, communications messaging, print and digital collateral, bus stop wayfinding and signage, and paid social media and Google advertising strategy. Given the significant number of first-time visitors to Chautauqua, it was necessary to continually inform new visitors, as well as local residents. In addition to the Google paid search and social media advertising campaign, the pilot was featured in the June/July 2017 issue of the City of Boulder community newsletter (“Free Chautauqua shuttle for summer 2017”). During the beginning of the pilot, there was positive media television coverage. Throughout the pilot, the CAMP and Park to Park webpages were regularly updated with new information, council correspondence and public input. There were also four “Heads Up” updates to Council – May 19, June 8, July 21 and Aug. 31. The city issued a community questionnaire at the end of the pilot. Findings included that 79.6 percent of respondents were aware of the free shuttle before their first visit, and 64.2 percent of respondents were aware of paid parking before accessing the area. City Council Study Session Page 9 of 199 7 Data Collection Data was collected according to the schedule below to understand conditions on pilot days and non-pilot days and to compare with the same data collected in 2016 as available. Note: “Parking utilization” refers to the number of parking spots used compared to the number of spots available. Data Collection Task Number of Collection Days and Times Responsible Party Daytime Parking Utilization – six zones: CCA Leasehold, Ranger Cottage Lot, The Green, Baseline Road, Temporary NPP, North (and east) of NPP Neighborhood 6 days, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 2 weekdays, 4 weekend days Fox Tuttle Hernandez Transportation Group (FTH) Evening Parking Utilization - part of NPP and North Neighborhood zones 3 concert days, 4 – 8 p.m. FTH/City Parking Utilization & Hang Tag/Permit data - Leasehold, NPP 2 weekend days, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. FTH Parking Utilization & License Plate state - New Vista and CU Regent satellite lots 2 weekend days, 3 peak hours (am, noon, pm) FTH Transit Ridership Pilot weekend days, 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. Via bus drivers, Automatic Passenger Counts (APC) on buses Traffic Volume and Speed on Baseline Road Saturday and Sunday, one weekend City Parking Enforcement Pilot weekend days City Baseline Crosswalk Volume & Driver Compliance – Baseline at Kings Gate and at Grant Place 2 weekday & 2 weekend days (4 hours midday) FTH Employee TDM data Pre- and post-pilot questionnaires in May and August; participation data collected throughout pilot City, CCA, CDH, CMF Trailhead Visitation June 1 – August 31, 24-hours per day every day City City and Regional Hotel Occupancy Average June, July, August BCVB City Council Study Session Page 10 of 199 8 Data Collection Task Number of Collection Days and Times Responsible Party CCA Event Attendance Regularly on event nights at Chautauqua during the pilot CCA and CMF Bicycle Parking – Ranger Lot racks near Ranger Cottage and Baseline 6 days, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. FTH Figure 1 – Parking Study Areas In addition to the data collection plan, staff committed to work with partners and the public to understand more subjective aspects of success, including conducting an online questionnaire to understand how the pilot affected customer satisfaction, visitor experience and changes in behavior, and seeking neighborhood feedback and input on what measures were most helpful. 2017 CAMP Pilot Budget The total cost of the pilot was budgeted as $457,500 to include transit, parking management administration, paid parking kiosks and ParkMobile, enforcement, on-site parking ambassadors, marketing and communications, TNC subsidies and data collection and analysis. With $97,000 appropriated through the 2017 base budget, $357,000 was allocated to this project in the first adjustment City Council Study Session Page 11 of 199 9 to base (ATB) in June 2017, which included $130,000 in revenue estimated to be generated by the pilot ($80,000 parking revenue and $50,000 contribution from the BCVB). As of October 11, 2017, pilot expenses were 87 percent of total budgeted at $396,722, including encumbrances. Paid parking revenue generated 50 percent more revenue than anticipated, at $119,967 as of October 11, 2017. In addition to paid parking revenue, the BCVB contributed $52,024 to the pilot for marketing support and provided additional ambassadors on the shuttles, at the Ranger Cottage and at the CU-Regent satellite parking lot. ANALYSIS The pilot ran for 26 days over 13 consecutive weekends from June 3 through August 27. Data collected during that period indicates that the pilot met the key issues identified for mitigation. Key Issues Addressed Reduction of automobile mode share to meet CAMP governing principles and city transportation and climate goals. Operating 936 total hours of service, the free Park to Park shuttle had 22,933 boardings, which equates to an average of 882 boardings per day. The free Park to Park shuttle was as productive (considering riders per service hour statistics) as some of the city’s longstanding Community Transit Network routes, such as JUMP. Staff estimates that transit ridership during the pilot reduced single occupancy vehicle (SOV) mode share of those seeking parking in the Chautauqua area by approximately 160 vehicles per day. An adjacent benefit to adding this transit service was that it connected shuttle riders to other destinations aside from Chautauqua—to downtown and CU—enabling users to leave their car in satellite parking or at home and enjoy both locations with car-free trips. In the Chautauqua leasehold (Figure 1 – Parking Study Areas), employee vehicle trips reduced by 14 percent, with 10 percent of employees regularly using the free shuttle. Ambassadors throughout the pilot and the Dining Hall manager expressed that there was a noticeable decrease in vehicles circling the Chautauqua Green in search for parking. Separately from the pilot components, bicycle parking was added at six locations in the city park in spring 2017 prior to the pilot. The CCA added bicycle racks near the Academic Hall, Auditorium, Columbine Lodge and Dining Hall. OSMP also added and upgraded bike racks, increasing bike parking capacity near the Ranger Cottage. Reduction of parking demand on adjacent neighborhood and Chautauqua leasehold neighborhood streets currently used as overflow parking for access to the site. Parking management was in effect in five areas, with five parking zones (CCA Leasehold, Chautauqua Green, Ranger Cottage Lot, Baseline Road and North Neighborhood temporary NPP zone) enforced from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays during the pilot. Parking management included a paid parking approach as well as temporary NPP management strategy. Throughout the five zones, fewer cars were parked in the study area in 2017 than in 2016, even during the weekdays when paid parking was not in place.On weekends, 48 fewer cars per hour were observed, and 35 fewer cars per hour were observed on weekdays during the pilot. Some leasehold and temporary NPP demand moved into the North (and East) Neighborhood. City Council Study Session Page 12 of 199 10 Paid Parking • Including all paid parking areas, there was an average of 768 daily parking transactions during the pilot and a total of 19,958 paid parking transactions. • Baseline Road (78 spaces in 2017, down from 86 in 2016 following construction of a new sidewalk): The average number of cars parking along Baseline Road increased both weekdays and weekends in 2017 as compared to 2016, from 49 to 52 an hour on weekdays and from 49 to 58 an hour on weekends. • Chautauqua Green (72 spaces): Both weekday and weekend parking utilization decreased slightly during the pilot as compared to 2016, with the largest reductions after 2 p.m. on weekends. Both weekday and weekend average peak parking utilization decreased from 93 percent in 2016 to 84- 86 percent in 2017. • Ranger Cottage Lot (50 spaces): The Ranger Cottage lot was nearly 100 percent utilized at all hours of management parking, with very slight reductions in 2017 compared to 2016. Temporary NPP Zone • Both weekday and weekend parking utilization in the temporary NPP zone (336 spaces) decreased compared to parking utilization in the same area in 2016. Average weekend peak parking utilization was reduced from 69 –79 percent (depending on block) in 2016 to 55–62 percent in 2017. In the temporary NPP, overall weekend peak parking utilization reduced by approximately 20 percent, from 59 percent to 39 percent. • Weekend parking utilization in the neighborhood north of the temporary NPP (North Neighborhood in Figure 1) increased from 25–47 percent (depending on block) in 2016 to 36–72 percent in 2017. • The block of 10th Street between Baseline and Cascade that requested not to be in the temporary NPP saw peak parking utilization increase from 58 percent on weekends in 2016 to 91 percent in 2017. • The block of 10th Street between Cascade and Aurora remained stable with 38 percent utilization on weekends in 2016 and 36 percent in 2017. Residents within the NPP zone reported happiness with the pilot results, including less parking congestion, greater ability to access their own homes during the peak day time hours, and less trash and noise from parkers. Residents outside of the NPP zone expressed that parking impacts to the streets adjacent to the NPP had increased. Employee TDM Programs • CCA Leasehold (236 spaces): Both weekday and weekend parking utilization was lower during the pilot. Average peak parking utilization was reduced from 63 percent in 2016 to 42 percent in 2017 on the weekends and from 60 percent to 56 percent on the weekdays. Parking Enforcement Parking enforcement regularly enforced the five parking zones during the pilot to ensure compliance within the zones. An average of 49 violations were cited each day of the 26-day pilot. On an average daily basis, the most violations were cited in the temporary NPP zone, with significantly fewer violations in the other five zones. City Council Study Session Page 13 of 199 11 Reduction of conflicts between automobiles and pedestrians in highly-trafficked residential areas. At the main Chautauqua intersection of Baseline and Kinnikinic, the percentage of drivers on weekends that yielded to pedestrians waiting to cross Baseline increased from 64 percent in 2014 to 85 percent in 2016 to 90 percent in 2017. Recent improvements (e.g., east crossing curb extensions and west crossing median refuge) shortened crossing distances and increased visibility of pedestrians to drivers on Baseline. A 45 percent increase in pedestrian crossing volume on weekends was observed at Baseline and King’s Gate as compared to 2016 observations, believed to be a combination of shuttle riders (estimated 30 percent of pedestrians crossing) and persons parking in the neighborhood east of the temporary NPP zone. Observed driver compliance for yielding to pedestrians at Baseline and King’s Gate increased from 74 percent in 2016 to 95 percent in 2017. Recent improvements (southside curb extension) enhanced visibility of pedestrians and shortened the crossing distance for pedestrians. Compliance generally improves with higher pedestrian volumes. Traffic counts and speed data collected this summer were inconclusive concerning whether motor vehicle traffic into the Chautauqua area decreased from the pilot. However, the high shuttle use, decrease in parking utilization in the surrounding neighborhoods and stable trail usage all suggest that motor vehicle usage in the Chautauqua area decreased along with the potential for conflict with between automobiles and pedestrians. Data collected on pedestrian crosswalks on Baseline Road have also shown that conflicts for pedestrians have decreased as the percentage of drivers yielding in crosswalks has increased substantially. Staff believes this is due to improved facilities constructed recently and the increased crossings generated by the free shuttle service. Public Engagement Email inquiries and comments sent to parktopark@bouldercolorado.gov and CAMP@bouldercolorado.gov throughout the pilot were handled in a timely manner by staff. All emails have been cataloged for the public and City Council to review. Most email inquiries were seeking information about the pilot or Chautauqua in general. In terms of comments or inputs received, the majority were positive. Two examples: • I’m a local, and my niece and friends were in town for the weekend. We parked at New Vista and shuttled to Chautauqua for a Flagstaff hike and then shuttled to the Farmers’ Market for lunch. Afterwards we shuttled back to New Vista. We thought that it was just the best idea! And, the drivers were helpful and informative ambassadors. - Dave Hoyt • We used the ParktoPark shuttle from the CU Regents parking lot to go to the Children's Concert at Chautauqua. It was very convenient for us as first-time visitors. Thanks for instituting the service! - Kathy Wilson, Loveland, CO Concerns were expressed by a few neighbors on 9th Street regarding the shuttle noise early on weekend mornings and by climbers who were not adequately served by the 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. shuttle service hours, desiring earlier and later service. An example: • I live on the block of Ninth street adjacent to Chautauqua park. I have parking off of my alley, as do most of the homes in this area. When we bought our house, I understood that parking on the street would be an issue, but it's a fair tradeoff for living near the park. I don't have an issue with people wanting to park near Chautauqua, but I do have an issue with the noise and frequency with which the Park to Park buses passed our house. Usually they were almost empty (I did see buses with more people on them on the Chautauqua-to-New Vista route, but the buses going up and down 9th street were usually City Council Study Session Page 14 of 199 12 almost empty). The buses started at 7 am on Saturday and Sunday mornings, and since they were scheduled every 15 min in each direction, that meant a noisy almost-empty bus passed our house approximately every 7.5 minutes, from 7 am until 7 pm every weekend, and even longer if there was a concert that night. • Climbers emails from Open Boulder and Boulder Climbing Community/Access Fund Stakeholder Debriefs and Community Questionnaire The CAMP staff team conducted debrief meetings with multiple stakeholder groups that were involved with the pilot to understand their perception of the pilot and provide an opportunity for direct feedback. A brief summary of their feedback is described below. • Sustainable Chautauqua neighborhood group (Aug. 15): o Positives: Very happy with the pilot outcomes (“about as successful as could be hoped”); a substantial improvement; much less density of cars; less trolling, fewer U-turns on Baseline; shuttle is a great success because it was tied to parking management (“bus is noisy but I don’t care, as there is less dust and less trash”). o Opportunities for improvement: must address big tour buses; request expansion to include Fridays and run Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day; consider auditorium event night management, including Meadow Music (Mondays); parking in the area should pay for the bus. • Colorado Chautauqua Association staff leadership (Aug. 1 and Aug. 18): o Positives: Happy with the pilot outcomes (“It feels better”); maintain current pilot parameters – do not go to seven days/week; o Opportunities for improvement: transfer permit creation, allocation and administration process for leasehold to CCA; use hang tags instead of on-dashboard permits to speed enforcement; request additional and consistent enforcement within leasehold; recommend adding more ADA spots outside of leasehold and add payment kiosk at McClintock Trailhead; request the city provide four special permits for cottages located on Clematis to allow them to park for free; very time-consuming to respond to inquiries about the program; look to better coordinate or combine the Park to Park shuttle service with the Hop 2 Chautauqua shuttle service for Aauditorium events. • Chautauqua Dining Hall (CDH) general manager Jerry Manning (8/31/17): o Positives: CDH staff were surprised at how few complaints or concerns they received from guests and staff; suspects that the presence of the ambassadors helped respond to concerns before people walked into the CDH; saw the ambassadors as a huge help to the entire program; did not experience any negative business impact from the pilot; saw less congestion (“less traffic circling the Green three times looking for a parking space”). o Opportunities for improvement: observed guest confusion about when and where to pay; not enough signage and payment kiosks; strongly supports adding a payment kiosk near the CDH; agreed with CCA suggestion of adding more accessible parking spaces but wonders if better on Morning Glory than on Clematis. • CAMP Ambassadors, BCVB ambassadors and Via drivers (8/31/17): o Positives: BCVB pilot ambassadors and Via Mobility drivers had an overall positive involvement with the 2017 pilot and experienced very few issues. Their perception was that the teams and staff created an atmosphere that was successful and were enabled to make a positive impact on visitors. City Council Study Session Page 15 of 199 13 o Opportunities for improvement: with the drivers and ambassadors being intimately involved with the pilot details, they had suggestions for logistical improvements that include more crosswalk safety, addressing the confusion around HOP 2 Chautauqua, and overall parking and traffic signage. In addition to seeking stakeholder group feedback, staff issued a community questionnaire to understand visitor and customer experience and discern lessons learned. The questionnaire was open from August 14 through September 11, and its availability was marketed via email to the CAMP distribution list, paid advertising, and social media. Of the respondents, 73 percent rated their experience as very good, good or fair out of a 5-point scale from very good to very poor. From open-comment analysis, 55 percent of respondents commented that the pilot was better than expected. Conclusion from Analysis Based on the data collected, stakeholder debriefs, community questionnaire and staff perception of the community’s experiences, the CAMP 2017 summer pilot successfully met or exceeded the performance measures approved by City Council on April 18, 2017: • The pilot achieved an average of 873 shuttle riders per day over 26 days. • Driving alone and parking in the leasehold by Chautauqua employees decreased by 14 percent, with approximately 10 percent of employees using the shuttle. • There was an approximately 20 percent reduction in peak parking utilization in the temporary NPP zone immediately to the north of Chautauqua and the CCA leasehold area on pilot weekends as compared to 2016 utilization data. • There was reasonable compliance with parking restrictions. An expected number of parking violation citations were issued given the volume of parking. Inadvertent effects of the pilot included an increase in parking utilization in the blocks north and immediately east of the temporary NPP zone, noise impacts of the shuttle service on 9th Street and the paid parking mechanisms not being suitable for visitors with disabilities. Staff has identified multiple opportunities for improvement of the services offered in summer 2017, and fundamentally assesses the CAMP pilot as having achieved the project goals and being valuable to the community to continue in the future. NEXT STEPS Staff has prepared preliminary recommendations that make minor improvements while continuing the the majority of pilot components and maintaining the same or better level of service. These recommendations are summarized below. Staff also recommends that the pilot program become an ongoing funded program for a period of five years while other relevant studies and updates are completed, including the Open Space and Mountain Parks Master Plan. Following the master plan, subsequent site planning and design for the area would provide staff and the community another opportunity to evaluate the CAMP program in light of other decision points, such as natural and cultural resource management, appropriate levels of use, visitor experience and the potential for physical infrastructure changes to improve circulation and visitor amenities. Allowing CAMP to continue until these comprehensive conversations can occur would ensure that short- and long-term management decisions take into account all relevant considerations. During the 5-year program, if approved, City Council would receive annual Information Packet (IP) items that City Council Study Session Page 16 of 199 14 updates on the CAMP programs, which would include internal data collection points: shuttle ridership, paid parking transactions and duration, and enforcement statistics. The preliminary recommendations and council feedback will be presented to boards throughout November and December. Their feedback will be incorporated into final recommendations for the ongoing program to be presented to City Council (anticipated February 2018) along with ordinance amendments required for implementation. Preliminary Recommendations for Future Program Implementation After evaluating the data collection, stakeholder debriefs and community input, staff recommends that the majority of program components remain the same. Staff would like to extend the program to include the weekends of Memorial Day and Labor Day, as well as operating on the Independence Day holiday. In addition, staff would like to receive feedback from the community and boards on: • Shifting free shuttle operating hours to 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., to reduce bus noise on neighborhood streets in the early morning, accommodate users that benefit from later shuttle service and align with shuttle ridership data that suggests higher ridership levels during the day. Pre- and post- shuttle service travel can be complemented by subsidized TNC rides. • Aligning the NPP program with the NPP update, to include the same level of paid parking and enforcement, and to include consistent fees associated with NPPs throughout the city. • Transitioning to “paperless” paid parking based on license plate entry and adding technology hardware enhancements to the site to increase connectivity in response to difficulty using the ParkMobile application. • Exploring the use of “smart meters” and an additional payment kiosk to accommodate users of accessible parking that will enable drivers and/or passengers to easily access a physical pay kiosk within close proximity to accessible parking locations. Improving marketing and communications based on community and staff feedback to provide clarity and wayfinding of transit stop locations, paid parking regulations and transit service in and around Chautauqua. Staff would also like to provide additional training for bus drivers, ambassadors and guides for the buses to enhance their ability to share natural and cultural history stories with visitors. The chart below summarizes the changes to specific program components being proposed in the preliminary recommendation: City Council Study Session Page 17 of 199 15 Program Element 2017 Pilot 2018 Recommendation Recommendation Details General Program Duration June 1 to August 31 13 weekends, 26 days Modify • Saturday of Memorial Day Weekend through Monday of Labor Day, plus July 4 • Equates to 15 weekends, 33 days Transit Transit Shuttle Hours 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Modify • 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Shuttle Cost Free Same Transit Route Loop running from downtown, along 9, to New Vista and CU-Regent Same Transit Stops 8 stops (4 downtown) Same Free Satellite Parking Lots 5 downtown parking garages, New Vista High School, University of Colorado-Regent Lot Same Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) $2.50 discount per ride with Lyft all day Modify • Free rides for Chautauqua employees and visitors to and from CU-Regent Lot 6am-8am and 8pm-11on weekends • $2.50 subsidy each way for visitor TNC trips to and from Chautauqua on weekends Parking Daytime Parking Management Hours 8am – 5pm Same Evening Parking Management Hours None Same Paid Parking Fee $2.50/hr Same CCA Leasehold Zone • Permit-only parking access managed by CCA via signage at two entry points • Permits issued by City and administered by CCA • TDM program managed by all three employee groups Same, with program improvement • Transfer permit management to CCA to administer a paper permit program with permit fees that align with the principles of an NPP program and employee TDM program; details to be determined Baseline/Green/ Ranger Lots Paid parking Same City Council Study Session Page 18 of 199 16 NPP Zone Boundary 6 Street to and including Lincoln Place one block north of Baseline Road to and including Cascade Same • Option for blocks adjacent to NPP to “opt-in” as a critical component of parking management in the neighborhood NPP Zone Management • Permit or paid parking • Residents provided free permit Modify • Residents will be charged for NPP permits; price to be determined through the NPP program update Kiosk Locations 5 total: 4 on Baseline, 1 at Ranger Cottage Modify • 7 total: 5 on Baseline, 1 at Ranger Cottage, 1 near Dining Hall • 2 additions: west corner main entrance at Baseline/Grant; 1 near Dining Hall Parking Payment Process • Kiosks • Parkmobile smartphone application Same, with program improvement • Kiosks will be “paperless” (no receipts) • Wifi cradlepoints added to improve connectivity • Consider adding WayToPark application (another smartphone app for paying for parking) Accessible Parking 4 on Clematis, expected to use kiosk in Ranger Cottage or ParkMobile smartphone application Modify • Add 2 accessible dual-head smart meters to serve the 4 spaces on Clematis • Assess ADA requirements and add additional accessible spaces and meters as needed on Clematis and/or on Morning Glory Private Cottage Parking on Clematis None Modify • Provide 4 permits for the Green Parking Zone, one per private cottage located on Clematis • Residents will pay for the permits in alignment with NPP zone permits City Council Study Session Page 19 of 199 17 As mentioned above, On May 2, 2017, City Council passed on third reading Ordinance 8179 creating a Chautauqua Access Management Plan by amending Chapters 2-2, 4-20, 4-24, 7-6, and Title 4, B.R.C. 1983, related to the establishment of a Parking Management Area, related fees and setting forth related details for the duration of the pilot, only. The ordinance amendments sunset on December 31, 2017. The temporary amendments enacted by Ordinance 8179 are deemed by staff to have been effective. Staff anticipates addressing the same amendment requirements as part of its recommendations to Council in 2018 for the future summer program. Process/Schedule for Feedback on Preliminary Recommendations for Five-year Program The initial/preliminary recommendations presented herein will be presented to the community and to boards and commissions over the next two months. That feedback will be incorporated into materials presented to City Council in the first quarter of 2018. Oct. 11, 2017 What’s Up, Boulder? Citywide Open House and Activities Oct. 24 City Council Study Session Nov. 8 Open Space Board of Trustees Nov. 13 Colorado Chautauqua Association Board of Directors Nov. 13 Transportation Advisory Board Nov. 27 Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Dec. 6 Landmarks Board First Quarter 2018 City Council approval of final program and required ordinance amendments QUESTIONS FOR CITY COUNCIL 1. Does City Council have any questions about the CAMP Summer 2017 Pilot program implementation or results? 2. Does City Council have any feedback on the preliminary recommendations for an ongoing five- year summer CAMP program? ATTACHMENTS: A. Post-Pilot Community Questionnaire Results B. CAMP Pilot Budget vs. Actual City Council Study Session Page 20 of 199 Attachment A -Report for Park to Park Questionnaire Park to Park Questionnaire 1City Council Study Session Page 21 of 199 Data Results (No Analysis) 2City Council Study Session Page 22 of 199 Response Statistics Count Percent Complete 335 82.9 Partial 69 17.1 Disqualified 0 0 Totals 404 3City Council Study Session Page 23 of 199 Please select all that apply. Do you: Live within the immediate neighborhood of Chautauqua Live in the city of Boulder (not in the immediate neighborhood) Work at Chautauqua Attend school in Boulder Recreate in (visiting) Boulder Live within the immediate neighborhood of Chautauqua Live in the city of Boulder (not in the immediate neighborhood) Work at Chautauqua Attend school in Boulder Recreate in (visiting) Boulder Value Percent Count Live within the immediate neighborhood of Chautauqua 13.4%52 Live in the city of Boulder (not in the immediate neighborhood) 48.3%187 Work at Chautauqua 2.1%8 Attend school in Boulder 6.2%24 Recreate in (visiting) Boulder 42.1%163 4City Council Study Session Page 24 of 199 Did you get a temporary Chautauqua North Neighborhood Parking Permit? 42% 58% Yes No Value Percent Count Yes 42.3%22 No 57.7%30 Totals 52 5City Council Study Session Page 25 of 199 Did you travel to Chautauqua during the Park to Park pilot program (in place Saturdays and Sundays, June 3 to Aug. 27)? 74% 26% Yes No Value Percent Count Yes 73.8%290 No 26.2%103 Totals 393 6City Council Study Session Page 26 of 199 Why did you visit? Please select all that apply. To hike, climb, or otherwise use adjacent open space To attend events, like concerts, talks, films, workshops etc. in one of the hist To eat at the Dining Hall To use the playground, tennis courts, green lawn, or other park areas Other - Write In To hike, climb, or otherwise use adjacent open space To attend events, like concerts, talks, films, workshops etc. in one of the hist To eat at the Dining Hall To use the playground, tennis courts, green lawn, or other park areas Other -Write In Value Percent Count To hike, climb, or otherwise use adjacent open space 80.4%213 To attend events, like concerts, talks, films, workshops etc. in one of the historic buildings 25.3%67 To eat at the Dining Hall 17.0%45 To use the playground, tennis courts, green lawn, or other park areas 11.3%30 Other -Write In 6.4%17 7City Council Study Session Page 27 of 199 Were there any dogs in your party or group? 16% 84% Yes No Value Percent Count Yes 15.9%42 No 84.1%222 Totals 264 8City Council Study Session Page 28 of 199 How did you get to Chautauqua? Please select all that apply. Drove and parked near or in Chautauqua On foot/walked By bike Free shuttle bus Lyft Other - Write In (Required) Drove and parked near or in Chautauqua On foot/walked By bike Free shuttle bus Lyft Other -Write In (Required) Value Percent Count Drove and parked near or in Chautauqua 46.0%122 On foot/walked 17.0%45 By bike 7.5%20 Free shuttle bus 50.9%135 Lyft 1.5%4 Other -Write In (Required)3.0%8 9City Council Study Session Page 29 of 199 Which of the following pilot Park to Park shuttle and parking options were you aware of before your first weekend visit this summer? Please select all that apply. Free shuttle Free satellite parking Paid parking in and near Chautauqua Discounted Lyft rides I didn't know about any of these before my first weekend visit Free shuttle Free satellite parking Paid parking in and near Chautauqua Discounted Lyft rides I didn't know about any of these before my first weekend visit Value Percent Count Free shuttle 79.6%211 Free satellite parking 56.6%150 Paid parking in and near Chautauqua 64.2%170 Discounted Lyft rides 11.3%30 I didn't know about any of these before my first weekend visit 13.6%36 10City Council Study Session Page 30 of 199 Did the paid parking in and around Chautauqua on Saturdays and Sundays, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., make you more likely to ride the free shuttle from free satellite parking (operating 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)? 42% 19% 9% 30% Yes, the paid parking made the shuttle option more attractive. I would have ridden the shuttle even if there was free parking. No, I would pay to park regardless. Other -Write In Value Percent Count Yes, the paid parking made the shuttle option more attractive. 41.5%110 I would have ridden the shuttle even if there was free parking. 19.2%51 No, I would pay to park regardless.9.4%25 Other -Write In 29.8%79 Totals 265 11City Council Study Session Page 31 of 199 [If answered “No” to question #3] Did the Park to Park pilot program contribute to your decision not to visit Chautauqua? 48%52% Yes No Value Percent Count Yes 47.7%41 No 52.3%45 Totals 86 12City Council Study Session Page 32 of 199 Did the additional travel and parking options (satellite parking, free shuttle service, paid parking) make you more or less likely to visit Chautauqua on the weekends? 36% 29% 35%More likely Less likely No change Value Percent Count More likely 36.1%121 Less likely 28.7%96 No change 35.2%118 Totals 335 13City Council Study Session Page 33 of 199 Overall, what was your experience with the Park to Park pilot? This includes satellite parking, free shuttle service or paid parking at Chautauqua. 41% 17% 15% 13% 14% Very good Good Fair Poor Very Poor Value Percent Count Very good 41.4%126 Good 16.8%51 Fair 15.1%46 Poor 12.5%38 Very Poor 14.1%43 Totals 304 14City Council Study Session Page 34 of 199 Where do you currently reside? 55% 23% 19% 1%2%0% Location in the City of Boulder Location in Boulder County but not in City of Boulder The Denver Metro area/Front Range Colorado, but outside the Denver metro area/Front Range Elsewhere in the U.S. Elsewhere in the world Value Percent Count Location in the City of Boulder 54.5%182 Location in Boulder County but not in City of Boulder 23.4%78 The Denver Metro area/Front Range 18.9%63 Colorado, but outside the Denver metro area/Front Range 1.2%4 Elsewhere in the U.S.1.8%6 Elsewhere in the world 0.3%1 Totals 334 15City Council Study Session Page 35 of 199 What is your age? 1% 38% 28% 30% 2%1% Under 20 20 to 39 40 to 54 55 to 74 Over 74 Prefer not to answer Value Percent Count Under 20 1.2%4 20 to 39 37.4%125 40 to 54 28.4%95 55 to 74 29.6%99 Over 74 2.1%7 Prefer not to answer 1.2%4 Totals 334 16City Council Study Session Page 36 of 199 What is your gender? 58% 38% 0%4% Female Male Self-identify: Prefer not to answer Value Percent Count Female 57.7%191 Male 38.4%127 Self-identify:0.3%1 Prefer not to answer 3.6%12 Totals 331 17City Council Study Session Page 37 of 199 Open-Ended Response Analysis 18City Council Study Session Page 38 of 199 19City Council Study Session Page 39 of 199 Attachment B - Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) 2017 Pilot 2017 Revenue and Expense Budget and Actuals Component of Project Budget after ATB1 2017 Actual Revenue/Expenses as of Oct. 11, 2017* *Incl. encumbrances Consultant Support for process, data collection and evaluation for Pilot Program 121,000$ 121,000$ Consultant Support for Fall 2017 public process to develop DRAFT CAMP (2017 funding only)20,000$ 22,650$ City staff data collection, printing, mailing and questionnaire advertising 10,000$ - Lease Shuttles and Drivers Transit (7 Days 7a-7p/ Jun-Aug / 15 min headways)80,000$ 62,073$ Ride-sharing Subsidy program 15,000$ 5,000$ Wrap/Unwrap Transit buses 0 - Design Wrap for CAMP buses 0 - Access to Parking facilities for shuttle CU surface lots 3,000$ 20,000$ Expected but not encumbered New Vista HS parking lot 12,000$ 15,000$ Expected but not encumbered Installation of parking regulation signing 60,000$ 36,840$ Four parking kiosks placed upon the south side of Baseline Road adjacent to Chautauqua property 42,000$ 37,690$ Overtime budget for Parking Enforcement 10,000$ 3,545$ Contracted Ambassadors for Parking 30,000$ 28,575$ Marketing Program for Access Changes (including website 50,000$ 50,055$ Additional LPR unit -$ - One Variable Message board in advance of Shuttle parking opportunities (Lease)3,000$ Permit Program administration and materials 1,500$ Visitor's Bureau Funding (50,000)$ (52,024)$ Pay for Parking Revenue (90,000)$ (119,967)$ Total Cost of Pilot Program 457,500$ 402,428$ 88% Revenue offset (140,000)$ (171,991)$ 123% Data collection/evaluation Transit and Ride-Sharing Parking Management Other components City Council Study Session Page 40 of 199 Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) City Council –Study Session 2017 CAMP Summer Pilot Program Results and Preliminary Recommendations for Future Summer Programs October 24, 2017 1 City Council Study Session Page 41 of 199 CAMP Context and Process Incorporate lessons learned from pilot Gather additional input from the public, boards and council Develop long-term ACCESS strategies for Chautauqua area “Finalize" Plan in 2018 Respond promptly to neighbor concerns and lease requirements Engage with public to communicate changes and ways to provide feedback Pilot to see what works and what doesn’t Summer 2017 Pilot 2 public open houses 5 meetings with Community Working Group Online public questionnaire (~2,400 responses) Input from boards Meetings with CCA, CMF CDH and neighbors Public Input Transportation data OSMP data CCA data Key findings Key issues identified 2016 Data Collection 2016 lease with city and CCA Neighbors request neighborhood parking permit Complaints from neighbors re: buses and parking Council Direction 2016 Study Session Driving Forces 2 City Council Study Session Page 42 of 199 The Chautauqua Access Management Plan (CAMP) will explore ways to manage existing demand for access to and from the Chautauqua area in ways that minimize impacts to surrounding neighbors, visitors and the area’s natural and cultural resources. CAMP Vision Statement 3 City Council Study Session Page 43 of 199 •Operated June 3 –August 27 on Saturday and Sundays •Free Park to Park shuttle with free satellite parking •Managed (paid) parking in Chautauqua area •Permit parking only in the leasehold area •Temporary Neighborhood Parking Permit (NPP) zone •Employee Transportation Demand Management (TDM) •Subsidized Transportation Network Company (TNC) rides •Onsite and on-shuttle ambassador program •Focused marketing and communications CAMP 2017 Pilot Components 4 City Council Study Session Page 44 of 199 Park-to-Park Shuttle + TNCs 5 City Council Study Session Page 45 of 199 Summer 2017 Parking Zones North Neighborhood CCA Leasehold NPP Baseline The Green Ranger Lot 6 City Council Study Session Page 46 of 199 North CAMP NPP Zone Revised Proposal –4/18/2017 Columbine NPP Uni-Hill NPP North CAMP NPP Pilot Zone Proposed, Not Included 7 City Council Study Session Page 47 of 199 •Employee Transportation Coordinators for CCA, CDH, and CMF •Encourage use of shuttle •Free, but limited, parking pass access in leasehold area •CCA Program •Limited parking pass access •$3/day parking cash out benefit •Free Uber rides before and after shuttle hours •New Bike racks (35 bikes) Employee (TDM) program •CMF Program •Limited parking pass access •Encourage carpooling •CDH Program •Meal credit program •Prize drawings 8 City Council Study Session Page 48 of 199 Pilot Program Goals Reduce automobile and pedestrian conflicts Reduce automobile mode share Reduce parking demand in adjacent neighborhoods 9 City Council Study Session Page 49 of 199 Metrics Transit Shuttle Boardings Parking Utilization –All Zones Traffic Counts/Speed Data on Baseline Road Crosswalk Compliance on Baseline Road Parking Enforcement Parking Payment Activity Trailhead Counts 10 City Council Study Session Page 50 of 199 Pilot Program Results 11 City Council Study Session Page 51 of 199 Reduce automobile mode share Transit Shuttle Ridership Employee TDM TNC Subsidy 12 City Council Study Session Page 52 of 199 Park-to-Park Transit Avg. Daily Boardings: 882 Total Pilot Boardings: 22,933 Daily Boardings Ranged From: 558 on Sunday, Aug. 27 1,483 on Saturday, July 8th 13 City Council Study Session Page 53 of 199 Average Daily Boardings by Stop Location Summer 2017 10%, 91 31%, 275 43%, 382 1%, 12 14%, 123 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 CU Regent New Vista Baseline & 10th 9th & College Downtown Stops 14 City Council Study Session Page 54 of 199 Inbound and Outbound Average Daily Boardings Summer 2017 25 34 78 75 76 49 41 40 26 23 14 16 1 2 6 12 43 65 57 60 55 38 26 1826 36 84 87 119 114 98 100 82 62 39 35 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18Boardings Hour of Day Inbound (all other stops) Outbound (10th & Baseline) 15 City Council Study Session Page 55 of 199 Employer TDM Pilot Program Results Pre-and Post Pilot Surveys of Employees Results 14% decrease in SOV on weekends 10% used the shuttle regularly 16 City Council Study Session Page 56 of 199 TNC subsidy was $1.25 first half of Pilot, $2.50 second half of Pilot ➢66 Lyft rides taken using this method during Pilot Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) 17 City Council Study Session Page 57 of 199 Reduce parking demand on adjacent neighborhood and CCA leasehold streets Parking Utilization Paid Parking Parking Enforcement 18 City Council Study Session Page 58 of 199 Parking Study Results Summer 2017 –study areas North Neighborhood CCA Leasehold NPP Baseline The Green Ranger Lot1,262 parking spaces studied 19 City Council Study Session Page 59 of 199 Change in Observed Parked Cars by Zone 2017 compared to 2016 (9am to 5pm) Average Weekday per Hour Average Weekend per Hour Leasehold -8 -46 Green -9 -11 Ranger Lot -4 -1 Baseline -10 -2 NPP -21 -52 North Neighborhood +16 +65 TOTAL -36 -48 •Fewer cars were parked in the study area in 2017 •~ 36 less cars per hour observed on weekdays •~ 48 less cars per hour observed on weekends •On weekends, some Leasehold and NPP demand moved to the North Neighborhood 20 City Council Study Session Page 60 of 199 Weekend Parking Study Results 9am –5pm 2016 21 City Council Study Session Page 61 of 199 2017Weekend Parking Study Results 9am –5pm 22 City Council Study Session Page 62 of 199 NPP and North Neighborhood Weekend Parking Utilization Average Peak Utilization 9am –2pm 2016 NPP CCA: <=45% 46 -60% 61 -74% >=75%23 City Council Study Session Page 63 of 199 NPP and North Neighborhood Weekend Parking Utilization Average Peak Utilization 9am –2pm 2017 <=45% 46 -60% 61 -74% >=75%CCA: NPP 24 City Council Study Session Page 64 of 199 Parking Enforcement 336 Spaces 21 Violations 86 Spaces 1 Violation 50 Spaces 6 Violations 72 Spaces 8 Violations 10 Spaces 3 Violations 236 Spaces 9 Violations 0 5 10 15 20 25 North NPP Baseline Ranger Lot Chautauqua Green McClintock CCA LeaseholdNumber of ViolationsTotal Parking Supply and Average Daily Violations by Zone (August 2017) 49 average daily violations 25 City Council Study Session Page 65 of 199 •1,271 parking citations issued in the Chautauqua area •84% of the citations were for lack of payment or lack of permit •Less than 20% of the Violations remain unpaid (10/9/2017) – Similar to unpaid violation rates across the City. Parking Enforcement 26 City Council Study Session Page 66 of 199 Reduce automobile and pedestrian conflicts Crosswalk Yield Compliance Baseline Volume & Speed 27 City Council Study Session Page 67 of 199 Pedestrian Crosswalk Volume & Yield Compliance: Baseline & Kings Gate 45% increase in pedestrian crossing volume 30% of pedestrians observed crossing were transit users in 2017 Observed driver compliance has increased from 74% in 2016 to 95% in 2017 28 City Council Study Session Page 68 of 199 Baseline Volume and Speed No significant change in traffic volume 2016 to 2017 ➢8,900 -9,100 daily vehicles Speeds somewhat higher in 2017 ➢25 mph in 2016, 28 mph in 2017* Speed limit Evaluation for Baseline from Broadway to City Limits resulted in the limit being reduced from 30 mph to 25 mph. This occurred after completion of the CAMP data collection this summer. *85th percentile speed 29 City Council Study Session Page 69 of 199 No substantial impact on Open Space trail use Trail Visitation 30 City Council Study Session Page 70 of 199 Avg. Daily Visits: 2015 vs 2017 OSMP Trailhead Counts –Preliminary Results August 2015 2017 20172015 Weekday Weekend ~8% ~11% 31 City Council Study Session Page 71 of 199 Local Visitation Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau 32 City Council Study Session Page 72 of 199 *Includes encumbrances Budget Budget (through ATB1)Actual* (as of 10/9/17)Variance Percent Pilot Revenue $130,000 $171,991 + $41,991 132% Pilot Expense $457,500 $396,722 -$60,777 87% 33 City Council Study Session Page 73 of 199 Suggestions for Improvement Comments received during and after the 2017 pilot: •Some residents of/near 9th street said they experienced loud bus noise, perception of bus speed above speed limit, and buses with no riders •Some visitors experienced difficulty reaching a payment kiosk from the accessible parking spots around the Chautauqua Green •Some visitors had feedback about signage clarity regarding the need to enter license plate information at the payment kiosks •Some visitors had difficulty downloading the ParkMobile smart phone application •Some concern from visitors about having to pay to park at Chautauqua 34 City Council Study Session Page 74 of 199 Preliminary Recommendation for 2018 Overview Process to develop preliminary recommendations •Data Collection and Analysis •Community Questionnaire •Stakeholder Debriefs •Public Email Feedback •Charrette with CCA to Develop Recommendations •“What’s Up Boulder” Open House 35 City Council Study Session Page 75 of 199 Pilot Results = Success! 36 City Council Study Session Page 76 of 199 CAMP Preliminary Recommendation Program Element 2017 Pilot 2018 Recommendation Program Dates •June 1 to August 31 •13 weekends •26 days •Saturday, Memorial Day Weekend to Monday, Labor Day Weekend + July 4th •15 weekends •33 days Transit Hours •7am to 7pm •8am to 8pm Transportation Network Companies (TNC) •Lyft subsidy $2.50 per ride •Free rides before/after shuttle hours to/from the CU Regent Lot •Subsidy during shuttle hours NPP Zone Management •Permit or Paid Parking Only •Residents issued free permits •Residents charged for permits, price TBD through NPP program update Payment System •5 Kiosks •Paymobile smartphone application •Two (2) kiosks added •Cradlepoints added to improve connectivity Accessible Parking Spaces Along Chautauqua Green •Payment at kiosks or Paymobile •Accessible smart meters installed •Need for additional accessible spaces and meters assessed Staff recommends the program for the next 5 years.37 City Council Study Session Page 77 of 199 Next Steps 10/24 –City Council Study Session •2017 pilot review •Preliminary recommendations 11/8 –OSBT meeting •2017 pilot review •Present recommendations for feedback 11/13 –TAB meeting 11/13 –CCA meeting 11/27 –PRAB meeting 12/6 –Landmarks Board meeting Q1 2018 –Board meetings for ordinance changes –City Council ordinance readings •Return to OSBT and TAB for ordinance readings •LAC application and process •Return to City Council with board feedback and final recommendations/ordinance changes 38 City Council Study Session Page 78 of 199 1.Does City Council have any questions about the CAMP Summer 2017 Pilot program implementation or results? 2.Does City Council have any feedback on the preliminary recommendations for ongoing 5-year Summer CAMP program? Questions for Council 39 City Council Study Session Page 79 of 199 Discussion 40 City Council Study Session Page 80 of 199 Extra Slides for Questions 41 City Council Study Session Page 81 of 199 The distribution of boardings by stop & hour was consistent each month Saturday 950 Sunday 815 June 830 July 995 August 790 Average Daily Boardings Park-to-Park Transit 42 City Council Study Session Page 82 of 199 Daily 24.5 Saturday 26.4 Sunday 22.6 June 23.1 July 27.7 August 22.0 Boardings per Shuttle Service Hour 936 total hours of service during the CAMP Pilot Park-to-Park Transit 43 City Council Study Session Page 83 of 199 Daily Total Boardings Summer 2017 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 3-Jun4-Jun10-Jun11-Jun17-Jun18-Jun24-Jun25-Jun1-Jul2-Jul8-Jul9-Jul15-Jul16-Jul22-Jul23-Jul29-Jul30-Jul5-Aug6-Aug12-Aug13-Aug19-Aug20-Aug26-Aug27-AugDaily Boardings44 City Council Study Session Page 84 of 199 Average Daily Boardings by Hour Summer 2017 3% 26 4% 36 10% 84 10% 87 14% 119 13% 114 11% 98 11% 100 9% 82 7% 62 4% 39 4% 35 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18Boardings Hour of Day 45 City Council Study Session Page 85 of 199 Average Hourly Boardings by Stop Summer 2017 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19Average BoardingsHour of Day CU Regent New Vista Baseline & 9th 9th & College Pearl & 10th Walnut & 14th Spruce & Broadway 46 City Council Study Session Page 86 of 199 Leasehold: Weekday vs Weekend 236 spaces 132 151 151 138 133 124 110 115121 144 149 130 119 115 107 101 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekday 2016 2017 150 170 165 141 115 118 119 112103 113 108 88 78 78 76 76 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekend 2016 2017 47 City Council Study Session Page 87 of 199 NPP: Weekday vs Weekend 336 spaces 100 129 149 147 127 97 85 7686 103 114 125 102 81 67 60 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekday 2016 2017 191 224 226 196 161 137 107 108 88 125 155 155 136 112 89 76 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekend 2016 2017 48 City Council Study Session Page 88 of 199 North Neighborhood: Weekday vs Weekend 490 spaces 143 136 151 157 150 147 138 138 162 169 175 173 157 154 150 144 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekday 2016 2017 136 152 164 159 148 139 124 126 203 229 237 226 209 195 188 178 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekend 2016 2017 49 City Council Study Session Page 89 of 199 The Green: Weekday vs Weekend 72 spaces 66 69 67 68 65 65 54 50 61 63 64 59 64 58 34 33 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekday 2016 2017 66 68 68 66 67 67 66 65 54 62 63 62 62 54 50 37 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekend 2016 2017 50 City Council Study Session Page 90 of 199 Ranger Lot: Weekday vs Weekend 50 spaces 51 51 50 50 49 51 46 46 50 50 50 50 48 49 38 31 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Weekday 2016 2017 50 51 50 49 50 51 48 4849494948494949 43 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Weekend 2016 2017 51 City Council Study Session Page 91 of 199 Baseline: Weekday vs Weekend 47 57 56 51 49 36 29 18 28 46 56 58 30 19 18 11 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekday 2016 2017 2016: 86 spaces 2017: 78 spaces 65 66 65 49 45 46 47 38 51 68 70 66 47 44 35 24 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Weekend 2016 2017 52 City Council Study Session Page 92 of 199 Weekday Parking Study Results 9am –5pm 2016 53 City Council Study Session Page 93 of 199 Weekday Parking Study Results 9am –5pm 2017 54 City Council Study Session Page 94 of 199 Grant Place: Weekday 19 33 38 39 34 31 24 2121 25 31 30 23 19 16 13 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 Grant Place 2016 2017 18 21 21 21 24 22 20 1819 22 22 23 19 18 19 16 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 Grant Place 2016 2017 55 City Council Study Session Page 95 of 199 Grant Place: Weekend 44 43 40 36 34 31 22 31 22 33 39 34 27 22 16 14 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 Grant Place 2016 2017 21 25 25 26 24 22 12 16 32 36 34 31 29 27 26 24 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 Grant Place 2016 2017 56 City Council Study Session Page 96 of 199 9th Street: Weekday 15 26 24 25 27 16 13 1010 16 18 21 17 11 12 10 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 9th Street 2016 2017 8 13 11 10 11 11 11 8 19 20 22 24 23 22 21 20 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 9th Street 2016 2017 57 City Council Study Session Page 97 of 199 9th Street: Weekend 31 33 27 30 27 23 14 1413 20 25 27 24 21 15 13 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 9th Street 2016 2017 13 15 15 19 15 14 11 15 28 27 28 28 26 23 21 20 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 9th Street 2016 2017 58 City Council Study Session Page 98 of 199 Lincoln Place: Weekday 18 18 20 21 21 20 19 17 12 14 16 21 18 16 13 14 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 Lincoln Place 2016 2017 14 15 14 16 16 13 14 12 18 21 18 19 18 21 18 17 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 Lincoln Place 2016 2017 59 City Council Study Session Page 99 of 199 Lincoln Place: Weekend 29 35 34 31 23 18 18 1716 25 27 29 25 20 19 14 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 Lincoln Place 2016 2017 9 11 13 15 13 11 10 12 14 20 20 17 15 16 17 15 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 Lincoln Place 2016 2017 60 City Council Study Session Page 100 of 199 10th Street: Weekday 17 15 16 22 22 20 19 20 32 31 36 35 31 28 26 29 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 10th Street 2016 2017 20 23 24 24 24 24 21 18 30 28 30 27 26 28 24 24 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%800 10th Street 2016 2017 61 City Council Study Session Page 101 of 199 10th Street: Weekend 22 28 33 29 27 20 21 20 40 47 46 46 39 40 39 33 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 700 10th Street 2016 2017 19 20 21 19 19 20 20 191819191717171617 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 800 10th Street 2016 2017 62 City Council Study Session Page 102 of 199 OSMP Visitation Data Preliminary Results August 2017 average daily visitation was lower than August 2015 August 2017 average daily visitation was lower than June 2017 2017 Trail Monitor Locations 63 City Council Study Session Page 103 of 199 2017 Average Daily Visitation OSMP Trailhead Counts –Preliminary Results 2017 WeekdayWeekendJune July August ~13% June to Aug. ~18% June to Aug. 64 City Council Study Session Page 104 of 199 Pedestrian Crosswalk Volume: Baseline & Kings Gate 45% increase in pedestrian crossing volume 30% of pedestrians observed crossing were transit users in 2017 Saturday, July 25, 2017: 344 total crossing pedestrians 108 exited NB bus and crossed 65 City Council Study Session Page 105 of 199 Pedestrian Crosswalk Compliance: Baseline & Kings Gate Observed driver compliance has increased from 74% in 2016 to 95% in 2017. Recent improvements enhanced visibility for pedestrians and shortened crossing distance (south side curb extension) Compliance generally improves with higher pedestrian volumes 66 City Council Study Session Page 106 of 199 Pedestrian Crosswalk Compliance: Baseline & Grant Place Observed driver yield compliance has increased from 64% in 2014 to 85% in 2016 to 90% in 2017. Recent improvements shortened crossing distances (east crossing curb extensions and west crossing median refuge) NB peds on east leg are more visible to eastbound drivers (esp. when NBRT is queued) Previous Condition 67 City Council Study Session Page 107 of 199 Parking Enforcement 49 Average Daily Violations 51 49 47 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 June July AugustNumber of EnforcementsAverage Daily Warnings, Violations, and Voids by Month WARNINGS VIOLATIONS VOIDS 68 City Council Study Session Page 108 of 199 Pilot Evaluation Collect the following for comparison to 2016 data: •Arrival mode •Transit and TNC ridership •Traffic patterns (speed and volume) •Parking location and utilization Trail counters •Use levels •Distribution across time/day/month Online users questionnaire •Visitor demographics •Customer satisfaction and visitor experience •Did visitors go elsewhere? Where? Why? 69 City Council Study Session Page 109 of 199 Preliminary Recommendation Program Element 2017 Pilot 2018 Recommendation Program Dates •June 1 to August 31 •13 weekends •26 days Modify •Saturday, Memorial Day Weekend to Monday, Labor Day Weekend, and July 4th •Equates to 15 weekends (33 days) Transit Hours •7am to 7pm Modify •8am to 8pm Transit Route and Stops •Bi-directional route connecting Chautauqua and free parking: •Downtown, New Vista, and University of Colorado Same Shuttle Frequency •Every 15 minutes Same Shuttle Price •Free Same Transportation Network Companies (TNC) •Lyft subsidy $2.50 per ride Modify •Free rides before/after shuttle hours •Subsidy during shuttle hours Employee Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Program •Employees offered incentives to ride shuttle Same Transit 70 City Council Study Session Page 110 of 199 Preliminary Recommendation Program Element 2017 Pilot 2018 Recommendation Parking Management Hours •8am to 5pm Same Colorado Chautauqua Association (CCA) Leasehold Area •Permit Parking Only Same, with improvement •Permit management transferred to CCA with paid permits for employees and residents •Clematis Cottages parking permit for Chautauqua Green (NPP price) Baseline, Green, Ranger Lot, McClintock Trailhead •Paid Parking Only Same Neighborhood Parking Permit (NPP) Zone •6th St. to Lincoln Pl., one block north to Cascade Ave. Same NPP Zone Management •Permit or Paid Parking Only •Residents issued free permits Modify •Residents charged for permits, price TBD through NPP program update Paid Parking Price •$2.50/hr Same Payment System •5 Kiosks •Paymobile smartphone app Modify •Two (2) kiosks added •Wifi cradlepoints added to improve connectivity Accessible Parking Spaces Along Chautauqua Green •Payment at kiosks or Paymobile Modify •Accessible smart meters installed •Need for additional accessible spaces and meters assessed Parking Management 71 City Council Study Session Page 111 of 199 Initial Community Engagement Initial feedback from community (open houses, CAMP Working Group) suggested the need for change in both parking management and providing transit service. These initial outreach efforts largely reached people living and working in the area and not the people who come to the park and open space. 72 City Council Study Session Page 112 of 199 Public Questionnaire: Highlights The online questionnaire (January-February) was our best outreach tool to reach the larger community. (2,358) 27%: It already is so difficult to access Chautauqua that they rarely do so. 22 to 52%: They would no longer come to Chautauqua if there were time restrictions or if they had to pay to park. 18 to 31%: They would use other modes of transportation like the shuttle to access Chautauqua if there were time restrictions or if they had to pay to park 73 City Council Study Session Page 113 of 199 Boards Feedback Presentations made to four city boards: -Parkmobile / need to have smart phone to park; -Time limit of 2 hours / concern that turnover will bring more cars to the area; -Aesthetics and character impacts of signing in Landmark area and that Pay Stations inappropriate for the area; -High fee for this trailhead / Precedent for paying for access to open space; Boards expressed concerns but willing to try an experiment. 74 City Council Study Session Page 114 of 199 Engagement with CCA Multiple CAMP staff meetings with CCA ED 4/26/16 -2/7/17 in addition to monthly CSF meetings 4/26/16 CAMP update memo for 5/2/16 CCA BOD meeting –presentation declined CCA board member selected to CAMP Working Group. Other CCA board members attended the final four working group meetings along with CCA ED and other CCA staff. 12/19/16 CAMP summer 2016 data “deeper dive” meeting with CCA ED 1/6/17 CAMP summer 2016 data presentation to CCA board reps, many CCA staff and Lenny Martinelli and Jerry Manning of the Chautauqua Dining Hall 1/20/17 and 2/7/17 -CAMP staff, consultant charrettes with CCA ED and staff 2/8/17 CAMP staff met with Chautauqua Dining Hall general manager Jerry Manning and CCA ED -overview pilot direction, discuss CDH needs and interests 2/13/17 Chautauqua leasehold permitting meeting with CCA ED and three staff 2/14/17 CAMP staff met with Colorado Music Festival Executive Director, CCA ED, CCA staff -overview pilot direction, discuss CMF needs and interests 2/16/17 CAMP staff spoke with CCA staff re: potential time restrictions impacting silent films. Staff thereafter changed 7 a.m. –7 p.m. in favor of 5 p.m. end in leasehold zone.75 City Council Study Session Page 115 of 199 Recent Public Feedback More recent public feedback has been questioning the need for action and concern that the solution is worse than the problem. -Not necessary on weekdays (weekends are the problem) -Signing is ugly and inappropriate in neighborhoods and historic areas -Concern about paying for access to open space -Concern about 2 hour time limits being too short -Parking management –start later / end earlier 76 City Council Study Session Page 116 of 199 Other Pilot Program Options 1.Parking Management and Transit service Friday through Sunday or only on Weekends. 2.Parking management from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in all zones. 3.Three or four hour time restriction in neighborhood zones. 4.Do not allow any non-permit parking in the leasehold. Permits allocated by the city and managed by the CCA. 5.Do not charge for parking. Instead have unrestricted parking in the Green, Ranger lot and Baseline and have time restricted parking (with permits) on the neighborhood streets. 6.Voluntary TDM for Chautauqua area employees. 7.Higher parking rates to incent transit use and to seek more cost recovery. 77 City Council Study Session Page 117 of 199 Pilot Program Summary Pilot Recommendations developed using: •CAMP Guiding Principles from the 2016 Lease, •Technical analyses / Key Findings, and •Community engagement Summary Pilot Recommendations: 1. Free transit from satellite parking lots 2. Parking management 3. Employee TDM 78 City Council Study Session Page 118 of 199 Timeline / Next Steps Ordinance / Regulation changes -1st Reading on April 4th -2nd Reading and public hearing on April 18th Budget / Adjustment to Base -Council action on May 16th If approved and funded: -Remaining implementation steps -Summer Pilot –June 1st through August 31st 79 City Council Study Session Page 119 of 199 Pilot Implementation Steps 1.Finalize administration of Chautauqua Permit Program 2.Finalize administration of Neighborhood Permit Program 3.RFP and contracts for transit components and satellite parking (CU and BVSD) 4.Complete project cost and revenue estimates for Adjustment to Base submittal 5.Work with vendors to finalize plans for communicating the changes to the public 6.Order and install parking pay stations and regulatory signing 7.Hire and train parking ambassadors 80 City Council Study Session Page 120 of 199 CAMP Guiding Principles –1 Chautauqua is a unique shared resource requiring unique solutions. Chautauqua is a National Historic Landmark. The needs of all stakeholders, including the Association, cottage owners, park users, open space users, and neighbors should be considered. A mix of uses must be accommodated. Pedestrians must be given priority on the narrow streets without sidewalks. Traffic circulation should be minimized in the interests of pedestrian safety and user experience. Parking demand is seasonal and solutions need not address time periods during which access is readily available. During peak periods, the parking needs of the users in the historic core should be prioritized, but not exclusive. (CONTINUED)81 City Council Study Session Page 121 of 199 CAMP Guiding Principles -2 A seasonal transportation demand management (TDM) plan for employees should be implemented. The right of public access should not be restricted except for good cause with such restrictions minimized as appropriate. The interests of the surrounding neighbors should be addressed. Any plan should be flexible to address changing circumstances. Access management should be consistent with the Guiding Principles for Place Management and Fiscal Sustainability. Consistent with the City’s climate commitment and sustainability and resiliency goals, any plan should support public transit, alternative modes of transportation, a reduction in vehicle miles traveled and a reduction in visits in single occupant vehicles. 82 City Council Study Session Page 122 of 199 Key Pilot Program Considerations 1.Ordinance changes are required to allow NPP zones near Chautauqua; NPP on Sundays and change in parking requirements for OSMP trailheads 2.Cost of pilot program (Costs exceed revenue by $380K). Will require an Adjustment to Base. 3.Regulatory signing required for parking management in the historic district. 4.Pay for parking in most zones will be dependent upon “Park Mobile” application (Pay stations available on Baseline) and aided by parking ambassadors. 83 City Council Study Session Page 123 of 199 Communications Plan City communications staff will continue to provide core support to the pilots, should they move ahead Leveraging city resources: community-wide newsletter, Channel8, social media accounts, open houses, website, CAMP email listserv, coordination with partners, etc. Staff has identified a need to work with an external vendor(s) to ensure broad community communication regarding the pilots, including an intensive outreach campaign on parking and transit changes -budgeted Will include ads (bus wraps or other), ambassadors and more 84 City Council Study Session Page 124 of 199 Pay for Parking and Park mobile signing 85 City Council Study Session Page 125 of 199 Parking Pay Station 86 City Council Study Session Page 126 of 199 Chautauqua Access Key Findings During the Summer, average visitation to Chautauqua is 2,570/day. Visitation here has more than doubled in the past 10 years. Between 75 and 85 percent of visitors arrive at the Chautauqua site by Motor Vehicle. About 1/3 of visitors are Boulder residents. All others live outside the city. 5 blocks in the Neighborhood to the North and most of the leasehold streets meet the City’s 75% parking utilization threshold for 4 or more hours per day. Less than 1/3 of survey respondents found it difficult to find parking. 87 City Council Study Session Page 127 of 199 Parking Study Results Summer 2016 –All days 88 City Council Study Session Page 128 of 199 Parking Study Results Summer 2016 –Monday to Friday 89 City Council Study Session Page 129 of 199 Parking Study Results Summer 2016 –Saturday and Sunday 90 City Council Study Session Page 130 of 199 Parking Management Proposed North Neighborhood NPP boundaries Columbine NPP Uni-Hill NPP PROPOSED: North CAMP NPP Pilot Zone 94 City Council Study Session Page 131 of 199 Chautauqua NPP Zone Proposed Chautauqua Leasehold Boundaries Chautauqua NPP 95 City Council Study Session Page 132 of 199 Neighborhood Permit Parking (NPP) Summer 2017 Pilot RESIDENT permit for each vehicle registered at address (max. 4) 2 VISITOR permits per address (re-usable) 2 GUEST permits (overnight) available –date-specific (max. 21 days) NO CHARGE FOR PERMITS during pilot No commuter permits All non-permitted vehicles would pay to park AND be restricted to two hours/once per day to provide turnover and more availability for residents’ uses 96 City Council Study Session Page 133 of 199 Public Feedback Feedback from Community Workshops and meetings with CWG have suggested the need for change in both parking management and providing transit service. These outreach efforts have largely reached people living and working in the area and not the people who come to the park and open space. The Questionnaire we released in February has been our best outreach tool to the larger community. 97 City Council Study Session Page 134 of 199 2. Transit service from remote parking •Segment A+B that connects to 330 remote free and paid parking locations •15 minute headways weekdays and weekends •Vehicles would accommodate dogs and climbing equipment •Integrated with Transportation Network Company (TNC) discounts 98 City Council Study Session Page 135 of 199 CAMP Pilot Budget 7 Days 3 Days Weekend Total Cost $855 K $548 K $454 K Revenue -$360 K -$190 K -$150 K Existing -$113 K -$113 K -$113 K New 2017 +$382 K +$244 K +$191 K Transit Only $486 K $233 K $190 K 99 City Council Study Session Page 136 of 199 CAMP Pilot Budget Components •Transit - •Shuttles and drivers (contract with operator) •Ride-sharing subsidy •Branded wrap –design, wrap, unwrap •Parking Management - •Signage, kiosks –purchase, installation, removal •Overtime for parking enforcement •Data Collection and Evaluation •Other - •Parking ambassadors, marketing, permit admin, offsite signage, LPR equip. 100 City Council Study Session Page 137 of 199 101 Town of Breckenridge DOWNTOWN TROLLEY 101 City Council Study Session Page 138 of 199 Town of Breckenridge Free Downtown “Trolley” Start Date: September 2016 Length of Route: 3 miles, Downtown Transit Center to Ice Rink Service Span: All year, every day, 9 am –11 pm Frequency: Every 30 minutes (will increase to 15-min in 2018) Ridership: Jan 1 to Mar 31, 2017 -18,306 total riders Vehicle Cost: $488,000 for bus with custom trolley facade Vehicle Specs: 30’ Gillig Bus, with trolley facade installed by Cable Car Classics 102 City Council Study Session Page 139 of 199 Additional notes from Breckenridge Transit Manager ToB used actual trolleys until 2007, but they were old and unsafe for drivers and passengers Drivers like the new “trolley” because it is exactly like driving a bus ToB has ordered another and it will arrive in 2018 Will be used to increase frequency Operating trolleys only on Main Street Ridership increase from 2016 to 2017 attributed to new parking management strategy and new trolley vehicle type 103 City Council Study Session Page 140 of 199 Summer 2017 CAMP Pilot Staff Recommendations 1.FREE transit service from FREE satellite parking 2.Paid parking in all zones 3.2 hour time-restriction and permit systems ONLY in neighborhoods 4.NO TIME RESTRICTIONS on Baseline, in Ranger Cottage lot or around The Green 5.Employee Transportation Demand Management (TDM) 104 City Council Study Session Page 141 of 199 CPP = Chautauqua Permit Program NPP = Neighborhood Permit Program #1: Adjacent Neighborhood #2: Baseline Road #3: Green and Ranger Lot #4:Leasehold Neighborhood Time Restrictions 2 hr max once per day but TBD with neighborhood at upcoming meeting None None except no overnight parking (no change) 2hr max once a day Parking Rates $2.50 per hour for 2hr max $2.50 per hour with no time restriction $2.50 per hour with no time restriction $2.50 per hour for 2hr max Permits Allowed Standard NPP groups None None Special CPP user groups Parking Restrictions 7am –7pm, 7 days a week with LPR technology 7am –5pm, 7 days a week with LPR technology 7am –7pm, 7 days a week with LPR technology 7am –5pm, 7 days a week with LPR technology Equipment required for Summer 2017 Pilot New signs on each block face and mobile parking app (TBD) Pay Stations and new signs on all block faces and mobile parking app New signs at entrances & elsewhere and mobile parking app New signs on each block and mobile parking app 2. Parking Management by zones LPR = License Plate Recognition 105 City Council Study Session Page 142 of 199