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Additional IP - Flatirons Events Center Update INFORMATION PACKET MEMORANDUM To: Members of City Council From: Jane S. Brautigam, City Manager Paul J. Fetherston, Deputy City Manager Jeff Dillon, Interim Director, Parks and Recreation Jeff Haley, Planning Manager, Parks and Recreation Doug Cook, Golf Facilities Operations Manager Date: April 16, 2014 Subject:Information Item: Flatirons Event Center Update EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Due to the impacts of the September 2013 flooding at the Flatirons Golf Course, the City of Boulder Parks and Recreation Department completed a comprehensive assessment of the existing Flatirons Event Center to determine the detailed extent of damage and determine action strategies for proceeding with the flood recovery and repairs.You canclick here for the executive summary and the full draft report is available hereor upon request through the Finance Department. The report contains observations of architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems along with an assessment of the thermal performance and energy consumption of the structure and observation of civil (site) systems related to the structure and its immediate surroundings. The investigation assessed current condition of the structure and its site and revisitedand referenced conditions observed during an assessment completed in 2008. Current conditions observed were noted and any significant changes to systems that have occurred in the intervening five and one half years since the previous assessment were addressed. The report does not make value judgments other than to give an opinion of the conditions observed relative to professional experience with other buildings of similar type, age and use. In addition, the report provides a variety of scenarios and associated costs to repair or replace the facility. Based upon the extensive need for repairs and improvements as noted in the report, staff will be recommending at a minimum that council consider the demolition and removal of hazardous materials from the facility as part of the “pay as you go” capital financing strategy to be discussed at the April 22, 2014 study session. Information Item2C Page 1 FISCAL IMPACT $2,912,725 $6,751,049 Reconstruction of the event center is estimated at a range of to dependent upon final design and size of the facility. Additionally, if a new facility is constructed, ongoing O&M costs will need to be realized and budgeted appropriately to include ongoing maintenance, preventative maintenance, and major lifecycle renovations for the projected lifecycle of the new facility. Additional costs would include ongoing programming and operations of the new facility that would require public/private partnership with the community. COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENTS AND IMPACTS Economic: Prior to the flood, the Flatirons Event Center supported a single local business for food delivery and several community groups in providing event space and accommodations for private events. Due to the flood impacts, the center has been closed and, as a result, those businesses and community groups have found alternate locations to meet their needs. Environmental: The current structure includes an outdated and uninsulated building envelope combined with aging and inefficient mechanical systems, inadequate space within the thermal envelope for mechanical distribution systems and inefficient lighting systems result in utility costs that are extreme. Existing uninsulated masonry walls lose over 600% more energy than and typical wall designed to meet the energy code. Electric and natural gas use at the Flatirons Event Center that is more than 500% of the national average for structures of similar use and size. Achieving energy code compliance will require a comprehensive renovation of virtually every building system in the existing structure including: roof structure, building envelope insulation and air infiltration barriers, windows, doors, water heating, HVAC, ventilation and energy recovery and lighting. Social:The existing Flatirons Event Center provides some community gathering space and special event opportunities for a few community groups and private events. Reconstruction of the event center would require community engagement and partnership in determining the community need and demand to appropriately design and program the new facility. Additionally, the meeting space competes with the primary golf course function and limits community golf events and related golfing activities while providing civic use for non-golf activities. BACKGROUND In general, the existing event center structure is at the end of its useful life, with out of date and deteriorated building systems, marginally adequate life safety systems, overwhelming accessibility shortcomings, extreme energy inefficiencies and substantial quantities of hazardous materials. Key areas of investigation and determination include: Building Systems - Several building systems: roofing, roof structure, mechanical and electrical systems are in extremely poor condition, functioning only marginally and with numerous code violations. Information Item2C Page 2 Life Safety and Accessibility - Designed for a different use, the building has been repurposed with only minor renovation and replanning. The result is a building with barely adequate life safety exiting systems and wholly inadequate accessibility. Energy – The assessment determined that the building envelope is outdated and uninsulated and, combined with aging and inefficient mechanical systems,reflects an inadequate space within the thermal envelope for mechanical distribution systems and inefficient lighting systems that result in utility costs that are extreme. Hazardous Materials - The structure contains a significant quantity of hazardous materials. Flood Hazards - The structure sits within the South Boulder Creek floodplain. Its site is nearly flat with inadequate slope to allow for proper drainage. The grade adjacent to an outdoor terrace on the south side of the structure creates a sump condition which relies on mechanical pumps to move water away from the structure. Long sustained rain events like that of September 2013 or even short intense storms typical in spring and early summer can overwhelm the system and will most likely lead to repeated flooding of the structure. The damage incurred by the structure in 2013 appears not to have been caused by floodwaters from South Boulder Creek but from sump pumps on the south side of the structure becoming overwhelmed or simply losing power during the storm. Should a flash flood occur creating flows across the golf course that rise to the Base Flood Elevation anticipated in current flood mapping, the damage to the structure will be far greater than that of 2013 based simply upon water adjacent to and within the structure at depths several times the 1” - 2” depth that occurred in September 2013. ANALYSIS Capital Costs The attached report containsa series of defined scenarios for the future of the structure. These scenarios include: 1.Repair to pre-flood condition; 2.Flood proofing; 3.Renovation of the structure to full code compliance relative to current City of Boulder requirements; 4.Demolition of the existing Event Center and repair of the snack bar for ongoing use by the golf course; 5.Demolition of the entire structure and construction of a new golf clubhouse and restaurant; and 6.Demolition of the entire structure and construction of a new event center with integrated restaurant and golf clubhouse. Within each scenario, the necessary scope of work has been broadly defined and a preliminary cost estimate (Class C – 50% plus or minus) has been developed to complete the work. This includes a 15% contingency cost. As expected, with each successive level of repair/renovation/replacement total capital costs increase as will O&M costs. Information Item2C Page 3 Scenario A Repair to pre-flood condition (repairs finishes and systems damaged by water in September $213,555 2013) Scenario B Flood proofing of the structure (includes revisions to the structure only - no revisions to parking $519,374 or the site are included - and includes scope of work outlined in Scenario A above.) Scenario C Renovation of the structure to full code compliance relative to current City of Boulder requirements (includes repair of finishes (Scenario A) and flood proofing of structure (Scenario $2,912,725 B above.) Scenario D Demolition of the existing Event Center, repair of the snack bar for ongoing use by the golf $609,550 course and construction of a new restroom facility for golf patrons Scenario E Demolition of the entire structure and construction of a new golf clubhouse and restaurant includes revisions to the parking lot and approach road and includes modifications to the golf $3,359,881 course and driving range as outlined in the 2010 Dye Design Business Plan.) Scenario F Demolition of the entire structure and construction of a new event center with integrated restaurant and golf clubhouse (includes revisions to the parking lot and approach road and includes modifications to the golf course and driving range as outlined in the 2010 Dye Design $6,751,049 Business Plan.) NEXT STEPS The existing structure is in poor condition and is in need of a significant capital infusion in order for it to remainmarginally functional. In addition, the structure possesses many immediate and near term hazards, resulting in considerable risk exposure for the city. Renovation to bring the structure into code compliance and minimize the city’s risk will require capital investment equal to nearly forty years worth of current, pre-disaster revenues of the facility. The facility assessment does not make a recommendation for any one scenario over the others except to note that action is required. It is apparent from the cost estimating that the cost to bring the facility to compliance is similar to the cost of constructing a new facility. The current building continues to deteriorate and may soon start to experience failures in several systems. Based upon the consultants professional assessment of the facility condition, it is staff’s recommendation that the council consider Scenario D – demolition and removal of hazardous materials from the facility as part of the “pay as you go” capital financing strategy to be discussed at the April 22, 2014 study session. Prior to proceeding with new construction, a full public engagement process to determine community needs and associated demand for the facility, partnership opportunities and appropriate locations should be completed. Long term operation and maintenance costs associated with a new facilitywill also need to be calculatedas part of this effort. Information Item2C Page 4